Wide-Area Networking Configuration Guide: Wide-Area Application Services, Cisco IOS Release 15.1M&T
Configuring WAAS Express
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Configuring WAAS Express

Table Of Contents

Configuring WAAS Express

Finding Feature Information

Contents

Prerequisites for WAAS Express

WAAS Express Licensing

Restrictions for WAAS Express

Information About WAAS Express

WAAS Express Overview

Traffic Optimization Process

Key Services of WAAS Express

Transport Flow Optimization

Compression

Auto-discovery of WAAS Devices

WAAS Application Policies

How to Configure WAAS Express

Configuring WAN Optimization Parameters

Defining WAAS Express Policies

Defining Class maps

Examples

What to Do Next

Associating Class maps to Policy maps

Examples

Troubleshooting Tips

What to Do Next

Enabling WAAS Express

Troubleshooting Tips

Configuration Examples for WAAS Express

Configuring WAAS Express: Example

Additional References

Related Documents

Standards

MIBs

RFCs

Technical Assistance

Feature Information for WAAS Express


Configuring WAAS Express


First Published: October 15, 2010
Last Updated: October 29, 2010

This module describes Cisco's WAAS Express software, which interoperates with WAN optimization headend applications from Cisco. WAAS Express improves WAN access and use by optimizing applications that require high bandwidth or are bound to a LAN, such as backup.

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest feature information and caveats, see the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the "Feature Information for WAAS Express" section.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to http://www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Contents

Prerequisites for WAAS Express

Restrictions for WAAS Express

Information About WAAS Express

How to Configure WAAS Express

Configuration Examples for WAAS Express

Additional References

Feature Information for WAAS Express

Prerequisites for WAAS Express

WAAS Express requires version 4.2.1 or higher installed on Cisco Network Module (NME) and Wide-area Application Engines (WAE).

WAAS Express Licensing

You must have a valid license for WAAS Express. The WAAS Express software includes a trial license for 60 days. WAAS Express switches into the following modes based on the available memory on the router

WAAS_Standard—WAAS Express operates on this mode if maximum memory is available on the router.

WAAS_Trial_Limited—WAAS Express operates on this mode if default memory is available on the router.

WAAS_Disabled—WAAS Express operates on this mode if less than default memory is available on the router.


Note The maximum and default memory depend on the router.


Restrictions for WAAS Express

In Cisco 1905 and 1921 routers, DRE is disabled because the maximum memory in these routers is 512 Mb.

WAAS Express does not support the following:

Data Redundancy Elimination (DRE) encoding

Dual WAN interfaces.

The maximum number of concurrent connections optimized by WAAS Express depends on the platform.

You cannot define a user-defined map of type waas.

WAAS Express accepts Selective Acknowledgement (SACK) notifications but does not generate SACK.

WAAS Express interoperates with the following features and may work with features not mentioned in the list:

Dynamic Multipoint VPN (DMVPN)

Zone-based Firewall

Virtual tunnel interfaces (VTI)

Network address translation (NAT)

Quality of service (QoS)

Flexible NetFlow


Note If WAAS Express and cryptomaps are configured on the same WAN interface and Flexible NetFlow is also configured to collect the WAAS Express flow information, Flexible NetFlow only collects small packets of the WAAS Express flows and does not report flows that are marked optimized and consumed by WAAS Express.


The following WAAS Express license restrictions apply:

Low memory is not available in permanent license.

WAAS_Trial_Limited:

Operates on limited flows and DRE memory and does not support IO resizing.

Information About WAAS Express

This section contains the following topics:

WAAS Express Overview

Traffic Optimization Process

Key Services of WAAS Express

WAAS Application Policies

WAAS Express Overview

Cisco WAN optimization system consists of WAAS Express (WE) routers and Wide-area Application Engines (WAEs) that work together to optimize TCP traffic in your network. When client and server applications attempt to communicate with each other, the network intercepts the traffic and acts on behalf of the client application and the destination server. The WE and WAEs examine the traffic and use built-in application policies to determine whether the traffic in the network can be optimized.

WAAS Express helps enterprises meet the following objectives:

Complements the Cisco WAN optimization system by adding the capability to the branch routers.

Provide branch office employees with LAN-like access to information and applications across a geographically distributed network.

Minimize unnecessary WAN bandwidth consumption through the use of advanced compression algorithms.

Virtualize print and other local services to branch office users.

Improve application performance over the WAN by addressing the following common issues:

Low data rates (constrained bandwidth)

Slow delivery of frames (high network latency)

Higher rates of packet loss (low reliability)

Table 1 describes how WAAS Express uses TCP optimization techniques to overcome the most common challenges associated with transporting traffic over a WAN.

Table 1 WAAS Express Solution

WAN Issue
WAAS Solution

Constrained bandwidth

Data caching provided with the file services feature and data compression reduces the amount of data sent over the WAN, which increases data transfer rates. These solutions improve total transaction time on congested links by reducing the amount of data sent across the WAN.

Packet loss

The optimized TCP stack in WAAS overcomes the issues associated with high packet loss and protects communicating endpoints from the state of the WAN.<<protects what>>


Traffic Optimization Process

The following steps describe how a WAAS Express-enabled network optimizes connections between the branch office client and destination server:

1. A branch office client attempts to connect to the destination server over the native application port.

2. The branch client intercepts the traffic.

3. The branch client performs the following actions:

Examines the parameters in the traffic's TCP headers and then refers to the application policies to determine if the intercepted traffic should be optimized. Information in the TCP header, such as the source and destination IP address, allows the branch client to match the traffic to an application policy. For a list of the default policies, see the "WAAS Application Policies" section.

Negotiates with the data-center WAE whether the traffic must be optimized.

Based on the negotiation, if the branch client determines that the traffic should be optimized, it adds information to the TCP header that informs the next client in the network path to optimize the traffic.

4. The branch client passes along the client request through the network to its original destination server.

5. The data center WAE performs the following actions:

Intercepts the traffic going to the destination server.

Establishes an optimized connection with the branch. If the data center WAE has optimization disabled, then an optimized connection is not established and the traffic passes over the network unoptimized.

6. WAAS optimizes subsequent traffic between the branch and data center WAE depending on the connection type.

WAAS Express does not optimize traffic in the following situations:

WAAS Express is overloaded and does not have resources to optimize traffic.

The WAE intercepts non-TCP traffic, such as Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP).

The WAE is overloaded and does not have the resources to optimize the traffic.

The intercepted traffic matches an application policy that specifies to pass the traffic through unoptimized.


Note If unoptimized traffic reaches a WAE, the WAE forwards the traffic in pass-through mode without affecting the performance of the application using the passed-through connection.


Key Services of WAAS Express

The following sections describe WAAS Express services that help optimize traffic over your WAN:

Transport Flow Optimization

Compression

Auto-discovery of WAAS Devices

Transport Flow Optimization

WAAS Express uses the transport flow optimization (TFO) features described in the following sections to optimize traffic intercepted by the WAAS devices. TFO protects communicating clients and servers from negative WAN conditions, such as bandwidth constraints, packet loss, congestion, and retransmission.

Windows Scaling

Selective Acknowledgment

Binary Increase Congestion TCP

Windows Scaling

RFC 1323 describes TCP extensions for high performance. Window scaling allows the receiver of a TCP packet to advertise that its TCP receive window can exceed 64 KB. The receive window size determines the amount of space that the receiver has available for unacknowledged data. Windows scaling allows TCP endpoints to take advantage of available bandwidth in your network and not be limited to the default window size specified in the TCP header.


Note WAAS Express limits the maximum receive window size to 64 KB.


Selective Acknowledgment

RFC 2018 describes TCP Selective Acknowledgment (SACK) options. SACK is an efficient packet loss recovery and retransmission feature that allows clients to recover from packet losses more quickly than the default recovery mechanism used by TCP.

By default, TCP uses a cumulative acknowledgment scheme that forces the sender to either wait for a round trip to learn if any packets were not received by the recipient or to unnecessarily retransmit segments that may have been correctly received.

SACK allows the receiver to inform the sender about all segments that arrive successfully, so the sender needs to retransmit only the segments that are lost.

Binary Increase Congestion TCP

Binary Increase Congestion (BIC) TCP is a congestion management protocol that allows your network to recover more quickly from packet loss events.

When your network loses a packet, BIC TCP reduces the receiver's window size and sets that reduced size as the new value for the minimum window. BIC TCP then sets the maximum window size value to the size of the window just before the packet loss occurred. Because packet loss occurred at the maximum window size, the network can transfer traffic without dropping packets whose size falls within the minimum and maximum window size values.

If BIC TCP does not register packet loss at the updated maximum window size, that window size becomes the new minimum. If packet loss does occur, that window size becomes the new maximum. This process continues until BIC TCP determines the new optimum minimum and maximum window size values.

Compression

WAAS Express uses the following compression technologies to help reduce the size of data transmitted over a WAN:

Data Redundancy Elimination (DRE)

Lempel-Ziv (LZ) compression

These compression technologies reduce the size of transmitted data by removing redundant information before sending the shortened data stream over the WAN. By reducing the amount of transferred data, WAAS compression can reduce network utilization and application response times.

When WAAS Express uses compression to optimize TCP traffic, it replaces repeated data in the stream with a much shorter reference, then sends the shortened data stream out across the WAN. The receiving WAAS Express device uses its local redundancy library to reconstruct the data stream before passing it along to the destination client or server.

The DRE compression scheme is based on a shared cache architecture where each device involved in compression and decompression shares the same redundancy library. When the cache that stores the redundancy library on a WAE becomes full, DRE uses a first in, first out algorithm (FIFO) to discard old data and make room for new data. For WAAS Express, the cache is only used for decoding.

LZ compression operates on smaller data streams and keeps limited compression history. DRE operates on significantly larger streams (typically tens to hundreds of bytes or more) and maintains a much larger compression history. Large chunks of redundant data is common in file system operations when files are incrementally changed from one version to another or when certain elements are common to many files, such as file headers and logos.


Note DRE optimization is not supported for connections between WAAS Express devices.


WAAS Express does not compress uploading traffic using the DRE algorithm. WAAS Express decompresses the download traffic that is compressed by DRE.

Auto-discovery of WAAS Devices

WAAS Express includes an autodiscovery feature that enables WAEs and WAAS Express devices to automatically locate peer WAEs on your network by adding TCP options on the control packets. After discovering a peer device automatically, the WAEs terminate and separate the LAN-to-WAN TCP connections and add a buffering layer to resolve the differing speeds or WAAS Express proxies the connection on the router in different segments to achieve optimization benefits. Once a WAE establishes a connection to a peer WAE, the two devices can establish an optimized link for TCP traffic, or pass the non-TCP traffic through as unoptimized.

The autodiscovery of peer WAAS devices is achieved using TCP options. These TCP options are recognized and understood only by WAAS devices and are ignored by non-WAAS devices.

WAAS Application Policies

The WAAS software includes over 150 default application policies that help the WAAS system to classify and optimize some of the most common types of traffic in the network.

Table 2 lists the default applications and classifiers that WAAS will either optimize or pass through based on the policies that are provided with the system.

Cisco recommends that you review the default policies and modify them as appropriate before you create a new application policy. It is often easier to modify an existing policy than to create a new one.

When reviewing Table 2, note the following:

The subheadings represent the application names. The associated classifiers are listed under these subheadings. For example, Authentication is a type of application and Kerberos is a classifier for that application.

The word Monitored indicates that the applications are monitored by the WAAS Central Manager, which can only display statistics for 20 applications at a time.

The WAAS software supports the following optimization actions based on the type of traffic it encounters:

TFO—A collection of optimization technologies such as automatic windows scaling, increased buffering, and selective acknowledgment that optimize all TCP traffic over your network.

Data Redundancy Elimination (DRE)—A compression technology that reduces the size of transmitted data by removing redundant information before sending the shortened data stream over the WAN. DRE operates on significantly larger streams and maintains a much larger compression history than LZ compression.

LZ (compression)—A compression technology that operates on smaller data streams and keeps limited compression history compared to DRE.

Table 2 Default Traffic Policies 

Classifier
WAAS Action
Destination Ports

Authentication

Kerberos

Pass-through

88, 464, 543, 544, 749, 754, 888, 2053

SASL

Pass-through

3659

TACACS

Pass-through

49

Backup (monitored)

Amanda

TFO

10080

BackupExpress

TFO

6123

CommVault

TFO

8400-8403

Connected-DataProtector

TFO

16384

IBM-TSM

TFO+LZ+DRE

1500-1502

Legato-NetWorker

TFO

7937, 7938, 7939

Legato-RepliStor

TFO

7144, 7145

Veritas-BackupExec

TFO

1125, 3527, 6101, 6102, 6106

Veritas-NetBackup

TFO

13720, 13721, 13782, 13785

Computer-aided Design (CAD)

PDMWorks

LZ+TFO+DRE

30000, 40000

Call Management

Cisco-CallManager

Pass-through

2443, 2748

SIP-secure

Pass-through

5061

VoIP-Control

Pass-through

1300, 1718-1720, 2000-2002, 2428, 5060, 11000-11999

Conferencing

CU-SeeMe

Pass-through

7640, 7642, 7648, 7649

ezMeeting

Pass-through

10101-10103, 26260-26261

GnomeMeeting

Pass-through

30000-30010

Intel-Proshare

Pass-through

5713-5717

MS-NetMeeting

Pass-through

522, 1503, 1731

VocalTec

Pass-through

1490, 6670, 22555, 25793

Console

SSL-Shell

Pass-through

614

Telnet

Pass-through

23, 107, 513

Telnets

Pass-through

992

Unix-Remote-Execution

Pass-through

512, 514

Content-Management (monitored)

Documentum

LZ+TFO+DRE

1489

Filenet

LZ+TFO+DRE

32768-32774

ProjectWise-FileTransfer

LZ+TFO+DRE

5800

Directory Services (monitored)

LDAP

LZ+TFO+DRE

389, 8404

LDAP-Global-Catalog

LZ+TFO+DRE

3268

LDAP-Global-Catalog-Secure

Pass-through

3269

LDAP-secure

Pass-through

636

E-mail and Messaging (monitored)

HP-OpenMail

LZ+TFO+DRE

5729, 5755, 5757, 5766, 5767, 5768

Internet-Mail

LZ+TFO+DRE

25, 110, 143, 220

Internet-Mail-secure

TFO

465, 993, 995

Lotus-Notes

LZ+TFO+DRE

1352

MAPI1

LZ+TFO+DRE

UUID:a4f1db00-ca47-1067-b31f-00dd010662da

MDaemon

LZ+TFO+DRE

3000, 3001

NNTP

LZ+TFO+DRE

119

NNTP-secure

TFO

563

Novell-Groupwise

LZ+TFO+DRE

1099, 1677, 2800, 3800, 7100, 7101, 7180, 7181, 7205, 9850

PCMail-Server

LZ+TFO+DRE

158

QMTP

LZ+TFO+DRE

209

X400

LZ+TFO+DRE

102

Enterprise Applications (monitored)

SAP

LZ+TFO+DRE

3200-3219, 3221-3224, 3226-3267, 3270-3282, 3284-3305, 3307-3388, 3390-3399, 3600-3659, 3662-3699

Siebel

LZ+TFO+DRE

2320, 2321, 8448

File System (monitored)

AFS

LZ+TFO+DRE

7000-7009

Apple-AFP

LZ+TFO+DRE

548

CIFS-non-wafs

LZ+TFO+DRE

139, 445

NFS

LZ+TFO+DRE

2049

Novell-NetWare

LZ+TFO+DRE

524

Sun-RPC

Pass-through

111

File Transfer (monitored)

BFTP

LZ+TFO+DRE

152

FTP-Control2

Pass-through

21

FTP-Data2

LZ+TFO+DRE

src20

FTPS2

TFO

990

FTP-Control2

Pass-through

src989

Simple-FTP

LZ+TFO+DRE

115

TFTP

LZ+TFO+DRE

69

TFTPS

TFO

3713

Instant Messaging

AOL

Pass-through

5190-5193

Apple-iChat

Pass-through

5297, 5298

IRC

Pass-through

531, 6660-6669

Jabber

Pass-through

5222, 5269

Lotus-Sametime-Connect

Pass-through

1533

MS-Chat

Pass-through

6665, 6667

MSN-Messenger

Pass-through

1863, 6891-6900

Yahoo-Messenger

Pass-through

5000, 5001, 5050, 5100

Name Services

DNS

Pass-through

53

iSNS

Pass-through

3205

Service-Location

Pass-through

427

WINS

Pass-through

42, 137, 1512

Network Analysis

Cisco-NetFlow

Pass-through

7544, 7545

Other (monitored)

Basic-TCP-services

Pass-through

1-19

BGP

LZ+TFO+DRE

179

MS-Message-Queuing

LZ+TFO+DRE

1801, 2101, 2103, 2105

NTP

Pass-through

123

Other-Secure

Pass-through

261, 448, 684, 695, 994, 2252, 2478, 2479, 2482, 2484, 2679, 2762, 2998, 3077, 3078, 3183, 3191, 3220, 3410, 3424, 3471, 3496, 3509, 3529, 3539, 3660, 3661, 3747, 3864, 3885, 3896, 3897, 3995, 4031, 5007, 5989, 5990, 7674, 9802, 12109

SOAP

LZ+TFO+DRE

7627

Symantec-AntiVirus

LZ+TFO+DRE

2847, 2848, 2967, 2968, 38037, 38292

Peer-to-peer (P2P) (monitored)

BitTorrent

Pass-through

6881-6889, 6969

eDonkey

Pass-through

4661, 4662

Gnutella

Pass-through

6346-6349, 6355, 5634

Grouper

Pass-through

8038

HotLine

Pass-through

5500-5503

Kazaa

Pass-through

1214

Laplink-ShareDirect

Pass-through

2705

Napster

Pass-through

6666, 6677, 6700, 6688, 7777, 8875

Qnext

Pass-through

44, 5555

SoulSeek

Pass-through

2234, 5534

WASTE

Pass-through

1337

WinMX

Pass-through

6699

Printing (monitored)

AppSocket

LZ+TFO+DRE

9100

IPP

LZ+TFO+DRE

631

SUN-Xprint

LZ+TFO+DRE

8100

Unix-Printing

LZ+TFO+DRE

170, 515

Remote Desktop (monitored)

Altiris-CarbonCopy

Pass-through

1680

Apple-NetAssistant

Pass-through

3283

Citrix-ICA

LZ+TFO+DRE

1494, 2598

ControlIT

TFO

799

Danware-NetOp

TFO

6502

Laplink-Host

TFO

1547

Laplink-PCSync

TFO

8444

Laplink-PCSync-secure

TFO

8443

MS-Terminal-Services

TFO

3389

Netopia-Timbuktu

TFO

407, 1417-1420

PCAnywhere

TFO

73, 5631, 5632, 65301

RAdmin

TFO

4899

Remote-Anything

TFO

3999, 4000

Vmware-VMConsole

TFO

902

VNC

TFO

5801-5809, 6900-6909

XWindows

TFO

6000-6063

Replication (monitored)

Double-Take

LZ+TFO+DRE

1100, 1105

EMC-Celerra-Replicator

LZ+TFO+DRE

8888

MS-AD-Replication1

LZ+TFO+DRE

UUID:e3514235-4b06-11d1-ab04-00c04fc2dcd2

MS-Content-Replication-Service

TFO

560, 507

MS-FRS1

LZ+TFO+DRE

UUID:f5cc59b4-4264-101a-8c59-08002b2f8426

Netapp-SnapMirror

LZ+TFO+DRE

10565-10569

Remote-Replication-Agent

TFO

5678

Rsync

TFO

873

Structured Query Language (SQL) (monitored)

Borland-Interbase

LZ+TFO+DRE

3050

IBM-DB2

LZ+TFO+DRE

523

InterSystems-Cache

LZ+TFO+DRE

1972

MS-SQL

LZ+TFO+DRE

1433

MS-SQL-RPC1

LZ+TFO+DRE

UUID:3f99b900-4d87-101b-99b7-aa0004007f07

MySQL

LZ+TFO+DRE

3306

Oracle

LZ+TFO+DRE

66, 1521, 1525

Pervasive-SQL

LZ+TFO+DRE

1583

PostgreSQL

LZ+TFO+DRE

5432

Scalable-SQL

LZ+TFO+DRE

3352

SQL-Service

LZ+TFO+DRE

156

Sybase-SQL

LZ+TFO+DRE

1498, 2439, 2638, 3968

UniSQL

LZ+TFO+DRE

1978, 1979

Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) (monitored)

HTTPS

TFO

443

Secure Shell (SSH)

SSH

TFO

22

Storage (monitored)

EMC-SRDFA-IP

LZ+TFO+DRE

1748

FCIP

LZ+TFO+DRE

3225

iFCP

LZ+TFO+DRE

3420

iSCSI

LZ+TFO+DRE

3260

Streaming (monitored)

Liquid-Audio

LZ+TFO+DRE

18888

MS-NetShow

LZ+TFO+DRE

1755

RTSP

LZ+TFO+DRE

554, 8554

VDOLive

LZ+TFO+DRE

7000

Systems Management (monitored)

BMC-Patrol

Pass-through

6161, 6162, 6767, 6768, 8160, 8161, 10128

HP-OpenView

Pass-through

7426-7431, 7501, 7510

HP-Radia

LZ+TFO+DRE

3460, 3461, 3464, 3466

IBM-NetView

Pass-through

729-731

IBM-Tivoli

LZ+TFO+DRE

94, 627, 1580, 1581, 1965

LANDesk

LZ+TFO+DRE

9535, 9593-9595

NetIQ

Pass-through

2220, 2735, 10113-10116

Netopia-netOctopus

Pass-through

1917, 1921

Novell-ZenWorks

LZ+TFO+DRE

517, 1761-1763, 2037, 2544, 8039

WAAS-FlowMonitor

TFO

7878

WBEM

Pass-through

5987, 5988

Version Management (monitored)

Clearcase

LZ+TFO+DRE

371

CVS

LZ+TFO+DRE

2401

Virtual Private Network (VPN)

CIFS

LZ+TFO+DRE

139, 445

HTTP

LZ+TFO+DRE

80, 3128, 8000, 8001, 8080

HTTPS

TFO

443

L2TP

TFO

1701

OpenVPN

TFO

1194

PPTP

TFO

1723

1 These classifiers use the EndPoint Mapper (EPM) service in WAAS to accelerate traffic. EPM-based applications do not have predefined ports so the application's Unique Server Identity (UUID) must be used to identify the traffic.

2 These classifiers identify the source port instead of the destination port.


How to Configure WAAS Express

Configuring WAN Optimization Parameters (optional)

Defining WAAS Express Policies (optional)

Enabling WAAS Express (required)

Configuring WAN Optimization Parameters

Perform the following task to configure WAN optimization parameters globally.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. parameter-map type waas parameter-map-name

4. tfo auto-discovery blacklist {enable | hold-time minutes}

5. tfo optimize {full | dre {no | yes {compression} {lz | none}}}

6. cpu-threshold maximum-threshold

7. lz entropy-check

8. exit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

parameter-map type waas parameter-map-name

Example:

Router(config)# parameter-map type waas waas_global

Configures a parameter map of type waas and enters parameter map configuration mode.

Note The only supported parameter map of type waas is waas_global.

Step 4 

tfo auto-discovery blacklist {enable | hold-time minutes}

Example:

Router(config-profile)# tfo auto-discovery blacklist hold-time 1000

Enables, configures and integrates blacklist with auto-discovery for WAN globally.

enable—Enables a blacklist.

hold-time minutes—Specifies the period for holding the blacklist in the system.

Step 5 

tfo optimize {full | dre {yes | no {compression} {lz | none}}}

Example:

Router(config-profile)# tfo optimize dre no compression lz

Configures the compression for WAN.

full—Turns on DRE and LZ compression.

dre {yes | no}—Toggles on or off DRE.

compression {lz | none}—Toggles on or off LZ compression.

Step 6 

cpu-threshold maximum-threshold

Example:

Router(config-profile)# cpu-threshold 90

Sets the CPU threshold limit.

maximum-threshold—Specifies the maximum limit. The range is 1 to 100.

Step 7 

lz entropy-check

Example:

Router(config-profile)# lz entropy-check

Enables adaptive LZ through entropy checking.

Step 8 

exit

Example:

Router(config-profile)# exit

Exits the current mode.

Defining WAAS Express Policies


Note WAAS Express can be configured either with the default class maps and policy maps, or the class maps and policy maps can be defined and then WAAS Express configured.


Perform the following tasks to define class and policy maps if you do not want to use the default class and policy maps that are created when WAAS Express is enabled:

Defining Class maps

Associating Class maps to Policy maps

Defining Class maps

Perform the following task to define a class map.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. class-map type waas class-name

4. match tcp {any | destination | source}{ip ip-address [inverse mask] | port start-port-number1 [end-port-number2]}

5. exit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

class-map type waas class-name

Example:

Router(config)# class-map type waas waas_global

Defines a class map of type waas and enters class map configuration mode.

Step 4 

match tcp {any | destination | source}{ip 
ip-address [inverse mask] | port 
start-port-number1 [end-port-number2]}
Example:

Router(config-cmap)# match tcp destination port 7000 7009

Matches the traffic based on the following criteria.

any—Matches all TCP traffic.

destination—Matches the TCP traffic with the destination IP address or port number.

source—Matches the TCP traffic with the source IP address or port number.

ip ip-address—Refers to the IP address of the source and destination. If NAT is used, the IP address refers to inside local address and outside global address.

port port-number—Refers to the port number of the source and destination.

Note The class-map of type WAAS combines filters using the match-any logical operator. The match-all logical operator is not supported by the class map of type WAAS. This means that if one match criterion (filter) is matched, the entire class map is matched also.

Step 5 

exit

Example:

Router(config-cmap)# exit

Exits the current mode.

Examples

The following example matches traffic having the destination TCP port number between 7000 and 7009:

Router(config)# class-map type waas waas_global
Router(config-cmap)# match tcp destination port 7000 7009
 
   
Router(config)# class-map type waas waas_global
Router(config-cmap)# match tcp destination ip 209.165.200.225 0.0.0.31 port 80 80
Router(config-cmap)# match tcp destination ip 209.165.200.225 0.0.0.31 port 8080 8080
 
   

In the example, traffic in either of the following two conditions is matched:

Destination IP address is in the range 209.165.200.225, and the destination TCP port is 80.

Destination IP address is in the range 209.165.200.225, and the destination TCP port is 8080.

What to Do Next

After defining the class maps, proceed to Associating Class maps to Policy maps.

Associating Class maps to Policy maps

Perform the following task to associate a class map to a policy map, before enabling WAAS Express on the device.


Note Any changes to the policy configuration (global policy map and the class maps of type WAAS) remain forever. For instance, if you modify the policy configuration, disable WAAS Express on the interfaces and reenable WAAS Express, the changes would still be visible.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. policy-map type waas policy-name

4. sequence-interval number

5. class class-map-name

6. optimize tfo {dre | lz} application application-name

7. passthrough application application-name

8. exit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

policy-map type waas policy-name

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map type waas waas_global

Defines a policy map of type waas and enters policy map configuration mode.

Step 4 

sequence-interval number

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# sequence-interval 100

Assigns sequential numbers to the class-maps at the specified interval.

number—Specifies the sequential interval. The range is 1 to 65535.

Step 5 

class class-map-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class-map class1

Specifies the class on which optimization must be performed and enters class map configuration mode.

class-map-name—the name of the class-map.

Step 6 

optimize tfo {dre | lz} application application-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# optimize dre application web

Applies WAN optimization for the matching traffic as follows:

tfo—Applies TFO optimization only.

application application-name—Class-map application.

dre—Applies TFO and DRE optimization.

lz—Applies TFO and LZ optimization.

Step 7 

passthrough application application-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# passthrough application web

Passes through match traffic and does not apply WAN optimization to the matching traffic.

application application-name—Class-map application.

Note passthrough is the default WAN optimization for the matching traffic.

Step 8 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# exit

Exits the current mode.

Examples

This example shows how to create a new policy with actions and application tagging:

Router(config)# policy-map type waas waas_global
Router(config-pmap)# class AFS
Router(config-pmap-c)# optimize dre lz application Web
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# class Http
Router(config-pmap-c)# optimize lz application Filesystem
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# exit
 
   

The following is sample output from the show policy-map type waas command:

Policy Map type waas waas_global
 Class AFS
  optimize dre lz application Web
 Class Http
  optimize lz application Filesystem
 Class class-default
 
   

The following example shows how to create a policy map with Insert-Before:

Router(config)# policy-map type waas_global
Router(config-pmap)# class AFS
Router(config-pmap-c)# optimize lz application Filesystem
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# class Http insert-before AFS
Router(config-pmap-c)# optimize dre lz application Web
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# exit
 
   

The following is sample output from the show policy-map type waas command:

Router# show policy-map type waas
Policy Map type waas waas_global
 Class Http
  optimize dre lz application Web
 Class AFS
  optimize lz application Filesystem
 Class class-default
 
   

The following example shows how to create a policy map with sequence numbers:

Router(config)# policy-map type waas_global
Router(config-pmap)# sequence-interval 10
Router(config-pmap)# class AFS
Router(config-pmap-c)# optimize dre lz application Web
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# class Http
Router(config-pmap-c)# optimize lz application Filesystem
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# exit
 
   

The following is sample output from the show policy-map type waas command:

Router# show policy-map type waas
Policy Map type waas_global
	sequence-interval 10
10 Class AFS
	 optimize dre lz application Web
20 Class Http
	 optimize lz application Filesystem
30 Class class-default
 
   

The following example shows how to remove a class from a policy map:

Router(config)# policy-map type waas_global
Router(config-pmap)# no class AFS
Router(config-pmap)# exit
 
   

The following is sample output from the show policy-map type waas command:

Router# show policy-map type waas
Policy Map type waas_global
	sequence-interval 10
20 Class Http
	  optimize dre lz application Web
30 Class class-default

Troubleshooting Tips

To clear the DRE cache, enable WAAS Express and execute the no waas enable command with the forced argument on the interface.

What to Do Next

After defining the policy maps, you must enable WAAS Express.

Enabling WAAS Express

Perform this task to enable WAAS Express on an WAN interface. The waas enable command must be explicitly applied on each WAN interface. You can enable WAAS Express by using the default class and policy maps created automatically or define your class and policy maps.

The global policy map governs the behavior of optimization on the interface. All traffic exiting the WAN interface or entering from the WAN interface is screened for optimization according to the global policy map. However, the traffic on other interfaces will not be touched by WAAS Express. WAAS Express supports flows that travel over multiple WAN interfaces, entering one interface and exiting another.


Note WAAS Express does not support the option of selecting a user-defined policy-map to associate with the waas enable command. The default policy waas_global is used on the interface where WAAS Express is enabled. You can modify the default waas_global policy. The default WAAS Express policy is extracted from the default WAAS policy.


Perform the following task to enable WAAS Express on an interface.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface interface-type/number

4. waas enable

5. exit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface interface-type/number

Example:

Router(config)# interface GigabitEthernet0/0

Specifies an interface for configuration and enters interface configuration mode

Step 4 

waas enable

Example:

Router(config-if)# waas enable

Enables WAAS Express on the WAN interface.

Step 5 

exit

Example:

Router(config-if)# exit

Exits the current mode.

Troubleshooting Tips

To troubleshoot, execute the following commands:

debug waas—To detect errors.

monitor—To monitor and collect packet capture.

show waas—To verify the configuration.

The no waas enable command neither removes the WAAS Express configuration nor affects the existing flows execute flows that are already optimized by WAAS Express on an interface nor removes the default maps from the device. This command only removes the configuration. To terminate the flows and disable WAAS Express, use the command with the forced argument.

Use the waas config remove-all command, to remove the default maps from the device.

To replace the policy configuration that you defined with the default policy configuration, use the waas config restore-default command. This command replaces the existing policy configuration with the predefined default policy configuration.


Note You can execute the waas config restore-default command only if WAAS Express is disabled.


Configuration Examples for WAAS Express

Configuring WAAS Express: Example

Configuring WAAS Express: Example

Router(config)# class-map type waas match-any http
Router(config-cmap)# match tcp destination port 80 80 
Router(config-cmap)# match tcp destination port 8080 8082 
Router(config-cmap)# exit
 
   
Router(config)# class-map type waas waas_global
Router(config-cmap)# match tcp destination port 5190 5193 
Router(config-cmap)# exit
 
   
Router(config)# class-map type waas match-any bittorrent
Router(config-cmap)# match tcp destination port 6969 
Router(config-cmap)# match tcp destination port 6881 6889 
Router(config-cmap)# exit
 
   
Router(config)# policy-map type waas global
Router(config-pmap)# class http
Router(config-pmap-c)# optimize DRE LZ application web-traffic
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
 
   
Router(config-pmap)# class aol 
Router(config-pmap-c)# optimize tfo-only application IM
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
 
   
Router(config-pmap)# class bittorrent 
Router(config-pmap-c)# optimize LZ application p2p
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# exit
 
   
Router(config)# interface E0
Router(config-if)# description WAN Connection
Router(config-if)# waas enable
Router(config-if)# exit

Additional References

Related Documents


Standards

Standard
Title

None


MIBs

MIB
MIBs Link

None

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs


RFCs

RFC
Title

RFC 1323

TCP Extensions for High Performance

RFC 2018

TCP Selective Acknowledgment Options

RFC 3390

Increasing TCP's Initial Window


Technical Assistance

Description
Link

The Cisco Support website provides extensive online resources, including documentation and tools for troubleshooting and resolving technical issues with Cisco products and technologies.

To receive security and technical information about your products, you can subscribe to various services, such as the Product Alert Tool (accessed from Field Notices), the Cisco Technical Services Newsletter, and Really Simple Syndication (RSS) Feeds.

Access to most tools on the Cisco Support website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

http://www.cisco.com/cisco/web/support/index.html


Feature Information for WAAS Express

Table 3 lists the features in this module and provides links to specific configuration information.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and software image support. Cisco Feature Navigator enables you to determine which software images support a specific software release, feature set, or platform. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to http://www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.


Note Table 3 lists only the software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that software release train also support that feature.


Table 3 Feature Information for WAAS Express 

Feature Name
Releases
Feature Information

WAAS Express

15.1(2)T

Cisco's WAAS Express software, which interoperates with WAN optimization headend applications from Cisco. WAAS Express improves WAN access and use by optimizing applications that require high bandwidth or are bound to a LAN, such as backup.

The following sections provide information about this feature:

Information About WAAS Express

How to Configure WAAS Express

The following commands were introduced or modified: class-map type waas, clear waas, cpu-threshold, debug waas, lz entropy-check, match tcp, optimize, parameter-map type waas, passthrough, policy-map type waas, sequence-interval, show waas alarms, show waas auto-discovery, show waas connection, show waas statistics aoim, show waas statistics application, show waas statistics auto-discovery, show waas statistics class, show waas statistics dre, show waas statistics global, show waas statistics lz, show waas statistics pass-through, show waas statistics peer, show waas status, show waas token, tfo auto-discovery, tfo optimize, waas cm-register url, waas config, waas enable, waas export.