Cisco IPICS Troubleshooting Guide, Release 2.1(1)
Understanding the Cisco IPICS Logs
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Understanding the Cisco IPICS Logs

Table Of Contents

Understanding the Cisco IPICS Logs

Understanding and Locating the Cisco IPICS Log Files

Generating and Modifying the PMC Log Levels

Understanding PMC Debug Log Information

Using the Debugging Log Level

Checking CSA Logs

Viewing the CSA Messages from the CSA Utility

Opening the CSA Security Event Log with CLI Commands


Understanding the Cisco IPICS Logs


This chapter describes the logs that are available in Cisco IPICS, and how to retrieve and understand the information that is contained in the logs. The logs can help you to troubleshoot problems that may occur with Cisco IPICS and the PMC.

This chapter includes the following sections:

Understanding and Locating the Cisco IPICS Log Files

Generating and Modifying the PMC Log Levels

Checking CSA Logs

Understanding and Locating the Cisco IPICS Log Files

The Cisco IPICS log files contain information that can be used for auditing or tracking the usage of Cisco IPICS. The log files can also help you to determine the root cause of an error.

Table 7-1 lists the Cisco IPICS logs.

Table 7-1 Cisco IPICS Log Files 

Log Name
Description

catalina.out

The catalina.out file contains information about the Cisco IPICS web-based processes, including the tomcat service.

The catalina.out file is located in the /root/tomcat/current/logs directory.

Cisco IPICS Activity Log

The Cisco IPICS activity logs store information about activities relating to channels, users, and VTGs.

To download and view the information in the activity log in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet format, log in to the Administration Console as the ipics user, navigate to the Administration > Activity Log Management > Logs window, and click Download Activity Logs. You can change the information that Cisco IPICS saves in the activity log by navigating to Administration > Activity Log Options.

For more information about the activity log, refer to the "Performing Cisco IPICS System Administrator Tasks" chapter in the Cisco IPICS Server Administration Guide, Release 2.1(1).

csalog

This file provides CSA startup and shutdown history. The csalog file and the securitylog.txt file contain the logging information for CSA.

The csalog file is located in the /var/log directory.

CisconnnMIVR
nnnn.log

These log files provide you with information about call signaling and Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) information for the policy engine.

Cisco IPICS names the initial file Cisco001MIVR0001.log. Subsequent files are named Cisco001MIVR0002.log, Cisco001MIVR0003.log, and so on.

You configure the size of each CisconnnMIVRnnnn.log file, the total number of files that Cisco IPICS retains, and the information that Cisco IPICS logs in these files, by navigating to Policy Engine > Dial Engine > Control Center > Tracing in the Administration Console and changing the information in the Trace File Configuration and Trace Settings areas.

To download and view the Cisco001MIVR0001.log file, log in to the Administration Console as the ipics user, navigate to the Policy Engine > Dial Engine > Status window and click SIP Subsystem or Policy Engine Subsystem; then, click Cisco001MIVR0001.log. To download and view subsequent log files, navigate to the SIP subsystem or Policy Engine Subsystem window and click on the CisconnnMIVRnnnn.log file that you want to view.

The CisconnnMIVRnnnn.log files are located in the /opt/cisco/ippe/log/MIVR directory.

CisconnnMVCD
nnnn.log

These files provide you with error and status information for the cluster view daemon (CVD) component of the policy engine. The CVD is the node manager for the policy engine and is responsible for managing the startup process for the Cisco IPICS dial engine service.

Cisco IPICS names the initial file Cisco001MVCD0001.log. Subsequent files are named Cisco001MVCD0002.log, Cisco001MVCD0003.log, and so on.

To download and view the Cisco001MVCD0001.log file, log in to the Administration Console as the ipics user, navigate to the Policy Engine > Control Center > Status > Cluster View Daemon window, and click Cisco001MVCD0001.log. To download and view subsequent log files, navigate to the SIP subsystem or Policy Engine Subsystem window and click on the CisconnnMVCDnnnn.log file that you want to view.

The CisconnnMVCDnnnn.log files are located in the /opt/cisco/ippe/log/MVCD directory.

db-maintenance.log

The db-maintenance.log file contains records of the database backup and restore operations.

To download and view the db-maintenance.log file, log in to the Administration Console as the ipics user, navigate to the Administration > Database Management > Log window and click Download.

The db-maintenance.log file is located in the /opt/cisco/ipics/database/logs directory.

For more information about the db-maintenance.log file, refer to the "Performing Cisco IPICS Database Backup and Restore Operations" chapter in the Cisco IPICS Server Administration Guide, Release 2.1(1).

dbm_log_
archive.log.gz

This file is a compressed file that contains archived data from previous db-maintenance.log daily log files.

You can download the dbm_log_archive.log.gz file and save it to your PC by clicking the Download button in the Administration > Database Management > Log window. Once you download the files to your PC, you can view them as a text file.

The dbm_log_archive.log.gz file is located in the /opt/cisco/ipics/database/logs directory.

For more information about this archive file, refer to the "Performing Cisco IPICS Database Backup and Restore Operations" chapter in the Cisco IPICS Server Administration Guide, Release 2.1(1).

diagnostics.log

The diagnostics.log file contains messages that are related to the database subsystem, and is located in the /opt/cisco/ipics/database/logs directory.

driverManagern.log

The driverManager logs contain policy engine-specific information for the media that are associated with each call.

To configure the level of detail that the driverManager logs capture, navigate to the Policy Engine > Control Center > Tracing window in the Administration Console and check or uncheck the LIB_MEDIA check boxes.

Cisco IPICS sets the size and total number of driverManager files; you cannot change these settings.

When a log file reaches the configured maximum size, Cisco IPICS closes that log file and creates a new empty log file, and increments the number of the new log file by one.

The driverManagern.log files are located in the /opt/cisco/ippe/log/MIVR directory.

install.log

The install.log file shows details of the Cisco IPICS operating system installation, including the packages that were installed and any errors that occurred during the installation.

The install.log file is located in the /root directory.

ipics.log

The ipics.log file contains messages regarding all transactions that occur in the Cisco IPICS server. For example, this file contains information about the tomcat service, policy engine entries, or external notifications. The information that is contained in this log file can help you to troubleshoot problems that you might encounter with Cisco IPICS.

Each message is marked with a severity level. There are seven severities, from TRACE to FATAL. By default, the ipics.log file captures all logging from the INFO to the FATAL level.

You can view recent system logs in the Serviceability > System Logs window of the Administration Console. To download and view the information in the ipics.log, navigate to the Serviceability > System Logs window and click Download.

For more information about accessing and downloading the ipics.log file, refer to the "Understanding Cisco IPICS Serviceability and Diagnostic Information" chapter in the Cisco IPICS Server Administration Guide, Release 2.1(1).

The ipics.log file is located in the /root/tomcat/current/logs directory.

ipics_audit.log

The ipics_audit.log file records user activity. This activity includes successful and unsuccessful attempts by users to log in to the server, and actions that Cisco IPICS users perform when they are logged in to the Administration Console.

The ipics_audit.log file is located in the /root/tomcat/current/logs directory.

ipics-install-log.txt

The ipics-install-log.txt file shows details of the Cisco IPICS server software installation, including the packages that were installed, the user names that were created, and any errors that occurred during the installation.

The install.log file is located in the /var/opt/CSCOipics/run/yyyymmddhhmmss/ipics-install-log.txt directory,

where:

yyyymmddhhmmss represents the date and time that you performed the server software installation.

ipics_pmc.log

This log file collects information for PMC users. Cisco IPICS updates the log file when PMC users log in and log out, or when users update their PMC.

The ipics_pmc.log file is located in the /root/tomcat/current/logs directory.

Note To retrieve additional PMC data for a user, you can upload logging information from a PMC to the server. For more information, see the "Generating and Modifying the PMC Log Levels" section.

ipics_rms.log

The ipics_rms.log file collects log data for the RMS components that are part of the Cisco IPICS system.

The ipics_rms.log file is located in the /root/tomcat/current/logs directory.

lmgrd.log

The lmgrd.log file contains information regarding Cisco IPICS licenses and the license manager, which is the component that manages the licenses. Cisco IPICS logs any actions that the license manager performs in the lmgrd.log file.

You can download and view the lmgrd.log file by accessing the Administration Console as the ipics user, then navigating to the Serviceability > Diagnostics window and clicking Download Diagnostic Results. You receive a zipped file that contains the lmgrd.log and ipics.log files, along with the information that displays in the Diagnostics window.

The lmgrd.log file is located in the /opt/cisco/ipics/license/versions/2.1/logs directory.

messages

The messages file contains information about the following events:

Messages that are related to CSA processing

Users who have logged in to the Cisco IPICS server using SSH

Processes that have stopped or started

The messages file is located in the /var/log directory.

After seven days, CSA creates a new log and renames the previous log with a numbered extension so that the logs are named messages.0, messages.1, messages.2, and so on.

ntpsetup.log

This file records Network Time Protocol (NTP) configuration-related information.

The netsetup.log file is located in the /var/log directory.

Note You configure NTP by entering the ntpsetup command. For more information, see the "Configuring NTP on the Cisco IPICS Server with the ntpsetup Tool" section on page 6-5.

securitylog.txt

This file includes logs of rule violations and other security-related events, and is the primary file that CSA uses for security event logging.

The securitylog.txt file is located in the /var/log directory.

For more information about the securitylog.txt file, see the "Opening the CSA Security Event Log with CLI Commands" section

tacout

The tacout file contains the latest diagnostic summary information for Cisco IPICS.

The tacout file is located in the /root/tomcat/current/logs directory.

For more information about the tacout file, including instructions for downloading this file, refer to the "Understanding Cisco IPICS Serviceability and Diagnostic Information" chapter of the Cisco IPICS Server Administration Guide, Release 2.1(1).


Generating and Modifying the PMC Log Levels

The PMC application generates logs that can help you analyze user activity and troubleshoot problems that you may encounter when you use the application. The PMC writes the logs to the hard disk of the PMC client machine, so that the application can continue logging if the communication to the server is disrupted.

Cisco IPICS retrieves logs from the PMC if one of the following conditions are met:

When you click Get Logs from PMC from the User Management > Users > Username > PMC tab.


Note You can prevent the server from uploading the logs from the PMC user by navigating to Settings > Channels in the PMC application and checking the Optimize for low bandwidth check box. You should check this box if you are using the PMC in a low bandwidth, high latency network environment. The PMC still generates logs on the hard drive of the PMC client machine.


When you set the logs to be uploaded to the Cisco IPICS server automatically when the PMC user logs in, and then out of, a session (this event is called rollover).

Rollover occurs for the Authentication, Channel Statistics and User Interface logs, but not for the Debug Log. In the case of the Debug Log, the file continues to accumulate data until the server requests that the file be uploaded. For more information about a rollover occurrence, refer to the "Using the PMC Application Logs" chapter in the Cisco IPICS PMC Installation and User Guide, Release 2.1(1).

Users can modify the PMC logs in the following ways:

The PMC user can adjust settings within the PMC application. For more information about adjusting settings in the PMC application, refer to the "Using the PMC Application Logs" chapter in the Cisco IPICS PMC Installation and User Guide, Release 2.1(1).

From the Administration Console, the Cisco IPICS operator can modify the log settings in the User Management > Users > Username > PMC tab. See the "Performing Cisco IPICS Operator Tasks" chapter in the Cisco IPICS Server Administration Guide, Release 2.1(1) for more information about setting and modifying the log settings.

For a list of the log files and their descriptions, refer to the "Using the PMC Application Logs" chapter in the Cisco IPICS PMC Installation and User Guide, Release 2.1(1).

You can download activity logs for PMC users in the Administration > Activity Log Management > Logs tab of the Administration Console. The information that you download includes details about user associations to channels and VTGs, channel activation activities, and conference participation. You configure the activity logs to capture the PMC information in the Administration > Activity Log Options window. For information about the activity logs, refer to the "Performing Cisco IPICS System Administrator Tasks" chapter in the Cisco IPICS Server Administration Guide, Release 2.1(1).

This section contains the following topics:

Understanding PMC Debug Log Information

Using the Debugging Log Level

Understanding PMC Debug Log Information

Cisco IPICS organizes the DebugLog.txt data fields into three categories: User Interface, Signaling, and Media. These data fields are then divided into three logging levels, so that you can capture more precisely the debugging information that you need. The Debug Log categories contain the following information:

User Interface—These fields provide information about aspects of the user interface for the PMC. The category includes everything that the user can see on the PMC application, such as the buttons and volume controls. The User Interface category also includes information for debugging communication problems with the Cisco IPICS server.

Table 7-2 describes the information that Cisco IPICS gathers, by log level:

Table 7-2 User Interface Log Levels 

Logging
Level
Purpose

Low

Cisco IPICS retrieves information for the following problems at this logging level:

The user cannot log in

The user has difficulty activating channels

The user cannot close the PMC

The PMC unexpectedly goes into offline mode

The server is reporting errors

Medium

Cisco IPICS reports information that can help translate XML communication from the server.

High

Cisco IPICS gathers information regarding authentication, the GUI, and the PMC server update function.


Signaling—The Signaling category includes fields that provide information about the starting and stopping of voice channels. You would turn Signaling on when a user is not able to activate or deactivate a PMC channel.

Table 7-3 describes the information that Cisco IPICS reports by signaling levels.

.

Table 7-3 Signaling Log Levels

Logging
Level
Purpose

Low and Medium

Messages at these log levels describe issues with the high level state machines.

High

Messages at this level report issues with SIP messaging.


Media—These fields involve items related to the voice stream, such as the packets and the codecs that handle the data between end points. You would use Media information to diagnose any voice quality problem.

Table 7-4 describes the type of information you can gather with the Media log levels.

Table 7-4 Media Log Levels

Logging
Level
Purpose

Low

This information provides receive (RX) and transmit (TX) networking statistics.

Medium

This information can help you diagnose audio mixing issues, such as the combining of audio signals in a channel or VTG.

High

This information provides you with information regarding the conversion of audio using audio codecs.


Using the Debugging Log Level

When you choose to begin logging debug information for a PMC user, you select one or more of the information categories, each of which includes a list of debugging fields. You choose the category and logging level as it corresponds to the fields that you want to capture in the log.

Table 7-5 shows the fields that are included in each logging level.

The log levels for each category are cumulative. If you choose the Medium level for a category, the PMC writes Low- and Medium-level logs into the DebugLog.txt file. When you set the logging to High, you capture all the fields for that category.


Tip Always start debugging by collecting Low-level log data, which may provide all of the data that you require. Using this setting allows you to gather several days of log activity without filling the hard disk of the PMC client machine. If you cannot locate the cause of the problem, you can next set the logging to Medium or High.

Use the High level only for short durations. If you use the High level, you should closely monitor the hard drive of the user PMC client machine so that the High-level logs do not overwhelm the client hard drive or degrade the performance of the PMC.



Caution Because of the large amount of information that the system collects and generates when you set all of the debug options, Cisco recommends that you use debug logging only to isolate specific problems. When you complete your debugging tasks, be sure to turn off debug logging by clearing the debug log.

Table 7-5 lists the debug categories, and the fields and log levels that are associated with each category.

Table 7-5 Debug Log Fields and Log Levels  

Category
Field
Log Level

User Interface

channel-activation-debug

Low

error

exit-debug

sending-source-debug

sock-init-cleanup

xml-events

Medium

xml-post

xml-vars

Auth

High

critical-section-tune-debug

download-debug

gui-debug

server-task-debug

server-verbose

xml-deck

Signaling

cc

Low

fim

fsm

gsm

lsm

multicast-signaling-debug

sip-reg-state

sip-state

vcm

sip-task

Medium

sip-trx

Auth

High

cc-msg

sip-messages

Media

AMuteTrans

Low

AudioSink

AudioSource

MediaStream

OpenALAudioSink

RTPAudioSink

RTPAudioSockets

RTPAudioSource

RTPAudioStream

RTPJitterBuf

sock-init-Cleanup

WaveAudioSource

WaveFileSource

RxStats

TxStats

Media

ACMTrans

Medium

ASL

AudioBufferAndPlayback

dsp

FilePlay

PCMMixer

PCMVolTrans

PCMVolumeMax

RTPAudioStreamMgr

RxDetailStats

VAD

Media

AudioDump

High

AudioSamp

AudioSampLost

AudioSampMgr

AudioTrans

AutomaticGainControl

dtmf

FIRTrans

FSAudioBuf

G7112PCMTrans

G7232PCMTrans

G729A2PCMTrans

Limiter

PCM2G711Trans

PCM2G723Trans

PCM2G729ATrans

RTCPPacket

TimeSample

TimeRxSample

TimeTxSample


Checking CSA Logs

If CSA denies a system action, the process generates a message that you can access in one of the following ways:

You can open the CSA Utility to view the messages in the Message pane

You can view the Security Events Log, which includes all security events that have occurred on the system

You can navigate to the /var/log directory, and view the current and archived CSA logs

This section includes the following topics:

Viewing the CSA Messages from the CSA Utility

Opening the CSA Security Event Log with CLI Commands

Viewing the CSA Messages from the CSA Utility

To view status messages in the CSA utility, perform the following procedure:

Procedure


Step 1 Double-click the CSA tray icon (the red flag) to open the CSA Utility.

The CSA Utility displays.

Step 2 To access the Security Logs, click Messages.

Status messages display in the Messages pane.

Step 3 To view the CSA log, click View Log.

The current Security Events Log displays in a text viewer window.


Opening the CSA Security Event Log with CLI Commands

The /var/log directory in the Cisco IPICS server contains the current and archived CSA logs.

The file name of the log that contains security events is securitylog.txt. When the securitylog.txt file reaches a size of 100 MB, CSA creates a new log, and archives and renames the previous log file. Archived log files are named securitylog-yyyymmdd-hhmm.txt,

where:

yyyymmdd-hhmm is the date that CSA archived the log file.

To view the securitylog.txt file by using CLI commands, perform the following procedure:

Procedure


Step 1 Log in to the Cisco IPICS server by using the root user ID.

Step 2 To navigate to the /var/log directory, enter the following command:

[root] #cd /var/log

Step 3 To view the security event log files in the directory, enter the following command:

[root] #ls -al securitylog*

Files that begin with the name securitylog display.

Step 4 To view the contents of a log file, enter the following command:

[root] #cat securitylog[-yyyymmdd-hhmm].txt

Where:

yyyymmdd-hhmm is the date of the archived log file.


For information about the messages that appear in the CSA logs, refer to the CSA documentation at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/secursw/ps5057/
tsd_products_support_series_home.html