Intelligent Services Gateway Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS Release 15.2S
Configuring ISG Control Policies
Downloads: This chapterpdf (PDF - 192.0KB) The complete bookPDF (PDF - 2.34MB) | The complete bookePub (ePub - 1.51MB) | Feedback

Configuring ISG Control Policies

Configuring ISG Control Policies

Last Updated: December 19, 2012

Intelligent Services Gateway (ISG) is a Cisco IOS software feature set that provides a structured framework in which edge devices can deliver flexible and scalable services to subscribers. ISG control policies are a means of defining the actions the system will take in response to specified conditions and events. A wide variety of system actions, conditions, and events can be combined using a consistent policy language, providing a flexible and precise way of configuring ISG. This module provides information about how to configure ISG control policies.

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest caveats and feature information, see Bug Search Tool and the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the feature information table at the end of this module.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Prerequisites for ISG Control Policies

Authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) method lists must be configured prior to defining authentication and authorization actions.

Restrictions for ISG Control Policies

Control policies are activated for specific contexts, not directly on sessions. Control policies apply to all sessions hosted on the context.

Only one control policy map may be applied to a given context.

Control policies can be defined only through the router's command-line interface (CLI).

Not all actions may be associated with all events.

A new control class may not be inserted between existing control classes once a control policy map has been defined.

Information About ISG Control Policies

Control Policies

Control policies define the actions that the system will take in response to specified events and conditions. For example, a control policy can be configured to authenticate specific subscribers and then provide them with access to specific services.

A control policy is made of one or more control policy rules. A control policy rule is an association of a control class and one or more actions. The control class defines the conditions that must be met before the actions will be executed.

Three steps are involved in defining a control policy:

  1. Create one or more control class maps--A control class map specifies the conditions that must be met for a policy to be activated, and, optionally, the event that causes the class to be evaluated. A control class map may contain multiple conditions, each of which will evaluate to either true or false. Match directives can be used to specify whether all, any, or none of the individual conditions must evaluate true in order for the class to evaluate true.
  2. Create a control policy map--A control policy map contains one or more control policy rules. A control policy rule associates a control class map with one or more actions. Actions are numbered and executed sequentially.
  3. Apply the control policy map--A control policy map is activated by applying it to a context. A control policy map can be applied to one or more of the following types of contexts. In the following list, the context types are listed in order of precedence. For example, a control policy map that is applied to a PVC takes precedence over a control policy map that is applied to an interface.
    • Permanent virtual circuit (PVC)
    • Virtual circuit (VC) class
    • Virtual template
    • Subinterface
    • Interface
    • Global

In general, control policy maps that are applied to more specific contexts take precedence over policy maps applied to more general contexts.


Note


Traffic policies are another type of policy used by ISG. Traffic policies define the handling of data packets and are configured in service policy maps or service profiles. For more information about traffic policies, see the "Configuring ISG Subscriber Services" module.

Differentiated Initial Policy Control

Authentication failure for a subscriber may happen for an access-reject (which means a RADIUS server responded with a Reject) or due to an access request timeout (RADIUS server is unreachable).

Using ISG control policies, and actions configured for the 'radius-timeout' and 'access-reject' events, the system can distinguish between the different reasons for an authentication failure. Different events are thrown by the system (for example, a received authentication reject or an unavailable RADIUS server event). This allows the control policy to specify different actions for each type of authentication failure. For example, if the RADIUS server is down or unreachable, temporary access can be given to subscribers.

This feature is available only for IP-based sessions for subscriber authentication. This feature does not support the Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE) sessions.

Uses of Control Policies

Use control policies to configure an ISG to perform specific actions in response to specific events and conditions. For example, control policies could be used for the following purposes:

  • To activate a default service when a subscriber session is first detected
  • To sequence the gathering of subscriber identity, where a control protocol exists on the access side
  • To determine how the system responds to an idle timeout or to a subscriber who has run out of credit
  • To enable transparent automatic login, which enables authorization on the basis of an IP address or MAC address
  • To configure the maximum amount of time a session can remain unauthenticated
  • To send periodic session state information to other devices

How to Configure an ISG Control Policy

Configuring a Control Class Map

A control class map contains conditions that must be met for a control policy to be executed. A control class map can contain one or more conditions. Perform this task to configure a control class map.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    class-map type control [match-all|match-any|match-none] class-map-name

4.    available {authen-status | authenticated-domain | authenticated-username | dnis | media | mlp-negotiated | nas-port | no-username | protocol | service-name | source-ip-address | timer | tunnel-name | unauthenticated-domain | unauthenticated-username}

5.    greater-than [not] nas-port {adapter adapter-number | channel channel-number | ipaddr ip-address | port port-number | shelf shelf-number | slot slot-number | sub-interface sub-interface-number | type interface-type | vci vci-number | vlan vlan-id | vpi vpi-number}

6.    greater-than-or-equal [not]nas-port {adapter adapter-number | channel channel-number | ipaddr ip-address | port port-number | shelf shelf-number | slot slot-number | sub-interface sub-interface-number | type interface-type | vci vci-number | vlan vlan-id | vpi vpi-number}

7.    less-than [not] nas-port {adapter adapter-number | channel channel-number | ipaddr ip-address | port port-number | shelf shelf-number | slot slot-number | sub-interface sub-interface-number | type interface-type | vci vci-number | vlan vlan-id | vpi vpi-number}

8.    less-than-or-equal [not] nas-port {adapter adapter-number | channel channel-number | ipaddr ip-address | port port-number | shelf shelf-number | slot slot-number | sub-interface sub-interface-number | type interface-type | vci vci-number | vlan vlan-id | vpi vpi-number}

9.    match authen-status {authenticated | unauthenticated}

10.    match authenticated-domain {domain-name | regexp regular-expression}

11.    match authenticated-username {username | regexp regular-expression}

12.    match dnis {dnis | regexp regular-expression}

13.    match media {async | atm | ether | ip | isdn | mpls | serial}

14.    match mlp-negotiated {no | yes}

15.    match nas-port {adapter adapter-number | channel channel-number | circuit-id name | ipaddr ip-address | port port-number | remote-id name | shelf shelf-number | slot slot-number | sub-interface sub-interface-number | type {async | atm | basic-rate| enm | ether | fxo | fxs | none | primary-rate | synch | vlan | vty} | vci vci-number | vlan vlan-id | vpi vpi-number}

16.    match no-username {no | yes}

17.    match protocol {atom | ip | pdsn | ppp | vpdn}

18.    match service-name {service-name | regexp regular-expression}

19.    match source-ip-address ip-address subnet-mask

20.    match timer {timer-name | regexp regular-expression}

21.    match tunnel-name {tunnel-name | regexp regular-expression}

22.    match unauthenticated-domain {domain-name | regexp regular-expression}

23.    match unauthenticated-username {username | regexp regular-expression}

24.    match vrf {vrf-name | regexp regular-expression}


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
class-map type control [match-all|match-any|match-none] class-map-name


Example:

Router(config)# class-map type control match-all class1

 

Creates or modifies a control class map, which defines the conditions under which the actions of a control policy map will be executed, and enters control class map mode.

 
Step 4
available {authen-status | authenticated-domain | authenticated-username | dnis | media | mlp-negotiated | nas-port | no-username | protocol | service-name | source-ip-address | timer | tunnel-name | unauthenticated-domain | unauthenticated-username}


Example:

Router(config-control-classmap)# available nas-port

 

(Optional) Creates a condition that evaluates true if the specified subscriber identifier is locally available.

 
Step 5
greater-than [not] nas-port {adapter adapter-number | channel channel-number | ipaddr ip-address | port port-number | shelf shelf-number | slot slot-number | sub-interface sub-interface-number | type interface-type | vci vci-number | vlan vlan-id | vpi vpi-number}


Example:

Router(config-control-classmap)# greater-than nas-port type atm vpi 200 vci 100

 

(Optional) Creates a condition that evaluates true if the subscriber network access server (NAS) port identifier is greater than the specified value.

 
Step 6
greater-than-or-equal [not]nas-port {adapter adapter-number | channel channel-number | ipaddr ip-address | port port-number | shelf shelf-number | slot slot-number | sub-interface sub-interface-number | type interface-type | vci vci-number | vlan vlan-id | vpi vpi-number}


Example:

Router(config-control-classmap)# greater-than-or-equal nas-port vlan 10

 

(Optional) Creates a condition that evaluates true if the specified subscriber NAS port identifier is greater than or equal to the specified value.

 
Step 7
less-than [not] nas-port {adapter adapter-number | channel channel-number | ipaddr ip-address | port port-number | shelf shelf-number | slot slot-number | sub-interface sub-interface-number | type interface-type | vci vci-number | vlan vlan-id | vpi vpi-number}


Example:

Router(config-control-classmap)# less-than nas-port type atm vpi 200 vci 105

 

(Optional) Creates a condition that evaluates true if the specified subscriber NAS port identifier is less than the specified value.

 
Step 8
less-than-or-equal [not] nas-port {adapter adapter-number | channel channel-number | ipaddr ip-address | port port-number | shelf shelf-number | slot slot-number | sub-interface sub-interface-number | type interface-type | vci vci-number | vlan vlan-id | vpi vpi-number}


Example:

Router(config-control-classmap)# less-than-or-equal nas-port ipaddr 10.10.10.10

 

(Optional) Creates a condition that evaluates true if the specified subscriber NAS port identifier is less than or equal to the specified value.

 
Step 9
match authen-status {authenticated | unauthenticated}


Example:

Router(config-control-classmap)# match authen-status authenticated

 

(Optional) Creates a condition that evaluates true if a subscriber's authentication status matches the specified authentication status.

 
Step 10
match authenticated-domain {domain-name | regexp regular-expression}


Example:

Router(config-control-classmap)# match authenticated-domain cisco.com

 

(Optional) Creates a condition that evaluates true if a subscriber's authenticated domain matches the specified domain.

 
Step 11
match authenticated-username {username | regexp regular-expression}


Example:

Router(config-control-classmap)# match authenticated-username regexp "admin@.*com"

 

(Optional) Creates a condition that evaluates true if a subscriber's authenticated username matches the specified username.

 
Step 12
match dnis {dnis | regexp regular-expression}


Example:

Router(config-control-classmap)# match dnis reg-exp 5551212

 

(Optional) Creates a condition that evaluates true if a subscriber's Dialed Number Identification Service number (DNIS number, also referred to as called-party number) matches the specified DNIS number.

 
Step 13
match media {async | atm | ether | ip | isdn | mpls | serial}


Example:

Router(config-control-classmap)# match media atm

 

(Optional) Creates a condition that evaluates true if a subscriber's access media type matches the specified media type.

 
Step 14
match mlp-negotiated {no | yes}


Example:

Router(config-control-classmap)# match mlp-negotiated yes

 

(Optional) Creates a condition that evaluates true or false depending on whether the subscriber's session was established using multilink PPP negotiation.

  • If the yes keyword is used, the condition evaluates true if the subscriber's session was established using multilink PPP negotiation.
 
Step 15
match nas-port {adapter adapter-number | channel channel-number | circuit-id name | ipaddr ip-address | port port-number | remote-id name | shelf shelf-number | slot slot-number | sub-interface sub-interface-number | type {async | atm | basic-rate| enm | ether | fxo | fxs | none | primary-rate | synch | vlan | vty} | vci vci-number | vlan vlan-id | vpi vpi-number}


Example:

Router(config-control-classmap)# match nas-port type ether slot 3

 

(Optional) Creates a condition that evaluates true if a subscriber's NAS port identifier matches the specified value.

 
Step 16
match no-username {no | yes}


Example:

Router(config-control-classmap)# match no-username yes

 

(Optional) Creates a condition that evaluates true or false depending on whether or not a subscriber's username is available.

  • If the yes keyword is used, the condition evaluates true if the subscriber's username is not available.
 
Step 17
match protocol {atom | ip | pdsn | ppp | vpdn}


Example:

Router(config-control-classmap)# match protocol ip

 

(Optional) Creates a condition that evaluates true if a subscriber's access protocol type matches the specified protocol type.

 
Step 18
match service-name {service-name | regexp regular-expression}


Example:

Router(config-control-classmap)# match service-name service1

 

(Optional) Creates a condition that evaluates true if the service name associated with a subscriber matches the specified service name.

 
Step 19
match source-ip-address ip-address subnet-mask


Example:

Router(config-control-classmap)# match source-ip-address 10.10.10.10 255.255.255.255

 

(Optional) Creates a condition that evaluates true if a subscriber's source IP address matches the specified IP address.

 
Step 20
match timer {timer-name | regexp regular-expression}


Example:

Router(config-control-classmap)# match timer TIMERA

 

(Optional) Creates a condition that evaluates true upon expiry of a specified policy timer.

 
Step 21
match tunnel-name {tunnel-name | regexp regular-expression}


Example:

Router(config-control-classmap)# match tunnel-name regexp L.*

 

(Optional) Creates a condition that evaluates true if a subscriber's virtual private dialup network (VPDN) tunnel name matches the specified tunnel name.

 
Step 22
match unauthenticated-domain {domain-name | regexp regular-expression}


Example:

Router(config-control-classmap)# match unauthenticated-domain example.com

 

(Optional) Creates a condition that evaluates true if a subscriber's unauthenticated domain name matches the specified domain name.

 
Step 23
match unauthenticated-username {username | regexp regular-expression}


Example:

Router(config-control-classmap)# match unauthenticated-username regexp examplename1

 

(Optional) Creates a condition that evaluates true if a subscriber's unauthenticated username matches the specified username.

 
Step 24
match vrf {vrf-name | regexp regular-expression}


Example:

Router(config-control-classmap)# match vrf regexp examplename2

 

(Optional) Creates a condition that evaluates true if a subscriber's VPN routing and forwarding (VRF) matches the specified VRF.

 

Configuring a Control Policy Map

A control policy map contains one or more control policy rules that associate a control class with one or more actions. Perform this task to configure a control policy map.


Note


The actions that can be configured in a policy rule depend on the type of event that is specified by the class type control command. For example, if the account-logoff event is specified, the only action that can be configured in that policy rule is service. The procedure in this section shows all actions that can be configured in a policy map.
SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    policy-map type control policy-map-name

4.    class type control {control-class-name | always} [event {access-reject| account-logoff | account-logon | acct-notification | credit-exhausted | dummy-event | quota-depleted | radius-timeout | service-failed| service-start | service-stop | session-default-service | session-restart | session-service-found | session-start | timed-policy-expiry}]

5.    action-number authenticate aaa list list-name

6.    action-number authorize use method {aaa|legacy|rm|sgf|ssg|xconnect}[aaa parameter-name] [password password] [upon network-service-found {continue | stop}] identifier {authenticated-domain | authenticated-username | auto-detect| circuit-id| dnis | mac-address | nas-port | remote-id| source-ip-address | tunnel-name| unauthenticated-domain | unauthenticated-username|vendor-class-id}

7.    action-number collect [aaa list list-name] identifier {authen-status | authenticated-domain | authenticated-username | dnis | mac-address | media | mlp-negotiated | nas-port | no-username | protocol | service-name | source-ip-address | timer | tunnel-name | unauthenticated-domain | unauthenticated-username | vrf}

8.    action-number if upon network-service-found {continue | stop}

9.    action-number proxy accounting aaa list {list-name| default}

10.    action-number service [disconnect | local | vpdn]

11.    action-number service-policy type control policy-map-name

12.    action-number service-policy type service [unapply] [aaa list list-name] {name service-name | identifier {authenticated-domain | authenticated-username | dnis | nas-port | tunnel-name |unauthenticated-domain | unauthenticated-username}}

13.    action-number set name identifier {authen-status | authenticated-domain | authenticated-username | dnis | mac-address| media | mlp-negotiated | nas-port | no-username | protocol | service-name | source-ip-address | timer | tunnel-name | unauthenticated-domain | unauthenticated-username|vrf}

14.    action-number set-timer name-of-timer minutes

15.    action-number substitute name matching-pattern pattern-string

16.    end


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
policy-map type control policy-map-name


Example:

Router(config)# policy-map type control MY-POLICY

 

Creates or modifies a control policy map, which is used to define a control policy.

 
Step 4
class type control {control-class-name | always} [event {access-reject| account-logoff | account-logon | acct-notification | credit-exhausted | dummy-event | quota-depleted | radius-timeout | service-failed| service-start | service-stop | session-default-service | session-restart | session-service-found | session-start | timed-policy-expiry}]


Example:

Router(config-control-policymap)# class type control always event session-start

 

Specifies a control class for which actions may be configured.

  • A policy rule for which the control class is always will always be treated as the lowest priority rule within the control policy map.
 
Step 5
action-number authenticate aaa list list-name


Example:

Router(config-control-policymap-class-control)# 1 authenticate aaa list LIST1

 

(Optional) Initiates an authentication request.

 
Step 6
action-number authorize use method {aaa|legacy|rm|sgf|ssg|xconnect}[aaa parameter-name] [password password] [upon network-service-found {continue | stop}] identifier {authenticated-domain | authenticated-username | auto-detect| circuit-id| dnis | mac-address | nas-port | remote-id| source-ip-address | tunnel-name| unauthenticated-domain | unauthenticated-username|vendor-class-id}


Example:

Router(config-control-policymap-class-control)# 1 authorize identifier source-ip-address

 

(Optional) Initiates a request for authorization on the basis of the specified identifier.

 
Step 7
action-number collect [aaa list list-name] identifier {authen-status | authenticated-domain | authenticated-username | dnis | mac-address | media | mlp-negotiated | nas-port | no-username | protocol | service-name | source-ip-address | timer | tunnel-name | unauthenticated-domain | unauthenticated-username | vrf}


Example:

Router(config-control-policymap-class-control)# 1 collect identifier authen-status

 

(Optional) Collects the specified subscriber identifier from the access protocol.

 
Step 8
action-number if upon network-service-found {continue | stop}


Example:

Router(config-control-policymap-class-control)# 2 if upon network-service-found stop

 

(Optional) Specifies whether the system should continue processing policy rules once the subscriber's network service has been identified.

 
Step 9
action-number proxy accounting aaa list {list-name| default}


Example:

Router(config-control-policymap-class-control)# 1 proxy accounting aaa list default

 

(Optional) Specifies the list that the request should be proxied to.

 
Step 10
action-number service [disconnect | local | vpdn]


Example:

Router(config-control-policymap-class-control)# 3 service disconnect

 

(Optional) Specifies a network service type for PPP sessions.

 
Step 11
action-number service-policy type control policy-map-name


Example:

Router(config-control-policymap-class-control)# service-policy type control domain based access

 

(Optional) Nests the specified control policy map within a parent control policy map.

 
Step 12
action-number service-policy type service [unapply] [aaa list list-name] {name service-name | identifier {authenticated-domain | authenticated-username | dnis | nas-port | tunnel-name |unauthenticated-domain | unauthenticated-username}}


Example:

Router(config-control-policymap-class-control)# 1 service-policy type service aaa list LISTA name REDIRECT

 

(Optional) Activates an ISG service.

  • Specifying an identifier instead of a service name will activate a service that has the same name as the specified identifier.
 
Step 13
action-number set name identifier {authen-status | authenticated-domain | authenticated-username | dnis | mac-address| media | mlp-negotiated | nas-port | no-username | protocol | service-name | source-ip-address | timer | tunnel-name | unauthenticated-domain | unauthenticated-username|vrf}


Example:

Router(config-control-policymap-class-control)# 1 set APJ identifier authen-status

 

(Optional) Sets a variable name.

 
Step 14
action-number set-timer name-of-timer minutes


Example:

Router(config-control-policymap-class-control)# 1 set-timer TIMERA 5

 

(Optional) Starts a named policy timer.

  • Expiration of the timer generates the event timed-policy-expiry.
 
Step 15
action-number substitute name matching-pattern pattern-string


Example:

Router(config-control-policymap-class-control)# 1 substitute TPK SUBA SUBB

 

(Optional) Substitutes a matching pattern in variable content by a rewrite pattern.

 
Step 16
end


Example:

Router(config-control-policymap-class-control)# end

 

(Optional) Ends the current configuration session and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Applying the Control Policy Map

A control policy map must be activated by applying it to a context. Perform one or more of the following tasks to apply a control policy to a context:

Applying a Control Policy Map Globally on the Router

Perform this task to apply a control policy globally.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    service-policy type control policy-map-name


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
service-policy type control policy-map-name


Example:

Router(config)# service-policy type control policy1

 

Applies a control policy.

 

Applying an ISG Control Policy Map to an Interface or Subinterface

Perform this task to apply an ISG control policy to an interface or subinterface.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    interface type number [. subinterface-number]

4.    service-policy type control policy-map-name


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
interface type number [. subinterface-number]


Example:

Router(config)# interface gigabitethernet 0/1.1

 

Specifies an interface and enters interface configuration mode.

 
Step 4
service-policy type control policy-map-name


Example:

Router(config-if)# service-policy type control policy1

 

Applies a control policy.

 

Applying an ISG Control Policy Map to a Virtual Template

Perform this task to apply an ISG control policy map to a virtual template.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    interface virtual-template number

4.    service-policy type control policy-map-name


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
interface virtual-template number


Example:

Router(config)# interface virtual-template0

 

Creates a virtual template interface and enters interface configuration mode.

 
Step 4
service-policy type control policy-map-name


Example:

Router(config-if)# service-policy type control policy1

 

Applies a control policy.

 

Applying an ISG Control Policy Map to an ATM VC Class

A VC class is a set of preconfigured VC parameters that are configured and applied to a particular VC or ATM interface. Perform this task to apply an ISG control policy map to an ATM VC class.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    vc-class atm vc-class-name

4.    service-policy type control policy-map-name


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
vc-class atm vc-class-name


Example:

Router(config)# vc-class atm class1

 

Creates an ATM VC class and enters ATM VC class configuration mode.

  • A VC class can be applied to an ATM interface, subinterface, or VC.
 
Step 4
service-policy type control policy-map-name


Example:

Router(config-vc-class)# service-policy type control policy1

 

Applies a control policy.

 

Applying a Control Policy Map to an ATM PVC

Perform this task to apply an ISG control policy to an ATM PVC.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    interface atm interface-number [. subinterface-number {mpls | multipoint | point-to-point}]

4.    pvc vpi / vci

5.    service-policy type control policy-map-name


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
interface atm interface-number [. subinterface-number {mpls | multipoint | point-to-point}]


Example:

Router(config)# interface atm 5/0.1 multipoint

 

Specifies an ATM interface or subinterface and enters interface configuration mode.

 
Step 4
pvc vpi / vci


Example:

Router(config-if)# pvc 2/101

 

Creates an ATM PVC and enters ATM virtual circuit configuration mode.

 
Step 5
service-policy type control policy-map-name


Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# service-policy type control policy1

 

Applies a control policy.

 

Monitoring and Maintaining ISG Control Policies

Optionally, you can perform this task to monitor and maintain ISG control policy operation. Steps can be performed in any order.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    show class-map type control

3.    show policy-map type control

4.    clear class-map control

5.    clear policy-map control


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
show class-map type control


Example:

Router# show class-map type control

 

Displays information about ISG control class maps.

  • The display includes statistics on the number of times a particular class has been evaluated and what the results were.
 
Step 3
show policy-map type control


Example:

Router# show policy-map type control

 

Displays information about ISG control policy maps.

  • The display includes statistics on the number of times each policy rule within the policy map has been executed.
 
Step 4
clear class-map control


Example:

Router# clear class-map control

 

Clears the control class map counters.

 
Step 5
clear policy-map control


Example:

Router# clear policy-map control

 

Clears the control policy map counters.

 

Configuration Examples for ISG Control Policies

Control Policy for Layer 2 Access and Service Provisioning Example

The following example shows how to configure a control policy that produces the following results:

  • VPDN forwarding is applied to anyone dialing in from "example1.com".
  • Access to locally terminated Layer 3 network resources is provided to anyone dialing in from "example2.com".
  • Anyone else is barred.
! Configure the control class maps.
class-map type control match-all MY-FORWARDED-USERS
 match unauthenticated-domain "example1.com"
!
class-map type control match-all MY-LOCAL-USERS
 match unauthenticated-domain "example2.com"
!
! Configure the control policy map.
policy-map type control MY-POLICY
 class type control MY-FORWARDED-USERS event session-start
  1 service-policy type service identifier nas-port
  2 service local
!
 class type control MY-LOCAL-USERS event session-start
  1 service local
!
 class type control always event session-start
  2 service disconnect
!
! Apply the control policy to dialer interface 1.
interface Dialer1
 service-policy type control MY-POLICY

Control Policy for Restricting Access on the Basis of Interface and Access Media Example

This example shows how to configure a control policy to allow access only to users who enter the router from a particular interface and access type. In this case, only PPPoE users will be allowed; everyone else is barred.

The first condition class map "MATCHING-USERS" evaluates true only if all of the lines within it also evaluate true; however, within "MATCHING-USERS" is a nested class map (second condition), "NOT-ATM". This nested class map represents a subcondition that must also evaluate to true. Note that the class map "NOT-ATM" specifies "match-none". This means that "NOT-ATM" evaluates to true only if every condition line within it evaluates to false.

The third condition specifies matching on the NAS port associated with this subscriber. Specifically, only subscribers that arrive on a Gigabit Ethernet interface and on slot 3 will evaluate to true.

! Configure the control class maps.
class-map type control match-all MATCHING-USERS
 class type control NOT-ATM
 match media ether
 match nas-port type ether slot 3
!
class-map type control match-none NOT-ATM
 match media atm
!

If the conditions in the class map "MATCHING-USERS" evaluate to true, the first action to be executed is to authenticate the user. If authentication is successful, the service named "service1" will be downloaded and applied. Finally, a Layer 3 service is provided.

If "MATCHING-USERS" is not evaluated as true, the "always" class will apply, which results in barring anyone who does not match "MATCHING-USERS".

! Configure the control policy map.
policy-map type control my-pppoe-rule
 class type control MATCHING-USERS event session-start
  1 authenticate aaa list XYZ
  2 service-policy type service service1
  3 service local
!

class type control always

  1 service disconnect
!
! Apply the control policy to an interface.
interface gigabitethernet3/0/0
 service-policy type control my-pppoe-rule 

Finally, the policy is associated with an interface.

Default Method Lists

If you specify the default method list for any of the control policy actions, the default list will not display in the output from the show running-config command. For example, if you configure the following command:

Router(config-control-policymap-class-control)# 1 authenticate aaa list default

The following will display in the output from the show running-config command:

1 authenticate

Control Policy for ISG Prepaid Billing Support Example

The following example shows a control policy configured to redirect subscriber packets to the server group "redirect-sg" when the credit-exhausted event occurs:

service-policy type control RULEA 
!
policy-map type control RULEA
 class type control always event credit-exhausted
  1 service-policy type service redirectprofile
!
policy-map type service redirectprofile
 class type traffic CLASS-ALL
  redirect to group redirect-sg
policy-map type service mp3
 class type traffic CLASS-ACL-101
  authentication method-list cp-mlist
  accounting method-list cp-mlist
  prepaid conf-prepaid 
subscriber feature prepaid conf-prepaid
 threshold time 20
 threshold volume 0
 method-list accounting ap-mlist
 method-list authorization default

password cisco

Control Policies for Automatic Subscriber Login Example

In the following example, if the client is from the a subnet, automatic subscriber login is applied and an authorization request is sent to the list TALLIST with the subscriber's source IP address as the username. If the authorization request is successful, any automatic activation services specified in the returned user profile are activated for the session and the execution of rules within the control policy stops. If the authorization is not successful, the rule execution proceeds, and the subscriber is redirected to the policy server to log in. If the subscriber does not log in within five minutes, the session is disconnected.

interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0
 service-policy type control RULEA
aaa authentication login TALLIST group radius
aaa authentication login LOCAL local
access-list 100 permit ip any any
class-map type traffic match-any all-traffic
 match access-group input 100
 match access-group output 100

policy-map type service redirectprofile

 class type traffic all-traffic
  redirect to ip 10.0.0.148 port 8080
class-map type control match-all CONDA
 match source-ip-address 209.165.201.1 255.255.255.0 
!
class-map type control match-all CONDF
 match timer TIMERB
 match authen-status unauthenticated
policy-map type control RULEA
 class type control CONDA event session-start
  1 authorize aaa list TAL_LIST password cisco identifier source-ip-address
  2 apply aaa list LOCAL service redirectprofile
  3 set-timer TIMERB 5 minutes
 class type control CONDF event timed-policy-expiry

1 service disconnect

Additional References

Related Documents

Related Topic

Document Title

Cisco IOS commands

Cisco IOS Master Commands List, All Releases

ISG commands

Cisco IOS Intelligent Services Gateway Command Reference

HA commands

Cisco IOS High Availability Command Reference

HA configuration

Cisco IOS High Availability Configuration Guide

Traffic Policies

"Configuring ISG Subscriber Services" module in this guide

Technical Assistance

Description

Link

The Cisco Support and Documentation website provides online resources to download documentation, software, and tools. Use these resources to install and configure the software and to troubleshoot and resolve technical issues with Cisco products and technologies. Access to most tools on the Cisco Support and Documentation website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

http://www.cisco.com/cisco/web/support/index.html

Feature Information for ISG Control Policies

The following table provides release information about the feature or features described in this module. This table lists only the software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that software release train also support that feature.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Table 1 Feature Information for ISG Control Policies

Feature Name

Releases

Feature Configuration Information

ISG: Policy Control: Policy: Domain Based (Autodomain, Proxy)

12.2(28)SB 12.2(33)SRC 15.0(1)S

ISG control policies manage the primary services and rules used to enforce particular contracts. These policies include programmable interfaces to dynamic triggers and conditional logic to be applied to flows within a session, or other characteristics of a session, upon meeting the policy criteria. Policies can be configured to interpret the domain as a request to activate the service associated with that domain name, allowing users to automatically receive services in accordance with the domain to which they are attempting to connect.

In Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRC, support was added for the Cisco 7600 router.

ISG: Policy Control: Policy: Triggers

12.2(28)SB 12.2(33)SRC 15.0(1)S

ISG control policies can be configured with time-based, volume-based, and duration-based policy triggers. Time-based triggers use an internal clock, allowing policies to be applied at specific times. Volume-based triggers are based on packet count; when the packet count reaches a specified value, the specified policy is applied. Duration-based triggers are based on an internal timer. Upon expiration of the timer, the specified policy is applied.

In Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRC, support was added for the Cisco 7600 router.

ISG: Policy Control: Multidimensional Identity per Session

12.2(28)SB 12.2(33)SRC 15.0(1)S

ISG control policies provide a flexible way to collect pieces of subscriber identity information during session establishment. Control policies also allow session policy to be applied iteratively as more elements of identity information become available to the system.

In Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRC, support was added for the Cisco 7600 router.

ISG: Policy Control: Cisco Policy Language

12.2(28)SB 12.2(33)SRC

ISG control policies are a structured replacement for feature-specific configuration commands and allow configurable functionality to be expressed in terms of an event, a condition, and an action. Control policies provide an intuitive and extensible framework, with a consistent set of CLI commands, for specifying system behavior.

In Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRC, support was added for the Cisco 7600 router.

ISG: Policy Control: Differentiated Initial Policy Control

12.2(33)SRE 12.2(33)XNE

This features provides the ability to distinguish RADIUS authentication rejects from RADIUS server unavailability. It allows minimal or temporary network access to the subscribers when the RADIUS servers are down or cannot be accessed because of network issues or when an authentication reject is received for a subscriber.

In Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)XNE, support was added for the Cisco 10000 Series Routers.

The following command was introduced or modified:

class type control

Cisco and the Cisco logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Cisco and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and other countries. To view a list of Cisco trademarks, go to this URL: www.cisco.com/go/trademarks. Third-party trademarks mentioned are the property of their respective owners. The use of the word partner does not imply a partnership relationship between Cisco and any other company. (1110R)

Any Internet Protocol (IP) addresses and phone numbers used in this document are not intended to be actual addresses and phone numbers. Any examples, command display output, network topology diagrams, and other figures included in the document are shown for illustrative purposes only. Any use of actual IP addresses or phone numbers in illustrative content is unintentional and coincidental.

© 2012 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.