Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference
Introduction
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Introduction

Table Of Contents

Introduction

Cisco IOS IFS Command Syntax

Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines


Introduction


The Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference provides command documentation associated with the following tasks:

Using the Cisco IOS Command-Line Interface (CLI)

Configuration Using Setup and AutoInstall

Configuring Operating Characteristics for Terminals

Managing Connections, Logins, Menus, and System Banners

Configure user menus and banners

Using the Cisco Web Browser User Interface (UI)

Using the HTTP server-based UI as an alternative to the CLI

Using the Cisco IOS Integrated File System (IFS)

The basics of filesystem use and Cisco IOS software's filesystem infrastructure

Configuring Basic File Transfer Services

Copy, move, and delete files locally or across the network

Managing Configuration Files

Loading, Maintaining, and Upgrading System Images

Rebooting

For further information about performing these tasks, refer to the Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide for your release.


Note Some commands previously documented in this Command Reference have been moved to other books:
Commands related to system management and network monitoring can be found in the Cisco IOS Network Management Command Reference.
Command reference documentation for the Cisco IOS software feature "Service Assurance Agent (SAA)" can be found in the the Cisco IOS IP SLAs Command Reference.


Cisco IOS IFS Command Syntax

Some commands in this book use URLs (uniform resource locators) as part of the command syntax. URLs used in the Cisco IOS Integrated File System (IFS) contain two parts: a file system or network prefix, and a file identification suffix. The following tables list URL keywords that can be used in the source-url and destination-url arguments for all commands in this book. The prefixes listed below can also be used in the filesystem arguments in this document.

Table 8 lists common URL network prefixes used to indicate a device on the network.

Table 8 Network Prefixes for Cisco IFS URLs

Prefix
Description

ftp:

Specifies a File Transfer Protocol (FTP) network server.

rcp:

Specifies an remote copy protocol (rcp) network server.

tftp:

Specifies a TFTP server.


Table 9 lists the available suffix options (file indentification suffixes) for the URL prefixes used in Table 8.

Table 9 File ID Suffixes for Cisco IFS URLs

Prefix
Suffix Options

ftp:

[[//[username[:password]@]location]/directory]/filename

For example:

ftp://network-config (prefix://filename)

ftp://user1:mypassword1@example.com/config-files

rcp:

rcp:[[//[username@]location]/directory]/filename

tftp:

tftp:[[//location]/directory]/filename


Table 10 lists common URL prefixes used to indicate memory locations on the system.

Table 10 File System Prefixes for Cisco IFS URLs 

Prefix
Description

bootflash:

Boot flash memory.

disk0:

Rotating disk media.

flash: [partition-number]

Flash memory. This prefix is available on all platforms. For platforms that do not have a device named flash:, the prefix flash: is aliased to slot0:.

Therefore, you can use the prefix flash: to refer to the main Flash memory storage area on all platforms.

flh:

Flash load helper log files.

null:

Null destination for copies. You can copy a remote file to null to determine its size.

nvram:

NVRAM. This is the default location for the running-configuration file.

slavebootflash:

Internal Flash memory on a slave RSP card of a router configured with Dual RSPs.

slavenvram:

NVRAM on a slave RSP card.

slaveslot0:

First PCMCIA card on a slave RSP card.

slaveslot1:

Second PCMCIA card on a slave RSP card.

slot0:

First PCMCIA Flash memory card.

slot1:

Second PCMCIA Flash memory card.

xmodem:

Obtain the file from a network machine using the Xmodem protocol.

ymodem:

Obtain the file from a network machine using the Ymodem protocol.


For details about the Cisco IOS IFS, and for IFS configuration tasks, refer to the "Using the Cisco IOS Integrated File System (IFS)" chapter in the latest Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide appropriate for your release version.

Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines

For information on obtaining documentation, obtaining support, providing documentation feedback, security guidelines, and also recommended aliases and general Cisco documents, see the monthly What's New in Cisco Product Documentation, which also lists all new and revised Cisco technical documentation, at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/general/whatsnew/whatsnew.html