User Guide for Cisco Network Registrar, 7.1
Dashboard
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Server Status Dashboard

Table Of Contents

Server Status Dashboard

Opening the Dashboard

Display Types

Tables

Line Charts

Stacked Area Charts

Other Chart Types

Getting Help for the Dashboard Elements

Customizing the Display

Selecting Dashboard Elements to Include

Configuring Server Chart Types

Host Metrics

System Metrics

JVM Memory Utilization

DHCP Metrics

DHCP Server Request Activity

DHCP Server Response Activity

DHCP Buffer Capacity

DHCP Response Latency

DHCP DNS Updates

DHCP Address Current Utilization

DHCP Failover Status

DHCP General Indicators

DNS Metrics

DNS Query Responses

DNS Forwarding Errors

DNS Outbound Zone Transfers

DNS Inbound Zone Transfers

DNS Network Errors

DNS Related Servers Errors

DNS General Indicators


Server Status Dashboard


The Network Registrar server status dashboard in the web user interface (web UI) presents a graphical view of the system status, using graphs, charts, and tables, to help in tracking and diagnosis. These dashboard elements are designed to convey system information in an organized and consolidated way, and include:

Significant protocol server and other metrics

Alarms and alerts

Database inventories

Server health trends

The dashboard is best used in a troubleshooting desk context, where the system displaying the dashboard is dedicated for that purpose and might be distinct from the systems running the protocol servers. The dashboard system should point its browser to the system running the protocol servers.

You should interpret dashboard indicators in terms of deviations from your expected normal usage pattern. If you notice unusual spikes or drops in activity, there could be communication failures or power outages on the network that you need to investigate.

See Also

Opening the Dashboard
Display Types
Customizing the Display
Selecting Dashboard Elements to Include
Host Metrics
DHCP Metrics
DNS Metrics

Opening the Dashboard

Open the separate server status dashboard window by clicking Dashboard in the top right corner of the web UI page, between Help and Logout, in Basic, Advanced, and Expert mode.

Display Types

Provided you have DHCP and DNS privileges through administrator roles assigned to you, the preset display of the dashboard consists of the following tables (see Figure 3-1 for an example):

System Metrics—See the "System Metrics" section.

DHCP General Indicators—See the "DHCP General Indicators" section.

DNS General Indicators—See the "DNS General Indicators" section.


Tip These are just the preset selections. See the "Selecting Dashboard Elements to Include" section for other dashboard elements you can select. The dashboard retains your selections from session to session.


Figure 3-1 Preset Dashboard Elements

Each dashboard element initially appears as a table or a specific chart type, depending on the element:

Table—See the "Tables" section.

Line chart—See the "Line Charts" section.

Stacked area chart—See the "Stacked Area Charts" section.

General Status Indicators

Note the green box next to each dashboard element name in Figure 3-1. This box indicates that the server sourcing the information is functioning normally. A yellow box indicates that server operation is less than optimum. A red box indicates that the server is down. These indicators are the same as for the server health on the Manage Servers page in the regular web UI.

Graphic Indicators for Levels of Alert

Graphed lines and stacked areas in the charts follow a standard color and visual coding so that you can immediately determine key diagnostic indicators at a glance. The charts use the following color and textural indicators:

High alerts or warnings—Lines or areas in red, with a hatched texture.

All other indicators—Lines or areas in various other colors distinguish the data elements. The charts do not use green or yellow.

Magnifying and Converting Charts

If Magnified Chart is the selected Chart Link (see Figure 3-5), you can magnify a chart in a separate window by clicking the chart. In magnified chart view, you can choose an alternative chart type from the one that comes up initially (see the "Other Chart Types" section).


Note Automatic refresh is turned off for magnified charts (see the "Setting the Polling Interval" section). To get the most recent data, click the Refresh icon () next to the word Dashboard at the top left of the page.


To convert a chart to a table, see the "Displaying Charts as Tables" section. You cannot convert tables to a graphic chart format.

Legends

Each chart initially includes a color-coded legend. To turn off the legend display on the main dashboard page, see the "Displaying or Hiding Chart Legends" section. Removing the legend renders the graphic chart size relatively larger, which can be helpful if you have many charts displayed. You cannot remove legends in magnified views.

Tables

Dashboard elements rendered as tables have data displayed in rows and columns. The following dashboard elements are preset to consist of (or include) tables:

System Metrics

DHCP DNS Updates

DHCP Address Current Utilization

DHCP Failover Status

DHCP General Indicators

DNS General Indicators


Note (See Figure 3-1 for examples.) If you view a table in Expert mode, additional data might appear.


Line Charts

Dashboard elements rendered as line charts can include one or more lines plotted against the x and y axes. The three types of line charts are described in Table 3-1.

Table 3-1 Line Chart Types

Type of Line Chart
Description
Dashboard Elements Rendered

Raw data line chart

Lines plotted against raw data.

Java Virtual Machine (JVM) Memory Utilization (Expert mode only)

DHCP Buffer Capacity (see Figure 3-2)

DHCP Failover Status (two charts)

DNS Network Errors

DNS Related Servers Errors

Delta line chart

Lines plotted against the difference between two sequential raw data.

DNS Inbound Zone Transfers

DNS Outbound Zone Transfers

Rate line chart

Lines plotted against the difference between two sequential raw data divided by the sample time between them.

DHCP Server Request Activity

DHCP Server Response Activity

DHCP Response Latency

DNS Query Responses

DNS Forwarding Errors



Tip To get the raw data for a chart that shows delta or rate data, enter Expert mode, set the Chart Link to Data Table (see the "Displaying Charts as Tables" section), then click the chart. The Raw Data table is below the Chart Data table.


Figure 3-2 Line Chart Example

Stacked Area Charts

Dashboard elements rendered as stacked area charts have multiple related metrics plotted as trend charts, but stacked one on top of the other, so that the highest point represents a cumulative value. The values are independently shaded in contrasting colors. (See Figure 3-3 for an example of the DHCP Buffer Capacity chart shown in Figure 3-2 rendered as a stacked area chart.)

Figure 3-3 Stacked Area Chart Example

They are stacked in the order listed in the legend, the left-most legend item at the bottom of the stack and the right-most legend item at the top of the stack. In Figure 3-3, for example, the Requests in Use appear at the bottom of the stack and the Responses in Use appear at the top of the stack.

The dashboard elements that are pre-set to stacked area charts are:

DHCP Server Request Activity

DHCP Server Response Activity

DHCP Response Latency

Other Chart Types

The other chart types available for you to choose are:

Line—One of the line charts described in Table 3-1.

Stacked Area—Charts described in the "Stacked Area Charts" section.

Pie—Shows a single percentage pie chart of the data averaged over the time sampled.

3D Pie—Three-dimensional rendering of the pie chart.

Bar—Multiple related current value metrics plotted side by side as groups of bars that show the actual data sampled.

3D Bar—Three-dimensional rendering of the bar chart.

Stacked Bar—Addition total of the actual samples. This chart shows more distinct data points than the stacked area chart.


Tip Each chart type shows the data in distinct ways and in different interpretations. You can decide which type best suits your needs.


Getting Help for the Dashboard Elements

You can open a help window for each dashboard element by clicking the title of the element. In magnified view, click Chart Help.

Customizing the Display

To customize the dashboard display, you can:

Refresh the data and set an automatic refresh interval.

Expand a chart and render it in a different format.

Convert a graphic chart to a table.

Download data to comma-separated value (CSV) output.

Display or hide chart legends.

Configure server chart types.

Refreshing Displays

Refresh each display so that it picks up the most recent polling by clicking the Refresh icon ().

Setting the Polling Interval

You can set how often to poll for data. In the upper-left corner of the dashboard display are the controls for the polling interval of the cached data, which polls the protocol servers for updates. (See Figure 3-4.)

Figure 3-4 Setting the Chart Polling Interval

You can set the cached data polling (hence, automatic refresh) interval to:

Disabled—Does not poll, therefore does not automatically refresh the data.

Slow—Refreshes the data every 30 seconds.

Medium—Refreshes the data every 20 seconds.

Fast (the preset value)—Refreshes the data every 10 seconds.

Displaying Charts as Tables

You can choose to display a graphic chart as a table when you magnify the chart by clicking it (see the "Magnifying and Converting Charts" section). At the middle of the top of the dashboard display are the controls for the chart links (see Figure 3-5).

Figure 3-5 Specifying Chart Conversion to Table Format

Click the Data Table radio button. When you click the chart itself, it opens as a table. The preset display format is Magnified Chart.

Exporting to CSV Format

You can dump the chart data to a comma-separated value (CSV) file (such as a spreadsheet) when you magnify the chart by clicking it. In the Chart Link controls at the top of the page (see Figure 3-5), click the CSV Export radio button, then click the chart. A Save As window appears, where you can specify the name and location of the CSV file.

Displaying or Hiding Chart Legends

You can include or exclude the color-coded legends for charts on the main dashboard page. You might want to remove the legends as you become more familiar with the data and track it on a slightly larger chart display. In the upper-right of the dashboard display are the controls for the legend display (see Figure 3-6). The preset value is Visible.

Figure 3-6 Displaying or Hiding Chart Legends and Selecting Chart

Selecting Dashboard Elements to Include

You can decide how many dashboard elements you want to display on the page. At times, you might want to focus on one server activity only, such as for the DHCP server, and exclude all other metrics for the other servers. In this way, the dashboard becomes less crowded, the elements are larger and more readable. At other times, you might want an overview of all server activities, with a resulting smaller element display.

You can select the dashboard elements to display from the main Dashboard page by clicking Chart Selections in the upper right corner of the page (see Figure 3-6). Clicking the link opens the Chart Selection page (see Figure 3-7).

Configuring Server Chart Types

You can set the default chart types on the main dashboard view. You can customize the server charts in the dashboard to display only the specific chart types as default.

To set up default chart type, check the check box corresponding to the Metrics chart that you want to display and choose a chart type from the Chart Type drop-down list. The default chart types are consistent and shared across different user sessions (see Figure 3-7).


Tip The order in which the dashboard elements appear in the Chart Selection list does not necessarily determine the order in which the elements will appear on the page. An algorithm that considers the available space determines the order and size in a grid layout. The layout might be different each time you submit the dashboard element selections.


Figure 3-7 Selecting Dashboard Elements

To change selections, check the check box next to the dashboard element that you want to display. Specific group controls are available in the upper-right corner of the page. To:

Uncheck all check boxes, click None.

Revert to the preset selections, click Default. The preset dashboard elements for administrator roles supporting DHCP and DNS are:

Host Metrics: System Metrics (see the "Host Metrics" section)

DHCP Metrics: General Indicators

DNS Metrics: General Indicators

Choose the DHCP metrics only, click DHCP (see the "DHCP Metrics" section).

Choose the DNS metrics only, click DNS (see the "DNS Metrics" section).

Choose all the dashboard elements, click All.

Click Submit at the top left of the page to submit your choices, or Cancel at the bottom of the page.

Host Metrics

Host metrics comprise two charts:

System Metrics—See the "System Metrics" section.

JVM Memory Utilization (available in Expert mode only)—See the "JVM Memory Utilization" section.

System Metrics

The System Metrics dashboard element shows the free space on the disk volumes where the Network Registrar logs and database directories are located, the date and time of the last server backup, and CPU and memory usage for the various servers. System metrics are available if you choose Host Metrics: System Metrics in the Chart Selection list.

The resulting table shows:

Logs Volume—Current free space out of the total space on the disk drive where the logs directory is located, with the equivalent percentage of free space.

Database Volume—Current free space out of the total space on the disk drive where the data directory is located, with the equivalent percentage of free space.

Last Good Backup—Date and time when the last successful shadow database backup occurred (or Not Done if it did not yet occur) since the server agent was last started.

CPU Utilization (in seconds), Memory Utilization (in kilobytes), and (in Expert mode only) the VM Utilization (in kilobytes) and Process ID (PID) for the:

Network Registrar server agent

CCM server

DNS server

DHCP server

Web server

Router Interface Configuration (RIC) server

SNMP server

How to Interpret the Data

The System Metrics data shows how full your disk volumes are getting based on the available free space for the Network Registrar logs and data volumes. It also shows if you had a last successful backup of the data files and when that occurred. Finally, it shows how much of the available CPU and memory the Network Registrar servers are using. The difference in the memory and VM utilization values is:

Memory Utilization—Physical memory that a process uses, or roughly equivalent to the Resident Set Size (RSS) value in UNIX ps command output, or to the Task Manager Mem Usage value in Windows: the number of pages the process has in real memory minus administrative usage. This value includes only the pages that count toward text, data, or stack space, but not those demand-loaded in or swapped out.

VM Utilization—Virtual memory that a process uses, or roughly equivalent to the SZ value in UNIX ps command output, or to the Task Manager VM Size value in Windows: the in-memory pages plus the page files and demand-zero pages, but not usually the memory-mapped files. This value is useful in diagnosing how large a process is and if it continues to grow.

Troubleshooting Based on the Results

If you notice the free disk space decreasing for the logs or data directory, you might want to consider increasing the disk capacity or look at the programs you are running concurrently with Network Registrar.

JVM Memory Utilization

The Java Virtual Machine (JVM) Memory Utilization dashboard element is available only when you are in Expert mode. It is rendered as a line trend chart that traces the Unused Maximum, Free, and Used bytes of JVM memory. The chart is available if you choose Host Metrics: JVM Memory Utilization in the Chart Selection list when you are in Expert mode.

How to Interpret the Data

The JVM Memory Utilization data shows how much memory applies to running the dashboard in your browser. If you see the Used byte data spiking, dashboard elements might be using too much memory.

Troubleshooting Based on the Results

If you see spikes in Used memory data, check your browser settings or adjust the polling interval to poll for data less frequently.

DHCP Metrics

These DHCP metric elements are available in the dashboard:

DHCP Server Request Activity—See the "DHCP Server Request Activity" section.

DHCP Server Response Activity—See the "DHCP Server Response Activity" section.

DHCP Buffer Capacity—See the "DHCP Buffer Capacity" section.

DHCP Response Latency—See the "DHCP Response Latency" section.

DHCP DNS Update Activity—See the "DHCP DNS Updates" section.

DHCP Address Utilization—See the "DHCP Address Current Utilization" section.

DHCP Failover Status—See the "DHCP Failover Status" section.

DHCP General Indicators—See the "DHCP General Indicators" section.

DHCP Server Request Activity

The DHCP Server Request Activity dashboard element rendered as a stacked area chart traces the totals in the change rate of incoming DHCP packet activity. The chart is available if you choose DHCP Metrics: DHCP Server Request Activity in the Chart Selection list.

The resulting stacked area chart plots the following trends:

V4 Discovers—Number of DHCPv4 discover packets.

V4 Requests—Number of DHCPv4 request packets.

V4 Other—Number of DHCPv4 release, decline, or info-request packets.

V4 Lease Queries—Number of DHCPv4 lease query packets.

V6 Solicits—Number of DHCPv6 solicit packets.

V6 Requests/Renews/Rebinds—Number of DHCPv6 request, renew, and rebind packets.

V6 Other—Number of DHCPv6 release, decline, or information-request packets.

V6 Lease Queries—Number of DHCPv6 lease query packets.

Invalid Packets—Combined number of invalid DHCPv4 and DHCPv6 packets.

How to Interpret the Data

The DHCP Server Request Activity data shows the pattern of server traffic based on incoming DHCP requests. The trend should be fairly consistent, with spikes in the number of Invalid packets being a sign that there is some misconfigured data on the network. Note that DHCPv4 and DHCPv6 invalid packet activity is grouped together.

Troubleshooting Based on the Results

Check your DHCP server configurations if there is a sudden spike in activity, especially in the number of invalid request packets. Set your server logging to report where the activity is occurring. Spikes or drops in activity can indicate network or power outages that are worth investigating. Spikes in activity can also indicate a faulty client, malicious client activity, or a recovery after a power failure or outage that results in pent-up requests.

DHCP Server Response Activity

The DHCP Server Response Activity dashboard element rendered as a stacked area chart traces the totals in the change rate of outgoing DHCP packet activity. The chart is available if you choose DHCP Metrics: DHCP Server Response Activity in the Chart Selection list.

The resulting stacked area chart plots the following trends:

V4 Offers—Number of DHCPv4 offer packets.

V4 Acks—Number of DHCPv4 acknowledgment packets.

V4 Other Client—Number of other outgoing DHCPv4 client packets.

V4 Lease Queries—Number of outgoing DHCPv4 lease query packets.

V6 Advertises—Number of DHCPv6 advertise packets.

V6 Replies—Number of DHCPv6 reply packets.

V6 Reconfigures—Number of DHCPv6 reconfigure packets.

V6 Lease Query Replies—Number of DHCPv6 lease query reply packets.

Total Dropped—Combined number of dropped DHCPv4 and DHCPv6 packets.

How to Interpret the Data

The DHCP Server Response Activity data shows the pattern of server traffic to answer DHCP requests. The trend should be fairly consistent, with spikes in the number of Total Dropped packets being a sign that there is some misconfigured data on the network. Note that DHCPv4 and DHCPv6 dropped packet activity is grouped together.

Troubleshooting Based on the Results

Check your DHCP server configurations if there is a sudden spike in activity, especially in the number of total dropped response packets. The response activity should match the request activity, except for the normal time shift, and the same diagnostics apply.

DHCP Buffer Capacity

The DHCP Buffer Capacity dashboard element rendered as a table shows the number of allocated requests and responses, and a line chart that plots the number of requests and responses in use. The element is available if you choose DHCP Metrics: DHCP Buffer Capacity in the Chart Selection list.

The resulting table and line chart plots:

Requests in Use—Trend in the number of in-use request buffers.

Responses in Use—Trend in the number of in-use response buffers.

How to Interpret the Data

The DHCP Buffer Capacity data shows the pattern in the use of DHCP request and response buffers. If the buffers begin to increase in an abnormal pattern, there are measures you can take without trying to compensate by increasing the number of allocated buffers.

Troubleshooting Based on the Results

If you see increasing and consistent exceeding of the buffer threshold, find the reason why the server is running slowly. Possible reasons include high degrees of logging, slow DHCP extensions or LDAP servers, or overload, such as with chatty clients or frequent rebooting of cable modem termination systems (CMTSs). You might need to increase the buffer sizes.

DHCP Response Latency

The DHCP Response Latency dashboard element rendered as a stacked area chart shows the trend in the response packet latency (the time interval between the request packet and its ensuing response). The chart is available if you choose DHCP Metrics: DHCP Response Latency in the Chart Selection list.


Tip You must also set the collect-sample-counters DHCP server attribute for this data to display, with the enhanced-sample-counters attribute also set for further granularity. These attribute values are preset. If you are concerned about achieving maximum performance, unset these attributes. (See the "Displaying Statistics" section on page 7-13.)


The resulting stacked area chart plots response latencies at the intervals:

Less than 50 milliseconds

50 to 200 milliseconds

200 to 500 milliseconds

500 to 1000 milliseconds (note that if the enhanced-sample-counters attribute is not set, all values below 1 second appear in this grouping)

1 to 2 seconds

2 to 3 seconds

3 to 4 seconds

More than 4 seconds

How to Interpret the Data

The chart shows the trend in response packet latency as an indicator of how long it takes to respond to incoming packets. The gradations in the latency periods are stacked.

Troubleshooting Based on the Results

High response packet latency is similar to high buffer usage for troubleshooting purposes. Look for slow LDAP servers or DHCP extensions, high levels of logging, or disk I/O bottlenecks.

DHCP DNS Updates

The DHCP DNS Updates dashboard element rendered as a table shows the related DNS server and its current state, and how many pending DNS updates are occurring between it and the DHCP server. The table is available if you choose DHCP Metrics: DHCP DNS Updates in the Chart Selection list.

The resulting table shows:

Server—Related DNS server IP address

State—Related DNS server state

Pending Updates—Total number of pending updates

How to Interpret the Data

A high level of pending updates to a specific DNS server indicates that the server is unreachable or unavailable, or its address is wrong.

Troubleshooting Based on the Results

Check into the reachability of the associated DNS servers if the pending update rate spikes, or ensure that the address of the associated server is correct.

DHCP Address Current Utilization

The DHCP Address Current Utilization dashboard element rendered as a table shows the DHCPv4 address utilization (how many assigned addresses exist) for a particular address aggregation, which can be a scope, network, or network plus selection tag. The table is available if you choose DHCP Metrics: DHCP Address Current Utilization in the Chart Selection list.

The resulting table shows:

Name—Aggregation name (or address).

In Use—Number of in-use addresses.

Total—Total number of addresses.

Utilization—Percentage of utilized addresses.

Mode (appears in Expert mode only)—Aggregation mode (scope, network, or selection-tags).

How to Interpret the Data

The chart shows a table with four columns: the scope name, its in-use and total addresses, and the percentage of address utilization based on the previous two columns. The chart is available only if the DHCP server enhanced-sample-counters attribute is enabled.

If an SNMP trap configuration in scope mode applies, the Name column displays the scope name. Otherwise, it shows the network IP address.

If traps are not enabled (or if the DHCP server default-free-address-config or v6-default-free-address-config attribute is not set), the network address is appended with an asterisk (*).

If a selection tag applies, its name is also appended. See the "Handling SNMP Notification Events" section on page 1-7 for details on SNMP traps.

If you do not define a default-free-address-config (or v6-default-free-address-config) attribute, Network Registrar creates an internal, unlisted trap configuration named default-aggregation-addr-trap-config.

Because of this, do not use the name default-aggregation-addr-trap-config for a trap configuration you create.

Troubleshooting Based on the Results

If the percentage of utilized addresses is high, the addresses reached a saturation point. It might be necessary to reassign addresses from a different scope.

DHCP Failover Status

The DHCP Failover Status dashboard element rendered as two parallel trend charts that show the current and partner server state and the binding updates and acknowledgments sent and received between the two failover partners. The charts are available if you choose DHCP Metrics: DHCP Failover Status in the Chart Selection list.


Note The failover status is only for the first failover pair in the related servers list.


The display is a table along with two rate line trend charts that shows the failover status for the first failover pair for the related servers:

Local State—Local DHCP server failover state along with when it occurred.

Partner State—Partner server failover state along with when it occurred.

DHCP Failover Status Updates Received—The first trend chart shows a comparison of the number of binding updates received and binding acknowledgments sent.

DHCP Failover Status Updates Sent—The second trend chart shows a comparison of the number of binding updates sent and binding acknowledgments received.

How to Interpret the Data

Along with some state data, the display is split into two line trend charts that are inverses of each other. Each chart compares the binding updates with the acknowledgments. The top chart pairs the binding updates received with the acknowledgments sent; the bottom chart pairs the binding updates sent with the acknowledgments received.

Troubleshooting Based on the Results

If the Partner State value is other than 10, check the configuration of the partner server. The updates sent and received data should also be fairly level.

DHCP General Indicators

The DHCP General Indicators dashboard element rendered as a table shows the server state, reload data, and lease counts. The table is available if you choose DHCP Metrics: DHCP General Indicators in the Chart Selection list.

The resulting table shows:

Server State—Up or Down (based on whether statistics are available) and its duration.

Last Reload—Date and time of the last server reload.

Start Time—Date and time of the last server process (Network Registrar server agent) startup.

Total Scopes—Total number of configured DHCPv4 scopes.

V4 Leased Leases—Number of active DHCPv4 leases, including reservations.

V4 Configured Leases—Number of configured DHCPv4 leases, including reservations and ranges.

Total Prefixes—Number of configured DHCPv6 prefixes.

V6 Leased Leases—Number of active DHCPv6 leases, including reservations and delegated prefixes (which each count as one lease).

V6 Allocated Leases—Number of allocated DHCPv6 leases, including reservations and delegated prefixes (which each count as one lease).

How to Interpret the Data

The table indicates the server state, process start time (via the Network Registrar server agent), and reload data, and also provides lease statistics. The top set of data compares the DHCPv4 leases actually in effect with those configured; the bottom set of data does the same for DHCPv6 leases.

Time of last reload is important for determining if recent changes to the server configuration occurred from a reload operation. It can also help pinpoint when server changes were last applied, if other indicators show a marked, unexpected behavioral change. Be sure to preserve log files since the last reload.

Troubleshooting Based on the Results

A drop or increase in leases might indicate a power or network outage, but it can also indicate a normal variation depending on lease times and usage patterns. The number of scopes or prefixes indicated might also require some evaluation and possible reconfiguration. If the server state is Down, all the DHCP chart indicators show a red status box, so no data will be available. In the case of a server that is down, restart the server.

DNS Metrics

These DNS metric elements are available in the dashboard:

DNS Query Responses—See the "DNS Query Responses" section.

DNS Forwarding Errors—See the "DNS Forwarding Errors" section.

DNS Outbound Zone Transfers—See the "DNS Outbound Zone Transfers" section.

DNS Inbound Zone Transfers—See the "DNS Inbound Zone Transfers" section.

DNS Network Errors—See the "DNS Network Errors" section.

DNS Related Servers Errors—See the "DNS Related Servers Errors" section.

DNS General Indicators—See the "DNS General Indicators" section.

DNS Query Responses

The DNS Query Responses dashboard element rendered as a stacked area chart traces the totals in the change rate of the number of responses answered from memory and the cache database, and forwarded to other DNS servers. The display is available if you choose DNS Metrics: DNS Query Responses in the Chart Selection list.

The resulting stacked area chart plots the following trends:

Memory—Number of DNS queries answered entirely from in-memory cache.

Cache DB—Number of queries answered from the cache database.

Forwarding—Number of queries answered by having been forwarded to other servers.

How to Interpret the Data

This chart shows how the local DNS server responds to incoming queries, whether from memory or the cache database, or if the server forwards the queries. The rates of change of these values are identified separately, but stacked as a total in the chart. Because the responses from memory are the fastest, you should see a steady state or even increasing rate in the number of queries that the server responds to from memory. The queries answered from the cache database on disk, and especially those forwarded to other servers, result in less efficient responses, so the Cache DB and Forwarding rates should not be increasing.

Troubleshooting Based on the Results

The server should use memory cache as much as possible in responding to queries. Increasing rates of cache database reads and forwarded queries can indicate that not enough space is available in memory to store the cached queries for more efficient responses.

DNS Forwarding Errors

The DNS Forwarding Errors dashboard element rendered as a stacked area chart traces timeouts, lame delegations, and dropped forwarded queries. The chart is available if you choose DNS Metrics: DNS Forwarding Errors in the Chart Selection list.

The resulting stacked area chart plots the following trends:

Timeouts—Number of queries timed out with no responses.

Lame Delegations—Number of queries encountering lame delegation from remote servers.

Dropped—Number of dropped forwarded queries.

How to Interpret the Data

This chart indicates the health of any forwarded queries as consolidated stacked data. The most significant data is the number of dropped forwarded queries. Also significant, although not as critical, is the number of timed-out forwarded queries. Lame delegations are relatively easy to fix.

Troubleshooting Based on the Results

Check your DNS configuration if spikes or increases occur in timeouts, dropped packets, or lame delegations.

DNS Outbound Zone Transfers

The DNS Outbound Zone Transfers dashboard element rendered as a stacked area chart tracks the rate of change in full and incremental outbound zone transfer responses, and any associated errors. The chart is available if you choose DNS Metrics: DNS Outbound Zone Transfers in the Chart Selection list.

The resulting stacked area chart plots the following trends:

Full Responses—Number of full outbound zone transfers (AXFRs out).

Incremental Responses—Number of incremental outbound zone transfers (IXFRs out).

Authorization Errors—Number of unauthorized (refused) zone transfer requests.

Exceed Max Transfers Out—Number of failed outbound transfers that exceed the maximum limit.

Other Errors—Number of other outbound transfer errors that are not authorization errors.

How to Interpret the Data

This chart is useful in gauging if outbound zone transfers to a secondary DNS server are occurring as predicted and if there are any authorizations or failed transfer attempts in the process. The most significant indicator is the trend in the number of outbound zone transfers denied for lack of permission or for not being authorized for the zone.

Troubleshooting Based on the Results

Check the primary and secondary server configurations if there are errors or exceeded limits in the outbound zone transfers.

DNS Inbound Zone Transfers

The DNS Inbound Zone Transfers dashboard element rendered as a stacked area chart tracks the rate of change in full and incremental inbound zone transfer responses, and any associated errors. The chart is available if you choose DNS Metrics: DNS Inbound Zone Transfers in the Chart Selection list.

The resulting stacked area chart plots the following trends:

Full Responses—Number of full inbound zone transfers (AXFRs in).

Incremental Responses—Number of incremental inbound zone transfers (IXFRs in).

Authorization Errors—Number of refused responses (xfer-in-auth-errors).

Failed Attempts—Number of failures other than refusals (xfer-failed-attempts).

Exceed Max Transfers In—Number of times that the concurrent inbound transfers reach the maximum limit.

How to Interpret the Data

This chart is useful in gauging if inbound zone transfers to a secondary DNS server are occurring as predicted and if there are any authentication or failed transfer attempts in the process. The most significant indicator is the trend in the number of inbound zone transfers denied for lack of permission, for not being authorized for the zone, or for other reasons.

Troubleshooting Based on the Results

Check the primary and secondary server configurations if there are errors or exceeded limits in the inbound zone transfers.

DNS Network Errors

The DNS Network Errors dashboard element rendered as a line chart tracks the rate of change in DNS server network errors. The chart is available if you choose DNS Metrics: DNS Network Errors in the Chart Selection list.

The resulting line chart plots the following trends:

Query Error Packets/Query Responses—Ratio of query error packets over responses. Responses consist of:

Authoritative

Authoritative no-such-name

Authoritative no-such-data

Nonauthoritative

Nonauthoritative no-such-data

Requests refused

Non Error Dropped Packets/Query Responses—Ratio of nonerror dropped packets (queries dropped) over responses.

Update Errors/Updates—Ratio of DNS Update errors over total updates.

How to Interpret the Data

This chart indicates query and response errors as an indication of the health of the server.

Troubleshooting Based on the Results

Check the DNS server network configuration if errors are increasing.

DNS Related Servers Errors

The DNS Related Servers Errors dashboard element rendered as a line chart tracks the rate of change in DNS related server errors. The chart is available if you choose DNS Metrics: DNS Related Servers Errors in the Chart Selection list.

The resulting line chart plots the following trends:

Referral Timeouts/Referrals—Ratio of referral timeouts over referrals.

Failed Responses/Total Incoming Zone Transfer Requests—Ratio of failed responses over incoming zone transfer requests.

TSIG Errors/TSIG Attempts—Ratio of transaction signature (TSIG) errors (bad times, keys, or signatures) over total TSIG attempts (successfully received packets).

How to Interpret the Data

This chart indicates the health of connections and data transfers with related DNS servers. All three chart lines can have diagnostic significance.

Troubleshooting Based on the Results

Check the configurations and connectivity of the related servers in HA DNS relationships if errors are increasing.

DNS General Indicators

The DNS General Indicators dashboard element rendered as a table shows the server state, its last and startup reload time, the number of zones per server, and the total resource record (RR) count. The table is available if you choose DNS Metrics: DNS General Indicators in the Chart Selection list.

The resulting table shows:

Server State—Up or Down (based on whether statistics are available), and how long the server has been in this state.

Last Reload—How long since the last server reload.

Start Time—Date and time of the last server process (Network Registrar server agent) startup.

Total Zones—Number of configured zones.

Total RRs—Number of resource records.

How to Interpret the Data

The data in this chart shows general server health and operational duration. The objective is to make decisions about the server, such as whether it might be time for another reload, perhaps warranted by the number of configured zones.

Troubleshooting Based on the Results

If the server state is Down, all the DNS chart indicators show a red status box, so no data will be available. In the case of a server that is down, restart the server. The number of zones indicated might also require some evaluation and possible reconfiguration.