IP Routing: LISP Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS Release 15M&T
Redistribution of RIB Routes into LISP
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Redistribution of RIB Routes into LISP

Contents

Redistribution of RIB Routes into LISP

The Redistribution of RIB Routes into LISP feature redistributes routes present in the Routing Information Base (RIB), as available, from Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), Interior Gateway Protocols (IGPs), or static or connected sources, into a Locator ID Separation Protocol (LISP) egress tunnel router (ETR) to define ETR database mappings or into a LISP Proxy ingress tunnel router (PITR) to define PITR map-cache entries.

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest caveats and feature information, see Bug Search Tool and the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the feature information table at the end of this module.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/​go/​cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Information About Redistribution of RIB Routes into LISP

The Redistribution of RIB Routes into LISP feature extends support for the import of Routing Information Base (RIB) routes into Locator ID Separation Protocol (LISP). This feature is based on the RIB route redistribution mechanism and allows LISP to import RIB routes from Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), Interior Gateway Protocols (IGPs), or static or connected sources for use in internal LISP applications.

Currently supported sources are:

Source Description

bgp

Border Gateway Protocol (BGP)

connected

Connected

eigrp

Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP)

isis

ISO IS-IS

ospf

Open Shortest Path First (OSPF)

ospfv3

OSPFv3

rip

Routing Information Protocol (RIP)

static

Static routes

How to Configure Redistribution of RIB Routes into LISP

Configuring a Route Import Application

To redistribute Routing Information Base (RIB) routes into Locator ID Separation Protocol (LISP), one or more route import applications can be configured for each endpoint identifier (EID) instance. The currently defined route import applications are map cache and database import.


Note


A limitation in the way redistribution is communicated to the IOS RIB is that a specific RIB producer protocol cannot be used for both database and map-cache route-import applications under a specific EID table. However, database and map-cache route-import applications can still be enabled in the same EID table but for different RIB producer protocols.

Configuring a Route Import Map-Cache Application

Perform this task to configure the import of routes from the Routing Information Base (RIB) to define endpoint identifier (EID) space on an ingress tunnel router (ITR) or Proxy ingress tunnel router (PITR).

Before You Begin
When you use endpoint identifier (EID) virtualization within Locator ID Separation Protocol (LISP), you must create a VRF using the vrf definition command and enable at least one address family within the VRF. In addition, you must define the LISP instance ID to which the VRF is associated. LISP virtualization options and configurations are covered in the "LISP Shared Model" and "LISP Parallel Model Virtualization" sections of this configuration guide.

Note


By default, LISP considers EID prefixes to be available in the default RIB. For default (non-virtualized) LISP configurations, VRF definition is not required prior to LISP configuration.
SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    enable

    2.    configure terminal

    3.    router lisp [lisp-instantiation-number]

    4.    eid-table vrf vrf-name instance-id iid

    5.    {ipv4 | ipv6} route-import map-cache protocol autonomous-system-number [route-map map-name]

    6.    end


DETAILED STEPS
     Command or ActionPurpose
    Step 1 enable


    Example:
    Device> enable
     

    Enables privileged EXEC mode.

     
    Step 2configure terminal


    Example:
    Device# configure terminal
     

    Enters global configuration mode.

     
    Step 3router lisp [lisp-instantiation-number]


    Example:
    Device(config)# router lisp 22
     
    Creates the specified LISP instantiation number and enters LISP configuration mode. All subsequent LISP commands apply to that router LISP instantiation.
    Note    The use of the lisp-instantiation-number argument is optional. This argument is used when LISP parallel model virtualization is configured.
     
    Step 4 eid-table vrf vrf-name instance-id iid


    Example:
    Device(config-router-lisp)# eid-table vrf VRF1 instance-id 10
     

    Configures a LISP instance ID for association with a VRF table or default table through which the EID address space is reachable and enters LISP eid-table configuration mode.

     
    Step 5{ipv4 | ipv6} route-import map-cache protocol autonomous-system-number [route-map map-name]


    Example:
    Device(config-router-lisp-eid-table)# ipv4 route-import map-cache eigrp 19 route-map abcd
     
    Configures the import of routes from the RIB to define endpoint identifier EID space on an ITR or PITR.
    • (Optional) The route-map keyword specifies that imported IPv4 prefixes should be filtered according to the specified route-map name.

     
    Step 6end


    Example:
    Device(config-router-lisp)# end
     

    Ends the current configuration session and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

     

    Configuring a Route Import Database Application

    Perform this task to configure the import of Routing Information Base (RIB) routes to define local endpoint identifier (EID) prefixes and associate them with a specified locator set.

    Before You Begin
    When you use endpoint identifier (EID) virtualization within Locator ID Separation Protocol (LISP), you must create a VRF using the vrf definition command and enable at least one address family within the VRF. In addition, you must define the LISP instance ID to which the VRF is associated. LISP virtualization options and configurations are covered in the "LISP Shared Model" and "LISP Parallel Model Virtualization" sections of this configuration guide.

    Note


    By default, LISP considers EID prefixes to be available in the default RIB. For default (non-virtualized) LISP configurations, VRF definition is not required prior to LISP configuration.
    SUMMARY STEPS

      1.    enable

      2.    configure terminal

      3.    router lisp [lisp-instantiation-number]

      4.    locator-set set

      5.    {ipv4-interface if-name | ipv6-interface if-name | ipv4-address | ipv6-address} priority priority weight weight

      6.    exit

      7.    eid-table vrf vrf-name instance-id iid

      8.    {ipv4 | ipv6} route-import database protocol autonomous-system-number [route-map map-name] locator-set locator-set-name

      9.    end


    DETAILED STEPS
       Command or ActionPurpose
      Step 1 enable


      Example:
      Device> enable
       

      Enables privileged EXEC mode.

       
      Step 2configure terminal


      Example:
      Device# configure terminal
       

      Enters global configuration mode.

       
      Step 3router lisp [lisp-instantiation-number]


      Example:
      Device(config)# router lisp 15
       
      Creates the specified LISP instantiation number and enters LISP configuration mode. All subsequent LISP commands apply to that router LISP instantiation.
      Note    The use of the lisp-instantiation-number argument is optional. This argument is used when LISP parallel model virtualization is configured.
       
      Step 4locator-set set


      Example:
      Device(config-router-lisp)# locator-set ABC
       

      Specifies a locator set and enters LISP locator-set configuration mode.

       
      Step 5{ipv4-interface if-name | ipv6-interface if-name | ipv4-address | ipv6-address} priority priority weight weight


      Example:
      Device(config-router-lisp-locator-set)# ipv4-interface GigabitEthernet0/0 priority 5 weight 10
       

      Uses IPv4 address of interface as locator.

       
      Step 6exit


      Example:
      Device(config-router-lisp-locator-set)# exit
       

      Exits LISP locator-set configuration mode and enters LISP configuration mode.

       
      Step 7 eid-table vrf vrf-name instance-id iid


      Example:
      Device(config-router-lisp)# eid-table vrf VRF1 instance-id 10
       

      Configures a LISP instance ID for association with a VRF table or default table through which the EID address space is reachable and enters LISP eid-table configuration mode.

       
      Step 8{ipv4 | ipv6} route-import database protocol autonomous-system-number [route-map map-name] locator-set locator-set-name


      Example:
      Device(config-router-lisp-eid-table)# ipv4 route-import database bgp 22 route-map abc locator-set ABC
       
      Configures the import of RIB routes to define local EID prefixes and associates them with the specified locator set.
      • (Optional) The route-map keyword specifies that imported IP prefixes should be filtered according to the specified route-map name.

       
      Step 9end


      Example:
      Device(config-router-lisp-eid-table)# end
       

      Ends the current configuration session and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

       

      Configuring the Number of Routes to Be Imported for Each Application

      Perform this task to specify a limit to the number of routes that will be imported to either create local endpoint identifier (EID) database prefixes or remote EID map-cache entries.

      SUMMARY STEPS

        1.    enable

        2.    configure terminal

        3.    router lisp [lisp-instantiation-number]

        4.    eid-table vrf vrf-name instance-id iid

        5.    {ipv4 | ipv6} route-import {map-cache | database} maximum-prefix limit [warning-threshold] [warning-only]

        6.    end


      DETAILED STEPS
         Command or ActionPurpose
        Step 1 enable


        Example:
        Device> enable
         

        Enables privileged EXEC mode.

         
        Step 2configure terminal


        Example:
        Device# configure terminal
         

        Enters global configuration mode.

         
        Step 3router lisp [lisp-instantiation-number]


        Example:
        Device(config)# router lisp 22
         
        Creates the specified LISP instantiation number and enters LISP configuration mode. All subsequent LISP commands apply to that router LISP instantiation.
        Note    The use of the lisp-instantiation-number argument is optional. This argument is used when LISP parallel model virtualization is configured.
         
        Step 4 eid-table vrf vrf-name instance-id iid


        Example:
        Device(config-router-lisp)# eid-table vrf VRF100 instance-id 10
         

        Configures a LISP instance ID for association with a VRF table or default table through which the EID address space is reachable and enters LISP eid-table configuration mode.

         
        Step 5{ipv4 | ipv6} route-import {map-cache | database} maximum-prefix limit [warning-threshold] [warning-only]


        Example:
        Device(config-router-lisp-eid-table)# ipv4 route-import database maximum-prefix 45 15 warning-only
         

        Specifies a limit to the number of routes that will be imported to either create local EID database prefixes or remote EID map-cache entries.

         
        Step 6end


        Example:
        Device(config-router-lisp)# end
         

        Ends the current configuration session and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

         

        Verifying Redistribution of RIB Routes into LISP

        Perform this task to verify the configuration of the Redistribution of RIB Routes into LISP feature. The show commands can be entered in any order.

        SUMMARY STEPS

          1.    show ip lisp [lisp-instantiation-number] [instance-id iid] route-import database [ipv4-address | ipv4-prefix]

          2.    show ip lisp [lisp-instantiation-number] [instance-id iid] route-import map-cache [ipv4-address | ipv4-prefix]

          3.    show ipv6 lisp [lisp-instantiation-number] [instance-id iid] route-import database [ipv6-address | ipv6-prefix]

          4.    show ipv6 lisp [lisp-instantiation-number] [instance-id iid] route-import map-cache [ipv6-address | ipv6-prefix]


        DETAILED STEPS
          Step 1   show ip lisp [lisp-instantiation-number] [instance-id iid] route-import database [ipv4-address | ipv4-prefix]


          Example:

          The following example displays the current IPv4 Routing Information Base (RIB) routes imported into Locator ID Separation Protocol (LISP) to define local endpoint identifier (EID) database entries:

          Device# show ip lisp route-import database
          
          LISP IPv4 imported routes for EID-table default (IID 0)
          Config: 1, Entries: 8 (limit 1000)
          Prefix                      Uptime     Source  Map-cache   State
          10.1.0.0/16                 00:07:52   ospf 10 installed
          10.10.1.0/24                00:14:02   ospf 10 installed
          10.10.2.0/24                00:14:02   ospf 10 installed
          10.10.3.0/24                00:14:02   ospf 10 installed
          10.10.4.0/24                00:14:02   ospf 10 installed
          10.10.5.0/24                00:14:02   ospf 10 installed
          172.16.1.0/24               00:11:52   ospf 10 installed
          192.168.20.0/24             00:11:52   ospf 10 installed
          
          
          
          Step 2   show ip lisp [lisp-instantiation-number] [instance-id iid] route-import map-cache [ipv4-address | ipv4-prefix]


          Example:

          The following example displays the current IPv4 RIB routes imported into LISP to define local EID map-cache entries:

          Device# show ip lisp route-import map-cache
          
          LISP IPv4 imported routes for EID-table default (IID 0)
          Config: 1, Entries: 6 (limit 1000)
          Prefix                    Uptime     Source     Map-cache  State
          10.1.0.0/16               00:07:52   bgp 64496  installed
          10.2.0.0/16               00:21:31   bgp 64496  installed
          10.3.0.0/16               00:21:31   bgp 64496  installed
          10.4.0.0/16               00:21:31   bgp 64496  installed
          172.16.1.0/24             00:11:52   bgp 64496  installed
          192.168.20.0/24           00:11:52   bgp 64496  installed
          
          
          

          Step 3   show ipv6 lisp [lisp-instantiation-number] [instance-id iid] route-import database [ipv6-address | ipv6-prefix]


          Example:

          The following example displays the current IPv6 RIB routes imported into LISP to define local EID database entries:

          Device# show ipv6 lisp route-import database
          
          LISP IPv6 imported routes for EID-table default (IID 0)
          Config: 1, Entries: 4 (limit 1000)
          Prefix                      Uptime     Source  Map-cache   State
          2001:db8:10:1::/64          00:56:26   ospf 10 installed
          2001:db8:ab:cd:1::/80       00:17:52   ospf 10 installed
          2001:db8:ab:cd:2::/80       00:17:52   ospf 10 installed
          2001:db8:ab:cd:3::/80       00:17:52   ospf 10 installed
          
          
          

          Step 4   show ipv6 lisp [lisp-instantiation-number] [instance-id iid] route-import map-cache [ipv6-address | ipv6-prefix]


          Example:

          The following example displays the current IPv6 RIB routes imported into LISP to define local EID map-cache entries:

          Device# show ipv6 lisp route-import map-cache
          
          LISP IPv6 imported routes for EID-table default (IID 0)
          Config: 1, Entries: 4 (limit 1000)
          Prefix                     Uptime     Source     Map-cache  State
          2001:db8:ab:cd::/64        00:19:50   bgp 64496  installed
          2001:db8:cd::/48           00:25:32   bgp 64496  installed
          2001:db8:ce::/48           00:27:11   bgp 64496  installed
          2001:db8:cf::/48           00:12:12   bgp 64496  installed
          
          
          


          Configuration Examples for Redistribution of RIB Routes into LISP

          Examples: Configuring a Route Import Application

          Example: Configuring a Route Import Map-Cache Application

          The following example shows how to configure the import of routes from the Routing Information Base (RIB) to define endpoint identifier (EID) space on an ingress tunnel router (ITR) or Proxy ingress tunnel router (PITR):

          Device> enable
          Device# configure terminal
          Device(config)# router lisp 23
          Device(config-router-lisp)# eid-table vrf VRF1 instance-id 10
          Device(config-router-lisp-eid-table)# ipv4 route-import map-cache bgp 10 route-map abcd
          Device(config-router-lisp)# end
          

          Example: Configuring a Route Import Database Application

          The following example shows how to configure the import of Routing Information Base (RIB) routes to define local endpoint identifier (EID) prefixes and associate them with a specified locator set:

          Device> enable
          Device# configure terminal
          Device(config)# router lisp 23
          Device(config-router-lisp)# locator-set ABC
          Device(config-router-lisp-locator-set)# ipv4-interface GigabitEthernet0/0 priority 5 weight 10
          Device(config-router-lisp-locator-set)# exit
          Device(config-router-lisp)# eid-table vrf VRF1 instance-id 10
          Device(config-router-lisp-eid-table)# ipv4 route-import database bgp 22 route-map abcd locator-set ABC
          Device(config-router-lisp)# end
          

          Example: Configuring the Number of Routes to Be Imported for Each Application

          The following example shows how to specify a limit to the number of routes that will be imported to either create local endpoint identifier (EID) database prefixes or remote EID map-cache entries:

          Device> enable
          Device# configure terminal
          Device(config)# router lisp 23
          Device(config-router-lisp)# eid-table vrf VRF100 instance-id 10
          Device(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 route-import database maximum-prefix 30 15 warning-only
          Device(config-router-lisp)# end
          

          Additional References for Redistribution of RIB Routes into LISP

          Related Documents

          Related Topic

          Document Title

          Cisco IOS commands

          Cisco IOS Master Command List, All Releases

          Locator/ID Separation Protocol (LISP) commands

          Cisco IOS IP Routing: LISP Command Reference

          MIBs

          MIB

          MIBs Link

          None

          To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS software releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL: http:/​/​www.cisco.com/​go/​mibs

          RFCs

          RFC

          Title

          RFC 6830

          Locator/ID Separation Protocol (LISP) http:/​/​tools.ietf.org/​html/​rfc6830

          Technical Assistance

          Description

          Link

          The Cisco Support website provides extensive online resources, including documentation and tools for troubleshooting and resolving technical issues with Cisco products and technologies.

          To receive security and technical information about your products, you can subscribe to various services, such as the Product Alert Tool (accessed from Field Notices), the Cisco Technical Services Newsletter, and Really Simple Syndication (RSS) Feeds.

          Access to most tools on the Cisco Support website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

          http:/​/​www.cisco.com/​cisco/​web/​support/​index.html

          Feature Information for Redistribution of RIB Routes into LISP

          The following table provides release information about the feature or features described in this module. This table lists only the software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that software release train also support that feature.

          Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/​go/​cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

          Table 1 Feature Information for Redistribution of RIB Routes into LISP

          Feature Name

          Releases

          Feature Information

          Redistribution of RIB Routes into LISP

          15.4(2)T

          The Redistribution of RIB Routes into LISP feature redistributes routes present in the Routing Information Base (RIB), as available, from Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), Interior Gateway Protocols (IGPs), or static or connected sources, into a Locator ID Separation Protocol (LISP) egress tunnel router (ETR) to define ETR database mappings or into a LISP Proxy ingress tunnel router (PITR) to define PITR map-cache entries.

          The following commands were introduced or modified: ipv4 route-import maximum-prefix, ipv6 route-import maximum-prefix, ipv4 route-import database, ipv6 route-import database, ipv4 route-import map-cache, ipv6 route-import map-cache, show ip lisp route-import database, show ipv6 lisp route-import database, show ip lisp route-import map-cache, and show ipv6 lisp route-import map-cache.