Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router Installation and Configuration Guide
Maintaining the Cisco 12008
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Maintaining the Cisco 12008

Table Of Contents

Maintaining the Cisco 12008

Cleaning the Air Filter

Installing and Removing a Blank Filler Panel

Adding, Removing, or Replacing an AC-Input Power Supply

Adding an AC-Input Power Supply

Removing an AC-Input Power Supply

Replacing an Existing AC-Input Power Supply

Verifying the Installation of an AC-Input Power Supply

Adding, Removing, or Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply

Adding a DC-Input Power Supply

Removing a DC-Input Power Supply

Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply

Verifying the Installation of a DC-Input Power Supply

Removing and Replacing the Fan Trays

Removing the Fan Tray from the Lower Card Cage

Installing a Fan Tray in the Lower Card Cage

Removing the Power Supply Fan Tray

Installing the Power Supply Fan Tray

Checking the Installation of a Fan Tray

Status LEDs for the Fan Trays

Removing and Replacing the RP

Removing the RP

Installing the RP

Checking the Installation of the RP

Removing and Replacing Line Cards

Removing and Replacing Switch Cards

Removing an SFC

Installing an SFC

Removing a CSC

Installing a CSC

Checking the Installation of Switch Cards

Removing and Replacing the Cable Management System

Removing a Cable-Management Tray

Installing a Cable-Management Tray

Removing a Cable-Management Bracket

Installing a Cable-Management Bracket

Upgrading Memory on a Line Card

Removing a Line Card from the Router

Removing a DIMM from a Line Card

Installing a New DIMM on a Line Card

Reinstalling a Line Card in the Router

Checking the Installation of Line Card Memory

Upgrading Memory on the RP


Maintaining the Cisco 12008


After your Cisco 12008 has been operational for a period of time, you might need to perform specific maintenance tasks, replace certain field replaceable units (FRUs), upgrade memory components, or perform other tasks to ensure that the router continues to operate properly and reliably.

This chapter includes the following sections:

Cleaning the Air Filter

Installing and Removing a Blank Filler Panel

Adding, Removing, or Replacing an AC-Input Power Supply

Adding, Removing, or Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply

Removing and Replacing the Fan Trays

Removing and Replacing the RP

Removing and Replacing Line Cards

Removing and Replacing Switch Cards

Removing and Replacing the Cable Management System

Upgrading Memory on a Line Card

Upgrading Memory on the RP


Caution   
Before performing any of the procedures in this chapter, review the section entitled " Safety Recommendations" in Chapter 2 to prevent problems, damage to equipment, or injury to personnel.

Cleaning the Air Filter

The Cisco 12008 has a removable air filter assembly that forms part of the outer enclosure of the lower card cage (see ). This card cage accommodates a fan tray containing six fans that provide cooling air for all of the router's internal electronic circuitry, including all of the cards installed in the upper card cage slots and the optional set of three SFCs that you can install in the lower card cage slots.

The air filter assembly removes dust and particulate matter from the ambient air being drawn into the router by the card cage fan tray. Once a month (or more often in dusty environments) you should examine the air filter and replace it if it is dirty. You can clean or replace the air filter while the Cisco 12008 remains powered up and fully operational.

A new air filter (product number GSR8-FILTER=) is the only part that you will need if you decide that the old filter needs replacing.


Note   When ordering spare air filters, keep in mind that they have a shelf life of approximately 6 months.


To service the air filter, you need only remove the plastic bezel to gain access to the filter proper (see ). A vacuum cleaner is the only tool you need to perform air filter maintenance.

The closure for the lower card cage is designed in a way that permits you to detach the plastic bezel and the air filter without removing the underlying EMI frame. Thus, you can perform filter maintenance without disrupting the EMI integrity of the router enclosure.

The EMI frame, which contains a honeycomb screen for EMI suppression, should remain in place at all times during normal router use to ensure EMI compliance. However, this frame can be removed at any time should it become necessary to access the components in the lower card cage. The EMI frame is secured to the router by means of two panel fasteners (see ).

To remove or replace the air filter, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Using both hands, exert upward pressure on the two lower spring clips (see ) to disengage them from the body of the bezel; swing the bezel upward to release it from the upper spring clips. Set the bezel aside temporarily.

Step 2 Inspect the condition of the air filter and decide if it should be removed and cleaned.

Step 3 To remove the filter, slide it off the two panel fasteners (see ).


Caution   
Exercise care to prevent damage to the honeycomb screen in the EMI frame. Damage to the honeycomb screen might reduce its EMI suppression characteristics and restrict the flow of cooling air through the router.

Step 4 Vacuum both sides of the filter thoroughly.


Note   Do not vacuum the filter without removing it from the EMI frame; also, do not vacuum a removed filter in the proximity of the lower card cage. Either action might dislodge particulate matter that could be drawn into the interior of the router.


If the filter is damaged or cannot be adequately cleaned, discard it and replace it with a new one.

Step 5 As appropriate, reinstall the old filter or install the new filter in the EMI frame; grasp the filter by its sides, position it for insertion over the two panel fasteners, and seat it against the EMI frame.

Step 6 Grasp the plastic bezel by its sides; position the two slots in the lower surface of the bezel over the two lower spring clips of the EMI frame.

Step 7 Rotate the bezel upward, making sure that the two slots in the upper surface of the bezel are properly aligned with the two spring clips at the top of the EMI frame.

Step 8 Exert inward pressure on the bezel to snap it firmly into place.

Figure 7-1 Removing and Replacing the Air Filter Assembly

Installing and Removing a Blank Filler Panel

The Cisco 12008 must be fully enclosed to ensure that cooling air is circulated properly throughout the interior of the router. Fully enclosing the router prevents overheating of electronic components in the upper and lower card cages and suppresses EMI radiation.

To cover any vacant slot in the upper card cage of the Cisco 12008, you must install a blank filler panel (see ).

To install a blank filler panel, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Grasp the filler panel and position it vertically for insertion into the vacant slot.

Step 2 Slide the filler panel into the slot until its faceplate is flush against the top and bottom of the card cage.

Step 3 Tighten the captive installation screws on the faceplate of the filler panel to secure it in place.

If you need to install a circuit board in place of the blank filler panel, remove the panel by performing the reverse of the procedure outlined above.

Figure 7-2 Installing a Blank Filler Panel in the Upper Card Cage

Adding, Removing, or Replacing an AC-Input Power Supply

The Cisco 12008 can operate with either one or two AC-input power supplies. Although the router supports an online insertion and removal (OIR) capability for field replaceable units (FRUs), you must observe the following rules regarding the AC-input power supplies:

If your Cisco 12008 is configured with a single AC-input power supply, you must power down the system before replacing the unit.

If your Cisco 12008 is configured with two AC-input power supplies, you can remove and replace one of the power supplies while the other unit continues to supply power to the router.

You need the following to add, remove, or replace an AC-input power supply:

1/4-inch flat-blade screwdriver (to loosen/tighten the captive installation screw on the power supply faceplate)

A replacement AC-input power supply and the applicable AC power cord for your site


Note   To find out which type of AC-input power supply you need for your Cisco 12008, refer to the Cisco 12008 Gigabit Switch Router AC-Input Power Supply Replacement Instructions publication.



Caution   
You cannot use an AC-input power supply and a DC-input power supply in the same chassis.

Adding an AC-Input Power Supply

In the following procedure, it is assumed that you will be adding a second AC-input power supply to the router. In this case, it is also assumed that a blank filler panel has previously been installed in the vacant power supply bay.


Note   A vacant power supply bay must always be covered with a blank filler panel to ensure EMI compliance and the proper flow of cooling air through the router.



Note   It is recommended that you connect each AC-input power supply to an independent source of power with a 20A service. It is also recommended that you use an uninterruptable power source (UPS) for your site to protect against a site power failure.


To add a second (redundant) AC-input power supply to the router, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Locate the source AC circuit breaker that will service the AC-input power supply; ensure that this circuit breaker is set to the OFF position.

For added safety, tape the circuit breaker handle in the OFF position.

Step 2 Using a 1/4-inch flat-blade screwdriver, loosen the captive installation screw on the blank filler panel covering the vacant (upper) power supply bay; remove the filler panel and retain it for possible future use.

Presumably, you will install the new power supply in the upper power supply bay, since, by convention, a single AC-input power supply is installed in the lower bay.

Step 3 Ensure that the rotary power switch on the faceplate of the new power supply that you intend to install is set to the standby (OFF) position (see ).

Step 4 Grasp the carrying handle on the new power supply with one hand; while lifting the power supply, place your free hand beneath the unit to support its weight.


Warning   

The AC-input power supply weighs 17 lb (7.73 kg). For safety, use both hands to install the unit in the power supply bay.


Step 5 Position the power supply appropriately for insertion into the vacant upper bay.

Step 6 Gently slide the unit into the bay, carefully seating it so that the power supply faceplate rests flush against the sheet metal of the power supply bay.

Figure 7-3 Faceplate of the AC-Input Power Supply


Caution   
To prevent damage to the blind-mating connector at the rear of the power supply, do not use excessive speed or force when inserting the power supply into the bay.


Note   All necessary electrical connections between the power supply and the backplane are accomplished automatically by means of the blind-mating connector at the rear of the power supply.


Step 7 Using a 1/4-inch flat-blade screwdriver, tighten the captive installation screw on the faceplate of the power supply (see ).

Step 8 Connect the source AC power cord to the AC receptacle on the power supply faceplate (see a). Secure the bail latch over the source AC power cord (see b).

Step 9 Connect the other end of the source AC power cord to its power source (see c).

Step 10 Set the rotary power switch on the new AC-input power supply to the ON (1) position.

To verify that the new AC-input power supply is operating properly, proceed to the section entitled "Verifying the Installation of an AC-Input Power Supply."

Figure 7-4 Connecting Power to an AC-Input Power Supply

Removing an AC-Input Power Supply

For the following procedure, it is assumed that you will remove an AC-input power supply from a Cisco 12008 that is equipped with a single such unit. In this case, you must power down the router before removing the power supply.

It is also assumed that the power supply to be removed is installed in the lower power supply bay, which, by convention, is the normal configuration for a single power supply. Lastly, in such a single power supply configuration, it is assumed that the upper power supply bay has been previously covered by a blank filler panel to ensure EMI compliance and the proper flow of cooling air through the router.

To remove the AC-input power supply from the router, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Set the rotary power switch on the power supply faceplate to the standby (OFF) position.


Note   Turning the power supply switch counterclockwise to the standby (OFF) position also releases the mechanical interlock (latching mechanism) that secures the power supply in the bay.


Step 2 Locate and turn off the source AC circuit breaker that is currently servicing the AC-input power supply.

Step 3 Tape the circuit breaker handle in the OFF position as an added safety precaution.

Step 4 Release the bail latch that secures the source AC power cord to the AC receptacle on the power supply faceplate.

Step 5 Disconnect the source AC power cord from the AC receptacle.

Step 6 Using a flat-blade screwdriver, loosen the captive installation screw on the power supply faceplate that secures the power supply in the bay.

Step 7 With one hand, grasp the power supply carrying handle and pull the unit halfway out of the bay to disengage the female blind-mating connector at the back of the power supply from the backplane.


Warning   

The AC-input power supply weighs 17 lb (7.73 kg). For safety, use both hands to remove the unit from the power supply bay.


Step 8 Place your free hand beneath the power supply to support its weight and withdraw the unit completely from the bay.

Step 9 Set the power supply aside, pending further disposition.

If you intend to return the removed power supply to the factory for repair or replacement, repackage the unit properly for return shipment using the original packing materials, if available.

Replacing an Existing AC-Input Power Supply

In the following procedure, it is assumed that you will replace an existing power supply in a router that is configured with two (redundant) AC-input power supplies.

In this configuration, the router's online insertion and removal (OIR) capability enables you to replace one of the power supplies without removing power from the other. Thus, the router can remain fully operational during the power supply replacement procedure.

To replace one of the AC-input power supplies in a redundant power supply configuration, perform the following steps:


Step 1 On the power supply to be replaced, set the rotary power switch to the standby (OFF) position.


Note   Turning the power supply switch counterclockwise to the standby (OFF) position also releases the mechanical interlock (latching mechanism) that secures the power supply within in the bay.


Step 2 Locate and turn off the source AC circuit breaker that is currently servicing the AC-input power supply.

Step 3 Tape the circuit breaker handle in the OFF position as an added safety precaution.

Step 4 Using a 1/4-inch flat-blade screwdriver, loosen the captive installation screw on the power supply faceplate.

Step 5 Release the bail latch that secures the source AC power cord to the AC receptacle on the power supply faceplate.

Step 6 Remove the power cord from the AC receptacle.

Step 7 Grasp the power supply carrying handle with one hand and pull the unit halfway out of the bay to disengage the blind-mating connector at the back of the power supply from the backplane.


Warning   

The AC-input power supply weighs 17 lb (7.73 kg). For safety, use both hands to withdraw the unit from the bay.


Step 8 Place your free hand beneath the power supply to support its weight and withdraw the unit completely from the bay.

Step 9 Pending further action, set the unit aside.

If you intend to return the removed power supply to the factory for repair or replacement, repackage the unit properly for return shipment using the original packing materials, if available.

Step 10 On the new AC-input power supply that you intend to install in the now vacant bay, set the rotary power switch on the new power supply to the standby (OFF) position.

Step 11 Grasp the carrying handle on the power supply with one hand; place your free hand beneath the unit to support its weight.

Step 12 Position the unit appropriately for insertion into the power supply bay.

Step 13 Gently slide the new power supply into the bay, carefully seating it so that the power supply faceplate is flush against the sheet metal of the power supply bay. Doing so ensures that the blind-mating connector at the rear of the power supply is firmly seated in the backplane connector.


Caution   
To prevent damage to the blind-mating connectors, do not use excessive speed or force when inserting the new power supply into the bay.


Note   All the necessary electrical connections between the power supply and the backplane are accomplished automatically by means of the blind-mating connectors.


Step 14 Using a 1/4-inch flat-blade screwdriver, tighten the captive installation screw on the power supply faceplate.

Step 15 Connect the source AC power cord to the AC receptacle on the power supply faceplate.

Step 16 Secure the bail latch over the source AC power cord to secure it in the AC receptacle.

Step 17 Set the rotary power switch on the new AC-input power supply to the ON (|) position.

To verify that the new power supply is operating properly, perform the procedure in the following section.

Verifying the Installation of an AC-Input Power Supply

To verify the operation of a newly-installed AC-input power supply, first apply power to the unit and then observe the status of the LEDs on the power supply faceplate.

To verify the operation of a newly-installed AC-input power supply, perform the following steps:


Step 1 First, verify that the following conditions have been satisfied:

The power supply is completely inserted into the bay and secured in place with its captive installation screw.

A vacant power supply bay is covered with a blank filler panel to ensure EMI compliance and the proper flow of cooling air through the router enclosure.

The source AC power cable is properly connected to the AC receptacle on the power supply faceplate.

The source end of the AC power cable is properly connected to the main source AC circuit breaker.

The main source AC circuit breaker servicing the AC-input power supply is ON.

The source AC voltage is within the range specified on the power supply faceplate.

When two AC-input power supplies are installed, each power cord is connected to a separate AC power source.

Each AC power source must be on a dedicated circuit rated at 20A (for North America) or 10 or 16A (for the International area).

Step 2 Set the rotary power switch on the newly-installed power supply to the ON position.

Step 3 Observe the behavior of the green AC INPUT OK LED on the power supply faceplate for the following conditions:

The AC INPUT OK LED illuminates if the source AC voltage is within the proper operating range (see the label on the power supply faceplate).

If the green AC INPUT OK LED fails to illuminate, determine if

(a) The source AC circuit breaker is on.

(b) The source AC power cord is securely connected from the source AC circuit breaker to the AC receptacle on the power supply faceplate.

If the AC INPUT OK LED illuminates as expected, proceed to Step 4.

If the AC INPUT OK LED fails to illuminate after power is applied to the unit, contact a Cisco service representative for assistance.

Step 4 Observe the behavior of the red OUTPUT FAIL LED on the power supply faceplate after you apply power to the unit. This LED should flash on momentarily, then go off and remain so.

If the OUTPUT FAIL LED behaves as expected, proceed with normal system operations.

If the OUTPUT FAIL LED remains on when the new power supply is installed and powered up, the power supply may be faulty, or an adverse environmental condition may exist in the router, such as an overvoltage or overtemperature condition that causes the power supply to shut down.

If two AC-input power supplies are installed and the OUTPUT FAIL LED illuminates on only one power supply, the associated power supply itself may be faulty, or source power for that unit may be faulty.

If the OUTPUT FAIL LEDs on both power supplies go on, each of which is connected to a separate AC power source, you can assume that an overvoltage or overtemperature condition in the router is causing both power supplies to fail. Also, the OUTPUT FAIL LEDs could be on due to a defective MBus controller or an old version of MBus code.

If the new AC-input power supply fails to operate properly after several attempts to power it up as described above, contact your Cisco service representative for assistance.

Adding, Removing, or Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply

The Cisco 12008 can operate with either one or two DC-input power supplies. Although the router supports an online insertion and removal (OIR) capability for field replaceable units (FRUs), you must observe the following rules regarding the DC-input power supplies:

If your Cisco 12008 is configured with a single DC-input power supply, you must power down the system before replacing the unit.

If your Cisco 12008 is configured with two DC-input power supplies, you can remove and replace one of the power supplies while the other unit remains operational.

To add, remove, or replace a DC-input power supply, you need the following tools:

A 1/4-inch flat-blade screwdriver (to loosen/tighten the captive installation screw on the power supply faceplate).

A 10 mm, hollow-shaft nutdriver (to secure the source DC power cables to the terminals on the power supply with the lock washers and nuts). A 1/4-inch socket wrench with a 10 mm deep-well socket will also suffice for this purpose.

A voltmeter (to test the voltages across the source DC power cables).

The replacement DC-input power supply (product number PWR-GSR8-DC=) is the only part that you will need during the following procedures.


Caution   
You cannot use an AC-input power supply and a DC-input power supply in the same chassis.

Adding a DC-Input Power Supply

In the following procedure, it is assumed that you will be adding a second DC-input power supply to the router. It is also assumed that a blank filler panel is installed in the vacant power supply bay.


Note   A vacant power supply bay must always be covered with a blank filler panel to ensure EMI compliance and the proper flow of cooling air through the router.



Warning   

Before attempting to install a redundant DC-input power supply, you must have a second, independent DC power source available to service the unit.


To install a second (redundant) DC-input power supply, you must first satisfy the following requirements:

Ensure that a dedicated 40A service is available for the second power supply.

Ensure that the power cables from the source DC service circuit breaker to the DC-input power supply are made of 4 AWG, high-strand-count copper wire.

Ensure that the lugs on the source DC power cables (see ) have dual-holes, centered 0.625 inch apart, and that they will fit over the 0.25-inch M6 (metric) threaded terminals on the DC power supply faceplate (see ).


Caution   
AC-input and DC-input power supplies cannot be used together in the same router. Such a configuration is not supported and may damage the system.


Note   If you are adding a second (redundant) DC-input power supply to your router, you will need to obtain the proper source DC power cables and terminal lugs from a commercial supplier in order to connect source DC power to the new DC-input power supply. These parts are not available from Cisco Systems.


Figure 7-5 Dimensions of the Lugs Used with the Source DC Power Cables

Figure 7-6 Faceplate of the DC-Input Power Supply

To add a second (redundant) DC-input power supply to the router, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Locate the source DC circuit breaker that will service the DC-input power supply; ensure that this circuit breaker is set to the OFF position. For added safety, tape the circuit breaker handle in the OFF position.


Note   The color coding scheme used for the source DC power cables for the DC-input power supply depends on the scheme used for the site DC power source. Typically, green or green/yellow is used for earth ground, red is used for positive (+), and black is used for negative (-). Make certain that you properly map the color coding scheme used at the site for the DC power source to the proper terminals on the DC-input power supply faceplate.



Warning   

To be completely sure that power has been removed from the source DC circuit that will be used to service the new power supply, use a voltmeter to measure the voltage across the negative (-) and positive (+) source DC leads to be connected to the power supply. Set the voltmeter to a range that makes it capable of measuring up to 75 VDC. The measurement across the positive and negative leads should be zero (0) volts.


Step 2 Using a 1/4-inch flat-blade screwdriver, loosen the captive installation screw on the blank filler panel covering the vacant (upper) power supply bay; remove the filler panel and retain it for possible future use.

Presumably, you will be installing the new power supply in the upper power supply bay, since, by convention, a single DC-input power supply is installed in the lower bay.

Step 3 Ensure that the rotary power switch on the faceplate of the new power supply that you will be installing is set to the OFF (O) position.

Step 4 Grasp the carrying handle on the new power supply with your left hand; while lifting the power supply, place your right hand beneath the unit to support its weight.


Note   The carrying handle on the DC-input power supply is designed to be grasped with your left hand, rather than your right hand. Using your left hand eliminates the potential for catching your fingers in the limited space between the plastic safety shield (see ) and the carrying handle.



Warning   

The DC-input power supply weighs 14 lb (6.36 kg). For safety, use both hands to install the unit in the power supply bay.


Step 5 Position the power supply appropriately for insertion into the vacant upper bay.

Step 6 Gently slide the unit into the bay, carefully seating it so that the power supply faceplate rests flush against the sheet metal of the power supply bay.


Caution   
To prevent damage to the blind-mating connector at the rear of the power supply, do not use excessive speed or force when inserting the power supply into the bay.


Note   All necessary electrical connections between the power supply and the backplane are accomplished automatically by means of the blind-mating connector at the rear of the power supply.


Step 7 Using a 1/4-inch flat-blade screwdriver, tighten the captive installation screw on the power supply faceplate (see ).

Step 8 Remove the plastic safety shield (see ) that covers the alarm terminal block and the positive (+) and negative (-) terminals on the power supply faceplate.

To remove the plastic safety shield, take the following actions:

(a) Loosen the knurled thumb wheel on the bottom left standoff that secures the safety shield to the power supply faceplate.

(b) Grasp the safety shield and move it to the right and obliquely upward, positioning the shield so that it can be freed from the three standoffs on the power supply faceplate.

(c) Remove the shield from the standoffs and set it aside temporarily.

Figure 7-7 Plastic Safety Shield on the DC-Input Power Supply

Step 9 Unscrew the loosely mounted lock washers and nuts from all six terminals on the power supply faceplate; set this hardware aside temporarily.

Step 10 As an added safety precaution, it is recommended that you add a length of shrink tubing to the crimp area on each power cable lug (see ) before connecting the leads to the power supply.

The shrink tubing acts as an insulator to prevent the crimp area on the source DC power cable lugs from coming in contact with the faceplate of the DC-input power supply.

Step 11 Connect the source DC power leads to the terminals on the power supply faceplate. In so doing, strictly observe the following order in connecting the leads to the power supply:

(a) Ground

(b) + (positive)

(c) - (negative)

Step 12 Using the lock washers and nuts removed from the terminals in Step 9, connect each power supply cable to the appropriate terminals on the power supply faceplate.

Observe the order shown in in connecting the source DC power cables to the terminals on the power supply.

Step 13 After installing each cable, securely tighten the associated lock washers and nuts on the power supply terminals using a 10 mm nutdriver (or a 1/4-inch socket wrench with a 10 mm deep-well socket).


Caution   
Do not overtighten the nuts on the power supply terminals.

Step 14 If you intend to attach an external alarm monitoring facility to the alarm terminal block on the power supply, connect the leads from the external monitoring facility to the circuit breaker alarm terminal block. shows an example of how these leads can be connected.


Note   The circuit breaker alarm terminal block enables you to attach an external monitoring facility to the power supply to detect when the power supply circuit breaker trips during an electrical event, such as an overvoltage condition in the power supply.


The functions and uses of the circuit breaker alarm terminal block are described in detail in the subsection entitled "Circuit Breaker Alarm Terminal Block" in Chapter 1.

Figure 7-8 Connecting Source DC Power Cables to the DC-Input Power Supply

Figure 7-9 Connecting Leads to the Circuit Breaker Alarm Terminal Block

Step 15 Reinstall the plastic safety shield (see ) on the power supply faceplate by taking the following actions:

(a) Seat the shield over the standoffs on the power supply faceplate.

(b) Move the shield to the left and obliquely downward so that it registers properly on the three standoffs on the power supply faceplate.

(c) Tighten the knurled thumbscrew on the bottom left standoff to secure the shield to the power supply faceplate.

Step 16 Remove the tape from the main circuit breaker supplying source power to the new power supply (see Step 1).

Step 17 Set the circuit breaker to the ON position.

Step 18 Set the rotary power switch on the new DC-input power supply to the ON (|) position.

To verify that the new DC-input power supply is operating properly, proceed to the section below entitled "Verifying the Installation of a DC-Input Power Supply."

Removing a DC-Input Power Supply

For the following procedure, it is assumed that you will be removing a DC-input power supply from a Cisco 12008 router that is equipped with a single such unit. In this case, you must power down the router before removing the power supply.

It is assumed further that the power supply to be removed is installed in the lower power supply bay, which, by convention, is the recommended bay for installing a single power supply.

To remove the DC-input power supply from the router, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Set the rotary power switch on the power supply faceplate to the OFF (O) position.


Note   Turning the power supply switch counterclockwise to the OFF (O) position also releases the mechanical interlock (latching mechanism) that secures the power supply in the bay.


Step 2 Locate and turn off the source DC circuit breaker that is servicing the DC-input power supply.

Step 3 Tape the circuit breaker handle in the OFF position as an added safety precaution.

Step 4 Remove the plastic safety shield (see ) that covers the alarm terminal block and the positive (+) and negative (-) terminals on the power supply faceplate.

To remove the plastic safety shield (see ), take the following actions:

(a) Loosen the knurled thumb wheel on the bottom left standoff that secures the safety shield to the power supply faceplate.

(b) Grasp the safety shield and move it to the right and obliquely upward, positioning the shield so that it can be freed from the three standoffs on the power supply faceplate.

(c) Remove the shield from the standoffs and set it aside temporarily.


Warning   

To be completely sure that power has been removed from the source DC circuit that is presently servicing the power supply, use a voltmeter to measure the voltage across the negative (-) and positive (+) source DC leads on the power supply. Set the voltmeter to a range that makes it capable of measuring up to 75 VDC. The measurement across the positive and negative leads should be zero (0) volts.


Step 5 Before removing the power cables, write the name of each cable on a piece of tape, as follows:

Ground

+ (positive)

- (negative)

Step 6 Attach each piece of tape to the appropriate cable to identify it for later reconnection.

Step 7 Remove the power cables from the power supply terminals; strictly observe the following order in removing the cables:

(a) - (negative)

(b) + positive)

(c) Ground

Step 8 Using a 10 mm nutdriver (or a 1/4-inch socket wrench with a 10 mm deep-well socket) loosen the nuts securing the negative (-) power cable to the bottom terminals on the power supply faceplate; remove the nuts and locking washers from the terminals and set this hardware aside temporarily.

Step 9 Proceed in like manner to remove the remaining power cables from the positive (+) terminals and the grounding terminals, making sure that you remove the earth ground cable last.

Step 10 For added safety, place tape over the exposed lugs of the power cables to prevent contact between the leads.

Step 11 If leads are attached to the circuit breaker alarm terminal block on the power supply faceplate (see ), make a note of how these leads are connected so that they can be properly reconnected later.

Step 12 Using a 1/4-inch flat-blade screwdriver, loosen the captive installation screw on the power supply faceplate (see ).

Step 13 Grasp the power supply carrying handle with your left hand and pull the unit halfway out of the bay to disengage the blind-mating connector at the back of the power supply from the backplane.


Warning   

The DC-input power supply weighs 14 lb (6.36 kg). For safety, use both hands to remove the unit from the power supply bay.


Step 14 Place your right hand beneath the power supply to support its weight; withdraw the unit completely from the bay.

Step 15 Set the power supply aside in a safe place, pending further disposition.

If you intend to return the removed power supply to the factory for repair or replacement, repackage the unit properly for return shipment using the original packing materials, if available.

Replacing a DC-Input Power Supply

In the following procedure, it is assumed that you will be replacing an existing power supply in a router containing redundant DC-input power supplies. In this configuration, the router's online insertion and removal (OIR) capability enables you to replace a given power supply without removing power from the router.

To replace a power supply in a redundant DC-input power supply configuration, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Set the rotary power switch on the faceplate of the power supply to be removed to the OFF (O) position.


Note   Turning the power supply switch to the OFF (O) position also releases the mechanical interlock (latching mechanism) that secures the power supply in the bay.


Step 2 Locate and turn off the source DC circuit breaker that is currently servicing the DC-input power supply.

Step 3 Tape the circuit breaker handle in the OFF position as an additional safety precaution.

Step 4 Remove the plastic safety shield (see ) that covers the alarm terminal block and the positive (+) and negative (-) terminals on the power supply faceplate.

To remove the plastic safety shield, take the following actions:

(a) Loosen the knurled thumb wheel on the bottom left standoff that secures the safety shield to the power supply faceplate.

(b) Grasp the safety shield and move it to the right and obliquely upward, positioning the shield so that it can be freed from the three standoffs on the power supply faceplate.

(c) Remove the shield from the standoffs and set it aside temporarily.


Warning   

To be completely sure that power has been removed from the source DC circuit presently servicing the power supply that you intend to remove, use a voltmeter to measure the voltage across the negative (-) and positive (+) source DC leads. Set the voltmeter to a range that makes it capable of measuring up to 75 VDC. The measurement across the positive and negative leads should be zero (0) volts.


Step 5 Before removing the power cables, write the name of each cable on a piece of tape, as follows:

Ground

+ (positive)

- (negative)

Step 6 Attach each piece of tape to the appropriate cable to identify it for later reconnection.

Step 7 Remove the power cables from the power supply terminals, strictly observing the following order of removal:

(a) - (negative)

(b) + (positive)

(c) Ground

Step 8 Using a 10 mm nutdriver (or a 1/4-inch socket wrench with a 10 mm deep-well socket), loosen the nuts securing the negative (-) power cable to the bottom terminals on the power supply faceplate; remove the nuts and locking washers from the terminals; set this hardware aside temporarily and remove the power cable from the negative terminals.

Step 9 Proceed in like manner to remove the positive (+) and grounding cables from the power supply terminals, making sure that you remove the ground cable last.

Step 10 For added safety, place tape over the exposed lugs of the power cables to prevent contact between the leads.

Step 11 If an external alarm monitoring facility is attached to the circuit breaker alarm terminal block on the power supply faceplate (see ), make a note of how the leads are connected. Doing so enables you to properly identify each lead for later reconnection.

Step 12 Disconnect the leads from the circuit breaker alarm terminal block.

Step 13 Using a 1/4-inch flat-blade screwdriver, loosen the captive installation screw on the power supply faceplate (see ).

Step 14 Grasp the power supply carrying handle with your left hand and pull the unit halfway out of the bay to disengage the blind-mating connector at the back of the power supply from the backplane.


Warning   

The DC-input power supply weighs 14 lb (6.36 kg). For safety, use both hands to withdraw the unit from the bay.


Step 15 Place your right hand beneath the power supply to support its weight and completely withdraw the unit from the bay.

Step 16 Pending further action, set the unit aside in a safe place.

If you intend to return the removed power supply to the factory for repair or replacement, restore the nuts and lock washers to the power supply terminals, and reinstall the plastic safety shield (see ) on the faceplate standoffs. Repackage the unit properly for return shipment using the original packing materials, if available.

Step 17 On the new DC-input power supply that you intend to install in the now vacant power supply bay, set the rotary power switch on the power supply faceplate to the OFF (0) position.

Step 18 Grasp the carrying handle on the power supply with one hand; place your free hand beneath the unit to support its weight.

Step 19 Position the unit appropriately for insertion into the power supply bay.

Step 20 Gently slide the new power supply into the vacant bay, carefully seating it so that the power supply faceplate is flush against the sheet metal of the power supply bay. This action ensures that the blind-mating connector at the rear of the power supply is firmly seated into the backplane connector.


Caution   
To prevent damage to the blind-mating connectors, do not use excessive speed or force when inserting the new power supply into the bay.


Note   All the necessary electrical connections between the power supply and the backplane are accomplished automatically by means of the blind-mating connectors.


Step 21 Using a 1/4-inch flat-blade screwdriver, tighten the captive installation screw on the power supply faceplate.

Step 22 Remove the plastic safety shield (see ) from the new power supply, taking the same actions as specified in Step 4 above.


Warning   

To be completely sure that power has been removed from the source DC circuit that you intend to reconnect to the new power supply, use a voltmeter to measure the voltage across the negative (-) and positive (+) source DC leads. Set the voltmeter to a range that makes it capable of measuring up to 75 VDC. The measurement across the negative and positive leads should be zero (0) volts.


Step 23 Unscrew the loosely mounted lock washers and nuts from all six terminals on the new power supply faceplate; set this hardware aside temporarily.

Step 24 Before connecting each cable to the appropriate terminals on the power supply faceplate, remove the tape (that you applied in Step 10 above) from the lug. Strictly observe the following order in reconnecting the leads to the power supply terminals:

(a) Ground

(b) + (positive)

(c) - (negative)

Step 25 Secure each cable to the terminals using the previously removed lock washers and nuts. Tighten the lock washers and nuts on each terminal using a 10 mm nutdriver (or a 1/4-inch socket wrench with a 10 mm deep-well socket).


Caution   
Do not overtighten the nuts on the power supply terminals.

Step 26 If you intend to reconnect the external alarm monitoring facility to the circuit breaker alarm terminal block on the new power supply, reconnect the leads as they were on the old power supply (see Step 11).

Step 27 Remove the tape securing the main source DC circuit breaker in the OFF (0) position (see Step 3).

Step 28 Set the main source DC circuit breaker to the ON (1) position.

Step 29 Set the rotary power switch on the new DC-input power supply to the ON (|) position.

To verify that the new DC-input power supply is operating properly, perform the procedure in the following section.

Verifying the Installation of a DC-Input Power Supply

To verify the operation of a newly-installed DC-input power supply, first apply power to the unit and observe the status of the LEDs on the power supply faceplate.

To verify the operation of a newly-installed DC-input power supply, perform the following steps:


Step 1 First, verify that the following conditions are satisfied:

The power supply is completely inserted into the bay and secured in place with the captive installation screw.

A vacant power supply bay is covered with a blank filler panel.

The source DC power cables are connected properly to the terminals on the power supply faceplate.

The source end of the DC power cable is properly connected to the main source DC circuit breaker.

The main source DC circuit breaker servicing the DC-input power supply is in the ON (|) position.

The source DC voltage is within the range indicated on the power supply faceplate.

If two DC-input power supplies are installed, each power supply is being serviced by a separate 40A DC power source.

Step 2 Assuming that you have not already done so, set the rotary power switch of the newly installed power supply to the ON position.

Step 3 Observe the behavior of the green INPUT OK LED on the power supply faceplate for the following conditions:

If the source DC voltage is within the proper range, the INPUT OK LED goes on.

If the green INPUT OK LED does not go on, determine if

(a) The main source DC circuit breaker is on.

(b) The source DC power cables are connected properly to the terminals on the power supply faceplate.

If the INPUT OK LED goes on, proceed to Step 4.

If the INPUT OK LED does not go on after you apply power to the unit and verify the conditions outlined in Step 1, contact your local Cisco service representative for assistance.

Step 4 Observe the behavior of the red OUTPUT FAIL LED on the power supply faceplate after applying power to the unit. This LED should flash on momentarily, then go off and remain so.

If the OUTPUT FAIL LED on the new power supply behaves as expected, proceed with normal system operations.

If the OUTPUT FAIL LED remains on when the new power supply is installed and powered up, the power supply may be faulty, or an adverse environmental condition may exist in the router, such as an overvoltage or overtemperature condition that causes the power supply to shut down.

If two power supplies are installed and the OUTPUT FAIL LED on only one power supply goes on, you can assume that the power supply itself is faulty, or that the DC source for that power supply is faulty.

If the OUTPUT FAIL LEDs on both power supplies go on, each of which is connected to a separate DC power source, you can assume that an overvoltage or overtemperature condition in the router is causing both power supplies to fail. Also, the OUTPUT FAIL LEDs could be on due to a defective MBus controller or an old version of MBus code.

If the new DC-input power supply fails to operate properly after several attempts to power it up as described above, contact your Cisco service representative for assistance.

Removing and Replacing the Fan Trays

This section presents the procedures for removing and installing the following fan trays incorporated into the Cisco 12008:

Card cage fan tray—Located in the lower card cage behind the air filter assembly

Power supply fan tray—Located in the lower right corner of the router enclosure

The Cisco 12008 supports online insertion and removal of field-replaceable units (FRUs); thus, you can remove and replace a fan tray while the rest of the system remains powered up and fully operational.


Note   If you replace a defective fan tray while the router is running, you must do so quickly to minimize the risk of overheating router components. The system shuts down approximately 2 minutes after reaching the shutdown temperature threshold; therefore, you should replace a defective fan tray within this time span.


You will need the following tools and parts to remove or install a fan tray:

1/4-inch flat-blade screwdriver

ESD-preventive wrist strap

Lower card cage fan tray—product number GSR8-SYSBLOWER=

Power supply fan tray—product number GSR8-PWRBLOWER=

Removing the Fan Tray from the Lower Card Cage

To remove the fan tray from the lower card cage, perform the following steps.


Step 1 Loosen the two panel fastener screws on each side of the air filter assembly (see ); remove the assembly to expose the interior of the lower card cage and set it aside.

Step 2 Loosen the two captive installation screws at the sides of the fan tray.

Step 3 With one hand, grasp the ring-shaped insertion/extraction tab in the middle of the fan tray carrier; gently slide the fan tray halfway out of the guide rails to disengage the fan tray connector from the backplane (see ).

Step 4 Place your free hand beneath the fan tray to support its weight and slide the module completely out of the card cage.

Step 5 Set the fan tray aside.


Caution   
The card cage fan tray weighs approximately 12 lb (5.45 kg). For safety, use both hands when handling this assembly.

If you plan to return the removed fan tray to the factory for repair or replacement, repackage the unit in the original shipping container, if available, and prepare the package for return shipment.

Figure 7-10 Removing the Card Cage Fan Tray from the Router

Installing a Fan Tray in the Lower Card Cage

For the following procedure, it is assumed that you have removed a defective fan tray from the lower card cage and that you intend to replace it with a new one.

To install a new fan tray in the lower card cage, perform the following steps.


Caution   
For safety, use both hands when handling the card cage fan tray.


Step 1 With one hand, grasp the ring-shaped insertion/extraction tab in the middle of the new fan tray carrier and raise the front end of the assembly.

Step 2 Place your free hand beneath the assembly to support its weight; position the assembly in front of the guide rails in the lower card cage.

Step 3 Carefully insert the assembly into the guiderails (see ).

Step 4 Using gentle pressure on the insertion/extraction tab, fully insert the assembly until the sheet metal carrier rests against the stops for the captive installation screws.

If the router is operational, you should hear the fans come up to normal rotational speed at this time.


Note   All electrical connections are a made automatically when the fan tray and backplane connectors mate. The fan tray then immediately powers up.


Step 5 Tighten the two captive installation screws at the sides of the fan tray carrier.

Step 6 Restore the air filter assembly so that it covers the lower card cage and fully encloses the router. Secure the assembly in place by tightening its two panel fastener screws.

To verify that the card cage fan tray is operating properly, go to the section entitled "Checking the Installation of a Fan Tray."

Figure 7-11 Inserting the Card Cage Fan Tray into the Router

Removing the Power Supply Fan Tray

To remove the power supply fan tray from the router, perform the following steps.


Step 1 Loosen the captive installation screw on the honeycomb faceplate of the power supply fan tray (see ).

Step 2 With one hand, grasp the loosened installation screw on the power supply fan tray faceplate; gently pull the fan tray halfway out of the guide rails to disengage the fan tray connector from the backplane (see ).


Caution   
For safety, make sure that the fans have stopped spinning before grasping the fan tray assembly. It will take several seconds for the fans to stop spinning once the assembly is disengaged from the backplane.

Step 3 Using one hand, grasp the fan tray from above and slide the assembly completely out of the router (see ).

Step 4 Set the fan tray aside.

If you plan to return the removed fan tray to the factory for repair or replacement, repackage the fan tray in the original shipping container, if available, and prepare the package for return shipment.

Figure 7-12 Removing the Power Supply Fan Tray from the Router

Installing the Power Supply Fan Tray

For the following procedure, it is assumed that you have already removed a defective power supply fan tray and that you intend to replace it with a new one.

To install the new power supply fan tray, perform the following steps.


Step 1 Using one hand, grasp the power supply fan tray from above (as shown in ).

Step 2 Position the assembly in front of the guide rails in the fan tray bay.

Step 3 Carefully insert the fan tray into the guide rails in the bay (see ).

Figure 7-13 Inserting the Power Supply Fan Tray into the Router

Step 4 Using gentle pressure, fully insert the assembly into the bay until the sheet metal carrier of the fan tray rests against the stop for the captive installation screw.

Step 5 Tighten the captive installation screw on the fan tray faceplate (see ).

To verify that the power supply fan tray is operating properly, proceed to the following section.

Checking the Installation of a Fan Tray

To verify that a replacement fan tray is operating properly, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Check the following components to make sure that they are secure:

The power supply fan tray is inserted all the way into the bay and its captive installation screw is tightened.

The card cage fan tray is inserted all the way into the lower card cage and its two captive installation screws are tightened.

The air filter assembly is securely installed on the front of the lower card cage.

Step 2 Observe the status LEDs on the CSC faceplate (see the following section entitled "Status LEDs for the Fan Trays").

Step 3 Listen for the sound of the running cooling fans in the card cage fan tray and the power supply fan tray. In a noisy environment, it may be difficult to hear the fans running. If so, proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Run your hand along the width of the top rear of the router enclosure to verify that air is being exhausted from the vents for the upper card cage and the power supply bays.

If either fan tray fails to operate properly, contact your Cisco service representative for assistance.

Status LEDs for the Fan Trays

The status LEDs for the fan trays are arranged side-by-side on the CSC faceplate (see ). The positions of these LEDs correspond to the positions of the fan trays in the router.

The left LED indicates the status of the card cage fan tray, and the right LED indicates the status of the power supply fan tray.

lists the status LEDs for the fan trays and describes their meaning in the on/off state.

Table 7-1

Status LEDs
State
Description

Left LED

On (amber)

Indicates that a fault exists in the card cage fan tray

Right LED

On (amber)

Indicates that a fault exists in the power supply fan tray

Both LEDs

Off

Indicates that both fan trays are operating normally


Status LEDs for the Fan Trays

If a fan in one of the fan trays fails, the following occurs:

Fan speed on both fan trays increases to the maximum rate, even in the absence of an over-temperature condition in the router.

The appropriate status LED on the CSC faceplate goes on (see ), indicating which fan tray has failed.

You can check the status of the fan tray LEDs by issuing the show environment leds command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. You can check the status of the fan trays themselves by issuing the show environment all command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt.

Figure 7-14 Fan Tray Status LEDs on the CSC

Removing and Replacing the RP

The following sections present the procedures for removing and replacing the RP. The RP can be installed in any of the upper card cage slots 0 through 3 and 4 through 7. By convention, however, it is normally installed in slot 0 (the left-most slot in the upper card cage).


Caution   
Removing the RP while the system is operating will cause the system to stop forwarding packets and might cause the system to cease network operation. Therefore, it is recommended that you not remove the RP while the system is operating. To avoid system problems, it is best to power down the router before removing or replacing the RP.

You will need the following tools and parts to remove and replace the RP.

A 3/16-inch flat-blade screwdriver.

ESD-prevention equipment or the disposable ESD-preventive wrist strap included with all spares and upgrade kits.

Antistatic mat or foam pad (on which to place the RP if you plan to reinstall it) or an antistatic bag (to contain the removed RP if you plan to return it to the factory for repair or replacement).

The GRP (product number GRP= or PRP=).


Note   Before accessing any of the router's internal components, put on an antistatic wrist strap and make sure that it makes ample contact with your skin. Insert the equipment end of the wrist strap (the banana jack) into the ESD socket in the lower left corner of the upper card cage.



Caution   
An RP that is only partially removed from the backplane can halt the system.


Caution   
Before replacing the RP with another, back up the running configuration file to a Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) file server or an installed Flash memory card. Doing so enables you to retrieve the file later for reuse. If you do not back up the configuration file, it will be lost and you will have to manually reenter the configuration information for the router. If you are temporarily removing the RP and will be reinstalling it shortly, you need not back up the configuration file, because lithium batteries on the RP retain the configuration file in NVRAM until the RP is reinstalled.

Removing the RP

Although appearing later in this section illustrates a RP being removed from a Cisco 12012, the procedure for removing a RP from a Cisco 12008 is essentially identical. For purposes of the Cisco 12008 RP removal procedure, it is assumed that the RP is installed in slot 0 of the upper card cage.

To remove the RP from the Cisco 12008, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Set the rotary power switch(es) on the installed power supply(ies) to the Standby position (AC-input power supply) or the OFF position (DC-input power supply).

Step 2 If you are removing the RP from the system with the intent to replace it with another RP, copy the currently running configuration file to a TFTP server in the network or to a Flash memory card installed in either PCMCIA slot 0 or 1. Backing up the configuration file in this manner enables you to retrieve it later so that it can be copied to NVRAM on the new RP.

Step 3 Put on an antistatic wrist strap and make sure that it makes ample contact with your skin. Insert the equipment end of the wrist strap (the banana jack) into the ESD socket in the lower left corner of the upper card cage.

Step 4 If you are removing the RP with the intent to upgrade its memory (and will be reinstalling it shortly), you can leave any interface cables (for the console port, auxiliary port, and Ethernet ports) attached to the RP, provided that doing so will not strain the cables when you place the RP on an antistatic mat or foam pad to perform the memory upgrade procedure.

If the interface cables are not long enough to allow you to place the RP on an antistatic mat or foam pad without undue stress to the cables, disconnect the cables before removing the RP and proceeding with the memory upgrade task.

Step 5 Using a 3/16-inch flat-blade screwdriver, loosen the two captive screws at the top and bottom of the RP faceplate (see Figure 7-15a).

Step 6 Place your thumbs on each of the ejector levers and simultaneously pivot them away from the RP faceplate (see b). This action disengages the RP from the backplane.

Step 7 Grasp the RP faceplate with one hand and pull the RP straight out of the slot; place your free hand beneath the RP to support its weight (see c). Avoid touching the RP printed circuit board, its components, or its edge connector pins.

Step 8 Place the removed RP on an antistatic mat or foam pad.

If you plan to return the RP to the factory for repair or replacement, immediately place it in an antistatic bag for ESD protection.

Figure 7-15 Removing the RP (Cisco 12012 Shown)

Installing the RP

As noted in the preceding section, illustrates an RP being removed from a Cisco 12012. For purposes of the RP installation procedure presented in this section, it is assumed that you will be performing the reverse of the procedure illustrated in , but in the context of the Cisco 12008. It is also assumed that you will be installing the RP in slot 0 of the upper card cage of the Cisco 12008.

To install the RP in the Cisco 12008, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Put on an antistatic wrist strap and make sure that it makes ample contact with your skin. Insert the equipment end of the wrist strap (the banana jack) into the ESD socket in the lower left corner of the upper card cage.

Step 2 Grasp the RP faceplate with one hand and place your free hand under the card carrier to support the weight of the card; avoid touching the RP printed circuit board, its components, or its edge connector pins.

Step 3 Position the RP for insertion into slot 0; align the top and bottom edges of the card carrier with the guiderails at the top and bottom of slot 0.

Step 4 Carefully slide the RP into slot 0 until the ejector levers make contact with the top and bottom lip of the upper card cage enclosure.

Step 5 Using the thumb and forefinger of each hand, simultaneously pivot both ejector levers toward the center of the RP faceplate until they are perpendicular to the faceplate. This action fully seats the RP in the backplane.


Caution   
An RP that is only partially seated in the backplane can halt the system.

Step 6 Using a 3/16-inch flat-blade screwdriver, tighten the captive installation screws at the top and bottom of the RP faceplate.

Step 7 If you previously disconnected the interface cables from the console, auxiliary, and Ethernet ports to remove the RP, or if you are installing a new RP, connect the interface cables to the appropriate ports on the RP.

Step 8 Ensure that the console terminal is turned on.

Step 9 Turn the rotary power switch(es) on the power supply(ies) to the ON position to apply system power.

This completes the RP replacement procedure.

Checking the Installation of the RP

To verify that the new (or reinstalled) RP is functioning properly, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Verify the following conditions:

The RP is fully seated and its two captive installation screws are tightened.

The RP interface cables are connected and secure.

Any Flash memory cards removed from the old RP are reinstalled in the new RP.

Step 2 Ensure that a console terminal is connected to the console port on the RP and that the console is turned on, or that you are able to accomplish a remote login to the router from another host in the network by means of a telnet session.

Step 3 Check the startup banner and displays to ensure that the system restarts properly and that all the router interfaces reinitialize in the proper state.

Removing and Replacing Line Cards

Procedures for removing and replacing line cards are described in conjunction with the memory upgrade procedures presented in the section entitled "Upgrading Memory on a Line Card."

Removing and Replacing Switch Cards

This section presents the procedures for removing, installing, and verifying the installation of the CSC and the SFC.


Note   The Cisco 12008 supports an online insertion and removal (OIR) feature; thus, you can remove and replace a redundant CSC or any of the SFCs without powering down the system. If you do not have redundant CSCs in your router (that is, your router is equipped with a single CSC), you must power down the system before removing the CSC card.


When you install a new CSC or SFC, the router's OIR capability enables the new card to be recognized, initialized, and become operational in a transparent manner.

For the procedures in this section, it is assumed that you will be removing and replacing a switch card from a fully redundant and operational router.

When you replace a failed switch card, only four switch planes remain available to the router. For the duration of the replacement procedure, no redundant plane exists to take over if any other switch plane fails.

Under normal operating conditions in a fully redundant system, you would not leave a CSC slot or an SFC slot vacant for any length of time beyond that required to replace a failed card.

Two dedicated slots (CSC0 and CSC1) in the middle of the upper card cage are reserved for exclusive use by CSCs. Three dedicated slots (SFC0, SFC1, and SFC2) in the lower card cage are reserved for exclusive use by SFCs.

You will need the following tools and parts to install or replace a switch card:

1/4-inch flat-blade screwdriver

ESD-preventive wrist strap

Clock and scheduler card (CSC)—product number GSR8-CSC=

Switch fabric card (SFC)—product number GSR8-SFC=

Removing an SFC

To remove an SFC from the router, perform the following steps.


Note   Before accessing any of the router's internal components, put on an antistatic wrist strap and make sure that it makes ample contact with your skin. Insert the equipment end of the wrist strap (the banana jack) into the ESD socket in the lower left corner of the upper card cage.



Step 1 Loosen the two panel fastener screws on each side of the air filter assembly (see ); remove the assembly and set it aside.

Figure 7-16 Removing an SFC

Step 2 Grasp the front of the card carrier's metal faceplate, unseat the card from the backplane, and slide the SFC out of the slot, supporting the weight of the card by placing your other hand underneath the card carrier. Store the SFC in an antistatic bag or in an antistatic rack.

Step 3 If you intend to return the card for repair or replacement, leave the card in its antistatic bag and prepare a return package for shipment.


Caution   
Do not place any tools in the lower card cage. Also, be careful not to damage the honeycomb screen in the air filter assembly. Damaging this screen might restrict the flow of cooling air through the switch router, causing an overtemperature condition in the router.

Installing an SFC

To install an SFC in the router, perform the following steps:


Note   Before accessing any of the router's internal components, put on an antistatic wrist strap and make sure that it makes ample contact with your skin. Insert the equipment end of the wrist strap (the banana jack) into the ESD socket in the lower left corner of the upper card cage.



Step 1 With one hand, grasp the new SFC by its faceplate; support the weight of the card by placing your free hand beneath the card carrier.

Step 2 Position the card horizontally and insert it into the vacant slot until the SFC is firmly seated in the backplane (see ).

Step 3 Restore the air filter assembly to the router to fully enclose the lower card cage. Secure the assembly in place by tightening its two panel fastener screws.

This completes the procedure for removing and installing an SFC.

To verify the operability of the new SFC, perform the procedure in the section entitled "Checking the Installation of Switch Cards."

Figure 7-17 Installing an SFC

Removing a CSC

To remove a CSC from the router, perform the following steps.


Note   Before accessing any of the router's internal components, put on an antistatic wrist strap and make sure that it makes ample contact with your skin. Insert the equipment end of the wrist strap (the banana jack) into the ESD socket in the lower left corner of the upper card cage.



Step 1 Loosen the two captive installation screws beneath the card ejector levers at the top and bottom of the card (see ).

Step 2 Grasp the ejector levers and pull them away from the card faceplate to unseat the card from the backplane (see ).

Step 3 Touching only the ejector levers or the metal card carrier proper, slide the card out of the slot and store it in an antistatic bag or in an antistatic card rack (see ).

Step 4 If you intend to return the card for repair or replacement, leave the card in its antistatic bag and prepare a return package for shipment.

At the conclusion of this procedure, you must either install a replacement CSC or a blank filler panel to maintain the integrity of the router enclosure. Doing so is essential to maintain the proper flow of cooling air through the router and to ensure EMI compliance.

Figure 7-18 Removing a CSC

Installing a CSC

To install a CSC in the router, perform the following steps.


Note   Before accessing any of the router's internal components, put on an antistatic wrist strap and make sure that it makes ample contact with your skin. Insert the equipment end of the wrist strap (the banana jack) into the ESD socket in the lower left corner of the upper card cage.



Step 1 With one hand, grasp the new CSC by its faceplate; support the weight of the card by placing your free hand beneath the card carrier.

Step 2 Position the card vertically and insert it into the vacant slot in the upper card cage until the card's ejector levers meet the retention lips at the top and bottom of the enclosure (see ).

Step 3 Pivot the ejector levers toward the card faceplate to engage the retention lips at the top and bottom of the enclosure and firmly seat the card in the backplane (see ).

This completes the procedure for removing and installing a CSC.

To verify that the new CSC is operating properly, perform the procedure in the following section.

Figure 7-19 Installing a CSC

Checking the Installation of Switch Cards

This section tells you how to verify the operability of a newly installed switch card. Refer to while performing the following procedures.

Figure 7-20 Status LEDs on a CSC

To verify that a new switch card is operating properly, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Observe the LEDs on the faceplate of the CSC(s), as follows:

For a new CSC—Observe the two status LEDs for the CSC (refer to ). If the bottom (ENABLED) LED is on (green), the new CSC is operational. If the top (FAIL) LED is on (amber), the new CSC is faulty (see ). In this case, proceed to Step 3.

Table 7-2 Status LEDs for the CSC

Status LEDs
State
Description

Top LED (FAIL)

On (amber)

Indicates that the CSC is faulty

Bottom LED (ENABLED)

On (green)

Indicates that the CSC is operational


For a new SFC—The first (primary) indication of SFC status is provided by the status LEDs for the SFCs located at the bottom of the CSC faceplate (see ).

If the bottom (ENABLED) LED is on (green), the installed SFCs are operational (see ). This ends the validation procedure, except for returning the air filter assembly to its proper place (see Step 3).

If the top (FAIL) LED is on (amber), one or more of the installed SFCs is faulty (see ). In this case, proceed with Step 2.

Table 7-3

Status LEDs
State
Description

Top LED (FAIL)

On (amber)

Indicates that a fault has been detected in one or more of the SFCs.

Bottom LED (ENABLED

On (green)

Indicates that the SFCs are installed and operating normally.

Both LEDs

Off

Indicates that no SFCs are installed in the router.


Status LEDs for the SFCs

Step 2 The secondary indication of SFC status is provided by two LEDs on each SFC (see ).

Figure 7-21 Status LEDs on an SFC

Observe each pair of LEDs on each SFC for the following indications:

If the left LED (OK) is on (green), the SFC is operational.

If the right LED (FAIL) is on (amber), the SFC is faulty. In this case, proceed with Step 3.

Step 3 If the new switch card is faulty, perform the following steps, as appropriate:

Reseat the card in the slot and again observe its LEDs, as outlined in Step 1, Table 7-2, and Table 7-3.

If the associated LEDs for the card continue to indicate that the card is faulty, replace the card with a new one and repeat the verification procedure. If this does not resolve the problem, contact your Cisco service representative for assistance.

If you have installed new SFCs in the lower card cage and they pass the validation tests (as affirmed by the state of the primary and secondary LEDs noted in Step 1 and Table 7-3, respectively), replace the air filter assembly and secure it in place with the two captive installation screws.

In Step 2 above, since the SFCs are not visible during normal operation, you must remove the air filter assembly from the router to observe the status LEDs on each SFC (see ). These LEDs are arranged side-by-side behind a raised tab near the middle of the card (as you view the SFC from the front of the router).

Alternatively, you could issue the following command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt to show the status of all the router's LEDs:

router# show environment leds

If the CSC indicates a fault with an SFC, you must still remove the air filter assembly from the switch router and observe the status LEDs on the SFCs themselves to determine which card is at fault.

Removing and Replacing the Cable Management System

This section presents procedures for removing and installing a cable-management tray or a cable-management bracket for the Cisco 12008.

To perform these procedures, you will need the following tools:

1/4-inch flat-blade screwdriver

Number 1 Phillips screwdriver

ESD-preventive wrist strap

ACS-GSR8-CCBLM(=)—Cable-management tray

ACS-GSR-LCCBLM(=)—Cable-management bracket

Removing a Cable-Management Tray

The cable-management tray (ACS-GSR8-CCBLM) is actually three pieces: end cap, top trim, and tray (see ).

Figure 7-22 Cable-Management Tray on a Cisco 12008

To remove the cable-management tray while the system is operating, perform the following steps.


Note   Before accessing any of the router's internal components, put on an antistatic wrist strap and make sure that it makes adequate contact with your skin. Insert the equipment end of the wrist strap (the banana jack) into the ESD grounding socket on the lower left edge of the upper card cage (see ).



Step 1 Proceeding from left to right in the upper card cage, select the first line card. Starting with the interface cable for the bottom port on the line card (for cards with multiple ports), remove it from the associated finger on the cable-management tray (see ). Continue this for each interface cable.

Figure 7-23 Removing an Interface Cable from Cable-Management Tray

Step 2 Once the interface cables are removed from the cable-management tray, position the interface cables out of the way in preparation for removal of the cable-management tray.

Step 3 Remove the four installation screws securing the cable-management tray to the recessed router enclosure (see ). Save the screws for possible future use.

Figure 7-24 Removing the Cable-Management Tray from the Cisco 12008

Step 4 Remove the top trim piece from the chassis by pulling it away from the chassis fasteners (see , part 1).

Step 5 Remove the end cap (left-most, large finger piece) from the chassis by pulling it away from the chassis fasteners (see , part 2).

Step 6 Pivot the bottom of the cable-management tray away from the recessed router enclosure (see , part 3).

Step 7 Remove the cable-management tray from the router and set it aside.

This completes the removal procedure for the Cisco 12008 cable-management tray.

Installing a Cable-Management Tray

This section tells you how to install a cable-management tray in the Cisco 12008.


Note   Before accessing any of the router's internal components, put on an antistatic wrist strap and make sure that it makes adequate contact with your skin. Insert the equipment end of the wrist strap (the banana jack) into the ESD grounding socket on the lower left edge of the upper card cage (see ).


To install a cable-management tray while the system is operating, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Remove the replacement cable-management tray from its shipping container.

Step 2 Position the cable-management tray at an angle so that its top is oriented toward the tray recess in the router enclosure (see ).

Step 3 Pivot the bottom of the cable-management tray inward toward the router until it is flush against the sheet metal in the tray recess (see , part 1).

Step 4 Secure the cable-management tray in the recess with the two right-most installation screws that you set aside in the previous section entitled "Removing a Cable-Management Tray."

Figure 7-25 Installing a Cable Management Tray

Step 5 Install the end cap onto the chassis by pushing it onto the chassis fasteners (see , part 2).

Step 6 Secure the cable-management tray in the recess with the remaining two installation screws that you set aside in the previous procedure entitled "Removing a Cable-Management Tray."

Step 7 Install the top trim piece onto the chassis by pushing it onto the chassis fasteners (see , part 3).

Step 8 Carefully arrange the attached interface cables in the bottom of the cable-management tray so that they emerge from the tray directly over the intended line card (see ).

This completes the installation procedure for the Cisco 12008 cable-management tray.

Removing a Cable-Management Bracket

This section tells you how to remove a cable-management bracket from the Cisco 12008.


Note   Before accessing any of the router's internal components, put on an antistatic wrist strap and make sure that it makes adequate contact with your skin. Insert the equipment end of the wrist strap (the banana jack) into the ESD grounding socket on the lower left edge of the upper card cage (see ).


To remove a cable-management bracket from a line card, perform the following steps:


Step 1 On a piece of paper, list the current interface cable connections to the port(s) on each line card.


Note   This step may be unnecessary. If the interface cables were originally installed properly, the length of each cable should leave little question regarding the port to which it should be connected.


Step 2 Starting with the interface cable for the bottom port on the line card (for cards with multiple ports), disconnect the cable from the bottom line card port (see a).

Step 3 Proceeding upward, remove the interface cable from between all the metal fingers supporting the cable keeper clips (see b).

Step 4 Remove the interface cable from the associated cable keeper clip, as shown in c). Set the cable aside for later use.

Figure 7-26 Removing Interface Cables from a Line Card

Step 5 Go back to Step 2 and proceed through the cable removal procedure in a bottom to top direction until you have removed all of the interface cables from the line card ports.

Step 6 Once all of the line card interface cables are removed, loosen the captive installation screws at the top and bottom of the cable-management bracket (see ).

Step 7 Remove the cable-management bracket from the line card.

This completes the removal procedure for the Cisco 12008 cable-management bracket.

Figure 7-27 Removing the Cable-Management Bracket

Installing a Cable-Management Bracket

For the procedure in this section, it is assumed that you have installed a new line card in the router, in which case you must also install a cable-management bracket on the card. A small hook on the top of the cable-management bracket allows you to hook the bracket onto small cutouts on the cable-management tray during a line card replacement procedure.


Note   Before accessing any of the router's internal components, put on an antistatic wrist strap and make sure that it makes adequate contact with your skin. Insert the equipment end of the wrist strap (the banana jack) into the ESD grounding socket on the lower left edge of the upper card cage (see ).


To install a cable-management bracket on a line card, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Attach the cable-management bracket to the line card by means of the two captive installation screws at the top and bottom of the cable-management bracket (see ).

Step 2 Carefully arrange the interface cables in the cable-management tray (for line cards with multiple ports); determine the appropriate length of each cable for the intended port and route the cables down to the line card ports.

Step 3 Starting with the bottom port on the line card, connect the interface cables to the intended port (see , part 1).

Step 4 Carefully press the interface cable into the associated cable keeper clip on the cable-management bracket clip (see , part 2). Avoid any kinks or sharp bends in the cable.

Step 5 Proceeding upward, carefully press the interface cable between the metal fingers that support the cable keeper clips (see , part 3).

Step 6 Go back to Step 3 and proceed through the cable attachment procedure in a bottom-to-top direction until you have attached all the interface cables to the line card ports.

This completes the installation procedure for the Cisco 12008 cable-management bracket.

Figure 7-28 Attaching a Cable-Management Bracket to a Line Card

Figure 7-29 Installing Interface Cables onto a Line Card

Upgrading Memory on a Line Card

This section presents the procedures for upgrading memory on a Cisco 12000 series line card.

The Cisco 12000 series line cards used with the Cisco 12008 incorporate the following types of onboard memory:

DRAM—Each Cisco 12000 series line card has two DRAM DIMM sockets (see ). The DRAM is used by the line card's processor. The default DRAM configuration for the line card's processor is 32 MB—one 32-MB DIMM in socket P4 DIMM0.

SDRAM—Each Cisco 12000 series line card incorporates four SDRAM DIMM sockets (see ). The SDRAM is used by the line card's transmit and receive buffers. The default SDRAM configuration for a line card receive (RX) or transmit (TX) buffer is 16 MB.

All four SDRAM DIMM sockets must be populated with DIMMs to enable the receive and transmit buffers to operate properly. Also, both DIMMs installed in a given buffer pair (either transmit or receive) must be of the same size; however, the size of the DIMMs installed in the pair of transmit buffers need not be the same as the size of those installed in the pair of receive buffers, and vice versa.

Both types of memory in the Cisco 12000 series line cards can be upgraded in the field.

You will need the following tools to install or replace memory on the Cisco 12000 series line cards:

1/4-inch flat-blade screwdriver

3/16-inch flat-blade screwdriver

Your own ESD-prevention equipment or the disposable grounding wrist strap included with all upgrade kits, field-replaceable units (FRUs), and spares for the Cisco 12000 series routers

An antistatic mat or surface

Small needle nose pliers

The appropriate DRAM DIMM or SDRAM DIMM module(s) for configuring memory in the desired amount (see or ).

Figure 7-30 Memory Locations on Cisco Series 12000 Line Cards (Quad OC-3c/STM-1C POS Card Shown)

Before attempting to upgrade line card memory, consult or to determine the particular DIMM module(s) that you will need to achieve the desired memory configuration.

lists the available configurations and associated product numbers of DRAM DIMMs for upgrading processor memory on a line card.

lists the available configurations and associated product numbers of SDRAM DIMMs for upgrading the transmit and receive buffer memory on a line card.

Table 7-4 DRAM DIMM Configurations Available for Cisco 12000 Series Line Cards

DRAM DIMM Sockets
DIMM Module
Memory Provided
Product Number

P4 DIMM0

1 32-MB DIMM

32 MB

MEM-LC-321

P4 DIMM1

1 32-MB DIMM

64 MB2

MEM-LC-32=2

P4 DIMM0

1 64-MB DIMM

64 MB

MEM-GRP/LC-64=

P4 DIMM0

1 128-MB DIMM

128 MB

MEM-GRP/LC-128=

P4 DIMM0 and P4 DIMM1

2 128-MB DIMMs

256 MB

MEM-GRP/LC-256=

1 Standard (default) DRAM DIMM configuration for the processor on a line card is 32 MB.

2 For this option, it is assumed that you already have one 32-MB DRAM DIMM installed in P4 DIMM0 and that you want to upgrade to 64 MB by adding a second 32-MB DRAM DIMM to P4 DIMM1.


Table 7-5 SDRAM DIMM Configurations Available for Cisco 12000 Series Line Cards

SDRAM DIMM Sockets for Receive (RX) or Transmit (TX) Buffers
DIMM Module
Memory Provided
Product Number

DIMM0 and DIMM1

2 8-MB DIMMs

16 MB

MEM-LC-PKT-16=1

DIMM0 and DIMM1

2 16-MB DIMMs

32 MB

MEM-LC-PKT-32=

DIMM0 and DIMM1

2 32-MB DIMMs

64 MB

MEM-LC-PKT-64=

DIMM0 and DIMM1

2 64-MB DIMMs

128 MB

MEM-LC-PKT-128=

1 Standard (default) SDRAM DIMM configuration for line card transmit and receive buffers is 16 MB.


Also ensure that you have the proper tools at hand and that you are wearing appropriate ESD-prevention equipment.

Removing a Line Card from the Router

This section presents the procedures for removing a line card from the router. The router supports online insertion and removal (OIR) of line cards; thus, you can remove and replace any line card while the system remains powered up and operational.


Note   When removing or installing a line card, be sure to use the ejector levers to properly unseat and reseat the card in the backplane connector.


To remove a line card from the router, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Put on an antistatic wrist strap and make sure that it makes adequate contact with your skin. Insert the equipment end of the wrist strap (the banana jack) into the ESD socket in the lower left corner of the upper card cage.

Step 2 Disconnect all network interface cables from the ports on the line card faceplate.

Step 3 Before you remove a line card from the router, you must first remove the vertical cable-management bracket attached to the line card faceplate. To do so, perform the following steps:

(a) Loosen the two captive installation screws at the top and bottom of the vertical cable-management bracket (see Figure 7-31).

(b) Detach the bracket from the line card and hook it in the cutout located on the front of the horizontal cable-management tray (above the upper card cage).


Note   Do not remove the network interface cables from the vertical cable-management bracket.


Step 4 Loosen the captive installation screw at the top and bottom of the line card faceplate (see a).

Step 5 Pivot the two card ejector levers out, away from the line card faceplate to unseat the card from the backplane (see b).

Figure 7-31 Removing Vertical Cable-Management Bracket from Line Card (Quad OC-3c/STM-1c POS Line Card Shown in Cisco 12012)

Step 6 Grasp the line card faceplate with one hand and pull the line card straight out of the slot, keeping your other hand under the line card to support its weight. Avoid touching the line card printed circuit board, its components, or its edge connector pins (see c).

Figure 7-32 Removing a Line Card from the Router (Quad OC-3c/STM-1c POS Line Card Shown Installed in a Cisco 12012)

Step 7 Place the removed line card on an antistatic mat or foam pad.

This completes the line card removal procedure. Proceed to the next section to remove the DRAM DIMMs from the line card.

Removing a DIMM from a Line Card

Line card memory consists of DRAM DIMMs for the line card's processor, as well as SDRAM DIMMs for the line card's transmit and receive buffers. The locations of the DIMM sockets for these two types of line card memory are shown in .

The following guidelines apply to line card processor DRAM:

The P4 DIMM0 socket must always be populated.

The P4 DIMM1 socket can remain empty.

The DRAM DIMMs must be 3.3-volt devices.

The following guidelines apply to line card transmit and receive buffer SDRAM:

All four DIMM sockets for SDRAM buffer memory must be populated.

Both DIMM sockets for a given buffer pair (either those for the transmit buffer or those for the receive buffer) must be populated with an SDRAM DIMM of the same size.

The size of the SDRAM DIMMs in the transmit buffer need not match the size of the SDRAM DIMMs in the receive buffer.

The SDRAM DIMMs must be 3.3-volt devices.


Caution   
To prevent system and memory problems, all DIMMs installed in the line card must be 3.3-volt devices.

To remove a DIMM from a line card, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Put on an antistatic wrist strap and attach the equipment end of the strap to the bare metal surface of the line card carrier.

Step 2 Position the line card on an antistatic mat so that the faceplate is nearest to you.

Step 3 Locate the DIMM sockets on the line card (see ).

Step 4 For the DIMM you want to remove, pull down the release lever on the DIMM socket (see ).

Step 5 As one end of the DIMM is released, grasp the top corners of the DIMM with the thumb and forefinger of each hand and pull the DIMM completely out of its socket.


Note   Handle the DIMM only by its top corners; do not touch the memory chips or the keyed insertion fingers along the bottom of the DIMM (see ).


Step 6 Immediately place the module in an antistatic bag to protect it from ESD damage.

Repeat Step 4 through Step 6 for any remaining DIMMs that you want to remove.


Note   If you are upgrading buffer memory, both DIMM sockets of a given pair (either the transmit buffer or the receive buffer) must be populated with an SDRAM DIMM of the same size.


Proceed to the following section to install new DIMMs in the line card.

Installing a New DIMM on a Line Card

To install new DRAM or SDRAM DIMMs in the Cisco 12008, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Put on an antistatic wrist strap and attach the equipment end of the strap to the bare metal surface of the line card carrier.

Step 2 Remove the new DIMM from its protective antistatic bag.

Step 3 Grasp the DIMM only by its top corners; do not touch the memory chips or the keyed insertion fingers along the bottom edge of the DIMM.

Step 4 To position the DIMM for insertion, orient it at the same angle as the DIMM socket. Note the two notches (keys) on the bottom edge of the module. These keys ensure proper registration of the DIMM in the socket.

Step 5 Gently insert the DIMM into the socket until the release lever is flush against the side of the socket. If necessary, rock the DIMM back and forth gently to ensure that it is fully seated.


Caution   
When inserting DIMMs into a socket, apply firm, but not excessive, pressure. If you damage a DIMM socket, you must return the line card to the supplier for repair.

Step 6 Verify that the release lever is flush against the side of the socket. If it is not, the DIMM might not be seated properly.

If the module appears misaligned, carefully remove it and reseat it, ensuring that the release lever is flush against the side of the DIMM socket.

Repeat this procedure for any remaining DIMM(s) that you want to install to complete your desired memory configuration.

Proceed to the following section to reinstall the line card in the router.

Reinstalling a Line Card in the Router

To reinstall a line card in your router, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Put on an antistatic wrist strap and make sure that it makes ample contact with your skin. Insert the equipment end of the wrist strap (the banana jack) into the ESD socket in the lower left corner of the upper card cage.

Step 2 Grasp the faceplate of the line card with one hand and place your free hand under the card carrier to support the weight of the card; position the card for insertion into the card cage slot.

Step 3 Gently insert the card into the slot until the card ejector levers make contact with the lip of the card cage.

Step 4 Grasp the card ejector levers at the top and bottom of the line card faceplate and pivot them inward until they are perpendicular to the faceplate. This action firmly seats the card in the backplane.

Step 5 Tighten the captive screws at the top and bottom of the line card faceplate.

Step 6 Replace the vertical cable-management bracket, as follows:

(a) Unhook the line card vertical cable-management bracket from the horizontal cable tray.

(b) Position the bracket over the front of the line card faceplate.

(c) Tighten the two captive screws at the top and bottom of the vertical cable-management bracket to secure it to the line card.

Step 7 Restore the network interface cables to their original ports on the line card faceplate.

Proceed to the next section to check the installation of the line card memory.

Checking the Installation of Line Card Memory

After installing the new line card memory, replace the card and turn on system power. The system should reboot properly.

If the system fails to boot properly after the upgrading of DRAM or SDRAM on the line card, or if the console terminal displays a checksum or memory error, ensure that the DRAM or SDRAM DIMMs are installed properly on the line card by performing the following steps:


Step 1 If necessary, shut the system down and remove the line card from the upper card cage, as previously described.

Step 2 Check the alignment of the DRAM and SDRAM DIMMs by looking at them across the horizontal plane of the card. The DIMMs should reside in their sockets at the same angle and be fully inserted into their respective sockets.

Step 3 If a DIMM is not correctly aligned, remove it and reinsert it.

Step 4 Reinstall the line card in the upper card cage as previously described, reboot the system, and perform another installation check.

If you have upgraded line card buffer memory, both DIMM sockets of a given pair of transmit (TX) or receive (RX) buffers must contain SDRAM DIMMs of the same size and speed; otherwise, the system will not operate properly. SDRAM DIMMs must operate at 60 ns or faster. The speed of the DIMM is printed along one of its edges.

If the system fails to restart properly after several attempts and you are unable to resolve the problem, contact your Cisco service representative for assistance. Before calling, however, make note of any console error messages, unusual LED states, or other system indications or behaviors that might help to resolve the problem.

The time that the system requires to initialize may vary with different router configurations and memory configurations. For example, a router with a larger complement of memory might take longer to boot.

Upgrading Memory on the RP

The Cisco 12000 Series Gigabit Switch Router Memory Replacement Instructions (78-4338-xx), which is available on-line and on the Cisco CDROM, contains the latest information about memory requirements and replacing memory on the Cisco 12000 series RPs and line cards. Refer to that document before replacing or adding memory to your RP or line card.

You can find the Cisco 12000 Series Gigabit Switch Router Memory replacement instructions at Cisco.com:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/core/cis12012/bfrcfig/4338bmem.htm