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Cisco IOS Software Releases 12.2 SB

Cisco IOS In Service Software Upgrade and Enhanced Fast Software Upgrade Process

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Cisco IOS In Service Software Upgrade Process

Table Of Contents

Cisco IOS In Service Software Upgrade Process

Contents

Prerequisites for Performing ISSU

Restrictions for Performing ISSU

Information About Performing ISSU

ISSU Process Overview

Stateful Switchover Overview

NSF Overview

Versioning Capability in Cisco IOS Software to Support ISSU

Compatibility Matrix

ISSU-Capable Protocols and Applications

SNMP Support for ISSU

Compatibility Verification Using Cisco Feature Navigator

How to Perform the ISSU Process

Restrictions for Performing the ISSU Process

Loading Cisco IOS Software on the Standby RP

Switching to the Standby RP

Stopping the ISSU Rollback Timer

Verifying the ISSU Software Installation

Enabling the New Standby RP to Use New Cisco IOS Software Version

Aborting a Software Upgrade Using ISSU

Configuring the Rollback Timer to Safeguard Against Upgrades

Displaying ISSU Compatibility Matrix Information

Verifying Redundancy Mode Before Beginning the ISSU Process: Example

Verifying the ISSU State: Example

Performing the ISSU Process: Example

Initiating the ISSU Process: Example

Forcing a Switchover from the Active RP to the Standby RP: Example

Stopping the Rollback Process: Example

Committing the New Software to the Standby RP: Example

Aborting the ISSU Process: Example

Verifying Rollback Timer Information: Example

Additional References

Related Documents

Standards

MIBs

RFCs

Technical Assistance

Command Reference

configure issu set rollback timer

issu abortversion

issu acceptversion

issu commitversion

issu loadversion

issu runversion

show issu comp-matrix

show issu state

show redundancy


Cisco IOS In Service Software Upgrade Process


The In Service Software Upgrade (ISSU) process allows Cisco IOS software to be updated or otherwise modified while packet forwarding continues. In most networks, planned software upgrades are a significant cause of downtime. ISSU allows Cisco IOS software to be modified while packet forwarding continues, which increases network availability and reduces downtime caused by planned software upgrades. This document provides information about ISSU concepts and describes the steps taken to perform ISSU in a system.

Feature History for ISSU

Release
Modification

12.2(28)SB

This feature was introduced.

12.2(31)SGA

Support for ISSU was introduced on the Cisco Catalyst 4500 series platform.

Support for the following new features was added on the Cisco Catalyst 4500 series platform:

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) snooping

EtherChannel - Port Aggregation Protocol (PagP) and Link Aggregate Control Protocol (LACP)

IEEE 802.1x protocol

IEEE 802.3

Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) snooping

IP Host

Port security

Spanning-Tree Protocol (STP)

12.2(31)SB2

Support for the following new features were added to the 12.2(31)SB2 release:

ISSU - Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) on-demand address pool (ODAP) client/server

ISSU - DHCP proxy client

ISSU - DHCP relay on unnumbered interface

ISSU - DHCP server

ISSU - First Hop Routing Protocol (FHRP) - Gateway Load Balancing Protocol (GLBP)

ISSU - Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS)

ISSU - Quality of Service (QoS)


Finding Support Information for Platforms and Cisco IOS Software Images

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco IOS software image support. Access Cisco Feature Navigator at http://www.cisco.com/go/fn. You must have an account on Cisco.com. If you do not have an account or have forgotten your username or password, click Cancel at the login dialog box and follow the instructions that appear.

Contents

Prerequisites for Performing ISSU

Restrictions for Performing ISSU

Information About Performing ISSU

How to Perform the ISSU Process

Configuration Examples for Performing ISSU

Additional References

Command Reference

Prerequisites for Performing ISSU

Ensure that both the active and the standby Route Processors (RPs) are available in the system.

The new and old Cisco IOS software images must be loaded into the file systems of both the active and standby RPs before you begin the ISSU process.

Stateful Switchover (SSO) must be configured and working properly. If you do not have SSO enabled, see the Stateful Switchover document for further information on how to enable and configure SSO.

Nonstop Forwarding (NSF) must be configured and working properly. If you do not have NSF enabled, see the Cisco Nonstop Forwarding document for further information on how to enable and configure SSO.

Restrictions for Performing ISSU

General Restrictions

Before you perform ISSU, ensure the system is configured for redundancy mode SSO and that the file system for both the active and standby RPs contains the new ISSU-compatible image. The current version running in the system must also support ISSU. You can issue various commands to determine RP versioning and compatibility, or you can use the ISSU application on Cisco Feature Navigator.

Do not make any hardware changes while performing an ISSU process.

Cisco 10000 Series Internet Router Platform Restrictions

ISSU is available only in Cisco IOS 12.2(28)SB software released for the and later.

The following line cards support ISSU:

1-port channelized OC-12/STM-4

1-port Gigabit Ethernet

1-port half-height Gigabit Ethernet

1-port OC-12 ATM

1-port OC-12 Packet over SONET (PoS)

l-port OC-48 PoS

4-port channelized OC-3/STM-1

4-port OC-3 ATM IR

4-port OC-3 ATM LR

4-port half-height channelized T3

6-port channelized T3

6-port OC-3 PoS

8-port ATM E3/DS3

8-port E3/DS3

8-port half-height Fast Ethernet

24-port channelized E1/T1

Information About Performing ISSU

Before you perform ISSU, you should understand the following concepts:

ISSU Process Overview

Stateful Switchover Overview

NSF Overview

Versioning Capability in Cisco IOS Software to Support ISSU

ISSU-Capable Protocols and Applications

SNMP Support for ISSU

Compatibility Verification Using Cisco Feature Navigator

ISSU Process Overview

The ISSU process allows you to perform a Cisco IOS software upgrade or downgrade while the system continues to forward packets. Cisco IOS ISSU takes advantage of the Cisco IOS high availability infrastructure—Cisco NSF with SSO and hardware redundancy—and eliminates downtime associated with software upgrades or version changes by allowing changes while the system remains in service (see Figure 1). Cisco IOS software high availability features combine to lower the impact that planned maintenance activities have on network service availability, with the results of less downtime and better access to critical systems.

SSO mode supports configuration synchronization. When images on the active and standby RPs are different, this feature allows the two RPs to be kept in synchronization although they may support different sets of commands.

Figure 1 High Availability Features and Hardware Redundancy in the ISSU Process

I

An ISSU-capable router consists of two RPs (active and standby) and one or more line cards. Before initiating the ISSU process, copy the Cisco IOS software into the file systems of both RPs (see Figure 2).

Figure 2 How to Load New Cisco IOS Software on Both RPs

After you have copied the Cisco IOS software to both file systems, load the new version of Cisco IOS software onto the standby RP (see Figure 3).

Figure 3 Load New Cisco IOS Software on the Standby RP

After switchover, the standby RP takes over as the new active RP (see Figure 4).

Figure 4 Switch Over to Standby RP

Then, the former active RP, which is now the new standby RP, is loaded with the new software (see Figure 5).

Figure 5 Load New Standby RP with New Cisco IOS Software

The two RPs in a system can be in one of three different states during ISSU:

Active—One RP is actively forwarding packets with old software. After the ISSU process is performed, the original active RP becomes the standby RP.

Standby—Perform ISSU on the standby RP, loading it with new software. After the ISSU process is performed, the original standby RP is the new active RP.

Hot standby—After the original standby RP becomes the new active RP, load the new software image into the new standby RP. Doing so makes the standby RP a hot standby RP.

Figure 6 shows the ISSU states during the ISSU process.

Figure 6 ISSU States During the ISSU Process

Stateful Switchover Overview

Development of the SSO feature is an incremental step within an overall program to improve the availability of networks constructed with Cisco IOS routers.

In specific Cisco networking devices that support dual RPs, SSO takes advantage of RP redundancy to increase network availability by establishing one of the RPs as the active processor while the other RP is designated as the standby processor, and then synchronizing critical state information between them. Following an initial synchronization between the two processors, SSO dynamically maintains RP state information between them.

A switchover from the active to the standby processor occurs when the active RP fails, is removed from the networking device, or is manually taken down for maintenance.

Cisco NSF is used with SSO. Cisco NSF allows for the forwarding of data packets to continue along known routes while the routing protocol information is being restored following a switchover. With Cisco NSF, peer networking devices do not experience routing flaps, thereby reducing loss of service outages for customers.

Figure 7 illustrates how SSO is typically deployed in service provider networks. In this example, Cisco NSF with SSO is enabled at the access layer (edge) of the service provider network. A fault at this point could result in loss of service for enterprise customers requiring access to the service provider network.

For Cisco NSF protocols that require neighboring devices to participate in Cisco NSF, Cisco NSF-aware software images must be installed on those neighboring distribution layer devices. Depending on your objectives, you may decide to deploy Cisco NSF and SSO features at the core layer of your network. Doing this can help reduce the time to restore network capacity and service for certain failures, which leads to additional availability.

Figure 7 Cisco NSF with SSO Network Deployment: Service Provider Networks

Additional levels of availability may be gained by deploying Cisco NSF with SSO at other points in the network where a single point of failure exists. Figure 8 illustrates an optional deployment strategy that applies Cisco NSF with SSO at the enterprise network access layer. In this example, each access point in the enterprise network represents another single point of failure in the network design. In the event of a switchover or a planned software upgrade, enterprise customer sessions would continue uninterrupted through the network.

Figure 8 Cisco NSF with SSO Network Deployment: Enterprise Networks

For further information on SSO, see the Stateful Switchover document.

NSF Overview

Cisco NSF works with the SSO feature in Cisco IOS software. SSO is a prerequisite of Cisco NSF. NSF works with SSO to minimize the amount of time a network is unavailable to its users following a switchover. The main objective of Cisco NSF is to continue forwarding IP packets following an RP switchover.

Usually, when a networking device restarts, all routing peers of that device detect that the device went down and then came back up. This transition results in what is called a routing flap, which could spread across multiple routing domains. Routing flaps caused by routing restarts create routing instabilities, which are detrimental to the overall network performance. Cisco NSF helps to suppress routing flaps in SSO-enabled devices, thus reducing network instability.

Cisco NSF allows for the forwarding of data packets to continue along known routes while the routing protocol information is being restored following a switchover. With Cisco NSF, peer networking devices do not experience routing flaps. Data traffic is forwarded through intelligent line cards or dual forwarding processors (FPs) while the standby RP assumes control from the failed active RP during a switchover. The ability of line cards and FPs to remain up through a switchover and to be kept current with the Forwarding Information Base (FIB) on the active RP is key to Cisco NSF operation.

Versioning Capability in Cisco IOS Software to Support ISSU

Before the introduction of the ISSU capability, the SSO mode of operation required each RP to be running like versions of Cisco IOS software. The operating mode of the system in a redundant HA configuration is determined by exchanging version strings when the standby RP registers with the active RP.

The system entered SSO mode only if the versions running on the both RPs were the same. If not, the redundancy mode was reduced to ensure compatibility. With ISSU capability, the implementation allows two different but compatible release levels of Cisco IOS images to interoperate in SSO mode and enables software upgrades while packet forwarding continues. Version checking done before ISSU capability was introduced is no longer sufficient to allow the system to determine the operating mode.

ISSU requires additional information to determine compatibility between software versions. Therefore, a compatibility matrix is defined that contains information about other images with respect to the one in question. This compatibility matrix represents the compatibility of two software versions, one running on the active and the other on the standby RP, and to allow the system to determine the highest operating mode it can achieve. Incompatible versions will not be able to progress to SSO operational mode.

The Cisco IOS infrastructure has been internally modified and redesigned to accommodate subsystem versioning with ISSU. Cisco IOS subsystems correspond to feature sets and software component groupings. Features or subsystems that maintain state information across RPs are HA-aware or SSO clients. A mechanism called ISSU Framework, or ISSU protocol, allows subsystems within Cisco IOS software to communicate RP to RP and to negotiate the message version for communication between RPs. Internally, all NSF- and SSO-compliant applications or subsystems that are HA-aware must follow this protocol to establish communication with their peer across different versions of software. (For further information on operating modes, see the Stateful Switchover document.)

Compatibility Matrix

You can perform the ISSU process when the Cisco IOS software on both the active and the standby RP is capable of ISSU and the old and new images are compatible. The compatibility matrix information stores the compatibility among releases as follows:

Compatible—The base-level system infrastructure and all optional HA-aware subsystems are compatible. An in-service upgrade or downgrade between these versions will succeed with minimal service impact. The matrix entry designates the images to be compatible (C).

Base-level compatible—One or more of the optional HA-aware subsystems is not compatible. An in-service upgrade or downgrade between these versions will succeed; however, some subsystems will not be able to maintain state during the transition. The matrix entry designates the images to be base-level compatible (B).

Incompatible—A core set of system infrastructure exists that must be able to interoperate in a stateful manner for SSO to function correctly. If any of these required features or protocols is not interoperable, then the two versions of the Cisco IOS software images are declared to be incompatible. An in-service upgrade or downgrade between these versions is not possible. The matrix entry designates the images to be incompatible (I).

If you attempt to perform ISSU with a peer that does not support ISSU, the system automatically uses Fast Software Upgrade (FSU) instead.

The compatibility matrix represents the compatibility relationship a Cisco IOS software image has with all of the other Cisco IOS software versions within the designated support window (for example, all of those software versions the image "knows" about) and is populated and released with every image. The matrix stores compatibility information between its own release and prior releases. It is always the newest release that contains the latest information about compatibility with existing releases in the field. The compatibility matrix is available within the Cisco IOS software image and on Cisco.com so that users can determine in advance whether an upgrade can be done using the ISSU process.

Before attempting an ISSU, you should determine the compatibility level between the Cisco IOS software versions on the active and the standby RPs. To display the compatibility matrix data between two software versions on a given system, enter the show issu comp-matrix negotiated command.

ISSU-Capable Protocols and Applications

The following protocols and applications support ISSU:

ISSU - ARP —ARP supports ISSU.

ISSU - ATM—The ATM application supports ISSU. The application requirements for ISSU are as follows:

Identify the ATM client as nonbase

Support message versioning of ATM HA event synchronous messages

Provide capability exchange between peers

ISSU - Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) on-demand address pool (ODAP) client/server—This feature supports ISSU.

ISSU - DHCP proxy client—The DHCP proxy client feature supports ISSU.

ISSU - DHCP relay on unnumbered interface—The DHCP relay on unnumbered interface feature supports ISSU.

ISSU - DHCP server—The DHCP server feature supports ISSU.

ISSU - DHCP snooping—DHCP snooping supports ISSU.

ISSU - EtherChannel - PagP LACP—PagP and LACP support ISSU.

Cisco Express Forwarding—Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) supports ISSU.

ISSU - FHRP/GLBP—The Gateway Load Balancing Protocol (GLBP) supports ISSU.

ISSU - FHRP/HSRP—The Hot Standby Router Protocol (HSRP) supports ISSU.

ISSU - Frame Relay—The Frame Relay protocol supports ISSU.

ISSU - HDLC—The High-Level Data Link Control (HDLC) protocol supports ISSU.

ISSU - IEEE 802.1x—The IEEE 802.1x protocol supports ISSU.

ISSU - IEEE 802.3af—IEEE 802.3af supports ISSU.

ISSU - IGMP snooping—IGMP snooping supports ISSU.

ISSU - IP Host—The IP host supports ISSU.

ISSU - IS-IS - IS-IS protocol supports ISSU.

ISSU - MPLS L3VPN—Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) supports ISSU. For information about upgrading ISSU MPLS-related applications through ISSU, see the ISSU MPLS Clients document.

ISSU - Port Security—Port security supports ISSU.

ISSU - PPP/MLP—The PPP and multilink PPP (MLP) protocols support ISSU.

ISSU - QoS support—The Quality of Service (QoS) feature supports ISSU.

ISSU - Remote File System—The Remote File System (RFS) versioning feature supports ISSU.

ISSU - SNMP—SNMP supports ISSU.

ISSU - STP—STP supports ISSU

SNMP Support for ISSU

ISSU - SNMP for SSO provides a mechanism for synchronizing the SNMP configurations and the MIBs that support SSO from the active RP to the standby RP, assuming that both RPs are running the same version of Cisco IOS software. This assumption is not valid for ISSU.

ISSU - SNMP provides an SNMP client that can handle ISSU transformations for the MIBs. An SNMP client (SIC) handles ISSU for all MIBs and handles the transmit and receive functions required for ISSU. During SNMP, a MIB is completely synchronized from the active RP to the standby RP only if the versions of the MIB on both Cisco IOS releases are the same.

Compatibility Verification Using Cisco Feature Navigator

The ISSU application on Cisco Feature Navigator allows you to:

Select an ISSU-capable image

Identify which images are compatible with that image

Compare two images and understand the compatibility level of the images (that is, compatible, base-level compatible, and incompatible)

Compare two images and see the client compatibility for each ISSU client

Provide links to release notes for the image

How to Perform the ISSU Process

Unlike SSO, which is a mode of operation for the device and a prerequisite for performing ISSU, the ISSU process is a series of steps performed while the router or switch is in operation. The steps result in the implementation of new or modified Cisco IOS software, and have a minimal impact to traffic.

Restrictions for Performing the ISSU Process

The following list provides basic restrictions for performing the ISSU process:

Even with ISSU, it is recommended that upgrades be performed during a maintenance window.

The new features should not be enabled (if they require change of configuration) during the ISSU process.

In a downgrade scenario, if any feature is not available in the downgrade revision Cisco IOS software image, that feature should be disabled prior to initiating the ISSU process.

The tasks in the following sections explain how to perform the ISSU process:

Loading Cisco IOS Software on the Standby RP (required)

Switching to the Standby RP (required)

Stopping the ISSU Rollback Timer (required)

Verifying the ISSU Software Installation (required)

Aborting a Software Upgrade Using ISSU (optional)

Configuring the Rollback Timer to Safeguard Against Upgrades (optional)

Displaying ISSU Compatibility Matrix Information (optional)

Loading Cisco IOS Software on the Standby RP

This task describes how to use ISSU to load Cisco IOS software to the standby RP.

Prerequisites

Ensure that both the active and the standby RPs are configured in SSO mode. Refer to the Stateful Switchover document for more details on how to configure SSO mode on RPs.

Ensure that the new version of Cisco IOS software image is already loaded in the file system of both the active and standby RPs. Also ensure that appropriate boot parameters are set for the standby RP.

Optionally, customers may want to perform additional tests and commands to determine the current state of peers and interfaces for later comparison.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. issu loadversion active-slot active-image standby-slot standby-image [force]

3. show issu state [detail]

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

issu loadversion active-slot active-image standby-slot standby-image [force]

Example:
Router# issu loadversion a 
disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830 b 
stby-disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830

Starts the ISSU process.

It may take several seconds after the issu loadversion command is entered for Cisco IOS software to load onto the standby RP and for the standby RP to transition to SSO mode.

Step 3 

show issu state [detail]

Example:

Router# show issu state

Displays the state of the during the ISSU process. At this point in the ISSU process, use this command to check that the standby RP is loaded and is in SSO mode.

It may take several seconds after entering the issu loadversion command for Cisco IOS software to load onto the standby RP and the standby RP to transition to SSO mode. If you enter the show issu state command too soon, you may not see the information you need.

Switching to the Standby RP

This task describes how to switch to the standby RP, which is running the new Cisco IOS software image.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. issu runversion slot image

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

issu runversion slot image

Example:

Router# issu runversion b stby-disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830

Forces a switchover of the active to the standby processor and causes the newly active processor to run the new image.

Stopping the ISSU Rollback Timer

The following task describes how to stop the rollback timer. If the rollback timer is not stopped, the system automatically aborts the ISSU process and reverts to the original Cisco IOS software version if the next ISSU procedure is not performed prior to the rollback timer timeout. For example, the ISSU process would abort after the issu acceptversion command was entered only if the issu runversion command was not entered before rollback timeout.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. issu acceptversion {active slot-number | active slot-name slot-name}

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

issu acceptversion {active slot-number | active slot-name slot-name}

Example:

Router# issu acceptversion b disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830

Halts the rollback timer and ensures the new Cisco IOS software image is not automatically aborted during the ISSU process.

Verifying the ISSU Software Installation

During the ISSU process, there are three valid states: init, load version, and run version. Use the show issu state command to get information on each or all of these states:

Init state—The initial state is two RPs, one active and one standby, before the ISSU process is started.

Load version (LV) state—The standby RP is loaded with the new version of Cisco IOS software.

Run version (RV) state—The issu runversion command forces the switchover of the RPs. The newly active RP now runs the new Cisco IOS software image.

You can verify the ISSU software installation by entering show commands that provide information on the state of the during the ISSU process.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. show issu state [detail]

3. show redundancy [clients | counters | debug-log | handover | history | states | inter-device]

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

show issu state [detail]

Example:

Router# show issu state

Displays the state of the during the ISSU process.

Step 3 

show redundancy [clients | counters | debug-log | handover | history | states | inter-device]

Example:

Router# show redundancy

Displays current or historical status, mode, and related redundancy information about the device.

Enabling the New Standby RP to Use New Cisco IOS Software Version

After loading new Cisco IOS software to the standby RP, causing the standby RP to become the active RP and the former active RP to become the standby RP, you need to enable the new standby RP to use the new Cisco IOS software version. This task explains how to perform that process.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. issu commitversion slot active-image

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

issu commitversion slot active-image

Example:
Router# issu commitversion a 
stby-disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830

Allows the new Cisco IOS software image to be loaded into the standby RP.

Aborting a Software Upgrade Using ISSU

You can abort the ISSU process at any stage manually by issuing the issu abortversion command. The ISSU process also aborts on its own if the software detects a failure.

If you abort the process after you issue the issu loadversion command, then the standby RP is reset and reloaded with the original software.

If the process is aborted after either the issu runversion or issu acceptversion command is entered, then a second switchover is performed to the new standby RP that is still running the original software version. The RP that had been running the new software is reset and reloaded with the original software version.

This task describes how to abort the ISSU process before a user has committed to the process by issuing the issu commitversion command.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. issu abortversion slot image

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

issu abortversion slot image

Example:
Router# issu abortversion b 
disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830

Cancels the ISSU upgrade or downgrade process in progress and restores the router to its state before the process had started.

Configuring the Rollback Timer to Safeguard Against Upgrades

The Cisco IOS software maintains an ISSU rollback timer. The rollback timer provides a safeguard against an upgrade that may leave the new active RP in a state in which communication with the RP is severed.

A user may want to configure the rollback timer to fewer than 45 minutes (the default) so that the user need not wait in case the new software is not committed or the connection to the router was lost while it was in runversion mode. A user may want to configure the rollback timer to more than 45 minutes in order to have enough time to verify the operation of the new Cisco IOS software before committing the new image.

Once you are satisfied that the ISSU process has been successful and you want to remain in the current state, you must indicate acceptance by issuing the issu acceptversion command, which stops the rollback timer. Therefore, entering the issu acceptversion command is extremely important to moving the ISSU process forward.

Issuing the issu commitversion command at this stage is equal to entering both the issu acceptversion and the issu commitversion commands. Use the issu commitversion command if you do not intend to run in the current state for a period of time and are satisfied with the new software version.

This task explains how to configure the rollback timer.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. configure issu set rollback timer seconds

4. show issu rollback timer

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

configure issu set rollback timer seconds

Example:

Router(config)# configure issu set rollback timer 3600

Configures the rollback timer value.

Step 4 

exit

Example:

Router(config)# exit

Returns the user to privileged EXEC mode.

Step 5 

show issu rollback timer

Example:

Router# show issu rollback timer

Displays the current setting of the ISSU rollback timer.

Displaying ISSU Compatibility Matrix Information

The ISSU compatibility matrix contains information about other software images about the version in question. This compatibility matrix represents the compatibility of the two software versions, one running on the active and the other on the standby RP, and the matrix allows the system to determine the highest operating mode it can achieve. This information helps the user identify whether or not to use ISSU.

This task explains how to display information about the ISSU compatibility matrix.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. show issu comp-matrix {negotiated | stored}

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

show issu comp-matrix {negotiated | stored}

Example:

Router# show issu comp-matrix

Displays information regarding the ISSU compatibility matrix.

Configuration Examples for Performing ISSU

This section contains the following configuration examples:

Verifying Redundancy Mode Before Beginning the ISSU Process: Example

Verifying the ISSU State: Example

Performing the ISSU Process: Example

Aborting the ISSU Process: Example

Verifying Rollback Timer Information: Example

Verifying Redundancy Mode Before Beginning the ISSU Process: Example

Before you begin the ISSU process, verify the redundancy mode for the system. NSF and SSO must be configured before attempting an ISSU. The following example displays verification that the system is in SSO mode and that slot A—RP A is the active R, and slot B—RP B is the standby RP. Both RPs are running the same Cisco IOS software image.

Router# show redundancy states

        my state = 13 -ACTIVE 
      peer state = 8  -STANDBY HOT 
           Mode = Duplex
           Unit = Primary
        Unit ID = 0

Redundancy Mode (Operational) = SSO
Redundancy Mode (Configured)  = SSO
     Split Mode = Disabled
   Manual Swact = Enabled
 Communications = Up

   client count = 31
 client_notification_TMR = 30000 milliseconds
           RF debug mask = 0x0   

Router# show redundancy

Redundant System Information :
------------------------------
       Available system uptime = 9 minutes
Switchovers system experienced = 0
              Standby failures = 0
        Last switchover reason = none

                 Hardware Mode = Duplex
    Configured Redundancy Mode = SSO
     Operating Redundancy Mode = SSO
              Maintenance Mode = Disabled
                Communications = Up

Current Processor Information :
-------------------------------
               Active Location = slot A
        Current Software state = ACTIVE
       Uptime in current state = 9 minutes
                 Image Version = Cisco IOS Software, 10000 Software (C10K2-P11-M), 
Experimental Version 12.2(20040825:224856) [wgrupp-c10k_bba_122s_work 102] Copyright (c) 
1986-2004 by Cisco Systems, Inc. Compiled Mon 30-Aug-04 10:29 by wgrupp
                          BOOT = disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830,1;
                   CONFIG_FILE = 
                       BOOTLDR = 
        Configuration register = 0x102

Peer Processor Information :
----------------------------
              Standby Location = slot B
        Current Software state = STANDBY HOT
       Uptime in current state = 8 minutes
                 Image Version = Cisco IOS Software, 10000 Software (C10K2-P11-M), 
Experimental Version 12.2(20040825:224856) [wgrupp-c10k_bba_122s_work 102] Copyright (c) 
1986-2004 by Cisco Systems, Inc. Compiled Mon 30-Aug-04 10:29 by wgrupp
                          BOOT = disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830,1;
                   CONFIG_FILE = 
                       BOOTLDR = 
        Configuration register = 0x102

Verifying the ISSU State: Example

The following example displays and verifies the ISSU state:

Router# show issu state detail 

                          Slot = A
                      RP State = Active
                    ISSU State = Init
                 Boot Variable = N/A
                Operating Mode = SSO
               Primary Version = N/A
             Secondary Version = N/A
               Current Version = disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830

                          Slot = B
                      RP State = Standby
                    ISSU State = Init
                 Boot Variable = N/A
                Operating Mode = SSO
               Primary Version = N/A
             Secondary Version = N/A
               Current Version = disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830

The new version of the Cisco IOS software must be present on both of the RPs. The directory information displayed for each of the RPs (or RPs) shows that the new version is present.

Router# directory disk0:

Directory of disk0:/

    1  -rw-    16864340  Jul 16 2004 01:59:42 -04:00  c10k2-p11-mz.122-16.BX1.bin
    2  -rw-     2530912  Jul 16 2004 02:00:04 -04:00  c10k2-eboot-mz.122-16.BX1.bin
    3  -rw-    20172208  Aug 30 2004 16:25:56 -04:00  c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830
    4  -rw-    20171492  Aug 31 2004 12:25:34 -04:00  c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830

64253952 bytes total (4509696 bytes free)

Router# directory stby-disk0:

Directory of stby-disk0:/

    1  -rw-    16864340  Jul 16 2004 09:00:26 -04:00  c10k2-p11-mz.122-16.BX1.bin
    2  -rw-     2530912  Jul 16 2004 09:00:46 -04:00  c10k2-eboot-mz.122-16.BX1.bin
    3  -rw-    20172208  Aug 30 2004 16:28:44 -04:00  c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830
    4  -rw-    20171492  Aug 31 2004 12:30:20 -04:00  c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830

64253952 bytes total (4509696 bytes free)

Performing the ISSU Process: Example

The following examples explain how to verify the ISSU software installation by entering show commands that provide information on the state of the during the ISSU process.

Initiating the ISSU Process: Example

To initiate the ISSU process, enter the issu loadversion command as shown in the following example:

Router# issu loadversion a disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830 b 
stby-disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830

The following two examples display the ISSU state and redundancy state after ISSU process initiation:

Router# show issu state

                          Slot = A
                      RP State = Active
                    ISSU State = Load Version
                 Boot Variable = disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830,1;

                          Slot = B
                      RP State = Standby
                    ISSU State = Load Version
                 Boot Variable = 
disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830,12;disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830,1;

Router# show redundancy state

       my state = 13 -ACTIVE 
     peer state = 8  -STANDBY HOT 
           Mode = Duplex
           Unit = Primary
        Unit ID = 0

Redundancy Mode (Operational) = SSO
Redundancy Mode (Configured)  = SSO
     Split Mode = Disabled
   Manual Swact = Enabled
 Communications = Up

   client count = 31
 client_notification_TMR = 30000 milliseconds
           RF debug mask = 0x0 

Forcing a Switchover from the Active RP to the Standby RP: Example

At this point, the system is ready to switch over and run the new version of Cisco IOS software that has been loaded onto the standby RP. When you enter the issu runversion command, an SSO switchover will be performed, and NSF procedures will be invoked if so configured.

Router# issu runversion b stby-disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830

Once the ISSU process has been completed, the system will be running the new version of software and the previously active RP will now become the standby RP. The standby will be reset and reloaded, but it will remain on the previous version of software and come back online in STANDBY-HOT status. The following example shows how to connect to the newly active RP and verify these conditions.

Router# show redundancy

Redundant System Information :
------------------------------
       Available system uptime = 24 minutes
Switchovers system experienced = 1
              Standby failures = 0
        Last switchover reason = user initiated

                 Hardware Mode = Duplex
    Configured Redundancy Mode = SSO
     Operating Redundancy Mode = SSO
              Maintenance Mode = Disabled
                Communications = Up

Current Processor Information :
-------------------------------
               Active Location = slot B
        Current Software state = ACTIVE
       Uptime in current state = 8 minutes
                 Image Version = Cisco IOS Software, 10000 Software (C10K2-P11-M), 
Experimental Version 12.2(20040825:224856) [wgrupp-c10k_bba_122s_work 103] Copyright (c) 
1986-2004 by Cisco Systems, Inc. Compiled Mon 30-Aug-04 11:50 by wgrupp
                          BOOT = 
disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830,12;disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830,1;
                   CONFIG_FILE = 
                       BOOTLDR = 
        Configuration register = 0x102

Peer Processor Information :
----------------------------
              Standby Location = slot A
        Current Software state = STANDBY HOT
       Uptime in current state = 6 minutes
                 Image Version = Cisco IOS Software, 10000 Software (C10K2-P11-M), 
Experimental Version 12.2(20040825:224856) [wgrupp-c10k_bba_122s_work 102] Copyright (c) 
1986-2004 by Cisco Systems, Inc. Compiled Mon 30-Aug-04 10:29 by wgrupp 
                          BOOT = disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830,1;
                   CONFIG_FILE = 
                       BOOTLDR = 
        Configuration register = 0x102

Router# show issu state
                          Slot = B
                      RP State = Active
                    ISSU State = Run Version
                 Boot Variable = 
disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830,12;disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830,1;

                          Slot = A
                      RP State = Standby
                    ISSU State = Run Version
                 Boot Variable = disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830,1;

Router# show issu state detail

                          Slot = B
                      RP State = Active
                    ISSU State = Run Version
                 Boot Variable = 
disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830,12;disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830,1;
                Operating Mode = SSO
               Primary Version = disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830
             Secondary Version = disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830
               Current Version = disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830

                          Slot = A
                      RP State = Standby
                    ISSU State = Run Version
                 Boot Variable = disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830,1;
                Operating Mode = SSO
               Primary Version = disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830
             Secondary Version = disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830
               Current Version = disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830

The new active RP is now running the new version of software, and the standby RP is running the old version of software and is in the STANDBY-HOT state.

Stopping the Rollback Process: Example

In the following example, the "Automatic Rollback Time" information indicates the amount of time left before an automatic rollback will occur. Enter the issu acceptversion command within the time period specified by the rollback timer to acknowledge that the RP has achieved connectivity to the outside world; otherwise, the ISSU process is terminated, and the system reverts to the previous version of Cisco IOS software by switching to the standby RP.

Router# show issu rollback-timer 

Rollback Process State = In progress
Configured Rollback Time = 45:00
Automatic Rollback Time = 29:03

Entering the issu acceptversion command stops the rollback timer:

Router# issu acceptversion b disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830

Committing the New Software to the Standby RP: Example

The following example shows how to commit the new Cisco IOS software image in the file system of the standby RP and ensure that both the active and the standby RPs are in the run version (RV) state. The standby RP is reset and reloaded with the new Cisco IOS software and returned to STANDBY-HOT status.

Router# issu commitversion a stby-disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830

Router# show redundancy states

       my state = 13 -ACTIVE 
     peer state = 8  -STANDBY HOT 
           Mode = Duplex
           Unit = Secondary
        Unit ID = 1

Redundancy Mode (Operational) = SSO
Redundancy Mode (Configured)  = SSO
     Split Mode = Disabled
   Manual Swact = Enabled
 Communications = Up

   client count = 31
 client_notification_TMR = 30000 milliseconds
           RF debug mask = 0x0   

Router# show redundancy

Redundant System Information :
------------------------------
       Available system uptime = 35 minutes
Switchovers system experienced = 1
              Standby failures = 1
        Last switchover reason = user initiated

                 Hardware Mode = Duplex
    Configured Redundancy Mode = SSO
     Operating Redundancy Mode = SSO
              Maintenance Mode = Disabled
                Communications = Up

Current Processor Information :
-------------------------------
               Active Location = slot B
        Current Software state = ACTIVE
       Uptime in current state = 18 minutes
                 Image Version = Cisco IOS Software, 10000 Software (C10K2-P11-M), 
Experimental Version 12.2(20040825:224856) [wgrupp-c10k_bba_122s_work 103] Copyright (c) 
1986-2004 by Cisco Systems, Inc. Compiled Mon 30-Aug-04 11:50 by wgrupp
                          BOOT = 
disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830,12;disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830,1;
                   CONFIG_FILE = 
                       BOOTLDR = 
        Configuration register = 0x102

Peer Processor Information :
----------------------------
              Standby Location = slot A
        Current Software state = STANDBY HOT
       Uptime in current state = 4 minutes
                 Image Version = Cisco IOS Software, 10000 Software (C10K2-P11-M), 
Experimental Version 12.2(20040825:224856) [wgrupp-c10k_bba_122s_work 103] Copyright (c) 
1986-2004 by Cisco Systems, Inc. Compiled Mon 30-Aug-04 11:50 by wgrupp
                          BOOT = 
disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830,12;disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830,1;
                   CONFIG_FILE = 
                       BOOTLDR = 
        Configuration register = 0x102


Router# show issu state

                          Slot = B
                      RP State = Active
                    ISSU State = Init
                 Boot Variable = 
disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830,12;disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830,1;

                          Slot = A
                      RP State = Standby
                    ISSU State = Init
                 Boot Variable = 
disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830,12;disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830,1;

Router# show issu state detail

                          Slot = B
                      RP State = Active
                    ISSU State = Init
                 Boot Variable = 
disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830,12;disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830,1;
                Operating Mode = SSO
               Primary Version = N/A
             Secondary Version = N/A
               Current Version = disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830

                          Slot = A
                      RP State = Standby
                    ISSU State = Init
                 Boot Variable = 
disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830,12;disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830,1;
                Operating Mode = SSO
               Primary Version = N/A
             Secondary Version = N/A
               Current Version = disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830 

The ISSU process has been completed. At this stage, any further Cisco IOS software version upgrade or downgrade will require that a new ISSU process be invoked.

Aborting the ISSU Process: Example

The following example shows how to abort the ISSU process manually:

Router# issu abortversion b disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830

If you abort the process after you have entered the issu loadversion command, then the standby RP is reset and is reloaded with the original software version.

Verifying Rollback Timer Information: Example

To display rollback timer information, enter the show issu rollback-timer command:

Router# show issu rollback-timer 

        Rollback Process State = In progress
      Configured Rollback Time = 45:00
       Automatic Rollback Time = 29:03

Additional References

The following sections provide references related to performing ISSU.

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

Performing ISSU

Cisco IOS Software: Guide to Performing In Service Software Upgrades

Information about Cisco Nonstop Forwarding

Cisco Nonstop Forwarding

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios122s/122snwft/release/122s20/fsnsf20s.htm

Information about stateful switchover

Stateful Switchover

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios122s/122snwft/release/122s20/fssso20s.htm

ISSU and MPLS clients

ISSU MPLS Clients


Standards

Standards
Title

No new or modified standards are supported by this feature, and support for existing standards has not been modified by this feature.


MIBs

MIBs
MIBs Link

No new or modified MIBs are supported by this feature, and support for existing MIBs has not been modified by this feature.

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs


RFCs

RFCs
Title

No new or modified RFCs are supported by this feature, and support for existing RFCs has not been modified by this feature.


Technical Assistance

Description
Link

Technical Assistance Center (TAC) home page, containing 30,000 pages of searchable technical content, including links to products, technologies, solutions, technical tips, and tools. Registered Cisco.com users can log in from this page to access even more content.

http://www.cisco.com/public/support/tac/home.shtml


Command Reference

This section documents new and modified commands.

configure issu set rollback timer

issu abortversion

issu acceptversion

issu commitversion

issu loadversion

issu runversion

show issu comp-matrix, page 42

show issu state

show redundancy

configure issu set rollback timer

To configure the rollback timer value, use the configure issu set rollback timer command in global configuration mode.

configure issu set rollback timer seconds

Syntax Description

seconds

The rollback timer value, in seconds. The valid timer value range is from 0 to 7200 seconds (two hours). A value of 0 seconds disables the rollback timer.


Defaults

Rollback timer value is 45 minutes.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(28)SB

This command was introduced.

12.2(31)SGA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SGA.


Usage Guidelines

Use the configure issue set rollback timer command to configure the rollback timer value. Note that you can enable this command only when the Route Processors (RPs) are in the init state.

Examples

The following example sets the rollback timer value to 3600 seconds, or 1 hour:

configure issu set rollback timer 3600

Related Commands

Command
Description

issu acceptversion

Halts the rollback timer and ensures the new Cisco IOS software image is not automatically aborted during the ISSU process.

show issu rollback timer

Displays the current setting of the ISSU rollback timer.


issu abortversion

To cancel the In Service Software Upgrade (ISSU) upgrade or downgrade process in progress and restore the router to its state before the process had started, use the issue abortversion command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

issu abortversion slot image

Syntax Description

slot

The specified slot on the networking device. Refer to your hardware documentation for information on the number of slots on your networking device.

image

The new image to be loaded into the standby .


Defaults

This command is disabled by default.

Command Modes

User EXEC
Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(28)SB

This command was introduced.

12.2(31)SGA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SGA.


Usage Guidelines

The issu abortversion command allows the user to stop the ISSU process at any time before the user commits to completing the process by issuing the issu commitversion command. Before any action is taken, a check is performed to ensure that both RPs are either in the run version (RV) or load version (LV) state.

When the issu abortversion command is issued before the issu runversion command, the standby RP is reset and reloaded. When the issu abortversion command is issued after the issu runversion command, the network switches to the former Cisco IOS software version.

Examples

In the following example, the issu abortversion command resets and reloads the standby RP:

Router# issu abortversion a stby-disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830

Related Commands

Command
Description

issu acceptversion

Halts the rollback timer and ensures the new Cisco IOS software image is not automatically aborted during the ISSU process.

issu commitversion

Allows the new Cisco IOS software image to be loaded into the standby RP.

issu loadversion

Starts the ISSU process.

issu runversion

Forces a switchover of the active to the standby processor and causes the newly active processor to run the new image.

show issu state

Displays the state and current version of the during the ISSU process.


issu acceptversion

To halt the rollback timer and ensure the new Cisco IOS software image is not automatically aborted during the In Service Software Upgrade (ISSU) process, use the issu acceptversion command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

issu acceptversion {active slot-number | active slot-name slot-name}

Syntax Description

active slot-number

The specified active slot on your networking device. Refer to your hardware documentation for information on the number of slots on your networking device.

active slot-name slot-name

Identifies a specific slot name.


Defaults

45 minutes from the time the issu runversion command is issued to the time the issu acceptversion is issued.

Command Modes

User EXEC
Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(28)SB

This command was introduced.

12.2(31)SGA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SGA.


Usage Guidelines

Use the issu acceptversion command to ensure that the active Route Processor (RP) is running the new image, that the standby RP is running the old image, and that both RPs are in the run version (RV) state. If the issu acceptversion command is not issued within 45 minutes from the time the issu runversion command is issued, the new active RP is assumed to be unreachable, and the entire ISSU process is automatically rolled back to the previous version of the software. The rollback timer starts immediately after the user issues the issu runversion command.

If the rollback timer is set for a short period of time, such as 1 minute, and the standby RP is not yet in a hot standby state, you then have 15 1-minute extensions during which the router will wait for the standby state to become hot standby state. However, if the standby state becomes hot standby state within the 15-minute extension, the router will abort the ISSU process because the 1-minute rollback timer has expired. Therefore, it is not recommended to set the rollback timer shorter than the time required for the standby state to become hot standby state.

If the rollback timer is set to a long period of time, such as the default of 45 minutes, and the standby RP goes into the hot standby state in 7 minutes, you have 38 minutes (45 minus 7) to roll back if necessary.

Use the configure issu set rollback timer to configure the 45-minute default value on the rollback timer.

Examples

The following example halts the rollback timer and allows the ISSU process to continue:

Router# issu acceptversion b disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830 

Related Commands

Command
Description

configure issu set rollback timer

Configures the rollback timer value.

issu abortversion

Cancels the ISSU upgrade or downgrade process in progress and restores the router to its state before the process had started.

issu commitversion

Allows the new Cisco IOS software image to be loaded into the standby RP.

issu loadversion

Starts the ISSU process.

issu runversion

Forces a switchover of the active to the standby processor and causes the newly active processor to run the new image.

show issu state

Displays the state and current version of the RPs during the ISSU process.


issu commitversion

To allow the new Cisco IOS software image to be loaded into the standby RP, use the issu commitversion command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

issu commitversion slot active-image

Syntax Description

slot

The specified slot on the networking device. Refer to your hardware documentation for information on the number of slots on your networking device.

active-image

The new image to be loaded into the active networking device.


Defaults

This command is disabled by default.

Command Modes

User EXEC
Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(28)SB

This command was introduced.

12.2(31)SGA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SGA.


Usage Guidelines

The issu commitversion command verifies that the standby Route Processor (RP) has the new Cisco IOS software image in its file system and that both RPs are in the run version (RV) state. If these conditions are met, then the following actions take place:

The standby RP is reset and booted with the new version of Cisco IOS software.

If both images are compatible, the standby RP moves into the stateful switchover (SSO) mode and is fully stateful for all clients and applications with which the standby RP is compatible.

If both images are not compatible, the standby RP moves into Route Processor Redundancy Plus (RPR+) mode or RPR mode.

If all conditions are correct, the RPs are moved into final state, which is the same as initial state.

Issuing the issu commitversion command completes the In Service Software Upgrade (ISSU) process. This process cannot be stopped or reverted to its original state without starting a new ISSU process.

Issuing the issu commitversion command at this stage is equivalent to entering both the issu acceptversion and the issu commitversion commands. Use the issu commitversion command if you do not intend to run in the current state for a period of time and are satisfied with the new software version.

Examples

The following example causes the standby RP to be reset and reloaded with the new Cisco IOS software version:

Router# issu commitversion a stby-disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830

Related Commands

Command
Description

issu abortversion

Cancels the ISSU upgrade or downgrade process in progress and restores the router to its state before the process had started.

issu acceptversion

Halts the rollback timer and ensures the new Cisco IOS software image is not automatically aborted during the ISSU process.

issu loadversion

Starts the ISSU process.

issu runversion

Forces a switchover of the active to the standby processor and causes the newly active processor to run the new image.

show issu state

Displays the state and current version of the RPs during the ISSU process.


issu loadversion

To start the In Service Software Upgrade (ISSU) process, use the issu loadversion command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

issu loadversion active-slot active-image standby-slot standby-image [force]

Syntax Description

active-slot

The active slot on the networking device.

active-image

The active image on the networking device.

standby-slot

The standby slot on the networking device.

standby-image

The new image to be loaded into the standby networking device.

force

(Optional) Used to override the automatic rollback when the new Cisco IOS software version is detected to be incompatible, which is the case when as user intends to perform a fast software upgrade (FSU) in Route Processor Redundancy (RPR) mode.


Defaults

This command is disabled by default.

Command Modes

User EXEC
Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(28)SB

This command was introduced.

12.2(31)SGA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SGA.


Usage Guidelines

Enabling the issue loadversion command causes the standby Route Processor (RP) to be reset and booted with the new Cisco IOS software image specified by the command. If both the active and standby RP images are ISSU-capable, ISSU-compatible, and have no configuration mismatches, then the standby RP moves into stateful switchover (SSO) mode, and both RPs move into the load version (LV) state.

It may take several seconds after the issu loadversion command is entered for Cisco IOS software to load into the standby RP and the standby RP to transition to SSO mode.

Examples

The following example initiates the ISSU process by loading the active image into the active RP slot and loading the standby image into the standby RP slot:

Router# issu loadversion a disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830 b 
stby-disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830






Related Commands

Command
Description

issu abortversion

Cancels the ISSU upgrade or downgrade process in progress and restores the router to its state before the process had started.

issu acceptversion

Halts the rollback timer and ensures the new Cisco IOS software image is not automatically aborted during the ISSU process.

issu commitversion

Allows the new Cisco IOS software image to be loaded into the standby RP.

issu runversion

Forces a switchover of the active to the standby processor and causes the newly active processor to run the new image.

show issu state

Displays the state and current version of the RPs during the ISSU process.


issu runversion

To force a switchover from the active Route Processor (RP) to the standby RP and cause the newly active RP to run the new image specified in the issu loadversion command, use the issu runversion command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

issu runversion slot image

Syntax Description

slot

The specified slot on the networking device. Refer to your hardware documentation for information on the number of slots on your networking device.

image

The new image to be loaded into the standby RP.


Defaults

This command is disabled by default.

Command Modes

User EXEC
Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(28)SB

This command was introduced.

12.2(31)SGA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SGA.


Usage Guidelines

When a user enables the issu runversion command, a switchover is performed, and the standby RP is booted with the old image version following the reset caused by the switchover. As soon as the standby RP moves into the standby state, the rollback timer is started.

Examples

In the following example, the issu runversion command is used to switch to the redundant RP with the new Cisco IOS software image:

Router# issu runversion b stby-disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.2.20040830

Related Commands

Command
Description

issu abortversion

Cancels the ISSU upgrade or downgrade process in progress and restores the router to its state before the process had started.

issu acceptversion

Halts the rollback timer and ensures the new Cisco IOS software image is not automatically aborted during the ISSU process.

issu commitversion

Commits the new Cisco IOS software image in the file system of the standby RP and ensures that both the active and standby RPs are in the RV state.

issu loadversion

Starts the ISSU process.

show issu state

Displays the state and current version of the RPs during the ISSU process.


show issu comp-matrix

To display information regarding the In Service Software Upgrade (ISSU) compatibility matrix, use the show issu comp-matrix command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

show issu comp-matrix {negotiated | stored}

Syntax Description

negotiated

Displays negotiated matrix information.

stored

Displays stored matrix information.


Command Modes

User EXEC
Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(28)SB

This command was introduced.

12.2(31)SGA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SGA.


Usage Guidelines

Before attempting an ISSU, you should know the compatibility level between the Cisco IOS software versions on the active and the standby Route Processors (RPs). ISSU will not work if the two versions are incompatible. Use the show issu comp-matrix command with the negotiated keyword to display information on the negotiation of the compatibility matrix data between two software versions on a given system.

Compatibility matrix data is stored with each Cisco IOS software image that supports the ISSU capability. Use the show issu comp-matrix command with the stored keyword to display stored compatibility matrix information.

Examples

The following example displays stored compatibility matrix information:

Router# show issu comp-matrix stored

show issu state

To display the state and current version of the Route Processors (RPs) during the In Service Software Upgrade (ISSU) process, use the show issu state command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

show issu state [detail]

Syntax Description

detail

(Optional) Provides detailed information about the state of the active and standby RPs.


Command Modes

User EXEC
Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(28)SB

This command was introduced.

12.2(31)SGA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SGA.


Usage Guidelines

Use the show issu state command to display the state and current version of each RP.

It may take several seconds after the issu loadversion command is entered for Cisco IOS software to load onto the standby RP and the standby RP to transition to stateful switchover (SSO) mode. If you enter the show issu state command too soon, you may not see the information you need.

Examples

The following example displays and verifies the ISSU state:

Router# show issu state detail 

                          Slot = A
                      RP State = Active
                    ISSU State = Init
                 Boot Variable = N/A
                Operating Mode = SSO
               Primary Version = N/A
             Secondary Version = N/A
               Current Version = disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830

                          Slot = B
                      RP State = Standby
                    ISSU State = Init
                 Boot Variable = N/A
                Operating Mode = SSO
               Primary Version = N/A
             Secondary Version = N/A
               Current Version = disk0:c10k2-p11-mz.1.20040830

Related Commands

Command
Description

issu abortversion

Cancels the ISSU upgrade or downgrade process in progress and restores the router to its state before the process had started.

issu acceptversion

Halts the rollback timer and ensures the new Cisco IOS software image is not automatically aborted during the ISSU process.

issu commitversion

Allows the new Cisco IOS software image to be loaded into the standby RP.

issu loadversion

Starts the ISSU process.

issu runversion

Forces a switchover of the active to the standby processor and causes the newly active processor to run the new image.


show redundancy

To display current or historical status and related information on planned or logged handovers, use the show redundancy command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

Privileged EXEC Mode

show redundancy [clients | counters | debug-log | handover | history | switchover history |
states | inter-device]

User EXEC Mode

show redundancy {clients | counters | history | states | switchover}

Syntax Description

clients

Displays the redundancy-aware client-application list.

counters

Displays redundancy-related operational measurements.

debug-log

(Optional) Displays up to 256 redundancy-related debug entries.

handover

(Optional) Displays details of any pending scheduled handover.

history

Displays past status and related information about logged handovers. This is the only keyword supported on the Cisco AS5800.

switchover history

Displays redundancy switchover history.

states

Displays redundancy-related states: disabled, initialization, standby, active (various substates for the latter two).

switchover

Displays the switchover counts, the uptime since active, and the total system uptime.

inter-device

(Optional) Displays redundancy interdevice operational state and statistics.


Command Modes

User EXEC
Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

11.3(6)AA

This command was introduced in privileged EXEC mode.

12.2(8)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(8)T. Support for the Cisco AS5800 and Cisco AS5850 is not included in this release.

12.2(8)MC2

This command was introduced in user EXEC mode.

12.2(11)T

The privileged EXEC mode form of this command was implemented on the Cisco AS5800 and Cisco AS5850.

12.2(14)SX

The user EXEC mode form of this command was introduced on the Supervisor Engine 720.

12.2(18)S

This command was introduced on Cisco 7304 routers running Cisco IOS Release 12.2S.

12.2(20)S

The states, counters, clients, history, and switchover history keywords were added.

12.2(17d)SXB

Support for the user EXEC mode form of this command was extended to the Supervisor Engine 2.

12.3(8)T

The inter-device keyword was added to the privileged EXEC form of the command.

12.3(11)T

The user EXEC form of this command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.3(11)T.

12.2(28)SB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(28)SB.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(31)SGA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SGA.


Usage Guidelines

Cisco AS5800

Use this command from the router-shelf console to determine when failover is enabled. Use this command with the history keyword to log failover events.

Cisco AS5850

To use this command, the router must have two route-switch-controller (RSC) cards installed and must be connected to one of them.

Examples

The following example shows how to display information about the RF client:

Router# show redundancy clients

 clientID = 0       clientSeq = 0        RF_INTERNAL_MSG
 clientID = 25      clientSeq = 130      CHKPT RF
 clientID = 5026    clientSeq = 130      CHKPT RF
 clientID = 5029    clientSeq = 135      Redundancy Mode RF
 clientID = 5006    clientSeq = 170      RFS client
 clientID = 6       clientSeq = 180      Const OIR Client
 clientID = 7       clientSeq = 190      PF Client
 clientID = 5008    clientSeq = 190      PF Client
 clientID = 28      clientSeq = 330      Const Startup Config
 clientID = 29      clientSeq = 340      Const IDPROM Client
 clientID = 65000   clientSeq = 65000    RF_LAST_CLIENT

The output displays the following information:

clientID displays the client's ID number.

clientSeq displays the client's notification sequence number.

Current RF state.

The following example shows how to display information about the RF counters:

Router# show redundancy counters

Redundancy Facility OMs
               comm link up = 0
        comm link down down = 0

          invalid client tx = 0
          null tx by client = 0
                tx failures = 0
      tx msg length invalid = 0

      client not rxing msgs = 0
 rx peer msg routing errors = 0
           null peer msg rx = 0
        errored peer msg rx = 0

                 buffers tx = 0
     tx buffers unavailable = 0
                 buffers rx = 0
      buffer release errors = 0

 duplicate client registers = 0
  failed to register client = 0
       Invalid client syncs = 0

The following example shows information about the RF history:

Router# show redundancy history

00:00:00 client added: RF_INTERNAL_MSG(0) seq=0
00:00:00 client added: RF_LAST_CLIENT(65000) seq=65000
00:00:02 client added: Const Startup Config Sync Clien(28) seq=330
00:00:02 client added: CHKPT RF(25) seq=130
00:00:02 client added: PF Client(7) seq=190
00:00:02 client added: Const OIR Client(6) seq=180
00:00:02 client added: Const IDPROM Client(29) seq=340
00:00:02 *my state = INITIALIZATION(2) *peer state = DISABLED(1)
00:00:02 RF_PROG_INITIALIZATION(100) RF_INTERNAL_MSG(0) op=0 rc=11
00:00:02 RF_PROG_INITIALIZATION(100) CHKPT RF(25) op=0 rc=11
00:00:02 RF_PROG_INITIALIZATION(100) Const OIR Client(6) op=0 rc=11
00:00:02 RF_PROG_INITIALIZATION(100) PF Client(7) op=0 rc=11

The following example shows information about the RF state:

Router# show redundancy states

       my state = 13 -ACTIVE
     peer state = 1  -DISABLED
           Mode = Simplex
           Unit = Primary
        Unit ID = 1

Redundancy Mode (Operational) = Route Processor Redundancy
Redundancy Mode (Configured)  = Route Processor Redundancy
     Split Mode = Disabled
   Manual Swact = Disabled  Reason: Simplex mode
 Communications = Down      Reason: Simplex mode

   client count = 11
 client_notification_TMR = 30000 milliseconds
          keep_alive TMR = 4000 milliseconds
        keep_alive count = 0
    keep_alive threshold = 7
           RF debug mask = 0x0

If you enter the show redundancy states command with stateful switchover (SSO) configured, the Redundancy Mode (Operational) and the Redundancy Mode (Configured) fields display stateful switchover.

The following example shows how to display the switchover counts, the uptime since active, and the total system uptime:

Router> show redundancy switchover

Switchovers this system has experienced          : 1
Uptime since this supervisor switched to active  : 1 minute
Total system uptime from reload                  : 2 hours, 47 minutes

Cisco AS5850 Example

The following is sample output from the show redundancy handover and show redundancy states commands on a Cisco AS5850:

Router# show redundancy handover

No busyout period specified
Handover pending at 23:00:00 PDT Wed May 9 2001

Router# show redundancy states

my state = 14 -ACTIVE_EXTRALOAD
peer state = 4 -STANDBY COLD
Mode = Duplex
Unit = Preferred Primary
Unit ID = 6
Redundancy Mode = Handover-split: If one RSC fails, the peer RSC will take over the 
feature boards
Maintenance Mode = Disabled
Manual Swact = Disabled Reason: Progression in progress
Communications = Up
client count = 3
client_notification_TMR = 30000 milliseconds
keep_alive TMR = 4000 milliseconds
keep_alive count = 1
keep_alive threshold = 7
RF debug mask = 0x0

Cisco AS5800 Example

The following is sample output from the show redundancy command on a Cisco AS5800:

Router# show redundancy

DSC in slot 12:
Hub is in 'active' state.
Clock is in 'active' state.
DSC in slot 13:
Hub is in 'backup' state.
Clock is in 'backup' state.

Cisco AS5800 with History Example

The following is sample output from the show redundancy history command on a Cisco AS5800:

Router# show redundancy history

DSC Redundancy Status Change History:

981130 18:56 Slot 12 DSC: Hub, becoming active - RS instruction
981130 19:03 Slot 12 DSC: Hub, becoming active - D13 order

Cisco AS5800 Router Shelves as Failover Pair Example

The following is sample output from two Cisco AS5800 router shelves configured as a failover pair. The active router shelf is initially RouterA. The show redundancy history and show redundancy commands have been issued. The show redundancy command shows that failover is enabled, shows the configured group number, and shows that this router shelf is the active one of the pair. Compare this output with that from the backup router shelf (RouterB) that follows.


Note When RouterA is reloaded, thereby forcing a failover, new entries are shown on RouterB when a
show redundancy history command is issued after failover has occurred.


Log from the First Router (RouterA)

RouterA# show redundancy history

DSC Redundancy Status Change History:

010215 18:17 Slot -1 DSC:Failover configured -> ACTIVE role by default.
010215 18:18 Slot -1 DSC:Failover -> BACKUP role.
010215 18:18 Slot 12 DSC:Failover -> ACTIVE role.
010215 18:18 Slot 12 DSC:Hub, becoming active - arb timeout

RouterA# show redundancy

failover mode enabled, failover group = 32
Currently ACTIVE role.
DSC in slot 12:
Hub is in 'active' state.
Clock is in 'active' state.
No connection to slot 13

RouterA# reload

Proceed with reload? [confirm] y
*Feb 15 20:19:11.059:%SYS-5-RELOAD:Reload requested
System Bootstrap, Version xxx
Copyright xxx by cisco Systems, Inc.
C7200 processor with 131072 Kbytes of main memory

Log from the Second Router (RouterB)

RouterB# show redundancy

failover mode enabled, failover group = 32
Currently BACKUP role.
No connection to slot 12
DSC in slot 13:
Hub is in 'backup' state.
Clock is in 'backup' state.

*Feb 16 03:24:53.931:%DSC_REDUNDANCY-3-BICLINK:Switching to DSC 13
*Feb 16 03:24:53.931:%DSC_REDUNDANCY-3-BICLINK:Failover:changing to active mode
*Feb 16 03:24:54.931:%DIAL13-3-MSG:
02:32:06:%DSC_REDUNDANCY-3-EVENT:Redundancy event:LINK_FAIL from other DSC
*Feb 16 03:24:55.491:%OIR-6-INSCARD:Card inserted in slot 12, interfaces administratively 
shut down
*Feb 16 03:24:58.455:%DIAL13-3-MSG:
02:32:09:%DSC_REDUNDANCY-3-EVENT:Redundancy event:LINK_FAIL from other DSC
*Feb 16 03:25:04.939:%DIAL13-0-MSG:

RouterB# show redundancy

failover mode enabled, failover group = 32
Currently ACTIVE role.
No connection to slot 12
DSC in slot 13:
Hub is in 'active' state.
Clock is in 'backup' state.

RouterB# show redundancy history

DSC Redundancy Status Change History:

010216 03:09 Slot -1 DSC:Failover configured -> BACKUP role.
010216 03:24 Slot 13 DSC:Failover -> ACTIVE role.
010216 03:24 Slot 13 DSC:Hub, becoming active - D12 linkfail
010216 03:24 Slot 13 DSC:Hub, becoming active - D12 linkfail

*Feb 16 03:26:14.079:%DSIPPF-5-DS_HELLO:DSIP Hello from shelf 47 slot 1 Succeeded
*Feb 16 03:26:14.255:%DSIPPF-5-DS_HELLO:DSIP Hello from shelf 47 slot 3 Succeeded
*Feb 16 03:26:14.979:%DSIPPF-5-DS_HELLO:DSIP Hello from shelf 47 slot 10 Succeeded

Privileged EXEC Mode Example

The following is sample output generated by this command in privileged EXEC mode on router platforms that support no keywords for the privileged EXEC mode form of the command:

RouterB# show redundancy

MWR1900 is the Active Router 
Previous States with most recent at bottom 

 INITL_INITL     Dec 31 19:00:00.000 
 LISTN_INITL     Feb 28 19:00:15.568 
 LISTN_LISTN     Feb 28 19:00:15.568 
 SPEAK_LISTN     Feb 28 19:00:18.568 
 SPEAK_SPEAK     Feb 28 19:00:18.568 
 STDBY_SPEAK     Mar 19 08:54:26.191 
 ACTIV_SPEAK     Mar 19 08:54:26.191 
 ACTIV_STDBY     Mar 19 08:54:26.191 
 ACTIV_ACTIV     Mar 19 08:54:26.191 
 INITL_ACTIV     Mar 19 08:56:22.700 
 INITL_INITL     Mar 19 08:56:22.700 
 INITL_LISTN     Mar 19 08:56:28.544 
 LISTN_LISTN     Mar 19 08:56:28.652 
 LISTN_SPEAK     Mar 19 08:56:31.544 
 SPEAK_SPEAK     Mar 19 08:56:31.652 
 SPEAK_STDBY     Mar 19 08:56:34.544 
 SPEAK_ACTIV     Mar 19 08:56:34.544 
 STDBY_ACTIV     Mar 19 08:56:34.652 
 ACTIV_ACTIV     Mar 19 08:56:34.652 
 INITL_ACTIV     Mar 19 10:20:41.455 
 INITL_INITL     Mar 19 10:20:41.455 
 INITL_LISTN     Mar 19 10:20:49.243 
 LISTN_LISTN     Mar 19 10:20:49.299 
 LISTN_SPEAK     Mar 19 10:20:52.244 
 SPEAK_SPEAK     Mar 19 10:20:52.300 
 SPEAK_STDBY     Mar 19 10:20:55.244 
 STDBY_STDBY     Mar 19 10:20:55.300 
 ACTIV_STDBY     Mar 19 10:21:01.692 
 ACTIV_ACTIV     Mar 19 10:21:01.692 

Related Commands

Command
Description

debug redundancy

Displays information used for troubleshooting dual (redundant) router shelves (Cisco AS5800) or RSCs (Cisco AS5850).

hw-module

Enables the router shelf to stop a DSC or to restart a stopped DSC.

mode

Sets the redundancy mode.

mode y-cable

Invokes y-cable mode.

redundancy

Enters redundancy configuration mode.

redundancy force-switchover

Forces a switchover from the active to the standby supervisor engine.

show chassis

Displays, for a router with two RSCs, information about mode (handover-split or classic-split), RSC configuration, and slot ownership.

show standby

Displays the standby configuration.

standalone

Specifies whether the MWR 1941-DC router is used in a redundant or standalone configuration.

standby

Sets HSRP attributes.