High Availability Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS Release 12.2SY
Configuring Stateful Switchover
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Configuring Stateful Switchover

Contents

Configuring Stateful Switchover

Last Updated: August 26, 2011

The Stateful Switchover (SSO) feature works with Nonstop Forwarding (NSF) in Cisco software to minimize the amount of time a network is unavailable to its users following a switchover. The primary objective of SSO is to improve the availability of networks constructed with Cisco routers. SSO performs the following functions:

  • Maintains stateful protocol and application information to retain user session information during a switchover.
  • Enables line cards to continue to forward network traffic with no loss of sessions, providing improved network availability.
  • Provides a faster switchover relative to high system availability.

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest feature information and caveats, see the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the Feature Information Table at the end of this document.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Prerequisites for Stateful Switchover

General Prerequisites

  • For hardware-redundant platforms, two Route Processors (RPs) must be installed in the chassis, each running the same version or a compatible version of the Cisco software.
  • Before copying a file to flash memory, be sure that ample space is available in flash memory. Compare the size of the file you are copying to the amount of available flash memory shown. If the space available is less than the space required by the file you will copy, the copy process will not continue and an error message similar to the following will be displayed:
%Error copying tftp://image@server/tftpboot/filelocation/imagename (Not enough space on device). 
 
  • Distributed Cisco Express Forwarding must be enabled on any networking device configured to run SSO.
  • For Nonstop Forwarding (NSF) support, neighbor routers must be running NSF-enabled images, though SSO need not be configured on the neighbor device.

Cisco 10000 Series Devices Prerequisites

  • On Cisco 10000 series devices only, to boot both Performance Routing Engines (PREs) from the TFTP boot server, you must use the ip address negotiated command in interface configuration mode to enable DHCP on the PRE. Otherwise, you will get a duplicate IP address error because of the synchronization of the IP address from the active to the standby Route Processor (RP).

Cisco 7500 Series Internet Router Platform Prerequisites

  • On the Cisco 7507 and Cisco 7513 routers, any combination of RSP8 and RSP16 devices, or any combination of RSP2 and RSP4, are required.

Restrictions for Stateful Switchover

General Restrictions for SSO

  • Both RPs must run the same Cisco software image. If the RPs are operating different Cisco software images, the system reverts to RPR mode even if SSO is configured.
  • Configuration changes made through SNMP may not be automatically configured on the standby RP after a switchover occurs.
  • Load sharing between dual processors is not supported.
  • The Hot Standby Routing Protocol (HSRP) is not supported with Cisco Nonstop Forwarding with Stateful Switchover. Do not use HSRP with Cisco Nonstop Forwarding with Stateful Switchover.
  • Enhanced Object Tracking (EOT) is not stateful switchover-aware and cannot be used with HSRP, Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP), or Gateway Load Balancing Protocol (GLBP) in SSO mode.
  • Multicast is not SSO-aware and restarts after switchover; therefore, multicast tables and data structures are cleared upon switchover.

Configuration Mode Restrictions

  • The configuration registers on both RPs must be set the same for the networking device to behave the same when either RP is rebooted.
  • During the startup (bulk) synchronization, configuration changes are not allowed. Before making any configuration changes, wait for a message similar to the following:
%HA-5-MODE:Operating mode is sso, configured mode is sso.
  • On the Cisco 7304 router, a message similar to the following appears (the actual slot number depends on which slot has the active processor):

%HA-6-STANDBY_READY: Standby RP in slot n
 is operational in SSO mode

Switchover Process Restrictions

  • If the router is configured for SSO mode, and the active RP fails before the standby is ready to switch over, the router will recover through a full system reset.

ATM Restrictions

  • Label-controlled ATM (LC-ATM) functionality does not co-exist with SSO in this release.
  • The ATM line protocol does not support stateful switchover capability for the following features in this release:
    • SVCs
    • Switched virtual paths (SVPs)
    • Tagged virtual circuits (TVCs)
    • Point-to-multipoint SVC
    • Integrated Local Management Interface (ILMI)
    • Signaling and Service Specific Connection Oriented Protocol (SSCOP)
    • ATM Connection Manager, permanent virtual circuit (PVC) discovery, ATM applications
    • Backward or version compatibility
    • Statistics and accounting
    • Zero ATM cell loss

Frame Relay and Multilink Frame Relay Restrictions

  • The following Frame Relay features are not synchronized between the active and standby RPs in this release: Frame Relay statistics; enhanced LMI (ELMI); Link Access Procedure, Frame Relay (LAPF); SVCs; and subinterface line state.

Note


The subinterface line state is determined by the PVC state, which follows the line card protocol state on DCE interfaces, and is learned from first LMI status exchange after switchover on DTE interfaces.
  • Frame Relay SSO is supported with the following features:
    • Serial interfaces
    • DTE and DCE LMI (or no keepalives)
    • PVCs (terminated and switched)
    • IP
  • When no LMI type is explicitly configured on a DTE interface, the autosensed LMI type is synchronized.
  • LMI sequence numbers are not synchronized between the active and standby RPs by default.

LMI keepalive messages contain sequence numbers so that each side (network and peer) of a PVC can detect errors. An incorrect sequence number counts as one error. By default, the switch declares the line protocol and all PVCs down after three consecutive errors. Although it seems that synchronizing LMI sequence numbers might prevent dropped PVCs, the use of resources required to synchronize LMI sequence numbers for potentially thousands of interfaces (channelized) on larger networking devices might be a problem in itself. The networking device can be configured to synchronize LMI sequence numbers. Synchronization of sequence numbers is not necessary for DCE interfaces.

  • Changes to the line protocol state are synchronized between the active and standby RPs. The line protocol is assumed to be up on switchover, providing that the interface is up.
  • PVC state changes are not synchronized between the active and standby RPs. The PVC is set to the up state on switchover provided that the line protocol state is up. The true state is determined when the first full status message is received from the switch on DTE interfaces.
  • Subinterface line state is not synchronized between the active and standby RPs. Subinterface line state is controlled by the PVC state, by configuration settings, or by the hardware interface state when the PVC is up. On switchover, the subinterface state is set to up, providing that the subinterfaces are not shut down and the main interface is up and the line protocol state is up. On DTE devices, the correct state is learned after the first LMI status exchange.
  • Dynamic maps are not synchronized between the active and standby RPs. Adjacency changes as a result of dynamic map change are relearned after switchover.
  • Dynamically learned PVCs are synchronized between the active and standby RPs and are relearned after the first LMI status exchange.
  • For Multilink Frame Relay bundle links, the state of the local bundle link and peer bundle ID is synchronized.
  • For a Multilink Frame Relay bundle, the peer ID is synchronized.

PPP Restrictions

  • The following PPP features are not supported in this release: dialer; authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA), IPPOOL, Layer 2 (L2X), Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP), Microsoft Point-to-point Encryption (MPPE), Link Quality Monitoring (LQM), link or header compression, bridging, asynchronous PPP, and XXCP.
  • We recommend that the keepalive value be set to 20 seconds on Cisco 7500 series routers for each peer in a PPP connection.

Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router Platform Restrictions

  • On Cisco 12000 series devices with three or more RPs in a chassis, after negotiation of active and standby RP, the non-active (remaining) RPs do not participate in router operation.
  • On the Cisco 12000 and 7500 series routers, if any changes to the fabric configuration happen simultaneously with an RP switchover, the chassis is reset and all line cards are reset.
  • On the Cisco 12000 series and 10000 series Internet routers, if a switchover occurs before the bulk synchronization step is complete, the new active RP may be in inconsistent states. The router will be reloaded in this case.
  • SSO does not support TFTP boot operation on the Cisco 12000 series Internet routers. The software images must be downloaded to the flash memory cards on the router.
  • Any line cards that are not online at the time of a switchover (line cards not in Cisco software running state) are reset and reloaded on a switchover.
  • The following line cards support SSO and Cisco NSF:
    • All Engine-0, Engine-2, and Engine-4 Packet over SONET (PoS) line cards
    • All Engine-0 ATM line cards
    • All nonchannelized DS3 and E3 line cards
    • All Engine-0 channelized line cards
    • 1XGE and 3XGE line cards
  • The following Engine-0 line cards are supported:
    • 4-port OC-3 PoS
    • 1-port OC-12 PoS
    • 1-port O-12 ATM
    • 4-port OC-3 ATM
    • 6-port DS3
    • 12-port DS3
    • 6-port E3
    • 12-port E3
    • 6-port CT3
    • 1-port CHOC-12->DS3
    • 6-port CT3->DS1
    • 1-port CHOC-12/STM4->OC-3/STM1 POS
    • 2-port CHOC-3/STM-1->DS1/E1
  • The following Engine-1 line cards are supported:
    • 2-Port OC-12/STM-4c DPT
  • The following Engine-2 line cards are supported:
    • 1-port OC-48 POS
    • 1-port OC-48/STM-16c DPT
    • 4-port OC-12 POS
    • 8-port OC-3 POS
    • 8-port OC-3/STM-1c ATM
    • 16-port OC-3 POS
  • The following Engine-4 line cards are supported:
    • 1-port OC-192 POS
    • 4-port OC-48 POS
  • The following IP Service Engine (ISE) line cards are supported:
    • 4-port OC-3c/STM-1c POS/SDH ISE
    • 8-port OC-3c/STM-1c POS/SDH ISE
    • 16-port OC-3c/STM-1c POS/SDH ISE
    • 4-port OC-12c/STM-4c POS/SDH ISE
    • 1-port OC-48c/STM-16c POS/SDH ISE
    • 4-port channelized OC-12/STM-4 (DS3/E3, OC-3c/STM-1c) POS/SDH ISE
    • 1-port channelized OC-48/STM-16 (DS3/E3, OC-3c/STM-1c) POS/SDH ISE
    • 4-port OC-12c/STM-4c DPT ISE

Cisco 10000 Series Internet Router Platform Restrictions

  • When configuring boot variables, booting from the TFTP boot server is not supported except on Cisco 10000 series Internet routers only.
  • Both RPs must run the same Cisco software image. If the RPs are operating different Cisco software images, the system reverts to RPR mode even if SSO is configured. On the Cisco 10000 series Internet router, the system reverts to RPR+ mode.
  • If a switchover occurs before the bulk synchronization step is complete, the new active RP may be in an inconsistent state. The router will be reloaded in this case.
  • SSO supports TFTP boot operation on the Cisco 10000 series Internet routers.
  • The following line cards support SSO and Cisco NSF:
    • 6-port Universal (Channelized or Clear-channel) DS3
    • 8-port E3/DS3
    • 1-port OC-12 POS
    • 6-port OC-3 POS
    • 1-port Gigabit Ethernet
    • 1-port Channelized OC-12
    • 4-port Channelized STM1
    • 24-port channelized E1/T1
    • 1-port OC-12 ATM
    • 4-port OC-3 ATM

Cisco 7500 Series Internet Router Platform Restrictions

  • On the Cisco 7500 series routers, if any changes to the fabric configuration happen simultaneously with an RP switchover, the chassis is reset and all line cards are reset.
  • On Cisco 7500 series routers configured for SSO mode, during synchronization between the active and standby RPs, the configured mode will be RPR. After the synchronization is complete, the operating mode will be SSO. If a switchover occurs before the synchronization is complete, the switchover will be in RPR mode.
  • On Cisco 7500 series routers, legacy IPs will default to RPR mode and must be reloaded. If three or more legacy IPs are present, then all the line cards, including the VIPs, must be reloaded.
  • SSO does not support TFTP boot operation on the Cisco 7500 series Internet routers. The software images must be downloaded to the flash memory cards on the router.
  • SSO operates only on a Cisco 7500 series Internet router that has VIPs as the port adapters. Systems with legacy interface processors not compatible with RPR+ or SSO mode will always get reset and reloaded upon switchover.
  • To support SSO, a router must have either a combination of two RSP8 and RSP16 devices or a combination of RSP2 and RSP4 devices. A combination of RSP8 or RSP16 with RSP2 or RSP4 devices on a platform is not supported. Only the Cisco 7507 and Cisco 7513 support dual processors, which is required to support SSO.
  • Simultaneous changes to the configuration from multiple CLI sessions is not allowed. Only one configuration session is allowed to enter into configuration mode at a time, other sessions will not be able to enter into configuration mode.
  • Using “send break” to break or pause the system is not recommended and may cause unpredictable results. To initiate a manual switchover, use the redundancy force-switchover command.
  • The following line cards support SSO and Cisco NSF:
    • PA-MC-E3, 1-port multichannel E3 port adapter (PA)
    • PA-MC-T3, 1-port multichannel T3 PA
    • PA-MC-2E1/120, 2-port multichannel E1 PA with G.703 120-ohm interface
    • PA-MC-2TE1, 2-port multichannel T1 PA with integrated channel service unit (CSU) and data service unit (DSU) devices
    • PA-MC-2T3+, 2-port multichannel T3 PA
    • PA-MC-4T, 4-port multichannel T1 PA with integrated CSU and DSU devices
    • PA-MC-8T1, 8-port multichannel T1 PA with integrated CSU and DSU devices
    • PA-MC-8DSX1, 8-port multichannel DS1 PA with integrated DSUs
    • PA-MC-8E1/120, 8-port multichannel E1 PA with G.703 120-ohm interface
    • PA-4T+, 4-port serial PA enhanced
    • PA-8T-V35, 8-port serial V.35 PA
    • PA-8T-232, 8-port serial 232 PA
    • PA-8T-X21, 8-port serial X.21 PA
    • PA-E3, 1-port E3 serial PA with E3 DSU
    • PA-T3+, 1-port T3 serial PA enhanced
    • PA-2E3, 2-port E3 serial PA with E3 DSUs
    • PA-2T3+, 2-port T3 serial PA enhanced
    • PA-H, 1-port High-Speed Serial Interface (HSSI) PA
    • PA-2H, 2-port HSSI PA
    • PA-2FE-TX, 2-port Ethernet 100BASE-TX PA
    • PA-2FE-FX, 2-port Ethernet 100BASE-FX PA
    • PA-FE-TX, 1-port Fast Ethernet 100BASE-TX PA
    • PA-FE-FX, 1-port Fast Ethernet 100BASE-FX PA
    • PA-4E 4-port, Ethernet 10BASE-T PA
    • PA-8E 8-port, Ethernet 10BASE-T PA
    • PA-A3-E3, 1-port ATM enhanced E3 PA
    • PA-A3-T3, 1-port ATM enhanced DS3 PA
    • PA-A3-OC3MM, 1-port ATM enhanced OC-3c/STM-1 multimode PA
    • PA-A3-OC3SMI, 1-port ATM enhanced OC-3c/STM-1 single-mode (IR) PA
    • PA-A3-OC3SML, 1-port ATM enhanced OC-3c/STM-1 single-model (LR) PA
    • PA-POS-OC3MM, 1-port PoS OC-3c/STM-1 multimode PA
    • PA-POS-OC3SMI, 1-port PoS OC-3c/STM-1 single-mode (IR) PA
    • PA-POS-OC3SML, 1-port PoS OC-3c/STM-1 single-mode (LR) PA
    • PA-A3-8E1IMA, 8-port ATM inverse multiplexer E1 (120-ohm) PA
    • PA-A3-8T1IMA, 8-port ATM inverse multiplexer T1 PA
    • PA-4E1G/75, 4-port E1 G.703 serial PA (75-ohm/unbalanced)
    • PA-4E1G/120, 4-port E1 G.703 serial PA (120-ohm/balanced)
    • PA-MCX-8TE1
    • PA-MCX-4TE1
    • PA-MCX-2TE1
    • All VIP2 and VIP4 line cards
    • PA/VIP Combinations: Gigabit-Ethernet IP (GEIP) and GEIP+

Cisco 7304 Router Platform Restrictions

  • Switchovers in SSO mode will not cause the reset of any line cards.
  • Interfaces on the RP itself are not stateful and will experience a reset across switchovers. The GE interfaces on the RPs are reset across switchovers and do not support SSO.
  • SSO does not support TFTP boot operation on Cisco 7304 series routers. The software images must be downloaded to the flash memory cards on the router.
  • On the Cisco 7304 routers, the two RPs must be the same type, either both NSE-100 or both NPE-G100. Mixing the two types is not supported.
  • The presence of the PCI port adapter carrier card will force the system to fall back to the RPR redundancy mode.
  • In Cisco IOS releases 12.2(20)S to 12.2(20)S2, the presence of the PA carrier card (7300-CC-PA) or the SPA carrier card (MSC-100) forces the system to RPR mode.
  • In Cisco IOS Release 12.2(20)S3, both the PA carrier card and SPA carrier card support SSO mode. The PA carrier card does not support RPR+ mode.
  • In Cisco IOS Release 12.2(20)S4 and later releases, all line cards support RPR+ and SSO modes.

Cisco ASR 1000 Series Aggregation Services Routers Restrictions

  • Only RPR and SSO are supported on Cisco ASR 1000 Aggregation Services routers.
  • RPR and SSO can be used on Cisco ASR 1000 Aggregation Services routers to enable a second Cisco software process on a single RP. This configuration option is only available on Cisco ASR 1002 and Cisco ASR 1004 routers. On all other Cisco ASR 1000 Aggregation Services routers, the second Cisco software process can run on the standby RP only.
  • A second Cisco software process can only be enabled using RPR or SSO if the RP is using 4 GB of DRAM. The show version command output shows the amount of DRAM configured on the router.
  • Enabling software redundancy on the Cisco ASR 1001, 1002, and 1004 routers can reduce the Cisco IOS memory by more than half and adversely affect control plane scalability. We recommend that you use hardware redundant platforms, such as the Cisco ASR 1006 or 1013 routers, in networks where both scalability and high availability are critical.

Information About Stateful Switchover

SSO Overview

SSO provides protection for network edge devices with dual RPs that represent a single point of failure in the network design, and where an outage might result in loss of service for customers.

In Cisco networking devices that support dual RPs, SSO takes advantage of RP redundancy to increase network availability. The feature establishes one of the RPs as the active processor while the other RP is designated as the standby processor, and then synchronizing critical state information between them. Following an initial synchronization between the two processors, SSO dynamically maintains RP state information between them.

On Cisco ASR 1000 series routers, SSO can also be used to enable a second Cisco software process on the same RP. This second Cisco IOS process acts as a standby process for the active Cisco software process, and also allows certain subpackages to be upgraded without experiencing any router downtime.

A switchover from the active to the standby processor occurs when the active RP fails, is removed from the networking device, or is manually taken down for maintenance.

SSO is used with the Cisco Nonstop Forwarding (NSF) feature. Cisco NSF allows for the forwarding of data packets to continue along known routes while the routing protocol information is being restored following a switchover. With Cisco NSF, peer networking devices do not experience routing flaps, thereby reducing loss of service outages for customers.

The figure below illustrates how SSO is typically deployed in service provider networks. In this example, Cisco NSF with SSO is primarily at the access layer (edge) of the service provider network. A fault at this point could result in loss of service for enterprise customers requiring access to the service provider network.

Figure 1 Cisco NSF with SSO Network Deployment: Service Provider Networks


For Cisco NSF protocols that require neighboring devices to participate in Cisco NSF, Cisco NSF-aware software images must be installed on those neighboring distribution layer devices. Additional network availability benefits might be achieved by applying Cisco NSF and SSO features at the core layer of your network; however, consult your network design engineers to evaluate your specific site requirements.

Additional levels of availability may be gained by deploying Cisco NSF with SSO at other points in the network where a single point of failure exists. The figure below illustrates an optional deployment strategy that applies Cisco NSF with SSO at the enterprise network access layer. In this example, each access point in the enterprise network represents another single point of failure in the network design. In the event of a switchover or a planned software upgrade, enterprise customer sessions would continue uninterrupted through the network.

Figure 2 Cisco NSF with SSO Network Deployment: Enterprise Networks


Redundancy Modes

High System Availability

HSA mode allows you to install two RPs in a single router to improve system availability. This mode is available only on Cisco 7500 series routers. Supporting two RPs in a router provides the most basic level of increased system availability through a “cold restart” feature. A cold restart means that when one RP fails, the other RP reboots the router. Thus, the router is never in a failed state for very long, thereby increasing system availability.

Route Processor Redundancy Mode

Router Processor Redundancy (RPR) allows Cisco software to be booted on the standby processor prior to switchover (a cold boot). In RPR, the standby RP loads a Cisco software image at boot time and initializes itself in standby mode; however, although the startup configuration is synchronized to the standby RP, system changes are not. In the event of a fatal error on the active RP, the system switches to the standby processor, which reinitializes itself as the active processor, reads and parses the startup configuration, reloads all of the line cards, and restarts the system.

Route Processor Redundancy Plus

In RPR+ mode, the standby RP is fully initialized. For RPR+ both the active RP and the standby RP must be running the same software image. The active RP dynamically synchronizes startup and the running configuration changes to the standby RP, meaning that the standby RP need not be reloaded and reinitialized (a hot boot).

Additionally, on the Cisco 10000 and 12000 series Internet routers, the line cards are not reset in RPR+ mode. This functionality provides a much faster switchover between the processors. Information synchronized to the standby RP includes running configuration information, startup information (Cisco 7304, Cisco 7500, Cisco 10000, and Cisco 12000 series networking devices), and changes to the chassis state such as online insertion and removal (OIR) of hardware. Line card, protocol, and application state information is not synchronized to the standby RP.

Stateful Switchover Mode

SSO mode provides all the functionality of RPR+ in that Cisco software is fully initialized on the standby RP. In addition, SSO supports synchronization of line card, protocol, and application state information between RPs for supported features and protocols (a hot standby).

Redundancy Modes by Platform and Software Release


Note


During normal operation, SSO is the only supported mode for the Cisco 10000 series Internet routers.

The five tables below show redundancy modes by platform and release.

Table 1 Redundancy Modes by Platform in Cisco IOS Release 12.2S

Platform

Mode

12.2 (18)S

12.2 (20)S

12.2 (25)S

7304

HSA

No

Yes

Yes

RPR

No

Yes

Yes

RPR+

No

Yes

Yes

SSO

--

Yes

Yes

7500

HSA

Yes

No

Yes

RPR

Yes

No

Yes

RPR+

Yes

No

Yes

SSO

Yes

No

Yes

Table 2 Redundancy Modes by Platform in Cisco IOS Release 12.2SB

Platform

Mode

12.2(28)SB

12.2(31)SB2

7304

HSA

No

Yes

RPR

No

Yes

RPR+

No

Yes

SSO

No

Yes

10000

HSA

No

No

RPR

Yes

Yes

RPR+

Yes

Yes

SSO

Yes

Yes

Table 3 Redundancy Modes by Platform in Cisco IOS Release 12.2SR

Platform

Mode

12.2 (33) SRA

12.2(33) SRB

12.2(33) SRC

7600

HSA

No

No

No

RPR

Yes

Yes

Yes

RPR+

Yes

Yes

Yes

SSO

Yes

Yes

Yes

Table 4 Redundancy Modes by Platform in Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX

Platform

Mode

12.2 (33)SXH

CAT6500

HSA

No

RPR

Yes

RPR+

Yes

SSO

Yes

Table 5 Redundancy Modes by Platform in Cisco IOS Release 12.0S

Platform

Mode

Redundancy Mode Support in Cisco IOS Software Releases

12.0(22)S

12.0(23)S

12.0(24)S

12.0(26)S

12.0(28)S

7500

HSA

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

RPR

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

RPR+

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

SSO

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

10000

HSA

No

No

No

No

No

RPR

No

No

No

No

No

RPR+

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

SSO

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

12000

HSA

No

No

No

No

No

RPR

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

RPR+

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

SSO

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Route Processor Synchronization

In networking devices running SSO, both RPs must be running the same configuration so that the standby RP is always ready to assume control if the active RP fails.

To achieve the benefits of SSO, synchronize the configuration information from the active RP to the standby RP at startup and whenever changes to the active RP configuration occur. This synchronization occurs in two separate phases:

  • While the standby RP is booting, the configuration information is synchronized in bulk from the active RP to the standby RP.
  • When configuration or state changes occur, an incremental synchronization is conducted from the active RP to the standby RP.

Bulk Synchronization During Initialization

When a system with SSO is initialized, the active RP performs a chassis discovery (discovery of the number and type of line cards and fabric cards, if available, in the system) and parses the startup configuration file.

The active RP then synchronizes this data to the standby RP and instructs the standby RP to complete its initialization. This method ensures that both RPs contain the same configuration information.

Even though the standby RP is fully initialized, it interacts only with the active RP to receive incremental changes to the configuration files as they occur. Executing CLI commands on the standby RP is not supported.

During system startup, the startup configuration file is copied from the active RP to the standby RP. Any existing startup configuration file on the standby RP is overwritten. The startup configuration is a text file stored in the NVRAM of the RP. It is synchronized whenever you perform the following operations:

  • The command copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config is used.
  • The command copy running-config startup-config is used.
  • The command write memory is used.
  • The command copy filename nvram:startup-config is used.
  • SNMP SET of MIB variable ccCopyEntry in CISCO_CONFIG_COPY MIB is used.
  • System configuration is saved using the reload command.
  • System configuration is saved following entry of a forced switchover command.

Incremental Synchronization

After both RPs are fully initialized, any further changes to the running configuration or active RP states are synchronized to the standby RP as they occur. Active RP states are updated as a result of processing protocol information, external events (such as the interface becoming up or down), or user configuration commands (using Cisco IOS commands or Simple Network Management Protocol [SNMP]) or other internal events.

Changes to the running configuration are synchronized from the active RP to the standby RP. In effect, the command is run on both the active and the standby RP.

Configuration changes caused by an SNMP set operation are synchronized on a case-by-case basis. Only two SNMP configuration set operations are supported:

  • shut and no-shut (of an interface)
  • link up/down trap enable/disable

Routing and forwarding information is synchronized to the standby RP:

  • State changes for SSO-aware protocols (ATM, Frame Relay, PPP, High-Level Data Link Control [HDLC]) or applications (SNMP) are synchronized to the standby RP.
  • Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) updates to the Forwarding Information Base (FIB) are synchronized to the standby RP.

Chassis state changes are synchronized to the standby RP. Changes to the chassis state due to line card insertion or removal are synchronized to the standby RP.

Changes to the line card states are synchronized to the standby RP. Line card state information is initially obtained during bulk synchronization of the standby RP. Following bulk synchronization, line card events, such as whether the interface is up or down, received at the active processor are synchronized to the standby RP.

The various counters and statistics maintained in the active RP are not synchronized because they may change often and because the degree of synchronization they require is substantial. The volume of information associated with statistics makes synchronizing them impractical.

Not synchronizing counters and statistics between RPs may create problems for external network management systems that monitor this information.

Switchover Operation

Switchover Conditions

An automatic or manual switchover may occur under the following conditions:

  • A fault condition that causes the active RP to crash or reboot--automatic switchover
  • The active RP is declared dead (not responding)--automatic switchover
  • The command is invoked--manual switchover

The user can force the switchover from the active RP to the standby RP by using a CLI command. This manual procedure allows for a graceful or controlled shutdown of the active RP and switchover to the standby RP. This graceful shutdown allows critical cleanup to occur.


Note


This procedure should not be confused with the graceful shutdown procedure for routing protocols in core routers--they are separate mechanisms.

Caution


The SSO feature introduces a number of new command and command changes, including commands to manually cause a switchover. The reload command does not cause a switchover. The reload command causes a full reload of the box, removing all table entries, resetting all line cards, and interrupting nonstop forwarding.


Switchover Time

The time required by the device to switch over from the active RP to the standby RP varies by platform:

  • On the Cisco 7500 series devices, switchover time is approximately 30 seconds.
  • On the Cisco 7304 and Cisco 10000 series devices, switchover time is only a few seconds.
  • On the Cisco 12000 series devices, switchover time due to a manual switchover or due to automatic switchover caused by an error is only a few seconds. If the switchover is caused by a fault on the active RP, the standby RP will detect the problem following the switchover timeout period, which is set to three seconds by default.
  • On the Cisco ASR 1000 series routers, switchover time is only a few seconds.

Although the newly active processor takes over almost immediately following a switchover, the time required for the device to begin operating again in full redundancy (SSO) mode can be several minutes, depending on the platform. The length of time can be due to a number of factors including the time needed for the previously active processor to obtain crash information, load code and microcode, and synchronize configurations between processors and line protocols and Cisco NSF-supported protocols.

The impact of the switchover time on packet forwarding depends on the networking device:

  • On the Cisco 7500 series devices, forwarding information is distributed, and packets forwarded from the same line card should have little to no forwarding delay; however, forwarding packets between line cards requires interaction with the RP, meaning that packet forwarding might have to wait for the switchover time. The switchover time on Cisco 7500 series devices is also dependent on the type of RSPs installed on the system.
  • On the Cisco 10000 series devices, Cisco Express Forwarding information resides on the RP, so packet forwarding can be impacted momentarily while the switchover occurs.
  • On the Cisco 12000 series devices, complete forwarding information is distributed to the line cards, so packet forwarding is not impacted as long as the line cards are working.

Online Removal of the Active RP

For Cisco 7500 series routers, online removal of the active RSP will automatically switch the redundancy mode to RPR. Online removal of the active RSP causes all line cards to reset and reload, which is equivalent to an RPR switchover, and results in a longer switchover time. When it is necessary to remove the active RP from the system, first issue a switchover command to switch from the active RSP to the standby RSP. When a switchover is forced to the standby RSP before the previously active RSP is removed, the network operation benefits from the continuous forwarding capability of SSO.

For Cisco 7304, Cisco 10000, and Cisco 12000 series Internet routers that are configured to use SSO, online removal of the active RP automatically forces a stateful switchover to the standby RP.

Fast Software Upgrade

You can use Fast Software Upgrade (FSU) to reduce planned downtime. With FSU, you can configure the system to switch over to a standby RP that is preloaded with an upgraded Cisco software image. FSU reduces outage time during a software upgrade by transferring functions to the standby RP that has the upgraded Cisco software preinstalled. You can also use FSU to downgrade a system to an older version of Cisco software or have a backup system loaded for downgrading to a previous image immediately after an upgrade.

SSO must be configured on the networking device before performing FSU.


Note


During the upgrade process, different images will be loaded on the RPs for a short period of time. During this time, the device will operate in RPR or RPR+ mode, depending on the networking device.

Core Dump Operation

In networking devices that support SSO, the newly active primary processor runs the core dump operation after the switchover has taken place. Not having to wait for dump operations effectively decreases the switchover time between processors.

Following the switchover, the newly active RP will wait for a period of time for the core dump to complete before attempting to reload the formerly active RP. The time period is configurable. For example, on some platforms an hour or more may be required for the formerly active RP to perform a coredump, and it might not be site policy to wait that much time before resetting and reloading the formerly active RP. In the event that the core dump does not complete within the time period provided, the standby is reset and reloaded regardless of whether it is still performing a core dump.

The core dump process adds the slot number to the core dump file to identify which processor generated the file content.


Note


Core dumps are generally useful only to your technical support representative. The core dump file, which is a very large binary file, must be transferred using the TFTP, FTP, or remote copy protocol (rcp) server and subsequently interpreted by a Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) representative that has access to source code and detailed memory maps.

Virtual Template Manager for SSO

The virtual template manager feature for SSO provides virtual access interfaces for sessions that are not HA-capable and are not synchronized to the standby router. The virtual template manager uses a redundancy facility (RF) client to allow the synchronization of the virtual interfaces in real time as they are created.

The virtual databases have instances of distributed FIB entries on line cards. Line cards require synchronization of content and timing in all interfaces to the standby processor to avoid incorrect forwarding. If the virtual access interface is not created on the standby processor, the interface indexes will be corrupted on the standby router and line cards, which will cause problems with forwarding.

SSO-Aware Protocols and Applications

SSO-supported line protocols and applications must be SSO-aware. A feature or protocol is SSO-aware if it maintains, either partially or completely, undisturbed operation through an RP switchover. State information for SSO-aware protocols and applications is synchronized from active to standby to achieve stateful switchover for those protocols and applications.

The dynamically created state of SSO-unaware protocols and applications is lost on switchover and must be reinitialized and restarted on switchover.

SSO-aware applications are either platform-independent, such as in the case of line protocols or platform-dependent (such as line card drivers). Enhancements to the routing protocols (Cisco Express Forwarding, Open Shortest Path First, and Border Gateway Protocol [BGP]) have been made in the SSO feature to prevent loss of peer adjacency through a switchover; these enhancements are platform-independent.

Line Protocols

SSO-aware line protocols synchronize session state information between the active and standby RPs to keep session information current for a particular interface. In the event of a switchover, session information need not be renegotiated with the peer. During a switchover, SSO-aware protocols also check the line card state to learn if it matches the session state information. SSO-aware protocols use the line card interface to exchange messages with network peers in an effort to maintain network connectivity.

Supported Line protocols by Platform

The five tables below indicate which line protocols are supported on various platforms and releases.

Table 6 Line Protocol Support in Cisco IOS Release 12.2S

Protocol

Platform

12.2 (18)S

12.2 (20)S

12.2 (25)S

ATM

Cisco 7304

No

Yes

Yes

Cisco 7500

Yes

No

Yes

Frame Relay and Multilink Frame Relay

Cisco 7304

No

Yes

Yes

Cisco 7500

Yes

No

Yes

PPP and Multilink PPP

Cisco 7304

No

Yes

Yes

Cisco 7500

Yes

No

Yes

HDLC

Cisco 7304

No

Yes

Yes

Cisco 7500

Yes

No

Yes

Table 7 Line Protocol Support in Cisco IOS Release 12.2SB

Protocol

Platform

12.2 (28)SB

12.2(31)SB2

ATM

Cisco 7304

Yes

Yes

Cisco 10000

Yes

Yes

Frame Relay and Multilink Frame Relay

Cisco 7304

Yes

Yes

Cisco 10000

Yes

Yes

PPP and Multilink PPP

Cisco 7304

Yes

Yes

Cisco 10000

Yes

Yes

HDLC

Cisco 7304

Yes

Yes

Cisco 10000

Yes

Yes

Table 8 Line Protocol Support in Cisco IOS Release 12.2SR

Protocol

Platform

12.2(33)SRA

12.2(33)SRB

12.2(33)SRC

ATM

Cisco 7600

Yes

Yes

Yes

Frame Relay and Multilink Frame Relay

Cisco 7600

Yes

Yes

Yes

PPP and Multilink PPP

Cisco 7600

Yes

Yes

Yes

HDLC

Cisco 7600

Yes

Yes

Yes

Table 9 Line Protocol Support in Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX

Protocol

Platform

12.2(33)SXH

ATM

Cisco CAT6500

Yes

Cisco 7600

Yes

Frame Relay and Multilink Frame Relay

Cisco CAT6500

Yes1

Cisco 7600

Yes

PPP and Multilink PPP

Cisco CAT6500

Yes

Cisco 7600

Yes

HDLC

Cisco CAT6500

Yes

Cisco 7600

Yes

1 Frame Relay is supported, but Multilink Frame Relay is not.
Table 10 Line Protocol Support in Cisco IOS Release 12.0S

Protocol

Platform

12.0 (22)S

12.0 (23)S

12.0 (24)S

12.0 (26)S

12.0(28)S

ATM

Cisco 7500

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Cisco 10000

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Cisco 12000

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Frame Relay and Multilink Frame Relay

Cisco 7500

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Cisco 10000

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Cisco 12000

No

No

No

No

Yes

PPP and Multilink PPP

Cisco 7500

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Cisco 10000

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Cisco 12000

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

HDLC

Cisco 7500

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Cisco 10000

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Cisco 12000

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

ATM Stateful Switchover

With stateful switchover, ATM dynamic state information is synchronized between the active RP and standby RP. Thus when the active RP fails, the standby RP can take over without spending excessive time relearning the dynamic state information, and forwarding devices can continue to forward packets with only a few seconds of interruption (less on some platforms).


Note


ATM SSO is not configurable and runs by default on networking devices configured with ATM and Redundancy Mode SSO.
Permanent Virtual Circuits

For ATM to support forwarding during and after switchover, ATM permanent virtual circuits (PVCs) must remain up not only within the networking device, but also within the ATM network.

In an ATM network, all traffic to or from an ATM interface is prefaced with a virtual path identifier (VPI) and virtual channel identifier (VCI). A VPI-VCI pair is considered a single virtual circuit. Each virtual circuit is a private connection to another node on the ATM network. In ATM SSO, the VPI-VCI pair is associated with a virtual circuit descriptor (VCD). ATM SSO uses VCD information in synchronizing VPI-VCI information to the standby RP.

Each virtual circuit is treated as a point-to-point or point-to-multipoint mechanism to another networking device or host and can support bidirectional traffic. On point-to-point subinterfaces, or when static mappings are configured, Inverse Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) need not run. In cases where dynamic address mapping is used, an Inverse ARP protocol exchange determines the protocol address to VPI-VCI mapping for the PVC. This process occurs as soon as the PVC on a multipoint subinterface makes the transition to active. If that process fails for some reason, the remote networking device may drop the Inverse ARP request if it has not yet seen the PVC transition to active. Inverse ARP runs every 60 seconds to relearn the dynamic address mapping information for the active RP.

ATM OAM Managed PVC or SVC Timeout

Operation, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) F5 loopback cells must be echoed back on receipt by the remote host, thus demonstrating connectivity on the PVC between the router and the remote host. With ATM SSO, OAM loopback cells received on an interface must be echoed within 15 seconds before a PVC or switched virtual circuit (SVC) is declared down. By default, the OAM timeout is set to 10 seconds, followed by at most five retries sent at 1-second intervals. In the worst case, a switchover will begin just before expiration of the 10-second period, meaning that the PVC will go down within 5 seconds on the remote networking device if switchover has not completed within 5 seconds.


Note


Timers at remote ATM networking devices may be configurable, depending on the remote device owner.
Frame Relay and Multilink Frame Relay Stateful Switchover

With stateful switchover, Frame Relay and Multilink Frame Relay dynamic state information is synchronized between the active RP and standby RP. Thus when the active RP fails, the standby RP can take over without spending excessive time relearning the dynamic state information, and forwarding devices can continue to forward packets with only a few seconds of interruption (less on some platforms).

Permanent Virtual Circuits

For Frame Relay and Multilink Frame Relay to support forwarding during and after switchover, Frame Relay PVCs must remain up not only within the networking device, but also within the Frame Relay network.

In many cases the networking devices are connected to a switch, rather than back-to-back to another networking device, and that switch is not running Cisco software. The virtual circuit state is dependent on line state. PVCs are down when the line protocol is down. PVCs are up when the line protocol is up and the PVC status reported by the adjacent switch is active.

On point-to-point subinterfaces, or when static mappings are configured, Inverse ARP need not run. In cases where dynamic address mapping is used, an Inverse ARP protocol exchange determines the protocol address to data-link connection identifier (DLCI) mapping for the PVC. This exchange occurs as soon as the multipoint PVC makes the transition to active. If the exchange fails for some reason, for example, the remote networking device may drop the Inverse ARP request if it has not yet seen the PVC transition to active--any outstanding requests are run off a timer, with a default of 60 seconds.

Keepalive Messages

A crucial factor in maintaining PVCs is the delivery of Local Management Interface (LMI) protocol messages (keepalives) during switchover. This keepalive mechanism provides an exchange of information between the network server and the switch to verify that data is flowing.

If a number of consecutive LMI keepalives messages are lost or in error, the adjacent Frame Relay device declares the line protocol down and all PVCs on that interface are declared down within the Frame Relay network and reported as such to the remote networking device. The speed with which a switchover occurs is crucial to avoid the loss of keepalive messages.

The line protocol state depends on the Frame Relay keepalive configuration. With keepalives disabled, the line protocol is always up as long as the hardware interface is up. With keepalives enabled, LMI protocol messages are exchanged between the networking device and the adjacent Frame Relay switch. The line protocol is declared up after a number of consecutive successful LMI message exchanges.

The line protocol must be up according to both the networking device and the switch. The default number of exchanges to bring up the line protocol is implementation-dependent: Three is suggested by the standards; four is used on a Cisco Frame Relay switch, taking 40 seconds at the default interval of 10 seconds; and two is used on a Cisco networking device acting as a switch or when connected back-to-back. This default number could be extended if the LMI “autosense” feature is being used while the LMI type expected on the switch is determined. The number of exchanges is configurable, although the switch and router may not have the same owner.

The default number of lost messages or errors needed to bring down the line is three (two on a Cisco router). By default, if a loss of two messages is detected in 15 to 30 seconds, then a sequence number or LMI type error in the first message from the newly active RP takes the line down.

If a line goes down, consecutive successful LMI protocol exchanges (default of four over 40 seconds on a Cisco Frame Relay switch; default of two over 20 seconds on a Cisco device) will bring the line back up again.

PPP and Multilink PPP Stateful Switchover

With stateful switchover, specific PPP state information is synchronized between the active RP and standby RP. Thus when the active RP fails, the standby RP can take over without spending excessive time renegotiating the setup of a given link. As long as the physical link remains up, forwarding devices can continue to forward packets with only a few seconds of interruption (less on some platforms). Single-link PPP and Multilink PPP (MLP) sessions are maintained during RP switchover for IP connections only.

PPP and MLP support many Layer 3 protocols such as IPX and IP. Only IP links are supported in SSO. Links supporting non IP traffic will momentarily renegotiate and resume forwarding following a switchover. IP links will forward IP traffic without renegotiation.

A key factor in maintaining PPP session integrity during a switchover is the use of keepalive messages. This keepalive mechanism provides an exchange of information between peer interfaces to verify data and link integrity. Depending on the platform and configuration, the time required for switchover to the standby RP might exceed the keepalive timeout period. PPP keepalive messages are started when the physical link is first brought up. By default, keepalive messages are sent at 10-second intervals from one PPP interface to the other PPP peer.

If five consecutive keepalive replies are not received, the PPP link would be taken down on the newly active RP. Caution should be used when changing the keepalive interval duration to any value less than the default setting.

Only in extremely rare circumstances could the RP switchover time exceed the default 50-second keepalive duration. In the unlikely event this time is exceeded, the PPP links would renegotiate with the peers and resume IP traffic forwarding.


Note


PPP and MLP are not configurable and run by default on networking devices configured with SSO.
HDLC Stateful Switchover

With stateful switchover, High-Level Data Link Control (HDLC) synchronizes the line protocol state information. Additionally, the periodic timer is restarted for interfaces that use keepalive messages to verify link integrity. Link state information is synchronized between the active RP and standby RP. The line protocols that were up before the switchover remain up afterward as long as the physical interface remains up. Line protocols that were down remain down.

A key factor in maintaining HDLC link integrity during a switchover is the use of keepalive messages. This keepalive mechanism provides an exchange of information between peer interfaces to verify data is flowing. HDLC keepalive messages are started when the physical link is first brought up. By default, keepalive messages are sent at 10-second intervals from one HDLC interface to the other.

HDLC waits at least three keepalive intervals without receiving keepalive messages, sequence number errors, or a combination of both before it declares a line protocol down. If the line protocol is down, SSO cannot support continuous forwarding of user session information in the event of a switchover.


Note


HDLC is not configurable and runs by default on networking devices configured with SSO.

Quality of Service

The modular QoS CLI (MQS)-based QoS feature maintains a database of various objects created by the user, such as those used to specify traffic classes, actions for those classes in traffic policies, and attachments of those policies to different traffic points such as interfaces. With SSO, QoS synchronizes that database between the primary and secondary RP.

IPv6 Support for Stateful Switchover

IPv6 neighbor discovery supports SSO using Cisco Express Forwarding. When switchover occurs, the Cisco Express Forwarding adjacency state, which is checkpointed, is used to reconstruct the neighbor discovery cache.

Line Card Drivers

Platform-specific line card device drivers are bundled with the Cisco software image for SSO and are correct for a specific image, meaning they are designed to be SSO-aware.

Line cards used with the SSO feature periodically generate status events that are forwarded to the active RP. Information includes the line up or down status, and the alarm status. This information helps SSO support bulk synchronization after standby RP initialization and support state reconciliation and verification after a switchover.

Line cards used with the SSO feature also have the following requirements:

  • Line cards must not reset during switchover.
  • Line cards must not be reconfigured.
  • Subscriber sessions may not be lost.

Note


The standby RP communicates only with the active RP, never with the line cards. This function helps to ensure that the active and standby RP always have the same information.

APS

RPR+ and SSO support allow the automatic protection switching (APS) state to be preserved in the event of failover.

Routing Protocols and Nonstop Forwarding

Cisco nonstop forwarding (NSF) works with SSO to minimize the amount of time a network is unavailable to its users following a switchover. When a networking device restarts, all routing peers of that device usually detect that the device went down and then came back up. This down-to-up transition results in what is called a “routing flap,” which could spread across multiple routing domains. Routing flaps caused by routing restarts create routing instabilities, which are detrimental to the overall network performance. Cisco NSF helps to suppress routing flaps, thus improving network stability.

Cisco NSF allows for the forwarding of data packets to continue along known routes while the routing protocol information is being restored following a switchover. With Cisco NSF, peer networking devices do not experience routing flaps. Data traffic is forwarded through intelligent line cards while the standby RP assumes control from the failed active RP during a switchover. The ability of line cards to remain up through a switchover and to be kept current with the FIB on the active RP is key to Cisco NSF operation.

A key element of Cisco NSF is packet forwarding. In Cisco networking devices, packet forwarding is provided by Cisco Express Forwarding. Cisco Express Forwarding maintains the FIB, and uses the FIB information that was current at the time of the switchover to continue forwarding packets during a switchover. This feature eliminates downtime during the switchover.

Cisco NSF supports the BGP, IS-IS, and OSPF routing protocols. In general, these routing protocols must be SSO-aware to detect a switchover and recover state information (converge) from peer devices. Each protocol depends on Cisco Express Forwarding to continue forwarding packets during switchover while the routing protocols rebuild the Routing Information Base (RIB) tables.


Note


Distributed Cisco Express Forwarding must be enabled in order to run NSF.

Network Management

Network management support for SSO is provided through the synchronization of specific SNMP data between the active and standby RPs. From a network management perspective, this functionality helps to provide an uninterrupted management interface to the network administrator.


Note


Synchronization of SNMP data between RPs is available only when the networking device is operating in SSO mode.

SSO for Circuit Emulation Services

SSO for circuit emulation services (CES) for TDM pseudowires provides the ability to switch an incoming DS1/T1/E1 on one SPA to another SPA on same SIP or onto a different SIP.

How to Configure Stateful Switchover

Copying an Image onto an RP


Note


To copy a consolidated package or subpackages onto active and standby RPs on the Cisco ASR 1000 Series Router, see the Cisco ASR 1000 Series Aggregation Services Routers Software Configuration Guide.
SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    copy tftp {slot | disk}device-number : filename

3.    copy tftp {slave | stby-}{slot | disk}device-number : filename

4.    exit


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
copy tftp {slot | disk}device-number : filename


Example:

Router# copy tftp slot0:image1

 

Copies a Cisco software image onto the flash device of the active RP.

 
Step 3
copy tftp {slave | stby-}{slot | disk}device-number : filename


Example:

Router# copy tftp stby-slot0:image1

 

Copies a Cisco software image onto the flash device of the standby RP.

 
Step 4
exit


Example:

Router# exit

 

Exits to user EXEC mode.

 

Setting the Configuration Register and Boot Variable


Note


Following the reload, each RP is in its default mode: The Cisco 7304 router boots in SSO mode; the Cisco 7500 series router reboots in HSA mode; the Cisco 10000 series Internet router boots in SSO mode, and the Cisco 12000 series Internet router reboots in RPR mode.
SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    show version

3.    configure terminal

4.    no boot system {flash [flash-fs:][partition-number:][filename ] | ftpfilename [ip-address ]}

5.    boot system {flash [flash-fs:][partition-number:][filename ] | tftpfilename [ip-address ]}

6.    config-register value

7.    exit

8.    copy running-config startup-config

9.    reload


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
show version


Example:

Router# show version

 

Obtains the current configuration register setting.

 
Step 3
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 4
no boot system {flash [flash-fs:][partition-number:][filename ] | ftpfilename [ip-address ]}


Example:

Router(config)# no boot system flash

 

(Optional) Clears any existing system flash or TFTP boot image specification.

 
Step 5
boot system {flash [flash-fs:][partition-number:][filename ] | tftpfilename [ip-address ]}


Example:



Example:

Router(config)# boot system flash

 

Specifies the filename of stored image in flash memory or, for Cisco 10000, on a TFTP server.

 
Step 6
config-register value


Example:

Router(config)# config-register 0x2102

 

Modifies the existing configuration register setting to reflect the way in which you want to load a system image.

 
Step 7
exit


Example:

Router(config)# exit

 

Exits global configuration mode and returns the router to privileged EXEC mode.

 
Step 8
copy running-config startup-config


Example:

Router# copy running-config startup-config

 

Saves the configuration changes to the startup configuration file.

 
Step 9
reload


Example:

Router# reload

 

Reboots both RPs on the device to ensure that changes to the configuration take effect.

 

Configuring SSO


Note


Cisco 7304 routers and Cisco 10000 series Internet routers operate in SSO mode by default after reloading the same version of SSO-aware images on the device. No configuration is necessary.
Before You Begin

Image to be used by active or standby RP at initialization must be available on the local flash device.


SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    hw-module slot slot-number image file-spec

4.    redundancy

5.    mode sso

6.    end

7.    copy running-config startup-config


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
hw-module slot slot-number image file-spec


Example:

Router(config)# hw-module slot 6 image slot0:rsp-pv-mz

 

(Optional) For Cisco 7500 series devices only. Specifies the image to be used by an RP at initialization.

  • Repeat this step for both the active and standby RPs.
 
Step 4
redundancy


Example:

Router(config)# redundancy

 

Enters redundancy configuration mode.

 
Step 5
mode sso


Example:

Router(config)# mode sso

 

Sets the redundancy configuration mode to SSO on both the active and standby RP.

Note    After configuring SSO mode, the standby RP will automatically reset.
 
Step 6
end


Example:

Router(config-red)# end

 

Exits redundancy configuration mode and returns the router to privileged EXEC mode.

 
Step 7
copy running-config startup-config


Example:

Router# copy running-config startup-config

 

Saves the configuration changes to the startup configuration file.

 

Configuring Frame Relay and Multilink Frame Relay Autosynchronization LMI Sequence Numbers

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    frame-relay redundancy auto-sync lmi-sequence-numbers


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
frame-relay redundancy auto-sync lmi-sequence-numbers


Example:

Router(config)# frame-relay redundancy auto-sync lmi-sequence-numbers

 

Configures automatic synchronization of Frame Relay LMI sequence numbers between the active RP and the standby RP.

 

Verifying SSO Configuration

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    show redundancy [clients | counters | history | switchover history | states]

3.    show redundancy states


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
show redundancy [clients | counters | history | switchover history | states]


Example:

Router# show redundancy

 

Displays SSO configuration information.

 
Step 3
show redundancy states


Example:

Router# show redundancy states

 

Verifies that the device is running in SSO mode.

 

Performing a Fast Software Upgrade


Note


During the upgrade process, different images will be loaded on the RPs for a very short period of time. If a switchover occurs during this time, the device will recover in HSA, RPR or RPR+ mode, depending on the networking device.
SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    copy tftp {slot | disk}device-number:filename

3.    copy tftp {slave | stby-}{slot | disk } device-number : filename

4.    configure terminal

5.    no hw-module slot slot-number image file-spec

6.    hw-module slot slot-number image file-spec

7.    no boot system flash [flash-fs:][partition-number:][filename ]

8.    boot system flash [flash-fs:][partition-number:][filename ]

9.    config-register value

10.    exit

11.    copy running-config startup-config

12.    hw-module standby-cpu reset

13.    reload standby-cpu

14.    redundancy force-switchover [main-cpu]


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
copy tftp {slot | disk}device-number:filename


Example:

Router# copy tftp slot0:image1

 

Copies a Cisco software image onto the flash device of the active RP.

 
Step 3
copy tftp {slave | stby-}{slot | disk } device-number : filename


Example:

Router# copy tftp stby-slot0:image1



Example:

 

Copies a Cisco software image onto the flash device of the standby RP.

 
Step 4
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 5
no hw-module slot slot-number image file-spec


Example:

Router(config)# no hw-module slot 6 image slot0:rsp-pv-mz

 

For Cisco 7500 series routers only. Clears existing configuration entries for the specified image on an RSP. Configuration entries are additive, and the networking device will use the first image found in the configuration file.

  • Repeat this step for both the active and standby RSPs.
 
Step 6
hw-module slot slot-number image file-spec


Example:

Router(config)# hw-module slot 6 image slot0:image1

 

For Cisco 7500 series routers only. Specifies the image to be used by the RSP at initialization. Configuration entries are additive, and the networking device will use the first image found in the configuration file.

  • Repeat this step for both the active and standby RSPs.
 
Step 7
no boot system flash [flash-fs:][partition-number:][filename ]


Example:

Router(config)# no boot system flash

 

Clears the current boot image filename from the configuration file.

 
Step 8
boot system flash [flash-fs:][partition-number:][filename ]


Example:

Router(config)# boot system flash

 

Specifies the filename of a boot image stored in flash memory.

 
Step 9
config-register value


Example:

Router(config)# config-register 0x2102

 

Modifies the existing configuration register setting to reflect the way in which you want to load a system image.

 
Step 10
exit


Example:

Router(config)# exit

 

Exits global configuration mode and returns the router to privileged EXEC mode.

 
Step 11
copy running-config startup-config


Example:

Router# copy running-config startup-config

 

Saves the configuration changes to your startup configuration in NVRAM so that the router will boot with the configuration you have entered.

 
Step 12
hw-module standby-cpu reset


Example:

Router# hw-module standby-cpu reset

 

Resets and reloads the standby processor with the specified Cisco software image, and executes the image.

 
Step 13
reload standby-cpu


Example:

Router# reload standby-cpu

 

(Optional) For Cisco 12000 series Internet routers only. Resets and reloads the standby processor with the specified Cisco software image, and executes the image.

 
Step 14
redundancy force-switchover [main-cpu]


Example:

Router# redundancy force-switchover

 

Forces a switchover to the standby RP.

  • For Cisco 10000 series Internet routers: The main-cpu keyword is required.
 

Troubleshooting Stateful Switchover

  • The standby RP was reset, but there are no messages describing what happened--To display a log of SSO events and clues as to why a switchover or other event occurred, enter the show redundancy history command on the newly active RP.
  • The show redundancy states command shows an operating mode that is different than what is configured on the networking device--On certain platforms the output of the show redundancy states command displays the actual operating redundancy mode running on the device, and not the configured mode as set by the platform. The operating mode of the system can change depending on system events. For example, SSO requires that both RPs on the networking device be running the same software image; if the images are different, the device will not operate in SSO mode, regardless of its configuration.
  • Reloading the device disrupts SSO operation--The SSO feature introduces a number of commands, including commands to manually cause a switchover. The reload command is not an SSO command. This command causes a full reload of the box, removing all table entries, resetting all line cards, and thereby interrupting network traffic forwarding. To avoid reloading the box unintentionally, use the redundancy force-switchover command.
  • During a software upgrade, the networking device appears to be in a mode other than SSO--During the software upgrade process, the show redundancy command indicates that the device is running in a mode other than SSO.

    This is normal behavior. Until the FSU procedure is complete, each RP will be running a different software version. While the RPs are running different software versions, the mode will change to either RPR or RPR+, depending on the device. The device will change to SSO mode once the upgrade has completed.

  • On the Cisco 7500 series router, the previously active processor is being reset and reloaded before the core dump completes--Use the crashdump-timeout command to set the maximum time that the newly active processor waits before resetting and reloading the previously active processor.
  • You can enter ROM monitor mode by restarting the router and then pressing the Break key or issuing a send break command from a telnet session during the first 60 seconds of startup.The send break function can be useful for experienced users or for users under the direction of a Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) representative to recover from certain system problems or to evaluate the cause of system problems.
  • On the Cisco 7500 series router, issuing a send break does not cause a system switchover--This is normal operation on the Cisco 7500 series router. Using send break to break or pause the system is not recommended and may cause unpredictable results. To initiate a manual switchover, use the redundancy force-switchover command.
  • You can enter ROM monitor mode by restarting the router and then pressing the Break key or issuing a send break command from a telnet session during the first 60 seconds of startup.The send break function can be useful for experienced users or for users under the direction of a Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) representative to recover from certain system problems or to evaluate the cause of system problems.
  • On Cisco 10000 and 12000 series Internet routers, if a standby RP is present, the system will detect the break and complete a switchover; however, this is not the recommended procedure for initiating a switchover. To initiate a manual switchover, use the redundancy force-switchover command.

Troubleshooting SSO

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    crashdump-timeout [mm | hh : mm]

3.    debug atm ha-error

4.    debug atm ha-events

5.    debug atm ha-state

6.    debug frame-relay redundancy

7.    debug ppp redundancy [detailed | event]

8.    debug redundancy {all | ui | clk | hub}

9.    show diag [ slot-number | chassis | subslot slot / subslot] [details | summary]

10.    show redundancy [clients | counters | debug-log | handover | history | switchover history | states | inter-device]

11.    show version


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
crashdump-timeout [mm | hh : mm]


Example:

router(config-red)# crashdump-timeout

 

Set the longest time that the newly active RP will wait before reloading the formerly active RP.

 
Step 3
debug atm ha-error


Example:

Router# debug atm ha-error

 

Debugs ATM HA errors on the networking device.

 
Step 4
debug atm ha-events


Example:

Router# debug atm ha-events

 

Debugs ATM HA events on the networking device.

 
Step 5
debug atm ha-state


Example:

Router# debug atm ha-state

 

Debugs ATM high-availability state information on the networking device.

 
Step 6
debug frame-relay redundancy


Example:

Router# debug frame-relay redundancy

 

Debugs Frame Relay redundancy on the networking device.

 
Step 7
debug ppp redundancy [detailed | event]


Example:

Router# debug ppp redundancy

 

Debugs PPP redundancy on the networking device.

 
Step 8
debug redundancy {all | ui | clk | hub}


Example:

Router# debug redundancy all

 

Debugs redundancy on the networking device.

 
Step 9
show diag [ slot-number | chassis | subslot slot / subslot] [details | summary]


Example:

Router# show diag

 

Displays hardware information for the router.

 
Step 10
show redundancy [clients | counters | debug-log | handover | history | switchover history | states | inter-device]


Example:

Router# show redundancy

 

Displays the redundancy configuration mode of the RP. Also displays information about the number of switchovers, system uptime, processor uptime, and redundancy state, and reasons for any switchovers.

 
Step 11
show version


Example:

Router# show version

 

Displays image information for each RP.

 

Configuration Examples for Stateful Switchover

Example Verifying that SSO Is Configured on Various Platforms

In the following several examples, the show redundancy command is used to verify that SSO is configured on the device. Sample output is provided for several platforms.

Cisco 7304 Router

Router# show redundancy
 
Redundant System Information : 
Available system uptime = 2 minutes 
Switchovers system experienced = 0 
Standby failures = 0 
Last switchover reason = none
Hardware Mode = Duplex 
Configured Redundancy Mode = SSO 
Operating Redundancy Mode = SSO 
Maintenance Mode = Disabled 
Communications = Up
Current Processor Information : 
Active Location = slot 0 
Current Software state = ACTIVE 
Uptime in current state = 2 minutes 
Image Version = Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software 
IOS (tm) 7300 Software (C7300-P-M), Version 12.2(20)S6, RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc4) 
Technical Support: http://www.cisco.com/techsupport 
Copyright (c) 1986-2004 by cisco Systems, Inc. 

In the following several examples, the show redundancy command is used to verify that SSO is configured on the device. Sample output is provided for several platforms.

Cisco 7304 Router

Router# show redundancy
 
Redundant System Information : 
Available system uptime = 2 minutes 
Switchovers system experienced = 0 
Standby failures = 0 
Last switchover reason = none
Hardware Mode = Duplex 
Configured Redundancy Mode = SSO 
Operating Redundancy Mode = SSO 
Maintenance Mode = Disabled 
Communications = Up
Current Processor Information : 
Active Location = slot 0 
Current Software state = ACTIVE 
Uptime in current state = 2 minutes 
Image Version = Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software 
IOS (tm) 7300 Software (C7300-P-M), Version 12.2(20)S6, RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc4) 
Technical Support: http://www.cisco.com/techsupport 
Copyright (c) 1986-2004 by cisco Systems, Inc. 
Compiled Fri 29-Oct-04 14:39
BOOT = 
CONFIG_FILE = 
BOOTLDR = bootdisk:c7300-boot-mz.121-13.EX1 
Configuration register = 0x0
Peer Processor Information : 
Standby Location = slot 2 
Current Software state = STANDBY HOT 
Uptime in current state = 1 minute 
Image Version = Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software 
IOS (tm) 7300 Software (C7300-P-M), Version 12.2(20)S6, RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc4) 
Technical Support: http://www.cisco.com/techsupport 
Copyright (c) 1986-2004 by cisco Systems, Inc. 
Compiled Fri 29-Oct-04 14:39
BOOT = 
CONFIG_FILE = 
BOOTLDR = bootdisk:c7300-boot-mz.121-13.EX1 
Configuration register = 0x0

Cisco 7500 Series Router

Router# show redundancy
Operating mode is sso
redundancy mode sso
hw-module slot 6 image disk0:rsp-pv-mz
hw-module slot 7 image disk0:rsp-pv-mz
Active in slot 6
Standby in slot 7
The system total uptime since last reboot is 2 weeks, 23 hours 41 minutes.
The system has experienced 4 switchovers.
The system has been active (become master) for 21 hours 1 minute.
Reason for last switchover: User forced.

Cisco 10000 Series Internet Router

Router# show redundancy 
PRE A (This PRE)   : Active
PRE B              : Standby
Operating mode                : SSO
Uptime since this PRE switched to active : 13 hours, 51 minutes
Total system uptime from reload      : 15 hours, 8 minutes
Switchovers this system has experienced : 2
Standby failures since this PRE active  : 0
The standby PRE has been up for    : 13 hours, 47 minutes
Standby PRE information....
Standby is up.
Standby has 524288K bytes of memory.
Standby BOOT variable = disk0:c10k-p10-mz
Standby CONFIG_FILE variable =
Standby BOOTLDR variable =
Standby Configuration register is 0x2102
Standby version:
Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software
IOS (tm) 10000 Software (C10K-P10-M), Version 12.0(20020221:082811)
 [REL-bowmore.ios-weekly 100]
Copyright (c) 1986-2002 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Thu 21-Feb-02 03:28
Active version:
Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software
IOS (am) 10000 Software (C10K-P10-M), Version 12.0(20020221:082811)
 [REL-bowmore.ios-weekly 100]
Copyright (c) 1986-2002 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Thu 21-Feb-02 03:28

Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router

Router# show redundancy 
Active GRP in slot 4:
Standby GRP in slot 5:
Preferred GRP:  none
Operating Redundancy Mode: SSO
Auto synch: startup-config running-config
switchover timer 3 seconds [default]

Cisco ASR 1000 Series Router

Router# show redundancy states
       my state = 13 -ACTIVE 
     peer state = 4  -STANDBY COLD 
           Mode = Duplex
        Unit ID = 48
Redundancy Mode (Operational) = rpr
Redundancy Mode (Configured)  = rpr
Redundancy State              = rpr
     Maintenance Mode = Disabled
    Manual Swact = enabled
 Communications = Up
   client count = 66
 client_notification_TMR = 30000 milliseconds
           RF debug mask = 0x0   

Example Verifying that SSO Is Operating on the Device

In the following several examples, the show redundancy command with the states keyword is used to verify that SSO is configured on the device. Sample output is provided for several platforms.

Cisco 7304 Router

Router# show redundancy states
 
my state = 13 -ACTIVE 
peer state = 8 -STANDBY HOT 
Mode = Duplex 
Unit ID = 0
Redundancy Mode (Operational) = SSO 
Redundancy Mode (Configured) = SSO 
Split Mode = Disabled 
Manual Swact = Enabled 
Communications = Up
client count = 18 
client_notification_TMR = 30000 milliseconds 
RF debug mask = 0x0 

Cisco 7500 Series Router

Router# show redundancy states
 
my state = 13 -ACTIVE
peer state = 8  -STANDBY HOT
Mode = Duplex
Unit ID = 7
Redundancy Mode = sso
Maintenance Mode = Disabled
Manual Swact = Enabled
Communications = Up
client count = 12
client_notification_TMR = 30000 milliseconds
RF debug mask = 0x0

Cisco 10000 Series Internet Router

Router# show redundancy states
 
my state = 13 -ACTIVE
peer state = 8  -STANDBY HOT
Mode = Duplex
Unit = Preferred Primary
Unit ID = 0
Redundancy Mode = SSO
Maintenance Mode = Disabled
Manual Swact = Enabled
Communications = Up
client count =14
client_notification_TMR = 30000 milliseconds
RF debug mask = 0x0

Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router

Router# show redundancy states
 
my state = 13 -ACTIVE
peer state = 8  -STANDBY HOT
Mode = Duplex
Unit ID = 4
Redundancy Mode = SSO
Maintenance Mode = Disabled
Manual Swact = Enabled
Communications = Up
client count = 14
client_notification_TMR = 30000 milliseconds
RF debug mask = 0x

Cisco ASR 1000 Series Router

Router# show redundancy states
       my state = 13 -ACTIVE 
     peer state = 4  -STANDBY COLD 
           Mode = Duplex
        Unit ID = 48
Redundancy Mode (Operational) = rpr
Redundancy Mode (Configured)  = rpr
Redundancy State              = rpr
     Maintenance Mode = Disabled
Manual Swact = enabled
 Communications = Up
   client count = 66
 client_notification_TMR = 30000 milliseconds
           RF debug mask = 0x0   

Example Verifying SSO Protocols and Applications

Enter the show redundancy command with the client keyword to display the list of applications and protocols that have registered as SSO protocols or applications. You can also verify the list of supported line protocols.

Cisco 7304 Router

Router# show redundancy clients
 
clientID = 0 clientSeq = 0 RF_INTERNAL_MSG 
clientID = 29 clientSeq = 60 Redundancy Mode RF 
clientID = 25 clientSeq = 130 CHKPT RF 
clientID = 1314 clientSeq = 137 7300 Platform RF 
clientID = 22 clientSeq = 140 Network RF Client 
clientID = 24 clientSeq = 150 CEF RRP RF Client 
clientID = 5 clientSeq = 170 RFS client 
clientID = 23 clientSeq = 220 Frame Relay 
clientID = 49 clientSeq = 225 HDLC 
clientID = 20 clientSeq = 310 IPROUTING NSF RF cli 
clientID = 21 clientSeq = 320 PPP RF 
clientID = 34 clientSeq = 350 SNMP RF Client 
clientID = 52 clientSeq = 355 ATM 
clientID = 35 clientSeq = 360 History RF Client 
clientID = 54 clientSeq = 530 SNMP HA RF Client 
clientID = 75 clientSeq = 534 VRF common 
clientID = 57 clientSeq = 540 ARP 
clientID = 65000 clientSeq = 65000 RF_LAST_CLIENT 

Cisco 7500 Series Router

Router# show redundancy clients 
clientID = 0      clientSeq = 0        RF_INTERNAL_MSG 
clientID = 25     clientSeq = 130      CHKPT RF              
clientID = 22     clientSeq = 140      Network RF Client     
clientID = 24     clientSeq = 150      CEF RRP RF Client     
clientID = 37     clientSeq = 151      MDFS RRP RF Client    
clientID = 23     clientSeq = 220      FRAME RELAY
clientID = 49     clientSeq = 225      HDLC                  
clientID = 20     clientSeq = 310      IPROUTING NSF RF cli  
clientID = 21     clientSeq = 320      PPP RF                
clientID = 34     clientSeq = 330      SNMP RF Client        
clientID = 29     clientSeq = 340      ATM                   
clientID = 35     clientSeq = 350      History RF Client     
clientID = 50     clientSeq = 530      SNMP HA RF Client     
clientID = 65000  clientSeq = 65000    RF_LAST_CLIENT 

Cisco 10000 Series Internet Routere

Router# show redundancy clients 
clientID = 0      clientSeq = 0        RF_INTERNAL_MSG       
clientID = 25     clientSeq = 130      CHKPT RF              
clientID = 22     clientSeq = 140      Network RF Client     
clientID = 24     clientSeq = 150      CEF RRP RF Client     
clientID = 26     clientSeq = 160      C10K RF Client        
clientID = 5      clientSeq = 170      RFS client            
clientID = 23     clientSeq = 220      Frame Relay           
clientID = 49     clientSeq = 225      HDLC                  
clientID = 20     clientSeq = 310      IPROUTING NSF RF cli  
clientID = 21     clientSeq = 320      PPP RF                
clientID = 34     clientSeq = 330      SNMP RF Client        
clientID = 29     clientSeq = 340      ATM                   
 clientID = 35     clientSeq = 350      History RF Client 
 clientID = 65000  clientSeq = 65000    RF_LAST_CLIENT 

Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router

Router# show redundancy clients 
clientID = 0      clientSeq = 0        RF_INTERNAL_MSG
clientID = 25     clientSeq = 130      CHKPT RF
clientID = 27     clientSeq = 132      C12K RF COMMON Client
clientID = 30     clientSeq = 135      Redundancy Mode RF
clientID = 22     clientSeq = 140      Network RF Client
clientID = 24     clientSeq = 150      CEF RRP RF Client
clientID = 37     clientSeq = 151      MDFS RRP RF Client
clientID = 5      clientSeq = 170      RFS client
clientID = 23     clientSeq = 220      Frame Relay
clientID = 49     clientSeq = 225      HDLC
clientID = 20     clientSeq = 310      IPROUTING NSF RF cli
clientID = 21     clientSeq = 320      PPP RF
clientID = 34     clientSeq = 330      SNMP RF Client
clientID = 29     clientSeq = 340      ATM
clientID = 35     clientSeq = 350      History RF Client
clientID = 50     clientSeq = 530      SNMP HA RF Client
 clientID = 65000  clientSeq = 65000    RF_LAST_CLIENT

Cisco ASR 1000 Series Router

Router# show redundancy clients
 clientID = 0       clientSeq = 0        RF_INTERNAL_MSG       
 clientID = 29      clientSeq = 60       Redundancy Mode RF    
 clientID = 139     clientSeq = 62       IfIndex               
 clientID = 25      clientSeq = 69       CHKPT RF              
 clientID = 1340    clientSeq = 90       ASR1000-RP Platform   
 clientID = 1501    clientSeq = 91       Cat6k CWAN HA         
 clientID = 78      clientSeq = 95       TSPTUN HA             
 clientID = 305     clientSeq = 96       Multicast ISSU Conso  
 clientID = 304     clientSeq = 97       IP multicast RF Clie  
 clientID = 22      clientSeq = 98       Network RF Client     
 clientID = 88      clientSeq = 99       HSRP                  
 clientID = 114     clientSeq = 100      GLBP                  
 clientID = 1341    clientSeq = 102      ASR1000 DPIDX         
 clientID = 1505    clientSeq = 103      Cat6k SPA TSM         
 clientID = 1344    clientSeq = 110      ASR1000-RP SBC RF     
 clientID = 227     clientSeq = 111      SBC RF                
 clientID = 71      clientSeq = 112      XDR RRP RF Client     
 clientID = 24      clientSeq = 113      CEF RRP RF Client     
 clientID = 146     clientSeq = 114      BFD RF Client         
 clientID = 306     clientSeq = 120      MFIB RRP RF Client    
 clientID = 1504    clientSeq = 128      Cat6k CWAN Interface  
 clientID = 75      clientSeq = 130      Tableid HA            
 clientID = 401     clientSeq = 131      NAT HA                
 clientID = 402     clientSeq = 132      TPM RF client         
 clientID = 5       clientSeq = 135      Config Sync RF clien  
 clientID = 68      clientSeq = 149      Virtual Template RF   
 clientID = 23      clientSeq = 152      Frame Relay           
clientID = 49      clientSeq = 153      HDLC                  
 clientID = 72      clientSeq = 154      LSD HA Proc           
 clientID = 113     clientSeq = 155      MFI STATIC HA Proc    
 clientID = 20      clientSeq = 171      IPROUTING NSF RF cli  
 clientID = 100     clientSeq = 173      DHCPC                 
 clientID = 101     clientSeq = 174      DHCPD                 
 clientID = 74      clientSeq = 183      MPLS VPN HA Client    
 clientID = 34      clientSeq = 185      SNMP RF Client        
 clientID = 52      clientSeq = 186      ATM                   
 clientID = 69      clientSeq = 189      AAA                   
 clientID = 118     clientSeq = 190      L2TP                  
 clientID = 82      clientSeq = 191      CCM RF                
 clientID = 35      clientSeq = 192      History RF Client     
 clientID = 90      clientSeq = 204      RSVP HA Services      
 clientID = 70      clientSeq = 215      FH COMMON RF CLIENT   
 clientID = 54      clientSeq = 220      SNMP HA RF Client     
 clientID = 73      clientSeq = 221      LDP HA                
 clientID = 76      clientSeq = 222      IPRM                  
 clientID = 57      clientSeq = 223      ARP                   
 clientID = 50      clientSeq = 230      FH_RF_Event_Detector  
 clientID = 1342    clientSeq = 240      ASR1000 SpaFlow       
 clientID = 1343    clientSeq = 241      ASR1000 IF Flow       
 clientID = 83      clientSeq = 255      AC RF Client          
 clientID = 84      clientSeq = 257      AToM manager          
 clientID = 85      clientSeq = 258      SSM                   
 clientID = 102     clientSeq = 273      MQC QoS               
 clientID = 94      clientSeq = 280      Config Verify RF cli  
 clientID = 135     clientSeq = 289      IKE RF Client         
 clientID = 136     clientSeq = 290      IPSEC RF Client       
 clientID = 130     clientSeq = 291      CRYPTO RSA            
 clientID = 148     clientSeq = 296      DHCPv6 Relay          
 clientID = 4000    clientSeq = 303      RF_TS_CLIENT          
 clientID = 4005    clientSeq = 305      ISSU Test Client      
 clientID = 93      clientSeq = 309      Network RF 2 Client   
 clientID = 205     clientSeq = 311      FEC Client            
 clientID = 141     clientSeq = 319      DATA DESCRIPTOR RF C  
 clientID = 4006    clientSeq = 322      Network Clock         
 clientID = 225     clientSeq = 326      VRRP                  
 clientID = 65000   clientSeq = 336      RF_LAST_CLIENT 

Additional References

Related Documents

Related Topic

Document Title

Cisco IOS commands

Cisco IOS Master Commands List, All Releases

Cisco High Availability commands

Cisco IOS High Availability Command Reference

DHCP proxy client

ISSU and SSO--DHCP High Availability Features module in the Cisco IOS IP Addressing Services Configuration Guide

MPLS high availability

MPLS High Availability: Overview module in the Cisco IOS Multiprotocol Label Switching Configuration Guide

NSF/SSO - 802.3ah OAM Support

Using Ethernet Operations, Administration, and Maintenance module in the Cisco IOS Carrier Ethernet Configuration Guide

NSF/SSO - Any Transport over MPLS (AToM)

Any Transport over MPLS and AToM Graceful Restart module in the Cisco IOS Multiprotocol Label Switching Configuration Guide

NSF/SSO - E-LMI Support

Configuring Ethernet Local Management Interface at a Provider Edge module in the Cisco IOS Carrier Ethernet Configuration Guide

SSO - BFD (Admin Down)

Bidirectional Forwarding Detection module in the Cisco IOS IP Routing: BFD Configuration Guide

SSO GLBP

GLBP SSO module in the Cisco IOS IP Application Services Configuration Guide

SSO HSRP

Configuring HSRP module in the Cisco IOS IP Application Services Configuration Guide

SSO and RPR on the Cisco ASR 1000 series routers

Cisco ASR 1000 Series Aggregation Services Routers Software Configuration Guide

SSO VRRP

Configuring VRRP module in the Cisco IOS IP Application Services Configuration Guide

Basic IPv6 configuration

Implementing IPv6 Addressing and Basic Connectivity module in the Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Guide

Virtual Private LAN Services

NSF/SSO/ISSU Support for VPLS module in the Cisco IOS Multiprotocol Label Switching Configuration Guide

Standards

Standard

Title

No new or modified standards are supported by this feature, and support for existing standards has not been modified by this feature.

--

MIBs

MIB

MIBs Link

No new or modified MIBs are supported, and support for existing MIBs has not been modified.

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs

RFCs

RFC

Title

No new or modified RFCs are supported by this feature.

--

Technical Assistance

Description

Link

The Cisco Support and Documentation website provides online resources to download documentation, software, and tools. Use these resources to install and configure the software and to troubleshoot and resolve technical issues with Cisco products and technologies. Access to most tools on the Cisco Support and Documentation website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

http://www.cisco.com/cisco/web/support/index.html

Feature Information for Stateful Switchover

The following table provides release information about the feature or features described in this module. This table lists only the software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that software release train also support that feature.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Table 11 Feature Information for Cisco Stateful Switchover

Feature Name

Releases

Feature Information

Stateful Switchover (SSO)

12.0(22)S 12.0(23)S 12.0(24)S 12.2(20)S 12.2(18)S 12.2(33)SRA

This feature was introduced:

In 12.0(23)S, support was added for 1xGE and 3xGE line cards on the Cisco 12000 series Internet router.

In 12.0(24)S, support was added for the following line cards on the Cisco 12000 series Internet router:

  • Engine 1
    • 2-port OC-12/STM-4c DPT
  • Engine 2
    • 1-port OC-48/STM-16c DPT
    • 8-port OC-3/STM-1c ATM
  • IP Service Engine (ISE)
    • 4-port OC-3c/STM-1c POS/SDH ISE
    • 8-port OC-3c/STM-1c POS/SDH ISE
    • 16-port OC-3c/STM-1c POS/SDH ISE
    • 4-port OC-12c/STM-4c POS/SDH ISE
    • 1-port OC-48c/STM-16c POS/SDH ISE
    • 4-port channelized OC-12/STM-4 (DS3/E3, OC-3c/STM-1c) POS/SDH ISE
    • 1-port channelized OC-48/STM-16 (DS3/E3, OC-3c/STM-1c) POS/SDH ISE

In 12.0(26)S, support was added for the following line cards on the Cisco 12000 series Internet router:

  • 4-port OC-12c/STM-4c DPT ISE

In 12.2(20)S, support was added for the Cisco 7304 router.

CEM SSO/ISSU

12.2(33)SRC

This feature was introduced.

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) On Demand Address Pool (ODAP) client/server

12.2(31)SB2

This feature was updated to be SSO-compliant.

NSF/SSO--Virtual Private LAN Services

12.2(33)SXI4 15.0(1)S

This feature was introduced.

Route Processor Redundancy Plus (RPR+)

12.2(20)S

This feature was introduced on the Cisco 7304 router.

SSO - Automatic Protection Switching (APS)

12.2(28)SB

This feature was introduced.

SSO - BFD (Admin Down)

12.2(33)SB

This feature was introduced.

SSO - DHCP proxy client

12.2(31)SB2 12.2(33)SRC

This feature was updated to be SSO-compliant.

In 12.2(33)SRC, this feature was introduced.

SSO - DHCP relay on unnumbered interface

12.2(31)SB2

This feature was updated to be SSO-compliant.

SSO - DHCP server

12.2(31)SB2

This feature was updated to be SSO-compliant.

SSO - Gateway Load Balancing Protocol (GLBP)

12.2(31)SB2 12.2(33)SXH

This feature was updated to be SSO-compliant.

SSO - HDLC

12.2(28)SB 15.0(1)S

This feature was introduced.

SSO - HSRP

12.2(33)SXH 15.0(1)S Cisco IOS XE 3.1.0SG

This feature was introduced.

SSO - MLPPP

12.2(28)SB

This feature was introduced.

SSO - Multilink Frame Relay

12.2(25)S 12.2(31)SB2 12.2(33)SRB 15.0(1)S

This feature was introduced.

In 12.2(28)S, support was added for the Cisco 12000 series Internet router.

In 12.2(31)SB2, support was added for the Cisco 10000 series Internet router.

In 12.2(33)SRB, this feature was updated to be SSO compliant.

SSO - Multilink PPP (MLP)

15.0(1)S

This feature is supported.

SSO - PPP

12.2(33)SRB 15.0(1)S

This feature was updated to be SSO-compliant.

SSO - PPPoA

12.2(31)SB2

This feature was updated to be SSO-compliant.

SSO - PPPoE

12.2(31)SB2

This feature was updated to be SSO-compliant.

SSO - PPPoE IPv6

12.2(33)SXE

This feature was introduced.

SSO - Quality of Service (QoS)

12.2(25)S 15.0(1)S

This feature was introduced.

SSO - VRRP

12.2(33)SRC 15.0(1)S

This feature was introduced.

Virtual template manager SSO

12.2(33)SRC

This feature was introduced.

Cisco and the Cisco Logo are trademarks of Cisco Systems, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and other countries. A listing of Cisco's trademarks can be found at www.cisco.com/go/trademarks. Third party trademarks mentioned are the property of their respective owners. The use of the word partner does not imply a partnership relationship between Cisco and any other company. (1005R)

Any Internet Protocol (IP) addresses and phone numbers used in this document are not intended to be actual addresses and phone numbers. Any examples, command display output, network topology diagrams, and other figures included in the document are shown for illustrative purposes only. Any use of actual IP addresses or phone numbers in illustrative content is unintentional and coincidental.

1 Frame Relay is supported, but Multilink Frame Relay is not.