QoS: RSVP Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS XE Release 3S
Configuring RSVP Support for LLQ
Downloads: This chapterpdf (PDF - 89.0KB) The complete bookPDF (PDF - 3.36MB) | Feedback

Configuring RSVP Support for LLQ

Configuring RSVP Support for LLQ

Last Updated: April 1, 2013

This chapter describes the tasks for configuring the RSVP Support for Low Latency Queueing (LLQ) feature.

For complete conceptual information, see the chapter "Signalling Overview" in this book.

For a complete description of the RSVP Support for LLQ commands in this chapter, see the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Command Reference. To locate documentation of other commands that appear in this chapter, use the command reference master index or search online.

To identify the hardware platform or software image information associated with a feature, use the Feature Navigator on Cisco.com to search for information about the feature or refer to the software release notes for a specific release.

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest caveats and feature information, see Bug Search Tool and the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the feature information table at the end of this module.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

RSVP Support for LLQ Configuration Task List

To configure RSVP support for LLQ, perform the tasks described in the following sections. The tasks in the first two sections are required; the tasks in the remaining sections are optional.

Configuring Flow Classification

To configure flow classification, use the following command in global configuration mode:

Command

Purpose

Router#(config)# ip rsvp pq-profile

Specifies the criteria for determining which flows go into the priority queue.

Enabling RSVP and WFQ

To enable RSVP and weighted fair queueing (WFQ), use the following commands beginning in global configuration mode:

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    Router(config)# interface s2/0

2.    Router(config-if)# ip rsvp bandwidth

3.    Router(config-if)# fair-queue


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
Router(config)# interface s2/0 

Enables an interface; for example, serial interface 2/0.

 
Step 2
Router(config-if)# ip rsvp bandwidth 

Enables RSVP on an interface.

 
Step 3
Router(config-if)# fair-queue 

Enables WFQ on an interface with priority queueing (PQ) support.

 

Configuring a Burst Factor

To configure a burst factor, use the following command in interface configuration mode:

Command

Purpose

Router(config-if)# ip rsvp burst policing

Specifies a burst factor on a per-interface basis.

Configuring a Path

To configure a path, use the following command in global configuration mode:

Command

Purpose

Router(config)# ip rsvp sender

Specifies the RSVP path parameters, including the destination and source addresses, the protocol, the destination and source ports, the previous hop address, the average bit rate, and the burst size.

Configuring a Reservation

To configure a reservation, use the following command in global configuration mode:

Command

Purpose

Router(config)# ip rsvp reservation

Specifies the RSVP reservation parameters, including the destination and source addresses, the protocol, the destination and source ports, the next hop address, the input interface, the service type, the average bit rate, and the burst size.

Verifying RSVP Support for LLQ Configuration

To verify RSVP support for LLQ configuration, perform the following steps:

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    Enter the show ip rsvp installedcommand to display information about interfaces and their admitted reservations. A sample output is shown.

2.    Enter the show ip rsvp installed detailcommand to display additional information about interfaces and their current reservations. A sample output is shown.


DETAILED STEPS
Step 1   Enter the show ip rsvp installedcommand to display information about interfaces and their admitted reservations. A sample output is shown.

This output shows that Ethernet interface 2/1 has four reservations and serial interface 3/0 has none.



Example:
Router# show ip rsvp installed
RSVP:Ethernet2/1
BPS    To              From            Protoc DPort  Sport  Weight Conversation
44K    145.20.0.202    145.10.0.201    UDP    1000   1000   0      264
44K    145.20.0.202    145.10.0.201    UDP    1001   1001   13     266
98K    145.20.0.202    145.10.0.201    UDP    1002   1002   6      265
1K     145.20.0.202    145.10.0.201    UDP    10     10     0      264
RSVP:Serial3/0 has no installed reservations
Router#
Note    In the sample output, weight 0 is assigned to voice-like flows, which proceed to the priority queue.
Step 2   Enter the show ip rsvp installed detailcommand to display additional information about interfaces and their current reservations. A sample output is shown.

Example:
Router# show ip rsvp installed detail
RSVP:Ethernet2/1 has the following installed reservations
RSVP Reservation. Destination is 145.20.0.202, Source is 145.10.0.201,
  Protocol is UDP, Destination port is 1000, Source port is 1000
  Reserved bandwidth:44K bits/sec, Maximum burst:1K bytes, Peak rate:44K bits/sec
  Resource provider for this flow:
    WFQ on hw idb Se3/0: PRIORITY queue 264.  Weight:0, BW 44 kbps
  Conversation supports 1 reservations
  Data given reserved service:316 packets (15800 bytes)
  Data given best-effort service:0 packets (0 bytes)
  Reserved traffic classified for 104 seconds
  Long-term average bitrate (bits/sec):1212 reserved, 0M best-effort
RSVP Reservation. Destination is 145.20.0.202, Source is 145.10.0.201,
  Protocol is UDP, Destination port is 1001, Source port is 1001
  Reserved bandwidth:44K bits/sec, Maximum burst:3K bytes, Peak rate:44K bits/sec
  Resource provider for this flow:
    WFQ on hw idb Se3/0: RESERVED queue 266.  Weight:13, BW 44 kbps
  Conversation supports 1 reservations
  Data given reserved service:9 packets (450 bytes)
  Data given best-effort service:0 packets (0 bytes)
  Reserved traffic classified for 107 seconds
  Long-term average bitrate (bits/sec):33 reserved, 0M best-effort
RSVP Reservation. Destination is 145.20.0.202, Source is 145.10.0.201,
  Protocol is UDP, Destination port is 1002, Source port is 1002
Router#
Note    In the sample output, the first flow gets the priority queue (weight = 0) while the second flow does not.


Example:
 

Monitoring and Maintaining RSVP Support for LLQ

To monitor and maintain the RSVP Support for LLQ feature, use the following commands in EXEC mode, as needed:

Command

Purpose

Router# show ip rsvp installed

Displays information about interfaces and their admitted reservations.

Router# show ip rsvp installed detail

Displays additional information about interfaces and their admitted reservations.

Router# show queue  interface-type interface-number 

Displays queueing configuration and statistics for a particular interface.

Example RSVP Support for LLQ Configuration

This section provides a configuration example for the RSVP Support for LLQ feature.

In the following example, PQ parameters, including flow rate and burst factor, are defined:

Router(config)# ip rsvp pq-profile ?
  <1-1048576>  Max Flow Rate (bytes/second)
  voice-like   Voice-like flows
  <cr>
Router(config)# ip rsvp pq-profile 11000 1500 ?
  <100-4000>         Max Peak to Average Ratio (in %)
  ignore-peak-value  Ignore the flow's p/r ratio
  <cr>
Router(config)# ip rsvp pq-profile 11000 1500 ignore-peak-value
Router(config)# end
Router# sh run | include pq-profile
ip rsvp pq-profile 11000 1500 ignore-peak-value

In the following example, RSVP is enabled:

Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)# interface loopback 40
Router(config-if)# ip rsvp bandwidth ?
  <1-10000000>  Reservable Bandwidth(KBPS)
  <cr>
Router(config-if)# ip rsvp bandwidth 300 ?
  <1-10000000>  Largest Reservable Flow(KBPS)
  <cr>
Router(config-if)# ip rsvp bandwidth 300 30 ?
  <cr>
Router(config-if)# ip rsvp bandwidth 300 30
Router(config-if)# end

In the following example, WFQ is enabled:

Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)# interface e0/1
Router(config-if)# fair-queue
Router(config-if)# fair-queue 64

In the following example, a burst factor is configured:

Router(config)# interface e3/0
Router(config-if)# ip rsvp burst policing 200

In the following example, a path is defined:

Router(config)# ip rsvp sender 145.20.20.202 145.10.10.201 udp 10 20
145.10.10.201 loopback 10  80 10

In the following example, a reservation is defined:

Router(config)# ip rsvp reservation 145.20.20.202 145.10.10.201 udp
10 20 145.20.20.202 lo20 ff load 80 10

Cisco and the Cisco logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Cisco and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and other countries. To view a list of Cisco trademarks, go to this URL: www.cisco.com/go/trademarks. Third-party trademarks mentioned are the property of their respective owners. The use of the word partner does not imply a partnership relationship between Cisco and any other company. (1110R)

Any Internet Protocol (IP) addresses and phone numbers used in this document are not intended to be actual addresses and phone numbers. Any examples, command display output, network topology diagrams, and other figures included in the document are shown for illustrative purposes only. Any use of actual IP addresses or phone numbers in illustrative content is unintentional and coincidental.

© 2013 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.