Cisco IOS Security Command Reference: Commands D to L, Cisco IOS XE Release 3SE (Cisco WLC 5700 Series)
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deny

To set conditions in a named IP access list or object group access control list (OGACL) that will deny packets, use the deny configuration command in the appropriate configuration mode. To remove a deny condition from an IP access list or OGACL, use the no form of this command.

deny protocol { src-addr src-wildcard | object-group object-group-name | any | host { addr | name } } { dest-addr dest-wildcard | any | eq port | gt port | host { addr | name } | lt port | neq port | portgroup srcport-groupname | object-group dest-addr-groupname | range port | [ dscp type | fragments | option option | precedence precedence | log | log-input | time-range time-range-name | tos tos | ttl ttl-value ] }

no deny protocol { src-addr src-wildcard | object-group object-group-name | any | host { addr | name } } { dest-addr dest-wildcard | any | eq port | gt port | host { addr | name } | lt port | neq port | portgroup srcport-groupname | object-group dest-addr-groupname | range port | [ dscp type | fragments | option option | precedence precedence | log | log-input | time-range time-range-name | tos tos | ttl ttl-value ] }

Syntax Description

protocol

Name or number of a protocol; valid values are eigrp, gre, icmp, igmp, igrp, ip, ipinip, nos, ospf, tcp, or udp, or an integer in the range 0 to 255 representing an IP protocol number. To match any Internet protocol (including Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP), TCP, and User Datagram Protocol (UDP), use the keyword ip. See the “Usage Guidelines” section for additional qualifiers.

src-addr

Number of the source network or host from which the packet is being sent in a 32-bit quantity in four-part, dotted-decimal format.

src-wildcard

Wildcard bits to be applied to source network in four-part, dotted-decimal format. Place ones in the bit positions you want to ignore.

object-group object-group-name

Specifies the source or destination name of the object group.

any

Specifies any source or any destination host as an abbreviation for the source-addror destination-addr valueand the source-wildcard or destination-wildcard value of 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255.

host addr

Specifies the source or destination address of a single host.

host name

Specifies the source or destination name of a single host.

tcp

Specifies the TCP protocol.

udp

Specifies the UDP protocol.

object-group source-addr-group-name

Specifies the source address group name.

destination-addr

Number of the network or host to which the packet is being sent in a 32-bit quantity in four-part, dotted-decimal format.

destination-wildcard

Wildcard bits to be applied to the destination in a 32-bit quantity in four-part, dotted-decimal format. Place ones in the bit positions you want to ignore.

eq port

Matches only packets on a given port number; see the “Usage Guidelines” section for valid values.

gt port

Matches only the packets with a greater port number; see the “Usage Guidelines” section for valid values.

lt port

Matches only the packets with a lower port number; see the “Usage Guidelines” section for valid values.

neq port

Matches only the packets that are not on a given port number; see the “Usage Guidelines” section for valid values.

portgroup srcport-group-name

Specifies the source port object group name.

object-group dest-addr-group-name

Specifies the destination address group name.

portgroup destport-group-name

Specifies the destination port object group name.

dscp type

(Optional) Matches the packets with the given Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) value; see the “Usage Guidelines” section for valid values.

fragments

(Optional) Applies the access list entry to noninitial fragments of packets; the fragment is either permitted or denied accordingly. For more details about the fragments keyword, see the “Access List Processing of Fragments” and “deny” sections in the “Usage Guidelines” section.

option option

(Optional) Matches the packets with the given IP options value number; see the “Usage Guidelines” section for valid values.

precedence precedence

(Optional) Specifies the precedence filtering level for packets; valid values are a number from 0 to 7 or by a name. See the “Usage Guidelines” section for a list of valid names.

log

(Optional) Causes an informational logging message about the packet that matches the entry to be sent to the console. (The level of messages logged to the console is controlled by the logging console command.)

The message for a standard list includes the access list number, whether the packet was permitted or denied, the source address, and the number of packets.

The message for an extended list includes the access list number; whether the packet was permitted or denied; the protocol; whether the protocol was TCP, UDP, ICMP, or a number; and, if appropriate, the source and destination addresses and source and destination port numbers.

For both standard and extended lists, the message is generated for the first packet that matches, and then at 5-minute intervals, including the number of packets permitted or denied in the prior 5-minute interval.

The logging facility might drop some logging message packets if there are too many to be handled or if there is more than one logging message to be handled in 1 second. This behavior prevents the router from reloading because of too many logging packets. Therefore, the logging facility should not be used as a billing tool or an accurate source of the number of matches to an access list.

log-input

(Optional) Matches the log against this entry, including the input interface.

time-range time-range-name

(Optional) Specifies a time-range entry name.

tos tos

(Optional) Specifies the service filtering level for packets; valid values are a number from 0 to 15 or by a name as listed in the “Usage Guidelines” section of the access-list(IP extended) command.

option option

(Optional) Matches packets with the IP options value; see the “Usage Guidelines” section for the valid values.

fragments

(Optional) Applies the access list entry to noninitial fragments of packets; the fragment is either permitted or denied accordingly. For more details about the fragments keyword, see the deny and “deny” sections in the “Usage Guidelines” section.

ttl ttl-value

(Optional) Matches packets with a given Time-to-live (ttl) value.

Command Default

There is no specific condition under which a packet is denied passing the access list.

Command Modes


Standard access-list configuration (config-std-nacl)
Extended access-list configuration (config-ext-nacl)

Command History

Release

Modification

12.4(20)T

This command was introduced.

Usage Guidelines

Use this command following the ip access-list command to specify conditions under which a packet cannot pass the access list.

The portgroup keyword appears only when you configure an extended ACL.

The address or object-group-name value is created using the object-group command.

The object-group object-group-namekeyword and argument allow you to create logical groups of users (or servers), which you can use to define access policy using ACLs. For example, with one ACL entry you can permit the object group named engineering to access all engineering servers. Otherwise, you would need one ACL entry for every person in the engineering group.

If the operator is positioned after the source-addr and source-wildcard values, it must match the source port.

If the operator is positioned after the destination-addr and destination-wildcard values, it must match the destination port.

If you are entering the port number of a TCP or UDP port, you can enter the decimal number or name of a TCP or UDP port. A port number is a number from 0 to 65535. TCP and UDP port names are listed in the “Usage Guidelines” section of the access-list(IP extended) command. TCP port names can be used only when filtering TCP. UDP port names can be used only when filtering UDP.

The valid values for the dscp type keyword and argument are as follows:

  • 0 to 63--Differentiated services code point value.
  • af11 --Match packets with AF11 dscp (001010).
  • af12 --Match packets with AF12 dscp (001100).
  • af13 --Match packets with AF13 dscp (001110).
  • af21 --Match packets with AF21 dscp (010010).
  • af22 --Match packets with AF22 dscp (010100).
  • af23 --Matches the patches with the AF23 dscp (010110).
  • af31 --Matches the patches with the AF31 dscp (011010).
  • af32 --Matches the patches with the AF32 dscp (011100).
  • af33 --Matches the patches with the AF33 dscp (011110).
  • af41 --Matches the patches with the AF41 dscp (100010).
  • af42 --Matches the patches with the AF42 dscp (100100).
  • af43 --Matches the patches with the AF43 dscp (100110).
  • cs1 --Matches the patches with the CS1 (precedence 1) dscp (001000).
  • cs2 --Matches the patches with the CS2 (precedence 2) dscp (010000).
  • cs3 --Matches the patches with the CS3 (precedence 3) dscp (011000).
  • cs4 --Matches the patches with the CS4 (precedence 4) dscp (100000).
  • cs5 --Matches the patches with the CS5 (precedence 5) dscp (101000).
  • cs6 --Matches the patches with the CS6 (precedence 6) dscp (110000).
  • cs7 --Matches the patches with the CS7 (precedence 7) dscp (111000).
  • default --Matches the patches with the default dscp (000000).
  • ef --Matches the patches with the EF dscp (101110).

The valid values for the eq port keyword and argument are as follows:

  • 0 to 65535--Port number.
  • bgp --Border Gateway Protocol (179).
  • chargen --Character generator (19).
  • cmd --Remote commands (rcmd, 514).
  • daytime --Daytime (13).
  • discard --Discard (9).
  • domain --Domain Name Service (53).
  • echo --Echo (7).
  • exec --Exec (rsh, 512).
  • finger --Finger (79).
  • ftp --File Transfer Protocol (21).
  • ftp-data --FTP data connections (20).
  • gopher --Gopher (70).
  • hostname --NIC hostname server (101).
  • ident --Ident Protocol (113).
  • irc --Internet Relay Chat (194).
  • klogin --Kerberos login (543).
  • kshell --Kerberos shell (544).
  • login --Login (rlogin, 513).
  • lpd --Printer service (515).
  • nntp --Network News Transport Protocol (119).
  • pim-auto-rp --PIM Auto-RP (496).
  • pop2 --Post Office Protocol v2 (109).
  • pop3 --Post Office Protocol v3 (110).
  • smtp --Simple Mail Transport Protocol (25).
  • sunrpc --Sun Remote Procedure Call (111).
  • syslog --Syslog (514).
  • tacacs --TAC Access Control System (49).
  • talk --Talk (517).
  • telnet --Telnet (23).
  • time --Time (37).
  • uucp --Unix-to-Unix Copy Program (540).
  • whois --Nicname (43).
  • www --World Wide Web (HTTP, 80).

The valid values for the gt port keyword and argument are as follows:

  • 0-65535--Port number.
  • biff --Biff (mail notification, comsat, 512).
  • bootpc --Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP) client (68).
  • bootps --Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP) server (67).
  • discard --Discard (9).
  • dnsix --DNSIX security protocol auditing (195).
  • domain --Domain Name Service (DNS, 53).
  • echo --Echo (7).
  • isakmp --Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (500).
  • mobile-ip --Mobile IP registration (434).
  • nameserver --IEN116 name service (obsolete, 42).
  • netbios-dgm --NetBios datagram service (138).
  • netbios-ns --NetBios name service (137).
  • netbios-ss --NetBios session service (139).
  • non500-isakmp --Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (4500).
  • ntp --Network Time Protocol (123).
  • pim-auto-rp --PIM Auto-RP (496).
  • rip --Routing Information Protocol (router, in.routed, 520).
  • snmp --Simple Network Management Protocol (161).
  • snmptrap --SNMP Traps (162).
  • sunrpc--Sun Remote Procedure Call (111).
  • syslog --System Logger (514).
  • tacacs --TAC Access Control System (49).
  • talk --Talk (517).
  • tftp --Trivial File Transfer Protocol (69).
  • time --Time (37).
  • who --Who service (rwho, 513).
  • xdmcp --X Display Manager Control Protocol (177).

The valid values for the lt port keyword and argument are as follows:

  • 0-65535--Port number.
  • biff --Biff (mail notification, comsat, 512).
  • bootpc --Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP) client (68).
  • bootps --Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP) server (67).
  • discard --Discard (9).
  • dnsix --DNSIX security protocol auditing (195).
  • domain --Domain Name Service (DNS, 53).
  • echo --Echo (7).
  • isakmp --Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (500).
  • mobile-ip --Mobile IP registration (434).
  • nameserver --IEN116 name service (obsolete, 42).
  • netbios-dgm --NetBios datagram service (138).
  • netbios-ns --NetBios name service (137).
  • netbios-ss --NetBios session service (139).
  • non500-isakmp --Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (4500).
  • ntp --Network Time Protocol (123).
  • pim-auto-rp --PIM Auto-RP (496).
  • rip --Routing Information Protocol (router, in.routed, 520).
  • snmp --Simple Network Management Protocol (161).
  • snmptrap --SNMP Traps (162).
  • sunrpc --Sun Remote Procedure Call (111).
  • syslog --System Logger (514).
  • tacacs --TAC Access Control System (49).
  • talk --Talk (517).
  • tftp --Trivial File Transfer Protocol (69).
  • time --Time (37).
  • who --Who service (rwho, 513).
  • xdmcp --X Display Manager Control Protocol (177).

The valid values for the neg port keyword and argument are as follows:

  • 0 to 65535--Port number.
  • biff --Biff (mail notification, comsat, 512).
  • bootpc --Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP) client (68).
  • bootps --Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP) server (67).
  • discard --Discard (9).
  • dnsix --DNSIX security protocol auditing (195).
  • domain --Domain Name Service (DNS, 53).
  • echo --Echo (7).
  • isakmp --Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (500).
  • mobile-ip --Mobile IP registration (434).
  • nameserver --IEN116 name service (obsolete, 42).
  • netbios-dgm --NetBios datagram service (138).
  • netbios-ns --NetBios name service (137).
  • netbios-ss --NetBios session service (139).
  • non500-isakmp --Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (4500).
  • ntp --Network Time Protocol (123).
  • pim-auto-rp --PIM Auto-RP (496).
  • rip --Routing Information Protocol (router, in.routed, 520).
  • snmp --Simple Network Management Protocol (161).
  • snmptrap --SNMP Traps (162).
  • sunrpc --Sun Remote Procedure Call (111).
  • syslog --System Logger (514).
  • tacacs --TAC Access Control System (49).
  • talk --Talk (517).
  • tftp --Trivial File Transfer Protocol (69).
  • time --Time (37).
  • who --Who service (rwho, 513).
  • xdmcp --X Display Manager Control Protocol (177).

The valid values for the option option keyword and argument are as follows:

  • 0 to 255--IP Options value.
  • add-ext --Matches the packets with Address Extension Option (147).
  • any-options --Matches the packets with ANY Option.
  • com-security --Matches the packets with Commercial Security Option (134).
  • dps --Matches the packets with Dynamic Packet State Option (151).
  • encode --Matches the packets with Encode Option (15).
  • eool --Matches the packets with End of Options (0).
  • ext-ip --Matches the packets with the Extended IP Option (145).
  • ext-security --Matches the packets with the Extended Security Option (133).
  • finn --Matches the packets with the Experimental Flow Control Option (205).
    • imitd--Matches the packets with IMI Traffic Desriptor Option (144).
    • lsr--Matches the packets with Loose Source Route Option (131).
    • match-all--Matches the packets if all specified flags are present.
    • match-any--Matches the packets if any specified flag is present.
    • mtup--Matches the packets with MTU Probe Option (11).
    • mtur--Matches the packets with MTU Reply Option (12).
    • no-op--Matches the packets with No Operation Option (1).
    • psh--Match the packets on the PSH bit.
    • nsapa--Matches the packets with NSAP Addresses Option (150).
    • reflect--Creates reflexive access list entry.
    • record-route--Matches the packets with Record Route Option (7).
    • rst--Matches the packets on the RST bit.
    • router-alert--Matches the packets with Router Alert Option (148).
    • sdb--Matches the packets with Selective Directed Broadcast Option (149).
    • security--Matches the packets with Basic Security Option (130).
    • ssr--Matches the packets with Strict Source Routing Option (137).
    • stream-id--Matches the packets with Stream ID Option (136).
    • syn--Match the packets on the SYN bit.
  • timestamp --Matches the packets with the Time Stamp Option (68).
  • traceroute --Matches the packets with the Trace Route Option (82).
  • ump --Matches the packets with the Upstream Multicast Packet Option (152).
  • visa --Matches the packets with the Experimental Access Control Option (142).
  • zsu --Matches the packets with the Experimental Measurement Option (10).

The valid values for the tos value keyword and argument are as follows:

  • 0 to 15--Type of service value.
  • max-reliability --Matches the packets with the maximum reliable ToS (2).
  • max-throughput --Matches the packets with the maximum throughput ToS (4).
  • min-delay --Matches the packets with the minimum delay ToS (8).
  • min-monetary-cost --Matches packets with the minimum monetary cost ToS (1).
  • normal --Matches the packets with the normal ToS (0).

Access List or OGACL Processing of Fragments

The behavior of access-list entries regarding the use or lack of the fragments keyword are summarized in the table below:

Table 1 Access list or OGACL Processing of Fragments

If the Access-List Entry Has...

Then...

...no fragments keyword (the default behavior), and assuming all of the access-list entry information matches,

For an access-list entry containing only Layer 3 information:

  • The entry is applied to nonfragmented packets, initial fragments, and noninitial fragments.

For an access list entry containing Layer 3 and Layer 4 information:

  • The entry is applied to nonfragmented packets and initial fragments:
    • If the entry is a permitstatement, the packet or fragment is permitted.
    • If the entry is a denystatement, the packet or fragment is denied.
  • The entry is also applied to noninitial fragments in the following manner. Because noninitial fragments contain only Layer 3 information, only the Layer 3 portion of an access-list entry can be applied. If the Layer 3 portion of the access-list entry matches, and
    • If the entry is a permitstatement, the noninitial fragment is permitted.
    • If the entry is a deny statement, the next access-list entry is processed.
Note   

The deny statements are handled differently for noninitial fragments versus nonfragmented or initial fragments.

...the fragments keyword, and assuming all of the access-list entry information matches,

Note   

The access-list entry is applied only to noninitial fragments. The fragments keyword cannot be configured for an access-list entry that contains any Layer 4 information.

Be aware that you should not simply add the fragments keyword to every access list entry because the first fragment of the IP packet is considered a nonfragment and is treated independently of the subsequent fragments. An initial fragment will not match an access list permit or deny entry that contains the fragmentskeyword, the packet is compared to the next access list entry, and so on, until it is either permitted or denied by an access list entry that does not contain the fragments keyword. Therefore, you may need two access list entries for every deny entry. The first deny entry of the pair will not include the fragments keyword, and applies to the initial fragment. The second deny entry of the pair will include the fragments keyword and applies to the subsequent fragments. In the cases where there are multiple deny access-list entries for the same host but with different Layer 4 ports, a single deny access-list entry with the fragments keyword for that host is all that needs to be added. Thus all the fragments of a packet are handled in the same manner by the access list.

Packet fragments of IP datagrams are considered individual packets and each counts individually as a packet in access list accounting and access list violation counts.


Note


The fragmentskeyword cannot solve all cases involving access lists and IP fragments.


Fragments and Policy Routing

Fragmentation and the fragment control feature affect policy routing if the policy routing is based on the match ip address command and the access list had entries that match on Layer 4 through 7 information. It is possible that noninitial fragments pass the access list and are policy routed, even if the first fragment was not policy routed or the reverse.

By using the fragments keyword in access list entries as described earlier, a better match between the action taken for initial and noninitial fragments can be made and it is more likely policy routing will occur as intended.

The portgroup srcport-groupname or portgroup destport-groupnamekeywords and arguments allow you to create an object group based on a source or destination group.

Examples

The following example creates an access list that denies all TCP packets:

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal

Router(config)# ip access-list extended my_ogacl_policy

Router(config-ext-nacl)# deny tcp any any

Router(config-ext-nacl)# exit

Router(config)# exit

Related Commands

Command

Description

ip access-group

Applies an ACL or OGACL to an interface or a service policy map.

ip access-list

Defines an IP access list or OGACL by name or number.

object-group network

Defines network object groups for use in OGACLs.

object-group service

Defines service object groups for use in OGACLs.

permit

Sets conditions in a named IP access list or OGACL that will permit packets.

show ip access-list

Displays the contents of IP access lists or OGACLs.

show object-group

Displays information about object groups that are configured.

deny (IP)

To set conditions in a named IP access list that will deny packets, use the deny command in access list configuration mode. To remove a deny condition from an access list, use the no form of this command.

[sequence-number] deny source [source-wildcard]

[sequence-number] deny protocol source source-wildcard destination destination-wildcard [ option option-name ] [ precedence precedence ] [ tos tos ] [ ttl operator value ] [log] [ time-range time-range-name ] [fragments]

no sequence-number

no deny source [source-wildcard]

no deny protocol source source-wildcard destination destination-wildcard

Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP)

[sequence-number] deny icmp source source-wildcard destination destination-wildcard [ icmp-type [icmp-code] | icmp-message ] [ precedence precedence ] [ tos tos ] [ ttl operator value ] [log] [ time-range time-range-name ] [fragments]

Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP)

[sequence-number] deny igmp source source-wildcard destination destination-wildcard [igmp-type] [ precedence precedence ] [ tos tos ] [ ttl operator value ] [log] [ time-range time-range-name ] [fragments]

Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)

[sequence-number] deny tcp source source-wildcard [ operator port [port] ] destination destination-wildcard [ operator [port] ] [ established { match-any | match-all } { + | - } flag-name | precedence precedence | tos tos | ttl operator value | log | time-range time-range-name | fragments ]

User Datagram Protocol (UDP)

[sequence-number] deny udp source source-wildcard [ operator port [port] ] destination destination-wildcard [ operator [port] ] [ precedence precedence ] [ tos tos ] [ ttl operator value ] [log] [ time-range time-range-name ] [fragments]

Syntax Description

sequence-number

(Optional) Sequence number assigned to the deny statement. The sequence number causes the system to insert the statement in that numbered position in the access list.

source

Number of the network or host from which the packet is being sent. There are three alternative ways to specify the source:

  • Use a 32-bit quantity in four-part dotted-decimal format.
  • Use the anykeyword as an abbreviation for a source and source-wildcard of 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255.
  • Use host sourceas an abbreviation for a sourceand source-wildcardof source0.0.0.0.

source-wildcard

Wildcard bits to be applied to the source . There are three alternative ways to specify the source wildcard:

  • Use a 32-bit quantity in four-part dotted-decimal format. Place 1s in the bit positions that you want to ignore.
  • Use the anykeyword as an abbreviation for a source and source-wildcard of 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255.
  • Use host sourceas an abbreviation for a sourceand source-wildcardof source0.0.0.0.

protocol

Name or number of an Internet protocol. The protocol argument can be one of the keywords eigrp, gre, icmp, igmp, ip, ipinip, nos, ospf, tcp, or udp, or an integer in the range from 0 to 255 representing an Internet protocol number. To match any Internet protocol (including ICMP, TCP, and UDP), use the ipkeyword.

Note   

When the icmp, igmp, tcp, and udp keywords are entered, they must be followed with the specific command syntax that is shown for the ICMP, IGMP, TCP, and UDP forms of the deny command.

icmp

Denies only ICMP packets. When you enter the icmp keyword, you must use the specific command syntax shown for the ICMP form of the deny command.

igmp

Denies only IGMP packets. When you enter the igmp keyword, you must use the specific command syntax shown for the IGMP form of the deny command.

tcp

Denies only TCP packets. When you enter the tcp keyword, you must use the specific command syntax shown for the TCP form of the deny command.

udp

Denies only UDP packets. When you enter the udp keyword, you must use the specific command syntax shown for the UDP form of the deny command.

destination

Number of the network or host to which the packet is being sent. There are three alternative ways to specify the destination:

  • Use a 32-bit quantity in four-part dotted-decimal format.
  • Use the anykeyword as an abbreviation for the destinationand destination-wildcardof 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255.
  • Use host destination as an abbreviation for a destinationand destination-wildcard of destination 0.0.0.0.

destination-wildcard

Wildcard bits to be applied to the destination. There are three alternative ways to specify the destination wildcard:

  • Use a 32-bit quantity in four-part dotted-decimal format. Place 1s in the bit positions that you want to ignore.
  • Use the any keyword as an abbreviation for a destinationand destination-wildcard of 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255.
  • Use host destination as an abbreviation for a destinationand destination-wildcard of destination 0.0.0.0.

option option-name

(Optional) Packets can be filtered by IP Options, as specified by a number from 0 to 255 or by the corresponding IP Option name, as listed in the table in the “Usage Guidelines” section.

precedence precedence

(Optional) Packets can be filtered by precedence level, as specified by a number from 0 to 7 or by a name.

tos tos

(Optional) Packets can be filtered by type of service (ToS) level, as specified by a number from 0 to 15, or by a name as listed in the “Usage Guidelines” section of the access-list(IP extended) command.

ttl operator value

(Optional) Compares the TTL value in the packet to the TTL value specified in this deny statement.

  • The operator can be lt (less than), gt (greater than), eq (equal), neq (not equal), or range (inclusive range).
  • The value can range from 0 to 255.
  • If the operator is range, specify two values separated by a space.
  • For Release 12.0S, if the operator is eq or neq, only one TTL value can be specified.
  • For all other releases, if the operator is eq or neq, as many as 10 TTL values can be specified, separated by a space. If the TTL in the packet matches just one of the possibly 10 values, the entry is considered to be matched.

log

(Optional) Causes an informational logging message about the packet that matches the entry to be sent to the console. (The level of messages logged to the console is controlled by the logging console command.)

time-range time-range-name

(Optional) Name of the time range that applies to this deny statement. The name of the time range and its restrictions are specified by the time-range and absolute or periodic commands, respectively.

fragments

(Optional) The access list entry applies to noninitial fragments of packets; the fragment is either permitted or denied accordingly. For more details about the fragments keyword, see the “deny (IP)” and “deny (IP)” sections in the “Usage Guidelines” section.

icmp-type

(Optional) ICMP packets can be filtered by ICMP message type. The type is a number from 0 to 255.

icmp-code

(Optional) ICMP packets that are filtered by ICMP message type can also be filtered by the ICMP message code. The code is a number from 0 to 255.

icmp-message

(Optional) ICMP packets can be filtered by an ICMP message type name or an ICMP message type and code name. The possible names are listed in the “Usage Guidelines” section of the access-list(IP extended) command.

igmp-type

(Optional) IGMP packets can be filtered by IGMP message type or message name. A message type is a number from 0 to 15. IGMP message names are listed in the “Usage Guidelines” section of the access-list(IP extended) command.

operator

(Optional) Compares source or destination ports. Operators include lt (less than), gt (greater than), eq (equal), neq (not equal), and range (inclusive range).

If the operator is positioned after the source and source-wildcard arguments, it must match the source port. If the operator is positioned after the destination and destination-wildcard arguments, it must match the destination port.

The range operator requires two port numbers. Up to ten port numbers can be entered for the eq (equal) and neq (not equal) operators. All other operators require one port number.

port

(Optional) The decimal number or name of a TCP or UDP port. A port number is a number from 0 to 65535. TCP and UDP port names are listed in the “Usage Guidelines” section of the access-list(IP extended) command.

TCP port names can be used only when filtering TCP. UDP port names can be used only when filtering UDP.

established

(Optional) For the TCP protocol only: Indicates an established connection. A match occurs if the TCP datagram has the ACK or RST bit set. The nonmatching case is that of the initial TCP datagram to form a connection.

Note   

The established keyword can be used only with the old command-line interface (CLI) format. To use the new CLI format, you must use the match-any or match-all keywords followed by the + or - keywords and flag-name argument.

match-any | match-all

(Optional) For the TCP protocol only: A match occurs if the TCP datagram has certain TCP flags set or not set. You use the match-anykeyword to allow a match to occur if any of the specified TCP flags are present, or you can use the match-allkeyword to allow a match to occur only if all of the specified TCP flags are present. You must follow the match-anyand match-allkeywords with the +or -keyword and the flag-nameargument to match on one or more TCP flags.

+ | - flag-name

(Optional) For the TCP protocol only: The + keyword allows IP packets if their TCP headers contain the TCP flags that are specified by the flag-name argument. The - keyword filters out IP packets that do not contain the TCP flags specified by the flag-name argument. You must follow the + and - keywords with the flag-name argument. TCP flag names can be used only when filtering TCP. Flag names for the TCP flags are as follows: urg, ack, psh, rst, syn, and fin.

Command Default

There are no specific conditions under which a packet is denied passing the named access list.

Command Modes


Access list configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

11.2

This command was introduced.

12.0(1)T

The time-range time-range-namekeyword and argument were added.

12.0(11)

The fragmentskeyword was added.

12.2(13)T

The igrp keyword was removed because the IGRP protocol is no longer available in Cisco IOS software.

12.2(14)S

The sequence-numberargument was added.

12.2(15)T

The sequence-numberargument was added.

12.3(4)T

The option option-name keyword and argument were added. The match-any, match-all, +,and -keywords and the flag-name argument were added.

12.3(7)T

Command functionality was modified to allow up to ten port numbers to be added after the eq and neq operators so that an access list entry can be created with noncontiguous ports.

12.4(2)T

The ttl operator value keyword and arguments were added.

12.2(27)SBC

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(27)SBC.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.

Usage Guidelines

Use this command following the ip access-list command to specify conditions under which a packet cannot pass the named access list.

The time-range keyword allows you to identify a time range by name. The time-range, absolute, and periodic commands specify when this deny statement is in effect.

log Keyword

A log message includes the access list number, whether the packet was permitted or denied; the protocol, whether it was TCP, UDP, ICMP, or a number; and, if appropriate, the source and destination addresses and source and destination port numbers. The message is generated for the first packet that matches, and then at 5-minute intervals, including the number of packets permitted or denied in the prior 5-minute interval.

Use the ip access-list log-update command to generate logging messages when the number of matches reaches a configurable threshold (rather than waiting for a 5-minute-interval). See the ip access-list log-update command for more information.

The logging facility might drop some logging message packets if there are too many to be handled or if there is more than one logging message to be handled in 1 second. This behavior prevents the router from crashing because of too many logging packets. Therefore, the logging facility should not be used as a billing tool or an accurate source of the number of matches to an access list.

If you enable Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) and then create an access list that uses the log keyword, the packets that match the access list are not CEF-switched. They are fast-switched. Logging disables CEF.

Access List Filtering of IP Options

Access control lists can be used to filter packets with IP Options to prevent routers from being saturated with spurious packets containing IP Options. To see a complete table of all IP Options, including ones currently not in use, refer to the latest Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) information that is available from its URL: www.iana.org.

Cisco IOS software allows you to filter packets according to whether they contain one or more of the legitimate IP Options by entering either the IP Option value or the corresponding name for the option-name argument as shown in the table below.

Table 2 IP Option Values and Names

IP Option Value or Name

Description

0 to 255

IP Options values.

add-ext

Match packets with Address Extension Option (147).

any-options

Match packets with any IP Option.

com-security

Match packets with Commercial Security Option (134).

dps

Match packets with Dynamic Packet State Option (151).

encode

Match packets with Encode Option (15).

eool

Match packets with End of Options (0).

ext-ip

Match packets with Extended IP Options (145).

ext-security

Match packets with Extended Security Option (133).

finn

Match packets with Experimental Flow Control Option (205).

imitd

Match packets with IMI Traffic Descriptor Option (144).

lsr

Match packets with Loose Source Route Option (131).

mtup

Match packets with MTU Probe Option (11).

mtur

Match packets with MTU Reply Option (12).

no-op

Match packets with No Operation Option (1).

nsapa

Match packets with NSAP Addresses Option (150).

psh

Matches the packets on the PSH bit.

record-route

Match packets with Router Record Route Option (7).

reflect

Creates reflexive access list entry.

rst

Matches the packets on the RST bit.

router-alert

Match packets with Router Alert Option (148).

sdb

Match packets with Selective Directed Broadcast Option (149).

security

Match packets with Base Security Option (130).

ssr

Match packets with Strict Source Routing Option (137).

stream-id

Match packets with Stream ID Option (136).

syn

Matches the packets on the SYN bit.

timestamp

Match packets with Time Stamp Option (68).

Filtering IP Packets Based on TCP Flags

The access list entries that make up an access list can be configured to detect and drop unauthorized TCP packets by allowing only the packets that have very specific groups of TCP flags set or not set. Users can select any desired combination of TCP flags with which to filter TCP packets. Users can configure access list entries in order to allow matching on a flag that is set and on a flag that is not set. Use the + and - keywords with a flag name to specify that a match is made based on whether a TCP header flag has been set. Use the match-any and match-all keywords to allow the packet if any or all, respectively, of the flags specified by the + or - keyword and flag-name argument have been set or not set.

Access List Processing of Fragments

The behavior of access list entries regarding the use or lack of use of the fragments keyword can be summarized as follows:

If the Access-List Entry Has...

Then...

...no fragments keyword (the default behavior), and assuming all of the access-list entry information matches,

For an access list entry that contains only Layer 3 information:

  • The entry is applied to nonfragmented packets, initial fragments, and noninitial fragments.

For an access list entry that contains Layer 3 and Layer 4 information:

  • The entry is applied to nonfragmented packets and initial fragments.
    • If the entry is a permitstatement, then the packet or fragment is permitted.
    • If the entry is a denystatement, then the packet or fragment is denied.
  • The entry is also applied to noninitial fragments in the following manner. Because noninitial fragments contain only Layer 3 information, only the Layer 3 portion of an access list entry can be applied. If the Layer 3 portion of the access list entry matches, and
    • If the entry is a permitstatement, then the noninitial fragment is permitted.
    • If the entry is a deny statement, then the next access list entry is processed.
Note   

The deny statements are handled differently for noninitial fragments versus nonfragmented or initial fragments.

...the fragments keyword, and assuming all of the access-list entry information matches,

The access list entry is applied only to noninitial fragments. The fragments keyword cannot be configured for an access list entry that contains any Layer 4 information.

Be aware that you should not add the fragments keyword to every access list entry because the first fragment of the IP packet is considered a nonfragment and is treated independently of the subsequent fragments. An initial fragment will not match an access list permit or deny entry that contains the fragmentskeyword. The packet is compared to the next access list entry, and so on, until it is either permitted or denied by an access list entry that does not contain the fragments keyword. Therefore, you may need two access list entries for every deny entry. The first deny entry of the pair will not include the fragments keyword and applies to the initial fragment. The second deny entry of the pair will include the fragments keyword and applies to the subsequent fragments. In the cases in which there are multiple deny access list entries for the same host but with different Layer 4 ports, a single deny access list entry with the fragments keyword for that host is all that needs to be added. Thus all the fragments of a packet are handled in the same manner by the access list.

Packet fragments of IP datagrams are considered individual packets, and each counts individually as a packet in access list accounting and access list violation counts.


Note


The fragmentskeyword cannot solve all cases that involve access lists and IP fragments.


Fragments and Policy Routing

Fragmentation and the fragment control feature affect policy routing if the policy routing is based on the match ip address command and the access list has entries that match on Layer 4 through 7 information. It is possible that noninitial fragments pass the access list and are policy-routed, even if the first fragment is not policy-routed.

By using the fragments keyword in access list entries as described earlier, a better match between the action taken for initial and noninitial fragments can be made, and it is more likely that policy routing will occur as intended.

Creating an Access List Entry with Noncontiguous Ports

For Cisco IOS Release 12.3(7)T and later releases, you can specify noncontiguous ports on the same access control entry, which greatly reduces the number of access list entries required for the same source address, destination address, and protocol. If you maintain large numbers of access list entries, we recommend that you consolidate them when possible by using noncontiguous ports. You can specify up to ten port numbers following the eq and neq operators.

Examples

The following example sets conditions for a standard access list named Internetfilter:

ip access-list standard Internetfilter
 deny 192.168.34.0  0.0.0.255
 permit 172.16.0.0  0.0.255.255
 permit 10.0.0.0  0.255.255.255
! (Note: all other access implicitly denied.)

The following example denies HTTP traffic on Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.:

time-range no-http
 periodic weekdays 8:00 to 18:00
!
ip access-list extended strict
 deny tcp any any eq http time-range no-http
!
interface ethernet 0
 ip access-group strict in

The following example adds an entry with the sequence number 25 to extended IP access list 150:

ip access-list extended 150
 25 deny ip host 172.16.3.3 host 192.168.5.34

The following example removes the entry with the sequence number 25 from the extended access list example shown above:

 no 25

The following example sets a deny condition for an extended access list named filter2. The access list entry specifies that a packet cannot pass the named access list if it contains the Strict Source Routing IP Option, which is represented by the IP option value ssr.

ip access-list extended filter2
 deny ip any any option ssr

The following example sets a deny condition for an extended access list named kmdfilter1. The access list entry specifies that a packet cannot pass the named access list if the RST and FIN TCP flags have been set for that packet:

ip access-list extended kmdfilter1
 deny tcp any any match-any +rst +fin

The following example shows several deny statements that can be consolidated into one access list entry with noncontiguous ports. The show access-lists command is entered to display a group of access list entries for the access list named abc.

Router# show access-lists abc
Extended IP access list abc
 10 deny tcp any eq telnet any eq 450
 20 deny tcp any eq telnet any eq 679
 30 deny tcp any eq ftp any eq 450 
 40 deny tcp any eq ftp any eq 679

Because the entries are all for the same deny statement and simply show different ports, they can be consolidated into one new access list entry. The following example shows the removal of the redundant access list entries and the creation of a new access list entry that consolidates the previously displayed group of access list entries:

ip access-list extended abc
 no 10
 no 20
 no 30
 no 40
 deny tcp any eq telnet ftp any eq 450 679

The following examples shows the creation of the consolidated access list entry:

Router# show access-lists abc
Extended IP access list abc
 10 deny tcp any eq telnet ftp any eq 450 679

The following access list filters IP packets containing Type of Service (ToS) level 3 with TTL values 10 and 20. It also filters IP packets with a TTL greater than 154 and applies that rule to noninitial fragments. It permits IP packets with a precedence level of flash and a TTL not equal to 1, and sends log messages about such packets to the console. All other packets are denied.

ip access-list extended canton
 deny ip any any tos 3 ttl eq 10 20
 deny ip any any ttl gt 154 fragments
 permit ip any any precedence flash ttl neq 1 log

Related Commands

Command

Description

absolute

Specifies an absolute time when a time range is in effect.

access-list (IP extended)

Defines an extended IP access list.

access-list (IP standard)

Defines a standard IP access list.

ip access-group

Controls access to an interface.

ip access-list

Defines an IP access list by name.

ip access-list log-update

Sets the threshold number of packets that cause a logging message.

ip access-list resequence

Applies sequence numbers to the access list entries in an access list.

ip options

Drops or ignores IP Options packets that are sent to the router.

logging console

Sends system logging (syslog) messages to all available TTY lines and limits messages based on severity.

match ip address

Distributes any routes that have a destination network number address that is permitted by a standard or extended access list, or performs policy routing on packets.

periodic

Specifies a recurring (weekly) time range for functions that support the time-range feature.

permit (IP)

Sets conditions under which a packet passes a named IP access list.

remark

Writes a helpful comment (remark) for an entry in a named IP access list.

show access-lists

Displays a group of access-list entries.

show ip access-list

Displays the contents of all current IP access lists.

time-range

Specifies when an access list or other feature is in effect.

deny (IPv6)

To set deny conditions for an IPv6 access list, use the deny command in IPv6 access list configuration mode. To remove the deny conditions, use the no form of this command.

deny protocol { source-ipv6-prefix/prefix-length | any | host source-ipv6-address | auth } [ operator [port-number] ] { destination-ipv6-prefix/prefix-length | any | host destination-ipv6-address | auth } [ operator [port-number] ] [ dest-option-type [ doh-number | doh-type ] ] [ dscp value ] [ flow-label value ] [fragments] [hbh] [log] [log-input] [mobility] [ mobility-type [ mh-number | mh-type ] ] [routing] [ routing-type routing-number ] [ sequence value ] [ time-range name ] [undetermined-transport]

no deny protocol { source-ipv6-prefix/prefix-length | any | host source-ipv6-address | auth } [ operator [port-number] ] { destination-ipv6-prefix/prefix-length | any | host destination-ipv6-address | auth } [ operator [port-number] ] [ dest-option-type [ doh-number | doh-type ] ] [ dscp value ] [ flow-label value ] [fragments] [hbh] [log] [log-input] [mobility] [ mobility-type [ mh-number | mh-type ] ] [routing] [ routing-type routing-number ] [ sequence value ] [ time-range name ] [undetermined-transport]

Internet Control Message Protocol

deny icmp { source-ipv6-prefix/prefix-length | any | host source-ipv6-address | auth } [ operator [port-number] ] { destination-ipv6-prefix/prefix-length | any | host destination-ipv6-address | auth } [ operator [port-number] ] [ icmp-type [icmp-code] | icmp-message ] [ dest-option-type [ doh-number | doh-type ] ] [ dscp value ] [ flow-label value ] [fragments] [hbh] [log] [log-input] [mobility] [ mobility-type [ mh-number | mh-type ] ] [routing] [ routing-type routing-number ] [ sequence value ] [ time-range name ]

Transmission Control Protocol

deny tcp { source-ipv6-prefix/prefix-length | any | host source-ipv6-address | auth } [ operator [port-number] ] { destination-ipv6-prefix/prefix-length | any | host destination-ipv6-address | auth } [ operator [port-number] ] [ack] [ dest-option-type [ doh-number | doh-type ] ] [ dscp value ] [established] [fin] [ flow-label value ] [fragments] [hbh] [log] [log-input] [mobility] [ mobility-type [ mh-number | mh-type ] ] [ neq { port | protocol } ] [psh] [ range { port | protocol } ] [routing] [ routing-type routing-number ] [rst] [ sequence value ] [syn] [ time-range name ] [urg]

User Datagram Protocol

deny udp { source-ipv6-prefix/prefix-length | any | host source-ipv6-address | auth } [ operator [port-number] ] { destination-ipv6-prefix/prefix-length | any | host destination-ipv6-address | auth } [ operator [port-number] ] [ dest-option-type [ doh-number | doh-type ] ] [ dscp value ] [ flow-label value ] [fragments] [hbh] [log] [log-input] [mobility] [ mobility-type [ mh-number | mh-type ] ] [ neq { port | protocol } ] [ range { port | protocol } ] [routing] [ routing-type routing-number ] [ sequence value ] [ time-range name ]

Syntax Description

protocol

Name or number of an Internet protocol. It can be one of the keywords ahp, esp, icmp, ipv6, pcp, sctp, tcp, udp, or hbh, or an integer in the range from 0 to 255 representing an IPv6 protocol number.

source-ipv6-prefix/prefix-length

The source IPv6 network or class of networks about which to set deny conditions.

This argument must be in the form documented in RFC 2373 where the address is specified in hexadecimal using 16-bit values between colons.

any

An abbreviation for the IPv6 prefix ::/0.

host source-ipv6-address

The source IPv6 host address about which to set deny conditions.

This source-ipv6-address argument must be in the form documented in RFC 2373 where the address is specified in hexadecimal using 16-bit values between colons.

operator [port-number]

(Optional) Specifies an operand that compares the source or destination ports of the specified protocol. Operands are lt (less than), gt (greater than), eq (equal), neq (not equal), and range (inclusive range).

If the operator is positioned after the source-ipv6-prefix/prefix-length argument, it must match the source port.

If the operator is positioned after the destination-ipv6/prefix-length argument, it must match the destination port.

The range operator requires two port numbers. All other operators require one port number.

The optional port-number argument is a decimal number or the name of a TCP or UDP port. A port number is a number from 0 to 65535. TCP port names can be used only when filtering TCP. UDP port names can be used only when filtering UDP.

destination-ipv6-prefix/prefix-length

The destination IPv6 network or class of networks about which to set deny conditions.

This argument must be in the form documented in RFC 2373 where the address is specified in hexadecimal using 16-bit values between colons.

host destination-ipv6-address

The destination IPv6 host address about which to set deny conditions.

This destination-ipv6-address argument must be in the form documented in RFC 2373 where the address is specified in hexadecimal using 16-bit values between colons.

auth

Allows matching traffic against the presence of the authentication header in combination with any protocol.

dest-option-type

(Optional) Matches IPv6 packets against the hop-by-hop option extension header within each IPv6 packet header.

doh-number

(Optional) Integer in the range from 0 to 255 representing an IPv6 destination option extension header.

doh-type

(Optional) Destination option header types. The possible destination option header type and its corresponding doh-number value are home-address—201.

dscp value

(Optional) Matches a differentiated services code point value against the traffic class value in the Traffic Class field of each IPv6 packet header. The acceptable range is from 0 to 63.

flow-label value

(Optional) Matches a flow label value against the flow label value in the Flow Label field of each IPv6 packet header. The acceptable range is from 0 to 1048575.

fragments

(Optional) Matches non-initial fragmented packets where the fragment extension header contains a non-zero fragment offset. The fragments keyword is an option only if the operator [port-number] arguments are not specified.

hbh

(Optional) Specifies a hop-by-hop options header.

log

(Optional) Causes an informational logging message about the packet that matches the entry to be sent to the console. (The level of messages logged to the console is controlled by the logging console command.)

The message includes the access list name and sequence number, whether the packet was denied; the protocol, whether it was TCP, UDP, ICMP, or a number; and, if appropriate, the source and destination addresses and source and destination port numbers. The message is generated for the first packet that matches, and then at 5-minute intervals, including the number of packets denied in the prior 5-minute interval.

log-input

(Optional) Provides the same function as the log keyword, except that the logging message also includes the input interface.

mobility

(Optional) Extension header type. Allows matching of any IPv6 packet including a mobility header, regardless of the value of the mobility-header-type field within that header.

mobility-type

(Optional) Mobility header type. Either the mh-number or mh-type argument must be used with this keyword.

mh-number

(Optional) Integer in the range from 0 to 255 representing an IPv6 mobility header type.

mh-type

(Optional) Name of a mobility header type. Possible mobility header types and their corresponding mh-number value are as follows:

  • 0—bind-refresh
  • 1—hoti
  • 2—coti
  • 3—hot
  • 4—cot
  • 5—bind-update
  • 6—bind-acknowledgment
  • 7—bind-error

routing

(Optional) Matches source-routed packets against the routing extension header within each IPv6 packet header.

routing-type

(Optional) Allows routing headers with a value in the type field to be matched independently. The routing-number argument must be used with this keyword.

routing-number

Integer in the range from 0 to 255 representing an IPv6 routing header type. Possible routing header types and their corresponding routing-number value are as follows:

  • 0—Standard IPv6 routing header
  • 2—Mobile IPv6 routing header

sequence value

(Optional) Specifies the sequence number for the access list statement. The acceptable range is from 1 to 4294967295.

time-range name

(Optional) Specifies the time range that applies to the deny statement. The name of the time range and its restrictions are specified by the time-range and absolute or periodic commands, respectively.

undetermined-transport

(Optional) Matches packets from a source for which the Layer 4 protocol cannot be determined. The undetermined-transport keyword is an option only if the operator [port-number] arguments are not specified.

icmp-type

(Optional) Specifies an ICMP message type for filtering ICMP packets. ICMP packets can be filtered by ICMP message type. The ICMP message type can be a number from 0 to 255, some of which include the following predefined strings and their corresponding numeric values:

  • 144—dhaad-request
  • 145—dhaad-reply
  • 146—mpd-solicitation
  • 147—mpd-advertisement

icmp-code

(Optional) Specifies an ICMP message code for filtering ICMP packets. ICMP packets that are filtered by ICMP message type can also be filtered by the ICMP message code. The code is a number from 0 to 255.

icmp-message

(Optional) Specifies an ICMP message name for filtering ICMP packets. ICMP packets can be filtered by an ICMP message name or ICMP message type and code. The possible names are listed in the “Usage Guidelines” section.

ack

(Optional) For the TCP protocol only: acknowledgment (ACK) bit set.

established

(Optional) For the TCP protocol only: Indicates an established connection. A match occurs if the TCP datagram has the ACK or RST bits set. The nonmatching case is that of the initial TCP datagram to form a connection.

fin

(Optional) For the TCP protocol only: Fin bit set; no more data from sender.

neq {port | protocol}

(Optional) Matches only packets that are not on a given port number.

psh

(Optional) For the TCP protocol only: Push function bit set.

range {port | protocol}

(Optional) Matches only packets in the range of port numbers.

rst

(Optional) For the TCP protocol only: Reset bit set.

syn

(Optional) For the TCP protocol only: Synchronize bit set.

urg

(Optional) For the TCP protocol only: Urgent pointer bit set.

Command Default

No IPv6 access list is defined.

Command Modes


IPv6 access list configuration (config-ipv6-acl)#

Command History

Release

Modification

12.0(23)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(13)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(13)T.

12.2(14)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(14)S.

12.4(2)T

The icmp-type argument was enhanced. The dest-option-type, mobility, mobility-type, and routing-type keywords were added. The doh-number, doh-type, mh-number, mh-type, and routing-number arguments were added.

12.2(28)SB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(28)SB.

12.2(25)SG

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)SG.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.1

This command was introduced on Cisco ASR 1000 Aggregation Series Routers.

12.4(20)T

The auth keyword was added.

12.2(33)SRE

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRE.

15.2(3)T

This command was modified. Support was added for the hbh keyword.

15.1(1)SY

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 15.1(1)SY.

Cisco IOS XE Release 3.2SE

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS XE Release 3.2SE.

Usage Guidelines

The deny (IPv6) command is similar to the deny (IP) command, except that it is IPv6-specific.

Use the deny (IPv6) command following the ipv6 access-list command to define the conditions under which a packet passes the access list or to define the access list as a reflexive access list.

Specifying IPv6 for the protocol argument matches against the IPv6 header of the packet.

By 1default, the first statement in an access list is number 10, and the subsequent statements are numbered in increments of 10.

You can add permit, deny, remark, or evaluate statements to an existing access list without retyping the entire list. To add a new statement anywhere other than at the end of the list, create a new statement with an appropriate entry number that falls between two existing entry numbers to indicate where it belongs.

In Cisco IOS Release 12.2(2)T or later releases, 12.0(21)ST, and 12.0(22)S, IPv6 access control lists (ACLs) are defined and their deny and permit conditions are set by using the ipv6 access-list command with the deny and permit keywords in global configuration mode. In Cisco IOS Release 12.0(23)S or later releases, IPv6 ACLs are defined by using the ipv6 access-list command in global configuration mode and their permit and deny conditions are set by using the deny and permit commands in IPv6 access list configuration mode. Refer to the ipv6 access-list command for more information on defining IPv6 ACLs.


Note


In Cisco IOS Release 12.0(23)S or later releases, every IPv6 ACL has implicit permit icmp any any nd-na, permit icmp any any nd-ns, and deny ipv6 any any statements as its last match conditions. (The former two match conditions allow for ICMPv6 neighbor discovery.) An IPv6 ACL must contain at least one entry for the implicit deny ipv6 any any statement to take effect. The IPv6 neighbor discovery process makes use of the IPv6 network layer service; therefore, by default, IPv6 ACLs implicitly allow IPv6 neighbor discovery packets to be sent and received on an interface. In IPv4, the Address Resolution Protocol (ARP), which is equivalent to the IPv6 neighbor discovery process, makes use of a separate data link layer protocol; therefore, by default, IPv4 ACLs implicitly allow ARP packets to be sent and received on an interface.


Both the source-ipv6-prefix/prefix-length and destination-ipv6-prefix/prefix-length arguments are used for traffic filtering (the source prefix filters traffic based upon the traffic source; the destination prefix filters traffic based upon the traffic destination).


Note


IPv6 prefix lists, not access lists, should be used for filtering routing protocol prefixes.


The fragments keyword is an option only if the operator [port-number] arguments are not specified.

The undetermined-transport keyword is an option only if the operator [port-number] arguments are not specified.

The following is a list of ICMP message names:

  • beyond-scope
  • destination-unreachable
  • echo-reply
  • echo-request
  • header
  • hop-limit
  • mld-query
  • mld-reduction
  • mld-report
  • nd-na
  • nd-ns
  • next-header
  • no-admin
  • no-route
  • packet-too-big
  • parameter-option
  • parameter-problem
  • port-unreachable
  • reassembly-timeout
  • renum-command
  • renum-result
  • renum-seq-number
  • router-advertisement
  • router-renumbering
  • router-solicitation
  • time-exceeded
  • unreachable

Examples

The following example configures the IPv6 access list named toCISCO and applies the access list to outbound traffic on Ethernet interface 0. Specifically, the first deny entry in the list keeps all packets that have a destination TCP port number greater than 5000 from exiting out of Ethernet interface 0. The second deny entry in the list keeps all packets that have a source UDP port number less than 5000 from exiting out of Ethernet interface 0. The second deny also logs all matches to the console. The first permit entry in the list permits all ICMP packets to exit out of Ethernet interface 0. The second permit entry in the list permits all other traffic to exit out of Ethernet interface 0. The second permit entry is necessary because an implicit deny all condition is at the end of each IPv6 access list.

ipv6 access-list toCISCO
 deny tcp any any gt 5000
 deny ::/0 lt 5000 ::/0 log
 permit icmp any any
 permit any any
interface ethernet 0
 ipv6 traffic-filter toCISCO out

The following example shows how to allow TCP or UDP parsing although an IPsec AH is present:

IPv6 access list example1 
    deny tcp host 2001::1 any log sequence 5 
    permit tcp any any auth sequence 10 
    permit udp any any auth sequence 20 

Related Commands

Command

Description

ipv6 access-list

Defines an IPv6 access list and enters IPv6 access list configuration mode.

ipv6 traffic-filter

Filters incoming or outgoing IPv6 traffic on an interface.

permit (IPv6)

Sets permit conditions for an IPv6 access list.

show ipv6 access-list

Displays the contents of all current IPv6 access lists.

dialer aaa

To allow a dialer to access the authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) server for dialing information, use the dialer aaa command in interface configuration mode. To disable this function, use the no form of this command.

dialer aaa [ password string | suffix string ]

no dialer aaa [ password string | suffix string ]

Syntax Description

password string

(Optional) Defines a nondefault password for authentication. The password string can be a maximum of 128 characters.

suffix string

(Optional) Defines a suffix for authentication. The suffix string can be a maximum of 64 characters.

Command Default

This feature is not enabled by default.

Command Modes


Interface configuration

Command History

Release

Modification

12.0(3)T

This command was introduced.

12.1(5)T

The password and suffix keywords were added.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS release 12.(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.

Usage Guidelines

This command is required for large scale dial-out and Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) dial-out functionality. With this command, you can specify a suffix, a password, or both. If you do not specify a password, the default password will be “cisco.”


Note


Only IP addresses can be specified as usernames for the dialer aaa suffix command.


Examples

This example shows a user sending out packets from interface Dialer1 with a destination IP address of 10.1.1.1. The username in the access-request message is “10.1.1.1@ciscoDoD” and the password is “cisco.”

interface dialer1
 dialer aaa
 dialer aaa suffix @ciscoDoD password cisco

Related Commands

Command

Description

accept dialout

Accepts requests to tunnel L2TP dial-out calls and creates an accept-dialout VPDN subgroup.

dialer congestion-threshold

Specifies congestion threshold in connected links.

dialer vpdn

Enables a Dialer Profile or DDR dialer to use L2TP dial-out.