IP Routing: BGP Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS XE Release 3SE (Catalyst 3850 Switches)
IPv6 Routing: Multiprotocol BGP Link-Local Address Peering
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IPv6 Routing Multiprotocol BGP Link-local Address Peering

IPv6 Routing: Multiprotocol BGP Link-Local Address Peering

Last Updated: November 21, 2012

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest caveats and feature information, see Bug Search Tool and the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the feature information table at the end of this module.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Information About IPv6 Routing: Multiprotocol BGP Link-Local Address Peering

IPv6 Multiprotocol BGP Peering Using a Link-Local Address

The IPv6 multiprotocol BGP can be configured between two IPv6 devices (peers) using link-local addresses. For this function to work, you must identify the interface for the neighbor by using the neighbor update-source command, and you must configure a route map to set an IPv6 global next hop.

How to Configure IPv6 Routing: Multiprotocol BGP Link-Local Address Peering

Configuring an IPv6 Multiprotocol BGP Peer Using a Link-Local Address

Configuring IPv6 multiprotocol BGP between two IPv6 devices (peers) using link-local addresses requires that you identify the interface for the neighbor by using the neighbor update-source command and that a you configure a route map to set an IPv6 global next hop.


Note


  • By default, neighbors that are defined using the neighbor remote-as command in router configuration mode exchange only IPv4 unicast address prefixes. To be able to exchange other address prefix types, such as IPv6 prefixes, neighbors must also be activated using the neighbor activate command in address family configuration mode for the other prefix types, as shown for IPv6 prefixes.
  • By default, route maps that are applied in router configuration mode using the neighbor route-map command are applied to only IPv4 unicast address prefixes. Route maps for other address families must be applied in address family configuration mode using the neighbor route-map command, as shown for the IPv6 address family. The route maps are applied either as the inbound or outbound routing policy for neighbors under the specified address family. Configuring separate route maps under each address family type simplifies managing complicated or different policies for each address family.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    router bgp autonomous-system-number

4.    neighbor {ip-address | ipv6-address [%] | peer-group-name} remote-as autonomous-system-number [alternate-as autonomous-system-number ...]

5.    neighbor {ip-address | ipv6-address [%] | peer-group-name} update-source interface-type interface-number

6.    address-family ipv6 [vrf vrf-name] [unicast | multicast | vpnv6]

7.    neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name | ipv6-address %} activate

8.    neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name | ipv6-address [%]} route-map map-name {in | out}

9.    exit

10.    exit

11.    route-map map-tag [permit | deny] [sequence-number]

12.    match ipv6 address {prefix-list prefix-list-name | access-list-name}

13.    set ipv6 next-hop ipv6-address [link-local-address] [peer-address]


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Device> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Device# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
router bgp autonomous-system-number


Example:

Device(config)# router bgp 65000

 

Enters router configuration mode for the specified routing process.

 
Step 4
neighbor {ip-address | ipv6-address [%] | peer-group-name} remote-as autonomous-system-number [alternate-as autonomous-system-number ...]


Example:

Device(config-router)# neighbor FE80::1234:BFF:FE0E:A471% remote-as 64600

 

Adds the link-local IPv6 address of the neighbor in the specified remote autonomous system to the IPv6 multiprotocol BGP neighbor table of the local device.

  • The optional % keyword is the IPv6 link-local address identifier. This keyword needs to be added whenever a link-local IPv6 address is used outside the context of its interface.
 
Step 5
neighbor {ip-address | ipv6-address [%] | peer-group-name} update-source interface-type interface-number


Example:

Device(config-router)# neighbor FE80::1234:BFF:FE0E:A471% update-source fastethernet0

 

Specifies the link-local address over which the peering is to occur.

  • The optional % keyword is the IPv6 link-local address identifier. This keyword needs to be added whenever a link-local IPv6 address is used outside the context of its interface.
  • If there are multiple connections to the neighbor and you do not specify the neighbor interface by using the interface-type and interface-number arguments in the neighbor update-source command, a TCP connection cannot be established with the neighbor using link-local addresses.
 
Step 6
address-family ipv6 [vrf vrf-name] [unicast | multicast | vpnv6]


Example:

Device(config-router)# address-family ipv6

 

Specifies the IPv6 address family, and enters address family configuration mode.

  • The unicast keyword specifies the IPv6 unicast address family. By default, the device is placed in configuration mode for the IPv6 unicast address family if the unicast keyword is not specified with the address-family ipv6 command.
  • The multicast keyword specifies IPv6 multicast address prefixes.
 
Step 7
neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name | ipv6-address %} activate


Example:

Device(config-router-af)# neighbor FE80::1234:BFF:FE0E:A471% activate

 

Enables the neighbor to exchange prefixes for the IPv6 address family with the local device using the specified link-local addresses.

  • The optional % keyword is the IPv6 link-local address identifier. This keyword needs to be added whenever a link-local IPv6 address is used outside the context of its interface.
 
Step 8
neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name | ipv6-address [%]} route-map map-name {in | out}


Example:

Device(config-router-af)# neighbor FE80::1234:BFF:FE0E:A471% route-map nh6 out

 

Applies a route map to incoming or outgoing routes.

  • The optional % keyword is the IPv6 link-local address identifier. This keyword needs to be added whenever a link-local IPv6 address is used outside the context of its interface.
 
Step 9
exit


Example:

Device(config-router-af)# exit

 

Exits address family configuration mode, and returns the device to router configuration mode.

 
Step 10
exit


Example:

Device(config-router)# exit

 

Exits router configuration mode, and returns the device to global configuration mode.

 
Step 11
route-map map-tag [permit | deny] [sequence-number]


Example:

Device(config)# route-map nh6 permit 10

 

Defines a route map and enters route-map configuration mode.

 
Step 12
match ipv6 address {prefix-list prefix-list-name | access-list-name}


Example:

Device(config-route-map)# match ipv6 address prefix-list cisco

 

Distributes any routes that have a destination IPv6 network number address permitted by a prefix list, or performs policy routing on packets.

 
Step 13
set ipv6 next-hop ipv6-address [link-local-address] [peer-address]


Example:

Device(config-route-map)# set ipv6 next-hop 2001:DB8::1

 

Overrides the next hop advertised to the peer for IPv6 packets that pass a match clause of a route map for policy routing.

  • The ipv6-address argument specifies the IPv6 global address of the next hop. It need not be an adjacent device.
  • The link-local-address argument specifies the IPv6 link-local address of the next hop. It must be an adjacent device. If you do not specify this optional argument, the link-local address of the interface specified with the interface-type argument (in the neighbor update-source command in Step 5) is included as the next-hop in the BGP updates. Therefore, only one route map that sets the global IPv6 next-hop address in BGP updates is required for multiple BGP peers that use link-local addresses.
  • The route map sets the IPv6 next-hop addresses (global and link-local) in BGP updates. If the route map is not configured, the next-hop address in the BGP updates defaults to the unspecified IPv6 address (::), which is rejected by the peer.
 

Configuration Examples for IPv6 Routing: Multiprotocol BGP Link-Local Address Peering

Example: Configuring an IPv6 Multiprotocol BGP Peer Using a Link-Local Address

The following example configures the IPv6 multiprotocol BGP peer FE80::1234:BFF:FE0E:A471 over Fast Ethernet interface 0 and sets the route map named nh6 to include the IPv6 next-hop global address of Fast Ethernet interface 0 in BGP updates. The IPv6 next-hop link-local address can be set by the nh6 route map (not shown in the following example) or from the interface specified by the neighbor update-source command (as shown in this example).

router bgp 65000
 neighbor FE80::1234:BFF:FE0E:A471 remote-as 64600
 neighbor FE80::1234:BFF:FE0E:A471 update-source fastethernet 0
 address-family ipv6
  neighbor FE80::1234:BFF:FE0E:A471 activate
  neighbor FE80::1234:BFF:FE0E:A471 route-map nh6 out
  route-map nh6 permit 10
   match ipv6 address prefix-list cisco
 set ipv6 next-hop 2001:DB8:526::1
ipv6 prefix-list cisco permit 2001:DB8:2F22::/48 le 128
ipv6 prefix-list cisco deny ::/0

Note


If you specify only the global IPv6 next-hop address (the ipv6-address argument) with the set ipv6 next-hop command after specifying the neighbor interface (the interface-type argument) with the neighbor update-source command, the link-local address of the interface specified with the interface-type argument is included as the next hop in the BGP updates. Therefore, only one route map that sets the global IPv6 next-hop address in BGP updates is required for multiple BGP peers that use link-local addresses.

Additional References

Related Documents

Related Topic Document Title

IPv6 addressing and connectivity

IPv6 Configuration Guide

Cisco IOS commands

Cisco IOS Master Command List, All Releases

IPv6 commands

Cisco IOS IPv6 Command Reference

Cisco IOS IPv6 features

Cisco IOS IPv6 Feature Mapping

Standards and RFCs

Standard/RFC Title

RFCs for IPv6

IPv6 RFCs

MIBs

MIB

MIBs Link

--

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs

Technical Assistance

Description Link

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Feature Information for IPv6 Routing: Multiprotocol BGP Link-Local Address Peering

The following table provides release information about the feature or features described in this module. This table lists only the software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that software release train also support that feature.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Table 1 Feature Information for IPv6 Routing: Multiprotocol BGP Link-Local Address Peering
Feature Name Releases Feature Information

IPv6 Routing: Multiprotocol BGP Link-Local Address Peering

12.0(22)S

12.2(14)S

12.2(17a)SX1

12.2(28)SB

12.2(25)SG

12.2(33)SRA

12.2(4)T

12.3

12.3(2)T

12.4

12.4(2)T

15.0(1)S

15.1(1)SG

Cisco IOS XE Release 3.3SG

Cisco IOS XE Release 3.2SE

IPv6 supports multiprotocol BGP link-local address peering.

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