Carrier Ethernet Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS XE Release 3S
Configuring IP SLAs Metro-Ethernet 3.0 (ITU-T Y.1731) Operations
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Configuring IP SLAs Metro-Ethernet 3.0 (ITU-T Y.1731) Operations

Contents

Configuring IP SLAs Metro-Ethernet 3.0 (ITU-T Y.1731) Operations

This module describes how to configure an IP SLAs Metro-Ethernet 3.0 (ITU-T Y.1731) operation to gather the following performance measurements for Ethernet service:

  • Ethernet Delay
  • Ethernet Delay Variation
  • Ethernet Frame Loss Ratio

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest caveats and feature information, see Bug Search Tool and the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the feature information table at the end of this module.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/​go/​cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Prerequisites for ITU-T Y.1731 Operations

IEEE-compliant Connectivity Fault Management (CFM) must be configured and enabled for Y.1731 performance monitoring to function.

Restrictions for IP SLAs Metro-Ethernet 3.0 (ITU-T Y.1731)

  • Depending on your Cisco software release, SNMP is not supported for reporting threshold events or collecting performance statistics for IP SLAs Metro-Ethernet 3.0 (ITU-T Y.1731) operations.
  • Continuity Check Message (CCM)-based dual-ended Ethernet frame loss operations are not supported.
  • In a single-ended Ethernet operation, performance measurement statistics can be retrieved only at the device on which the sender Ethernet Connectivity Fault Management (CFM) Maintenance End Point (MEP) is configured.
  • Frame Loss Measurement is not supported on Cisco ME 3600X Series and 3800X Series Ethernet Access Switches.

Information About IP SLAs Metro-Ethernet 3.0 (ITU-T Y.1731) Operations

Y.1731 Performance Monitoring (PM)

Y.1731 Performance Monitoring (PM) provides a standard Ethernet PM function that includes measurement of Ethernet frame delay, frame delay variation, frame loss, and frame throughput measurements specified by the ITU-T Y-1731 standard and interpreted by the Metro Ethernet Forum (MEF) standards group. As per recommendations, devices should be able to send, receive and process PM frames in intervals of 1000ms (1000 frames per second) with the maximum recommended transmission period being 1000ms (1000 frames per second) for any given service.

To measure Service Level Agreements (SLAs) parameters, such as frame delay or frame delay variation, a small number of synthetic frames are transmitted along with the service to the end point of the maintenance region, where the Maintenance End Point (MEP) responds to the synthetic frame. For a function such as connectivity fault management, the messages are sent less frequently, while performance monitoring frames are sent more frequently.

IP SLAs Metro-Ethernet 3.0 (ITU-T Y.1731) Operations

The IP SLAs Metro-Ethernet 3.0 (ITU-T Y.1731) feature supports key operation and maintenance standards that provide for automated end-to-end management and monitoring of Ethernet service by service providers. The ITU-T Y.1731 networking standard defines performance monitoring measurements such as frame delay, frame delay variation, and frame loss ratio to assist with IP SLAs assurance and capacity planning.

Ethernet Frame Delay (ETH-DM: FD), also known as delay, measures the frame latency from the time the first bit of the synthetic frame is transmitted, to the time the last bit of the frame is received. Delay measurement uses synthetic frames because service frames do not carry timestamps.

Ethernet Frame Delay Variation (ETH-DM: FDV), also known as delay variation, measures the difference between the frame latencies as experienced by two separate frames. The two frames can be either consecutive or separated by an exact number of frames, as specified in the configuration. ITU-T Y.1731 defines the following messages to measure Ethernet delay variation:
  • Delay Measurement Message (DMM)
  • Delay Measurement Reply (DMR)
  • One-Way Delay Measurement (1DM)
Ethernet Frame Loss Ratio (ETH-LM: FLR), also known as frame loss, measures the availability of synthetic frames in the network. Availability is defined in terms of the ratio of frames lost to frames sent, or Frame Loss Ratio (FLR). Near End Loss measures ingress frame loss and the Far End Loss measures egress frame loss. Availability is calculated using either the Near End loss numbers or the Far End loss numbers, or both. ITU-T Y.1731 defines the following messages to measure Ethernet frame loss:
  • Loss Measurement Message (LMM)
  • Loss Measurement Reply (LMR)

In a single-ended operation, a Maintenance End Point (MEP) on the source device acts as both the sender and receiver. The device sends a synthetic frame from the source to the destination and then, upon receiving back a response frame, the MEP on the source device performs the performance measurement calculations. In this operation, statistics can be retrieved only at the source device.

Dual-ended (or two-way) operations are supported for delay and delay-variation performance measurements only. When you start a dual-ended delay operation, the sender MEP on the source device transmits a synthetic frame to the receiver MEP configured on another (destination) device, and receives frames with reply information from its peer MEP. In this operation, the receiver MEP performs the measurement calculations. However, the statistics can be retrieved by the MEPs at both ends of the operation. Statistics from the operation are retrieved at the destination device through Cisco extensions to the protocol using Y.1731-defined Vendor-Specific Messages/Replies (VSM/VSR). For VSM/VSR in a dual-ended operation to work, the system clocks at the source and destination devices must be synchronized.

All measurements are performed using a point-to-point model between a given pair of MEPs. One-way measurement values are calculated based on the amount time that elapses between when a frame is sent from the MEP on one device, to the time when the frame is received at the MEP on another device. The accuracy of one-way delay calculations depends on close synchronization of the system clocks at the source and destination devices. Two-way measurement values are based on the time difference between when the source MEP transmits a request frame and when it receives a reply frame from the receiver MEP on the destination device, subtracting the time elapsed at the destination.

How to Configure IP SLAs Metro-Ethernet 3.0 (ITU-T Y.1731) Operations

Configuring a Dual-Ended Ethernet Delay or Delay Variation Operation

Perform the tasks for configuring a dual-ended operation in the order presented.


Note


To remove the MEP configurations in an already-configured dual-ended operation, always remove the MEPs in the reverse order in which they were configured. That is, remove the scheduler first, then the threshold monitoring configuration, and then the sender MEP configuration on the source device before removing the scheduler, proactive threshold monitoring, and receiver MEP configuration on the destination device.


Configuring a Receiver MEP on the Destination Device

Before You Begin

Time synchronization is required between the source and destination devices in order to provide accurate one-way delay (latency) or delay-variation measurements. Configure either Precision Time Protocol (PTP) or Network Time Protocol (NTP) on both the source and destination devices.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    enable

    2.    configure terminal

    3.    ip sla operation-number

    4.    ethernet y1731 delay receive 1DM domain domain-name {evc evc-id | vlan vlan-id} cos cos {mpid source-mp-id | mac-address source-address}

    5.    aggregate interval seconds

    6.    distribution {delay | delay-variation} one-way number-of-bins boundary[,...,boundary]

    7.    frame offset offset-value

    8.    history interval intervals-stored

    9.    max-delay milliseconds

    10.    owner owner-id

    11.    end


DETAILED STEPS
      Command or Action Purpose
    Step 1 enable


    Example:
    Router> enable
     

    Enables privileged EXEC mode.

    • Enter your password if prompted.
     
    Step 2 configure terminal


    Example:
    Router# configure terminal
     

    Enters global configuration mode.

     
    Step 3 ip sla operation-number


    Example:
    Router(config-term)# ip sla 501
              
     

    Begins configuring an IP SLAs operation and enters IP SLA configuration mode.

     
    Step 4 ethernet y1731 delay receive 1DM domain domain-name {evc evc-id | vlan vlan-id} cos cos {mpid source-mp-id | mac-address source-address}


    Example:
    Router(config-ip-sla)# ethernet y1731 delay receive 1DM domain xxx evc yyy cos 3 mpid 101
              
     
    Begins configuring the receiver on the responder and enters IP SLA Y.1731 delay configuration mode.
    • The source-mp-id or source-address configured by this command corresponds to that of the MEP being configured.
     
    Step 5 aggregate interval seconds


    Example:
    Router(config-sla-y1731-delay)# aggregate interval 900
              
     

    (Optional) Configures the length of time during which the performance measurements are conducted and the results stored.

     
    Step 6 distribution {delay | delay-variation} one-way number-of-bins boundary[,...,boundary]


    Example:
    Router(config-sla-y1731-delay)# distribution delay-variation one-way 5 5000,10000,15000,20000,-1
              
     

    (Optional) Specifies measurement type and configures bins for statistics distributions kept.

     
    Step 7 frame offset offset-value


    Example:
    Router(config-sla-y1731-delay)# frame offset 1
              
     

    (Optional) Sets the value for calculating delay variation rates.

     
    Step 8 history interval intervals-stored


    Example:
    Router(config-sla-y1731-delay)# history interval 2
              
     

    (Optional) Sets the number of statistics distributions kept during the lifetime of an IP SLAs Ethernet operation.

     
    Step 9 max-delay milliseconds


    Example:
    Router(config-sla-y1731-delay)# max-delay 5000
              
     

    (Optional) Sets the amount of time an MEP waits for a frame.

     
    Step 10 owner owner-id


    Example:
    Router(config-sla-y1731-delay)# owner admin
              
     

    (Optional) Configures the owner of an IP SLAs operation.

     
    Step 11 end


    Example:
    Router(config-sla-y1731-delay)# end
              
     

    Exits to privileged EXEC mode.

     
    What to Do Next

    To add proactive threshold conditions and reactive triggering for generating traps, see the "Configuring Proactive Threshold Monitoring" module of the IP SLAs Configuration Guide.

    When you are finished configuring proactive threshold monitoring for this MEP, see the "Scheduling IP SLAs Operations" section to schedule the operation.

    Configuring the Sender MEP on the Source Router

    Before You Begin
    • Time synchronization is required between the source and destination devices in order to provide accurate one-way delay (latency) or delay-variation measurements. Configure either Precision Time Protocol (PTP) or Network Time Protocol (NTP) on both the source and destination devices.
    • The receiver MEP must be configured, including proacive threshold monitoring, and scheduled before you configure the sender MEP.
    SUMMARY STEPS

      1.    enable

      2.    configure terminal

      3.    ip sla operation-number

      4.    ethernet y1731 delay 1DM domain domain-name {evc evc-id | vlan vlan-id} {mpid target-mp-id | mac-address target-address} cos cos {source {mpid source-mp-id | mac-address source-address}}

      5.    aggregate interval seconds

      6.    frame interval milliseconds

      7.    frame size bytes

      8.    history interval intervals-stored

      9.    owner owner-id

      10.    end


    DETAILED STEPS
        Command or Action Purpose
      Step 1 enable


      Example:
      Router> enable
       

      Enables privileged EXEC mode.

      • Enter your password if prompted.
       
      Step 2 configure terminal


      Example:
      Router# configure terminal
       

      Enters global configuration mode.

       
      Step 3 ip sla operation-number


      Example:
      Router(config)# ip sla 500
                
       

      Begins configuring an IP SLAs operation and enters IP SLA configuration mode.

       
      Step 4 ethernet y1731 delay 1DM domain domain-name {evc evc-id | vlan vlan-id} {mpid target-mp-id | mac-address target-address} cos cos {source {mpid source-mp-id | mac-address source-address}}


      Example:
      Router(config-ip-sla)# ethernet y1731 delay 1DM domain xxx evc yyy mpid 101 cos 3 source mpid 100
                
       

      Begins configuring a dual-ended Ethernet delay operation and enters IP SLA Y.1731 delay configuration mode.

       
      Step 5 aggregate interval seconds


      Example:
      Router(config-sla-y1731-delay)# aggregate interval
                
       

      (Optional) Configures the length of time during which the performance measurements are conducted and the results stored.

       
      Step 6 frame interval milliseconds


      Example:
      Router(config-sla-y1731-delay)# frame interval 100
                
       

      (Optional) Sets the gap between successive frames.

       
      Step 7 frame size bytes


      Example:
      Router(config-sla-y1731-delay)# frame size 64
                
       

      (Optional) Sets the padding size for frames.

       
      Step 8 history interval intervals-stored


      Example:
      Router(config-sla-y1731-delay)# history interval 2
                
       

      (Optional) Sets the number of statistics distributions kept during the lifetime of an IP SLAs Ethernet operation.

       
      Step 9 owner owner-id


      Example:
      Router(config-sla-y1731-delay)# owner admin
                
       

      (Optional) Configures the owner of an IP SLAs operation.

       
      Step 10 end


      Example:
      Router(config-sla-y1731-delay)# end
                
       

      Exits to privileged EXEC mode.

       
      What to Do Next

      To add proactive threshold conditions and reactive triggering for generating traps, see the "Configuring Proactive Threshold Monitoring" module of the IP SLAs Configuration Guide.

      When you are finished configuring proactive threshold monitoring for this MEP, see the "Scheduling IP SLAs Operations" section to schedule the operation.

      Configuring a Sender MEP for a Single-Ended Ethernet Delay or Delay Variation Operation

      Perform this task to configure a sender MEP on the source device.

      Before You Begin
      • Time synchronization is required between the source and destination devices in order to provide accurate one-way delay (latency) or delay-variation measurements. Configure either Precision Time Protocol (PTP) or Network Time Protocol (NTP) on both the source and destination devices.

      Note


      To display information about remote (target) MEPs on destination devices, use the show ethernet cfm maintenance-points remote command.


      SUMMARY STEPS

        1.    enable

        2.    configure terminal

        3.    ip sla operation-number

        4.    ethernet y1731 delay {DMM | DMMv1} [burst] domain domain-name {evc evc-id | vlan vlan-id} {mpid target-mp-id | mac-address target-address} cos cos {source {mpid source-mp-id | mac-address source-address}}

        5.    clock sync

        6.    aggregate interval seconds

        7.    distribution {delay | delay-variation} one-way number-of-bins boundary[,...,boundary]

        8.    frame interval milliseconds

        9.    frame offset offset-value

        10.    frame size bytes

        11.    history interval intervals-stored

        12.    max-delay milliseconds

        13.    owner owner-id

        14.    end


      DETAILED STEPS
          Command or Action Purpose
        Step 1 enable


        Example:
        Device> enable
         

        Enables privileged EXEC mode.

        • Enter your password if prompted.
         
        Step 2 configure terminal


        Example:
        Device# configure terminal
         

        Enters global configuration mode.

         
        Step 3 ip sla operation-number


        Example:
        Device(config-term)# ip sla 10
                  
         

        Begins configuring an IP SLAs operation and enters IP SLA configuration mode.

         
        Step 4 ethernet y1731 delay {DMM | DMMv1} [burst] domain domain-name {evc evc-id | vlan vlan-id} {mpid target-mp-id | mac-address target-address} cos cos {source {mpid source-mp-id | mac-address source-address}}


        Example:
        Device(config-ip-sla)# ethernet y1731 delay dmm domain xxx evc yyy mpid 101 cos 4 source mpid 100
                  
         
        Begins configuring a single-ended Ethernet delay operation and enters IP SLA Y.1731 delay configuration mode.
        • To configure concurrent operations, use the DMMv1 keyword with this command. Repeat the preceding two steps to each concurrent operation, to be added to a single IP SLA operation number. Concurrent operations are supported for a given EVC, CoS, and remote MEP combination, or for multiple MEPs for a given multipoint EVC.
         
        Step 5 clock sync


        Example:
        Device(config-sla-y1731-delay)# clock sync
                  
         

        (Optional) Indicates that the end points are synchronized and thus allows the operation to calculate one-way delay measurements.

         
        Step 6 aggregate interval seconds


        Example:
        Device(config-sla-y1731-delay)# aggregate interval 900
                  
         

        (Optional) Configures the length of time during which the performance measurements are conducted and the results stored.

         
        Step 7 distribution {delay | delay-variation} one-way number-of-bins boundary[,...,boundary]


        Example:
        Device(config-sla-y1731-delay)# distribution delay-variation one-way 5 5000, 10000,15000,20000,-1
                  
         

        (Optional) Specifies measurement type and configures bins for statistics distributions kept.

         
        Step 8 frame interval milliseconds


        Example:
        Device(config-sla-y1731-delay)# frame interval 100
                  
         

        (Optional) Sets the gap between successive frames.

         
        Step 9 frame offset offset-value


        Example:
        Device(config-sla-y1731-delay)# frame offset 1
                  
         

        (Optional) Sets value for calculating delay variation values.

         
        Step 10 frame size bytes


        Example:
        Device(config-sla-y1731-delay)# frame size 32
                  
         

        (Optional) Configures padding size for frames.

         
        Step 11 history interval intervals-stored


        Example:
        Device(config-sla-y1731-delay)# history interval 2
                  
         

        (Optional) Sets the number of statistics distributions kept during the lifetime of an IP SLAs Ethernet operation.

         
        Step 12 max-delay milliseconds


        Example:
        Device(config-sla-y1731-delay)# max-delay 5000
                  
         

        (Optional) Sets the amount of time an MEP waits for a frame.

         
        Step 13 owner owner-id


        Example:
        Device(config-sla-y1731-delay)# owner admin
                  
         

        (Optional) Configures the owner of an IP SLAs operation.

         
        Step 14 end


        Example:
        Device(config-sla-y1731-delay)# end
                  
         

        Exits to privileged EXEC mode.

         
        What to Do Next

        To add proactive threshold conditions and reactive triggering for generating traps, see the "Configuring Proactive Threshold Monitoring" module of the IP SLAs Configuration Guide.

        When you are finished configuring proactive threshold monitoring for this operation, see the "Scheduling IP SLAs Operations" section to schedule the operation.

        Configuring a Sender MEP for a Single-Ended Ethernet Frame Loss Ratio Operation


        Note



        This task is not supported on Cisco ME 3600X Series and 3800X Series Ethernet Access Switches


        Note


        To display information about remote (target) MEPs on destination devices, use the show ethernet cfm maintenance-points remote command.


        Perform this task to configure a sender MEP on the source device.

        Before You Begin
        • Class of Service (CoS)-level monitoring must be enabled on MEPs associated to the Ethernet frame loss operation by using the monitor loss counter command on the devices at both ends of the operation. See the Cisco IOS Carrier Ethernet Command Reference for command information. See the "Configuration Examples for IP SLAs Metro-Ethernet 3.0 (ITU-T Y.1731) Operations" section for configuration information.

          Note


          Cisco IOS Y.1731 implementation allows monitoring of frame loss for frames on an EVC regardless of the CoS value (any CoS or Aggregate CoS cases). See the "Configuration Examples for IP SLAs Metro-Ethernet 3.0 (ITU-T Y.1731) Operations" section for configuration information.


        SUMMARY STEPS

          1.    enable

          2.    configure terminal

          3.    ip sla operation-number

          4.    ethernet y1731 loss {LMM | SLM} [burst] domain domain-name {evc evc-id | vlan vlan-id} {mpid target-mp-id | mac-address target-address} CoS CoS {source {mpid source-mp-id | mac-address source-address}}

          5.    aggregate interval seconds

          6.    availability algorithm {sliding-window | static-window}

          7.    frame consecutive value

          8.    frame interval milliseconds

          9.    history interval intervals-stored

          10.    owner owner-id

          11.    exit

          12.    exit

          13.    ip sla reaction-configuration operation-number {react {unavailableDS | unavailableSD} [threshold-type {average [number-of-measurements] | consecutive [occurrences] | immediate}] [threshold-value upper-threshold lower-threshold]

          14.    ip sla logging traps

          15.    exit


        DETAILED STEPS
            Command or Action Purpose
          Step 1 enable


          Example:
          Device> enable
           

          Enables privileged EXEC mode.

          • Enter your password if prompted.
           
          Step 2 configure terminal


          Example:
          Device# configure terminal
           

          Enters global configuration mode.

           
          Step 3 ip sla operation-number


          Example:
          Device(config-term)# ip sla 11
                    
           

          Begins configuring an IP SLAs operation and enters IP SLA configuration mode.

           
          Step 4 ethernet y1731 loss {LMM | SLM} [burst] domain domain-name {evc evc-id | vlan vlan-id} {mpid target-mp-id | mac-address target-address} CoS CoS {source {mpid source-mp-id | mac-address source-address}}


          Example:
          Device(config-ip-sla)# ethernet y1731 loss LMM domain xxx vlan 12 mpid 34 CoS 4 source mpid 23
                    
           

          Begins configuring a single-ended Ethernet frame loss ratio operation and enters IP SLA Y.1731 loss configuration mode.

          • To configure concurrent operations, use the SLM keyword with this command. Repeat the preceding two steps to configure each concurrent operation to be added to a single IP SLA operation number. Concurrent operations are supported for a given EVC, CoS, and remote-MEP combination, or for multiple MEPs for a given multipoint EVC.
           
          Step 5 aggregate interval seconds


          Example:
          Device(config-sla-y1731-loss)# aggregate interval 900
                    
           

          (Optional) Configures the length of time during which performance measurements are conducted and the results stored.

           
          Step 6 availability algorithm {sliding-window | static-window}


          Example:
          Device(config-sla-y1731-loss)# availability algorithm static-window
                    
           

          (Optional) Specifies availability algorithm used.

           
          Step 7 frame consecutive value


          Example:
          Device(config-sla-y1731-loss)# frame consecutive 10
                    
           

          (Optional) Specifies number of consecutive measurements to be used to determine availability or unavailability status.

           
          Step 8 frame interval milliseconds


          Example:
          Device(config-sla-y1731-loss)# frame interval 100
                    
           

          (Optional) Sets the gap between successive frames.

           
          Step 9 history interval intervals-stored


          Example:
          Device(config-sla-y1731-loss)# history interval 2
                    
           

          (Optional) Sets the number of statistics distributions kept during the lifetime of an IP SLAs Ethernet operation.

           
          Step 10 owner owner-id


          Example:
          Device(config-sla-y1731-delay)# owner admin
                    
           

          (Optional) Configures the owner of an IP SLAs operation.

           
          Step 11 exit


          Example:
          Device(config-sla-y1731-delay)# exit
                    
           

          Exits to IP SLA configuration mode.

           
          Step 12 exit


          Example:
          Device(config-ip-sla)# exit
                    
           

          Exits to global configuration mode.

           
          Step 13 ip sla reaction-configuration operation-number {react {unavailableDS | unavailableSD} [threshold-type {average [number-of-measurements] | consecutive [occurrences] | immediate}] [threshold-value upper-threshold lower-threshold]


          Example:
          Device(config)# ip sla reaction-configuration 11 react unavailableDS
                    
           

          (Optional) Configures proactive threshold monitoring for frame loss measurements.

           
          Step 14 ip sla logging traps


          Example:
          Device(config)# ip sla logging traps
                    
           

          (Optional) Enables IP SLAs syslog messages from CISCO-RTTMON-MIB.

           
          Step 15 exit


          Example:
          Device(config)# exit
                    
           

          Exits to privileged EXEC mode.

           
          What to Do Next

          When you are finished configuring this MEP, see the "Scheduling IP SLAs Operations" section to schedule the operation.

          Scheduling IP SLAs Operations

          Before You Begin
          • All IP Service Level Agreements (SLAs) operations to be scheduled must be already configured.
          • The frequency of all operations scheduled in a multioperation group must be the same.
          • The list of one or more operation ID numbers to be added to a multioperation group must be limited to a maximum of 125 characters in length, including commas (,).
          SUMMARY STEPS

            1.    enable

            2.    configure terminal

            3.    Enter one of the following commands:

            • ip sla schedule operation-number [life {forever | seconds}] [start-time {[hh:mm:ss] [month day | day month] | pending | now | after hh:mm:ss}] [ageout seconds] [recurring]
            • ip sla group schedule group-operation-number operation-id-numbers {schedule-period schedule-period-range | schedule-together} [ageout seconds] [frequency group-operation-frequency] [life {forever | seconds}] [start-time {hh:mm [:ss] [month day | day month] | pending | now | after hh:mm [:ss]}]

            4.    end

            5.    show ip sla group schedule

            6.    show ip sla configuration


          DETAILED STEPS
              Command or Action Purpose
            Step 1 enable


            Example:
            Device> enable
             

            Enables privileged EXEC mode.

            • Enter your password if prompted.
             
            Step 2 configure terminal


            Example:
            Device# configure terminal
             

            Enters global configuration mode.

             
            Step 3 Enter one of the following commands:
            • ip sla schedule operation-number [life {forever | seconds}] [start-time {[hh:mm:ss] [month day | day month] | pending | now | after hh:mm:ss}] [ageout seconds] [recurring]
            • ip sla group schedule group-operation-number operation-id-numbers {schedule-period schedule-period-range | schedule-together} [ageout seconds] [frequency group-operation-frequency] [life {forever | seconds}] [start-time {hh:mm [:ss] [month day | day month] | pending | now | after hh:mm [:ss]}]


            Example:
            Device(config)# ip sla schedule 10 life forever start-time now
            Device(config)# ip sla group schedule 1 3,4,6-9 life forever start-time now 
             
            • Configures the scheduling parameters for an individual IP SLAs operation.
            • Specifies an IP SLAs operation group number and the range of operation numbers for a multioperation scheduler.
             
            Step 4 end


            Example:
            Device(config)# end
             

            Exits global configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

             
            Step 5 show ip sla group schedule


            Example:
            Device# show ip sla group schedule
             

            (Optional) Displays IP SLAs group schedule details.

             
            Step 6 show ip sla configuration


            Example:
            Device# show ip sla configuration
             

            (Optional) Displays IP SLAs configuration details.

             

            Configuration Examples for IP SLAs Metro-Ethernet 3.0 (ITU-T Y.1731) Operations

            Example: Dual-Ended Ethernet Delay Operation

            The following sample output shows the configuration, including default values, of a receiver MEP on the responder device for a dual-ended Ethernet delay or delay variation operation:

            Router# show ip sla configuration 501 
            
            IP SLAs Infrastructure Engine-III
            Entry number: 501
            Owner: admin
            Tag: 
            Operation timeout (milliseconds): 5000
            Ethernet Y1731 Delay Operation
            Frame Type: 1DM
            Domain: xxx
            ReceiveOnly: TRUE
            Evc: yyy
            Local Mpid: 101
            CoS: 3
               Max Delay: 5000
            Threshold (milliseconds): 5000
            .
            .
            .
            Statistics Parameters
              Aggregation Period: 900
              Frame offset: 1
              Distribution Delay One-Way: 
               Number of Bins 10
               Bin Boundaries: 5000,10000,15000,20000,25000,30000,35000,40000,45000,-1
              Distribution Delay-Variation One-Way: 
               Number of Bins 10
               Bin Boundaries: 5000,10000,15000,20000,25000,30000,35000,40000,45000,-1
            History
              Number of intervals: 2
             
                  

            The following sample output shows the configuration, including default values, of the sender MEP for a dual-ended IP SLAs Ethernet delay or delay variation operation:

            Router# show ip sla configuration 500 
            
            IP SLAs Infrastructure Engine-III
            Entry number: 500
            Owner: 
            Tag: 
            Operation timeout (milliseconds): 5000
            Ethernet Y1731 Delay Operation
            Frame Type: 1DM
            Domain: yyy
            ReceiveOnly: FALSE
            Evc: xxx
            Target Mpid: 101
            Source Mpid: 100
            CoS: 3
               Request size (Padding portion): 64
               Frame Interval: 1000
            Threshold (milliseconds): 5000
            .
            .
            .
            Statistics Parameters
              Aggregation Period: 900
              Frame offset: 1
            History
              Number of intervals: 22

            Example: Sender MEP for a Single-Ended Ethernet Delay Operation

            The following sample output shows the configuration, including default values, of the sender MEP for a single-ended IP SLAs Ethernet delay operation:

            Router# show ip sla configuration 10 
            
            IP SLAs Infrastructure Engine-III
            Entry number: 10
            Owner: 
            Tag: 
            Operation timeout (milliseconds): 5000
            Ethernet Y1731 Delay Operation
            Frame Type: DMM
            Domain: xxx
            Vlan: yyy
            Target Mpid: 101
            Source Mpid: 100
            CoS: 4
               Max Delay: 5000
               Request size (Padding portion): 64
               Frame Interval: 1000
               Clock: Not In Sync
            Threshold (milliseconds): 5000
            .
            .
            .
            Statistics Parameters
              Aggregation Period: 900
              Frame offset: 1
              Distribution Delay Two-Way: 
               Number of Bins 10
               Bin Boundaries: 5000,10000,15000,20000,25000,30000,35000,40000,45000,-1
              Distribution Delay-Variation Two-Way: 
               Number of Bins 10
               Bin Boundaries: 5000,10000,15000,20000,25000,30000,35000,40000,45000,-1
            History
              Number of intervals: 2
                  

            Example: CoS-Level Monitoring for MEPs in Single-Ended Ethernet Frame Loss Ratio Operation

            You must enable CoS-level monitoring for the sender and destination MEPs associated with an IP SLAs Metro-Ethernet 3.0 (ITU-T Y.1731) frame loss probe. The following sample output shows how to configure probe-monitoring frames on an EVC with CoS 5:

            Device-1# show running interface gigabitethernet2/3
            
            interface GigabitEthernet2/3
             service instance 101 ethernet evc-sample-1
              encapsulation dot1q 777
              xconnect 102.102.102.102 777777 encapsulation mpls
              cfm mep domain md-sample mpid 1
               monitor loss counter priority 5
            

            The following sample output shows how to configure an MEP for monitoring frame loss for frames on an EVC regardless of the CoS value (any CoS or Aggregate CoS cases).

            Device-1# show running interface gigabitethernet2/3
            
            interface GigabitEthernet2/3
             service instance 102 ethernet evc-sample-2
              encapsulation dot1q 888
              xconnect 102.102.102.102 888888 encapsulation mpls
              cfm mep domain md-sample mpid 1
               COS 5
               monitor loss counter
            

            Example: Sender MEP for a Single-Ended Ethernet Frame Loss Operation

            The following output shows the configuration, including default values, of the sender MEP in a basic single-ended IP SLAs Ethernet frame loss ratio operation with a start-time of now:

            Router# show ip sla configuration 11 
            
            IP SLAs Infrastructure Engine-III
            Entry number: 11
            Owner: 
            Tag: 
            Operation timeout (milliseconds): 5000
            Ethernet Y1731 Loss Operation
            Frame Type: LMM
            Domain: xxx
            Vlan: 12
            Target Mpid: 34
            Source Mpid: 23
            CoS: 4
               Request size (Padding portion): 0
               Frame Interval: 1000
            Schedule:
               Operation frequency (seconds): 60  (not considered if randomly scheduled)
               Next Scheduled Start Time: Start Time already passed
               Group Scheduled : FALSE
               Randomly Scheduled : FALSE
               Life (seconds): 3600
               Entry Ageout (seconds): never
               Recurring (Starting Everyday): FALSE
               Status of entry (SNMP RowStatus): ActiveThreshold (milliseconds): 5000
            Statistics Parameters
              Aggregation Period: 900
              Frame consecutive: 10
              Availability algorithm: static-window
            History
              Number of intervals: 2
                  

            Additional References for IP SLAs Metro-Ethernet 3.0 (ITU-T Y.1731) Operations

            Related Documents

            Related Topic

            Document Title

            Cisco IOS commands

            Cisco IOS Master Commands List, All Releases

            Cisco IOS Carrier Ethernet commands

            Cisco IOS Carrier Ethernet Command Reference

            Cisco IOS IP SLAs commands

            Cisco IOS IP SLAs Command Reference

            Ethernet CFM

            “Configuring Ethernet Connectivity Fault Management in a Service Provider Network” module of the Cisco IOS Carrier Ethernet Configuration Guide

            Network Time Protocol (NTP)

            “Configuring NTP” module of the Cisco IOS Network Management Configuration Guide

            Proactive threshold monitoring for Cisco IOS IP SLAs

            “Configuring Proactive Threshold Monitoring of IP SLAs Operations” module of the Cisco IOS IP SLAs Configuration Guide

            Standards and RFCs

            Standard/RFC

            Title

            ITU-T Y.1731

            OAM functions and mechanisms for Ethernet-based networks

            No specific RFCs are supported by the features in this document.

            --

            MIBs

            MIB

            MIBs Link

            • CISCO-IPSLA-ETHERNET-MIB
            • CISCO-RTTMON-MIB

            To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco software releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

            http:/​/​www.cisco.com/​go/​mibs

            Technical Assistance

            Description

            Link

            The Cisco Support and Documentation website provides online resources to download documentation, software, and tools. Use these resources to install and configure the software and to troubleshoot and resolve technical issues with Cisco products and technologies. Access to most tools on the Cisco Support and Documentation website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

            http:/​/​www.cisco.com/​cisco/​web/​support/​index.html

            Feature Information for IP SLAs Metro-Ethernet 3.0 (ITU-T Y.1731) Operations

            The following table provides release information about the feature or features described in this module. This table lists only the software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that software release train also support that feature.

            Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/​go/​cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

            Table 1 Feature Information for IP SLAs Metro-Ethernet 3.0 (ITU-T Y.1731)

            Feature Name

            Releases

            Feature Information

            IP SLAs Metro-Ethernet 3.0 (ITU-T Y.1731)

            15.1(2)S

            This feature provides the capability to gather Ethernet-layer network performance metrics, such as frame delay, frame delay variation, and frame loss ratio (as defined by the ITU-T Y.1737 networking standard), for assisting with IP SLAs assurance and capacity planning .

            The following commands were introduced or modified: aggregate interval, availability, distribution, ethernet y1731 delay, ethernet y1731 delay receive, ethernet y1731 loss , frame consecutive, frame interval, frame offset, frame size, history interval, ip sla reaction-configuration, max-delay, owner, show ip sla history interval.

            IPSLA Support for ETH-SLM (Ethernet Synthetic Loss Measurement in Y1731)

            Cisco IOS XE Release 3.8S

            15.3(2)S

            Y.1731 Performance Monitoring (PM) provides a standard Ethernet PM function that includes measurement of Ethernet frame delay, frame delay variation, frame loss, and frame throughput measurements specified by the ITU-T Y-1731 standard and interpreted by the Metro Ethernet Forum (MEF) standards group.

            In Cisco IOS XE Release 3.8S, support was added for the Cisco ASR 903 Router.

            In Cisco IOS Release 15.3(2)S, support was added for the Cisco ASR 901 Router.

            Y1731 MIB Support through existing IPSLA MIBs

            15.2(2)S

            Cisco IOS XE Release 3.8S

            Support was added for reporting threshold events and collecting performance statistics for IP SLAs Metro-Ethernet 3.0 (ITU-T Y.1731) operations using SNMP.

            Y.1731 Performance Monitoring

            15.2(1)S

            Support was added for Cisco ME 3600X Series and 3800X Series Ethernet Access Switches.