IP Routing: Protocol-Independent Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS Release 15S
Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing
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Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing

Contents

Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing

The Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing (PBR) feature allows a specified interface on a provider edge (PE) device to route packets to Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) based on packet length or match criteria defined in an IP access list.

You can enable VPN routing and forwarding (VRF) selection by policy routing packets through a route map, through the global routing table, or to a specified VRF.

You can enable policy-routing packets for VRF instances by using route map commands with set commands.

On supported hardware, you can configure both the Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing feature and the MPLS VPN VRF Selection Based on a Source IP Address feature on the same interface.

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest caveats and feature information, see Bug Search Tool and the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the feature information table at the end of this module.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/​go/​cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Prerequisites for Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing

  • The device must support policy-based routing (PBR) in order for you to configure this feature. For platforms that do not support PBR, use the MPLS VPN VRF Selection Based on a Source IP Address feature.
  • A Virtual Private Network (VPN) virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) instance must be defined before you configure this feature. An error message is displayed on the console if no VRF exists.

Restrictions for Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing

  • All commands that aid in routing also support hardware switching, except for the set ip next-hop verify availability command because Cisco Discovery Protocol information is not available in the line cards.
  • Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) and multicast packets do not support policy-based routing (PBR) and cannot be configured for a source IP address that is a match criterion for this feature.
  • The set vrf and set ip global next-hop commands can be configured with the set default interface, set interface , set ip default next-hop, and set ip next-hop commands. But the set vrf and set ip global next-hop commands take precedence over the set default interface, set interface , set ip default next-hop, and set ip next-hop commands. No error message is displayed if you attempt to configure the set vrf command with any of these three set commands.
  • The Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing feature cannot be configured with IP prefix lists.
  • The set global and set vrf commands cannot be simultaneously applied to a route map.
  • The Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing feature supports VRF-lite; that is, only IP routing protocols run on the device. Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) and Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) cannot be configured. However, the set vrf command will work in MPLS VPN scenarios.

Information About Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing

Policy Routing of VPN Traffic Based on Match Criteria

The Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing feature is an extension of the MPLS VPN VRF Selection Based on a Source IP Address feature. The Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing feature allows you to policy route Virtual Private Network (VPN) traffic based on match criteria. Match criteria are defined in an IP access list and/or are based on packet length. The following match criteria are supported in Cisco software:

  • IP access lists—Define match criteria based on IP addresses, IP address ranges, and other IP packet access list filtering options. Named, numbered, standard, and extended access lists are supported. All IP access list configuration options in Cisco software can be used to define match criteria.
  • Packet lengths—Define match criteria based on the length of a packet, in bytes. The packet length filter is defined in a route map with the match length route-map configuration command.

Policy routing is defined in the route map. The route map is applied to the incoming interface with the ip policy route-map interface configuration command. An IP access list is applied to the route map with the match ip address route-map configuration command. Packet length match criteria are applied to the route map with the match length route-map configuration command. The set action is defined with the set vrf route-map configuration command. The match criteria are evaluated, and the appropriate VRF is selected by the set command. This combination allows you to define match criteria for incoming VPN traffic and policy route VPN packets out to the appropriate virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) instance.

Policy-Based Routing set Commands

Policy-routing Packets for VRF Instances

To enable policy-routing packets for virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) instances, you can use route map commands with the following set commands. They are listed in the order in which the device uses them during the routing of packets.

  • set tos—Sets the Type of Service (TOS) bits in the header of an IP packet.
  • set df—Sets the Don’t Fragment (DF) bit in the header of an IP packet.
  • set vrf—Routes packets through the specified interface. The destination interface can belong only to a VRF instance.
  • set global—Routes packets through the global routing table. This command is useful for routing ingress packets belonging to a specific VRF through the global routing table.
  • set ip vrf next-hop—Indicates where to output IPv4 packets that pass a match criteria of a route map for policy routing when the IPv4 next hop must be under a specified VRF.
  • set ipv6 vrf next-hop—Indicates where to output IPv6 packets that pass a match criteria of a route map for policy routing when the IPv6 next hop must be under a specified VRF.
  • set ip global next-hop—Indicates where to forward IPv4 packets that pass a match criterion of a route map for policy routing and for which the Cisco software uses the global routing table. The global keyword explicitly defines that IPv4 next-hops are under the global routing table.
  • set ipv6 global next-hop—Indicates where to forward IPv6 packets that pass a match criterion of a route map for policy routing and for which the Cisco software uses the global routing table. The global keyword explicitly defines that IPv6 next-hops are under the global routing table.
  • set interface—When packets enter a VRF, routes the packets out of the egress interface under the same VRF according to the set interface policy, provided that the Layer 2 rewrite information is available.
  • set ip default vrf—Provides IPv4 inherit-VRF and inter-VRF routing. With inherit-VRF routing, IPv4 packets arriving at a VRF interface are routed by the same outgoing VRF interface. With inter-VRF routing, IPv4 packets arriving at a VRF interface are routed through any other outgoing VRF interface.
  • set ipv6 default vrf—Provides IPv6 inherit-VRF and inter-VRF routing. With inherit-VRF routing, IPv6 packets arriving at a VRF interface are routed by the same outgoing VRF interface. With inter-VRF routing, IPv6 packets arriving at a VRF interface are routed through any other outgoing VRF interface.
  • set ip default global—Provides IPv4 VRF to global routing.
  • set ipv6 default global—Provides IPv6 VRF to global routing.
  • set default interface—Indicates where to output packets that pass a match criterion of a route map for policy routing and have no explicit route to the destination. The interface can belong to any VRF.
  • set ip default next-hop—Indicates where to output IPv4 packets that pass a match criterion of a route map for policy routing and for which the Cisco software has no explicit route to a destination.
  • set ipv6 default next-hop—Indicates where to IPv6 output packets that pass a match criterion of a route map for policy routing and for which the Cisco software has no explicit route to a destination.

Change of Normal Routing and Forwarding Behavior

When you configure policy-based routing (PBR), you can use the following six set commands to change normal routing and forwarding behavior. Configuring any of these set commands, with the potential exception of the set ip next-hop command, overrides the routing behavior of packets entering the interface if the packets do not belong to a virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) instance. The packets are routed from the egress interface across the global routing table.

  • set default interface—Indicates where to output packets that pass a match criterion of a route map for policy routing and have no explicit route to the destination.
  • set interface—When packets enter a VRF interface, routes the packets out of the egress interface under the same VRF according to the set interface policy, provided that the Layer 2 rewrite information is available.

    Note


    The interface must be a peer-to-peer (P2P) interface.


  • set ip default next-hop—Indicates where to output IPv4 packets that pass a match criterion of a route map for policy routing and for which the Cisco software has no explicit route to a destination.
  • set ipv6 default next-hop—Indicates where to output IPv6 packets that pass a match criterion of a route map for policy routing and for which the Cisco software has no explicit route to a destination.
  • set ip next-hop—Indicates where to output IPv4 packets that pass a match criterion of a route map for policy routing. If an IPv4 packet is received on a VRF interface and is transmitted from another interface within the same VPN, the VRF context of the incoming packet is inherited from the interface.
  • set ipv6 next-hop—Indicates where to output IPv6 packets that pass a match criterion of a route map for policy routing. If an IPv6 packet is received on a VRF interface and is transmitted from another interface within the same Virtual Private Network (VPN), the VRF context of the incoming packet is inherited from the interface.

Support of Inherit-VRF Inter-VRF and VRF-to-Global Routing

The Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing (PBR) feature supports inherit-VRF and inter-VRF. With inherit-VRF routing, packets arriving at a virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) interface are routed by the same outgoing VRF interface. With inter-VRF routing, packets arriving at a VRF interface are routed through any other outgoing VRF interface.

VRF-to-global routing causes packets that enter any VRF interface to be routed through the global routing table. When a packet arrives on a VRF interface, the destination lookup normally is done only in the corresponding VRF table. If a packet arrives on a global interface, the destination lookup is done in the global routing table.

The Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing feature modifies the following set commands to support inherit-VRF, inter-VRF, and VRF-to-global routing. The commands are listed in the order in which the device uses them during the routing of packets.

  • set global—Routes packets through the global routing table. This command is useful for routing ingress packets belonging to a specific VRF through the global routing table.
  • set ip global next-hop—Indicates where to forward IPv4 packets that pass a match criterion of a route map for policy routing and for which the Cisco software uses the global routing table.
  • set ipv6 global next-hop—Indicates where to forward IPv6 packets that pass a match criterion of a route map for policy routing and for which the Cisco software uses the global routing table.
  • set ip vrf next-hop—Causes the device to look up the IPv4 next hop in the VRF table. If an IPv4 packet arrives on an interface that belongs to a VRF and the packet needs to be routed through a different VRF, you can use the set ip vrf next-hop command.
  • set ipv6 vrf next-hop—Causes the device to look up the IPv6 next hop in the VRF table. If an IPv6 packet arrives on an interface that belongs to a VRF and the packet needs to be routed through a different VRF, you can use the set ipv6 vrf next-hop command.
  • set ip default vrf—Provides IPv4 inherit-VRF and inter-VRF routing. With IPv4 inherit-VRF routing, IPv4 packets arriving at a VRF interface are routed by the same outgoing VRF interface. With inter-VRF routing, IPv4 packets arriving at a VRF interface are routed through any other outgoing VRF interface.
  • set ipv6 default vrf—Provides IPv6 inherit-VRF and inter-VRF routing. With IPv6 inherit-VRF routing, IPv6 packets arriving at a VRF interface are routed by the same outgoing VRF interface. With inter-VRF routing, IPv6 packets arriving at a VRF interface are routed through any other outgoing VRF interface.
  • set interface—When packets enter a VRF, routes the packets out of the egress interface under the same VRF, according to the set interface policy, provided that the Layer 2 rewrite information is available.
  • set default interface—Indicates where to output packets that pass a match criterion of a route map for policy routing and have no explicit route to the destination. The interface can belong to any VRF.
  • set ip next-hop—Routes IPv4 packets through the global routing table in an IPv4-to-IPv4 routing and forwarding environment.
  • set ipv6 next-hop—Routes IPv6 packets through the global routing table in an IPv6-to-IPv6 routing and forwarding environment.
  • set vrf—Selects the appropriate VRF after a successful match occurs in the route map. VRS-aware PSV allows only inter-VRF (or VRF-to-VRF) switching.

How to Configure Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing

Defining the Match Criteria for Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing

Define the match criteria for the Multi-VRF Selection using Policy-Based Routing (PBR) feature so that you can selectively route the packets instead of using their default routing and forwarding.

The match criteria for the Multi-VRF Selection using Policy-Based Routing are defined in an access list. Standard, named, and extended access lists are supported.

You can define the match criteria based on the packet length by configuring the match length route-map configuration command. This configuration option is defined entirely within a route map.

The following sections explain how to configure PBR route selection:

Configuring Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing with a Standard Access List

Before You Begin

The tasks in the following sections assume that the virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) instance and associated IP address are already defined.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    enable

    2.    configure terminal

    3.    access-list access-list-number {deny | permit} [source source-wildcard] [log]


DETAILED STEPS
     Command or ActionPurpose
    Step 1 enable


    Example:
    Device> enable
     

    Enables privileged EXEC mode.

    • Enter your password if prompted.
     
    Step 2 configure terminal


    Example:
    Device# configure terminal
     

    Enters global configuration mode.

     
    Step 3 access-list access-list-number {deny | permit} [source source-wildcard] [log]


    Example:
    Device(config)# access-list 40 permit source 10.1.1.0/24 0.0.0.255 
     

    Creates an access list and defines the match criteria for the route map.

    • Match criteria can be defined based on IP addresses, IP address ranges, and other IP packet access list filtering options. Named, numbered, standard, and extended access lists are supported. You can use all IP access list configuration options to define match criteria.
    • The example creates a standard access list numbered 40. This filter permits traffic from any host with an IP address in the 10.1.1.0/24 subnet.
     

    Configuring Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing with a Named Extended Access List

    To configure Multi-VRF Selection using Policy-Based Routing (PBR) with a named extended access list, complete the following steps.

    Before You Begin

    The tasks in the following sections assume that the virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) instance and associated IP address are already defined.

    SUMMARY STEPS

      1.    enable

      2.    configure terminal

      3.    ip access-list {standard | extended} [access-list-name | access-list-number]

      4.    [sequence-number] {permit | deny} protocol source source-wildcard destination destination-wildcard [option option-value] [precedence precedence] [tostos] [ttl operator-vaue] [log] [time-range time-range-name] [fragments]


    DETAILED STEPS
       Command or ActionPurpose
      Step 1 enable


      Example:
      Device> enable
       

      Enables privileged EXEC mode.

      • Enter your password if prompted.
       
      Step 2 configure terminal


      Example:
      Device# configure terminal
       

      Enters global configuration mode.

       
      Step 3 ip access-list {standard | extended} [access-list-name | access-list-number]


      Example:
      Device(config)# ip access-list extended NAMEDACL 
       

      Specifies the IP access list type and enters the corresponding access list configuration mode.

      • You can specify a standard, extended, or named access list.
       
      Step 4 [sequence-number] {permit | deny} protocol source source-wildcard destination destination-wildcard [option option-value] [precedence precedence] [tostos] [ttl operator-vaue] [log] [time-range time-range-name] [fragments]


      Example:
      Device(config-ext-nacl)# permit ip any any option any-options 
       

      Defines the criteria for which the access list will permit or deny packets.

      • Match criteria can be defined based on IP addresses, IP address ranges, and other IP packet access list filtering options. Named, numbered, standard, and extended access lists are supported. You can use all IP access list configuration options to define match criteria.
      • The example creates a named access list that permits any configured IP option.
       

      Configuring Multi-VRF Selection in a Route Map

      Incoming packets are filtered through the match criteria that are defined in the route map. After a successful match occurs, the set command configuration determines the VRF through which the outbound Virtual Private Network (VPN) packets will be policy routed.

      Before You Begin

      You must define the virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) instance before you configure the route map; otherwise an error message appears on the console.

      A receive entry must be added to the VRF selection table with the ip vrf receive command. If a match and set operation occurs in the route map but there is no receive entry in the local VRF table, the packet will be dropped if the packet destination is local.

      SUMMARY STEPS

        1.    enable

        2.    configure terminal

        3.    route-map map-tag [permit | deny] [sequence-number]

        4.    Do one of the following :

        • set ip vrf vrf-name next-hop global-ipv4-address [...global-ipv4-address]
        • set ipv6 vrf vrf-name next-hop global-ipv6-address [...global-ipv6-address]
        • set ip next-hop recursive vrf global-ipv4-address [...global-ipv4-address]
        • set ip global next-hop global-ipv4-address [...global-ipv4-address]
        • set ipv6 global next-hop global-ipv6-address [...global-ipv6-address]

        5.    Do one of the following:

        • match ip address {acl-number [acl-name | acl-number]}
        • match length minimum-lengthmaximum-length

        6.    end


      DETAILED STEPS
         Command or ActionPurpose
        Step 1 enable


        Example:
        Device> enable
         

        Enables privileged EXEC mode.

        • Enter your password if prompted.
         
        Step 2 configure terminal


        Example:
        Device# configure terminal
         

        Enters global configuration mode.

         
        Step 3 route-map map-tag [permit | deny] [sequence-number]


        Example:
        Device(config)# route-map map1 permit 10
         

        Defines the conditions for redistributing routes from one routing protocol into another, or enables policy routing.

        • Enters route-map configuration mode.
         
        Step 4Do one of the following :
        • set ip vrf vrf-name next-hop global-ipv4-address [...global-ipv4-address]
        • set ipv6 vrf vrf-name next-hop global-ipv6-address [...global-ipv6-address]
        • set ip next-hop recursive vrf global-ipv4-address [...global-ipv4-address]
        • set ip global next-hop global-ipv4-address [...global-ipv4-address]
        • set ipv6 global next-hop global-ipv6-address [...global-ipv6-address]


        Example:
        Device(config-route-map)# set ip vrf myvrf next-hop 10.0.0.0 
        


        Example:
        Device(config-route-map)# set ipv6 vrf myvrf next-hop 2001.DB8:4:1::1/64


        Example:
        Device(config-route-map)# set ip next-hop recursive vrf 10.0.0.0 


        Example:
        Device(config-route-map)# set ip global next-hop 10.0.0.0


        Example:
        Device(config-route-map)# set ipv6 global next-hop 2001.DB8:4:1::1/64
         

        Indicates where to forward packets that pass a match criterion of a route map for policy routing when the IPv4 next hop must be under a specified VRF.

        Indicates where to forward packets that pass a match criterion of a route map for policy routing when the IPv6 next hop must be under a specified VRF.

        Indicates the IPv4 address to which destination or next hop is used for packets that pass the match criterion configured in the route map.

        Indicates the IPv4 address to forward packets that pass a match criterion of a route map for policy routing and for which the software uses the global routing table.

        Indicates the IPv6 address to forward packets that pass a match criterion of a route map for policy routing and for which the software uses the global routing table.

         
        Step 5Do one of the following:
        • match ip address {acl-number [acl-name | acl-number]}
        • match length minimum-lengthmaximum-length


        Example:
        Device(config-route-map)# match ip address 1 
        or 


        Example:
        Device(config-route-map)# match length 3 200
         

        Distributes any routes that have a destination network number address that is permitted by a standard or extended access list, and performs policy routing on matched packets. IP access lists are supported.

        • The example configures the route map to use standard access list 1 to define match criteria.

        Specifies the Layer 3 packet length in the IP header as a match criterion in a class map.

        • The example configures the route map to match packets that are 3 to 200 bytes in length.
         
        Step 6 end


        Example:
        Device(config-route-map)# end 
         

        Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

         

        Configuring Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing and IP VRF Receive on the Interface

        The route map is attached to the incoming interface with the ip policy route-map interface configuration command.

        The source IP address must be added to the virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) selection table. VRF selection is a one-way (unidirectional) feature. It is applied to the incoming interface. If a match and set operation occurs in the route map but there is no receive entry in the local VRF table, the packet is dropped if the packet destination is local.

        SUMMARY STEPS

          1.    enable

          2.    configure terminal

          3.    interface type number [name-tag]

          4.    ip policy route-map map-tag

          5.    ip vrf receive vrf-name

          6.    end


        DETAILED STEPS
           Command or ActionPurpose
          Step 1 enable


          Example:
          Device> enable
           

          Enables privileged EXEC mode.

          • Enter your password if prompted.
           
          Step 2 configure terminal


          Example:
          Device# configure terminal
           

          Enters global configuration mode.

           
          Step 3 interface type number [name-tag]


          Example:
          Device(config)# interface FastEthernet 0/1/0 
           

          Configures an interface and enters interface configuration mode.

           
          Step 4 ip policy route-map map-tag


          Example:
          Device(config-if)# ip policy route-map map1
           

          Identifies a route map to use for policy routing on an interface.

          • The configuration example attaches the route map named map1 to the interface.
           
          Step 5 ip vrf receive vrf-name


          Example:
          Device(config-if)# ip vrf receive VRF-1
           

          Adds the IP addresses that are associated with an interface into the VRF table.

          • This command must be configured for each VRF that will be used for VRF selection.
           
          Step 6 end


          Example:
          Device(config-if)# end 
           

          Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

           

          Verifying the Configuration of Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing

          To verify the configuration of the Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing (PBR) feature, perform the following steps. You can enter the commands in any order.

          SUMMARY STEPS

            1.    show ip access-list [access-list-number | access-list-name]

            2.    show route-map [map-name]

            3.    show ip policy


          DETAILED STEPS
            Step 1   show ip access-list [access-list-number | access-list-name]

            Verifies the configuration of match criteria for Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing. The command output displays three subnet ranges defined as match criteria in three standard access lists:



            Example:
            Device# show ip access-list
             
            Standard IP access list 40
             10 permit 10.1.0.0, wildcard bits 0.0.255.255
            Standard IP access list 50
             10 permit 10.2.0.0, wildcard bits 0.0.255.255
            Standard IP access list 60
             10 permit 10.3.0.0, wildcard bits 0.0.255.255
            
            Step 2   show route-map [map-name]

            Verifies match and set commands within the route map:



            Example:
            Device# show route-map
            

            The output displays the match criteria and set action for each route-map sequence. The output also displays the number of packets and bytes that have been policy routed per each route-map sequence.



            Example:
            Device# show route-map map1 
            
            route-map map1, permit, sequence 10
            Match clauses:
            Set clauses:
             ip next-hop vrf myvrf 10.5.5.5  10.6.6.6  10.7.7.7
             ip next-hop global 10.8.8.8  10.9.9.9
            Policy routing matches: 0 packets, 0 bytes
            Device# show route-map map2 
            route-map map2, permit, sequence 10
            Match clauses:
            Set clauses:
             vrf myvrf 
            Policy routing matches: 0 packets, 0 bytes
            Device# show route-map map3 
            route-map map3, permit, sequence 10
            Match clauses:
            Set clauses:
             global
            Policy routing matches: 0 packets, 0 bytes
            

            The following show route-map command displays output from the set ip vrf next-hop command:



            Example:
            Device(config)# route-map test
             
            Device(config-route-map)# set ip vrf myvrf next-hop 
            Device(config-route-map)# set ip vrf myvrf next-hop 192.168.3.2
            Device(config-route-map)# match ip address 255 101
            Device(config-route-map)# end
            Device# show route-map
             
            route-map test, permit, sequence 10
             Match clauses:
              ip address (access-lists): 101
             Set clauses:
              ip vrf myvrf next-hop 192.168.3.2
             Policy routing matches: 0 packets, 0 bytes

            The following show route-map command displays output from the set ip global command:



            Example:
            Device(config)# route-map test
            Device(config-route-map)# match ip address 255 101
            Device(config-route-map)# set ip global next-hop 192.168.4.2 
            Device(config-route-map)# end
            Device# show route-map
             
            *May 25 13:45:55.551: %SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console by consoleout-map
            route-map test, permit, sequence 10
             Match clauses:
              ip address (access-lists): 101
             Set clauses:
              ip global next-hop 192.168.4.2
             Policy routing matches: 0 packets, 0 bytes
            
            Step 3   show ip policy

            Verifies the Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing policy.



            Example:
            Device# show ip policy
            

            The following show ip policy command output displays the interface and associated route map that is configured for policy routing:



            Example:
            Device# show ip policy 
            
            Interface                Route map
            FastEthernet0/1/0        PBR-VRF-Selection

            Configuration Examples for Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing

            Example: Defining the Match Criteria for Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing

            In the following example, three standard access lists are created to define match criteria for three different subnetworks. Any packets received on FastEthernet interface 0/1/0 will be policy routed through the PBR-VRF-Selection route map to the virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) that is matched in the same route-map sequence. If the source IP address of the packet is part of the 10.1.0.0/24 subnet, VRF1 will be used for routing and forwarding.

            access-list 40 permit source 10.1.0.0 0.0.255.255
            access-list 50 permit source 10.2.0.0 0.0.255.255
            access-list 60 permit source 10.3.0.0 0.0.255.255
            route-map PBR-VRF-Selection permit 10
             match ip address 40
             set vrf VRF1
             !
            route-map PBR-VRF-Selection permit 20
             match ip address 50
             set vrf VRF2
             !
            route-map PBR-VRF-Selection permit 30
             match ip address 60
             set vrf VRF3
             !
            interface FastEthernet 0/1/0
             ip address 192.168.1.6 255.255.255.252
             ip vrf forwarding VRF4 
             ip policy route-map PBR-VRF-Selection
             ip vrf receive VRF1
             ip vrf receive VRF2
             ip vrf receive VRF3 

            Example: Configuring Multi-VRF Selection in a Route Map

            The following example shows a set ip vrf next-hop command that applies policy-based routing to the virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) interface named myvrf and specifies that the IP address of the next hop is 10.0.0.2:

            Device(config)# route-map map1 permit
            Device(config)# set vrf myvrf
            Device(config-route-map)# set ip vrf myvrf next-hop 10.0.0.2
            Device(config-route-map)# match ip address 101
            Device(config-route-map)# end
            

            The following example shows a set ip global command that specifies that the device should use the next hop address 10.0.0.1 in the global routing table:

            Device(config-route-map)# set ip global next-hop 10.0.0.1 
            

            Additional References

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            Cisco IOS Security Command Reference

            Technical Assistance

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            Feature Information for Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing

            The following table provides release information about the feature or features described in this module. This table lists only the software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that software release train also support that feature.

            Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/​go/​cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

            Table 1 Feature Information for Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing

            Feature Name

            Releases

            Feature Information

            Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing (PBR)

            12.2(33)SRB1

            12.2(33)SXH1

            12.4(24)T

            Cisco IOS XE Release 2.2

            The Multi-VRF Selection Using Policy-Based Routing (PBR) feature allows a specified interface on a provider edge (PE) router to route packets to Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) based on packet length or match criteria defined in an IP access list. This feature and the MPLS VPN VRF Selection Based on Source IP Address feature can be configured together on the same interface

            In Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRB1, this feature was introduced.

            In Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH1, support was added.

            In Cisco IOS Release 12.4(24)T, this feature was integrated.

            In Cisco IOS XE Release 2.2, this feature was implemented on the Cisco ASR 1000 Series Aggregation Services Routers.

            The following commands were modified: set ip global next-hop and set ip vrf next-hop.

            IPv6 VRF-Aware PBR Next-hop Enhancement

            15.2(2)S

            Cisco IOS XE Release 3.6S

            In Cisco IOS Release 15.2(2)S, this feature was introduced.

            In Cisco IOS XE Release 3.6S, this feature was implemented on the Cisco ASR 1000 Series Aggregation Services Routers.

            The following commands were introduced: set ipv6 default next-hop, set ipv6 next-hop (PBR)

            Glossary

            CE device—customer edge device. A device that is part of a customer network and that interfaces to a provider edge (PE) device.

            Inherit-VRF routing—Packets arriving at a VRF interface are routed by the same outgoing VRF interface.

            Inter-VRF routing—Packets arriving at a VRF interface are routed via any other outgoing VRF interface.

            IP—Internet Protocol. Network layer protocol in the TCP/IP stack offering a connectionless internetwork service. IP provides features for addressing, type-of-service specification, fragmentation and reassembly, and security. Defined in RFC 791.

            PBR—policy-based routing. PBR allows a user to manually configure how received packets should be routed.

            PE device—provider edge device. A device that is part of a service provider’s network and that is connected to a CE device. It exchanges routing information with CE devices by using static routing or a routing protocol such as BGP, RIPv1, or RIPv2.

            VPN—Virtual Private Network. A collection of sites sharing a common routing table. A VPN provides a secure way for customers to share bandwidth over an ISP backbone network.

            VRF—A VPN routing and forwarding instance. A VRF consists of an IP routing table, a derived forwarding table, a set of interfaces that use the forwarding table, and a set of rules and routing protocols that determine what goes into the forwarding table.

            VRF-lite—A feature that enables a service provider to support two or more VPNs, where IP addresses can be overlapped among the VPNs.