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PA-2JT2 6.3 MHz Serial Port Adapter Installation and Configuration

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PA-2JT2 6.3-MHz Serial Port Adapter Installation and Configuration

Table Of Contents

PA-2JT2 6.3-MHz Serial Port Adapter Installation and Configuration

Use this configuration note in conjunction with the configuration note Second-Generation Versatile Interface Processor (VIP2) Installation and ConfigurationDocument Contents

Related Documentation

JT2 Port Adapter Installation Prerequisites

Software and Hardware Prerequisites

List of Parts and Tools

FCC Class B Compliance

Safety Guidelines

Safety Warnings

Electrical Equipment Guidelines

Telephone Wiring Guidelines

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

What Is the JT2 Port Adapter?

Port Adapter Locations on the VIP2

JT2 Port Adapter LEDs

JT2 Port Adapter Interface Connectors and Cables

JT2 Frame Format Description

VIP2 and the JT2 Port Adapter

Attaching JT2 Port Adapter Interface Cables

Configuring the JT2 Interfaces

Interface Processor Slot, Port Adapter Slot, and JT2 Interface Port Numbering

Configuring an Interface

Configuring CRC5

Checking the Configuration

Obtaining Documentation

World Wide Web

Documentation CD-ROM

Ordering Documentation

Documentation Feedback

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Cisco.com

Technical Assistance Center

Cisco TAC Web Site

Cisco TAC Escalation Center


PA-2JT2 6.3-MHz Serial Port Adapter Installation and Configuration


Product Numbers: PA-2JT2 and PA-2JT2=

This configuration note describes how to install and configure the Japan T2 Line (JT2) 6.3-megahertz (MHz), 2-port, serial port adapter (PA-2JT2[=]), which is used on the second-generation Versatile Interface Processor (VIP2) in all Cisco 7500 series and in Cisco 7000 series routers using the 7000 Series Route Switch Processor (RSP7000) and 7000 Series Chassis Interface (RSP7000CI). (For complete and specific compatibility requirements, refer to the section "Software and Hardware Prerequisites" on page 3.)

Use this configuration note in conjunction with the configuration note Second-Generation Versatile Interface Processor (VIP2) Installation and ConfigurationDocument Contents

This configuration note is organized into the following sections:

Related Documentation

JT2 Port Adapter Installation Prerequisites

What Is the JT2 Port Adapter?

VIP2 and the JT2 Port Adapter

Obtaining Documentation

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Related Documentation

The documentation listed below is available online, on the Documentation CD-ROM, or as printed documents.

Your router, switch, or gateway and the Cisco IOS software running on it contain extensive features and functionality, which are documented in the following resources:

Cisco IOS software:

For configuration information and support, refer to the modular configuration and modular command reference publications in the Cisco IOS software configuration documentation set that corresponds to the software release installed on your Cisco hardware.

To check the minimum software requirements of Cisco IOS software with the hardware installed on your router, Cisco maintains the Software Advisor tool on Cisco.com: http://www.cisco.com/cgi-bin/Support/CompNav/Index.pl. You must be a registered user on Cisco.com to access this tool.


Note You can access Cisco IOS software configuration and hardware installation and maintenance documentation on the World Wide Web at http://www.cisco.com/public/countries_languages.shtml.


Cisco 7000 series routers:

For hardware installation and maintenance information, refer to the following publications:

Cisco 7000 Hardware Installation and Maintenance that shipped with your router.

Second-Generation Versatile Interface Processor (VIP2) Installation and Configuration

Fourth-Generation Versatile Interface Processor (VIP4) Installation and Configuration

Versatile Interface Processor (VIP6-80) Installation and Configuration

Cisco 7500 series routers:

For hardware installation and maintenance information, refer to the following publications:

Cisco 7500 Installation and Configuration or the quick start guide that shipped with your router

Second-Generation Versatile Interface Processor (VIP2) Installation and Configuration

Fourth-Generation Versatile Interface Processor (VIP4) Installation and Configuration

Versatile Interface Processor (VIP6-80) Installation and Configuration

For international agency compliance, safety, and statutory information for WAN interfaces:

Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for the Cisco 7000 Series Routers

Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for the Cisco 7500 Series Routers

Site Preparation and Safety Guide

To view Cisco documentation or obtain general information about the documentation, refer to the following sections:

Obtaining Documentation

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Customer service at 800 553-6387 or 408 526-7208. Customer service hours are 5:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Pacific time, Monday through Friday (excluding Cisco-observed holidays). You can also send e-mail to cs-rep@cisco.com.

JT2 Port Adapter Installation Prerequisites

This section provides specific information you need to ensure a successful installation, and the following information is included:

Software and Hardware Prerequisites

List of Parts and Tools, page 3

FCC Class B Compliance, page 4

Safety Guidelines, page 4

Port Adapter Locations on the VIP2, page 8

Software and Hardware Prerequisites

For JT2 port adapters installed on the VIP2-40 in Cisco 7000 series or Cisco 7500 series routers, Cisco IOS Release 11.1(12)CA1, or later, is required.

For JT2 port adapters installed on the VIP2-50 in Cisco 7000 series or Cisco 7500 series routers, Cisco IOS Release 11.1(14)CA, or later, is required.


Note At a minimum, you must use the VIP2-40 (with 2 MB of SRAM and 32 MB of DRAM) or VIP2-50 (with 4 to 8 MB of SRAM and 32 to 128 MB of SDRAM) for use with one or two JT2 port adapters. We do not recommend the use of any other VIP2 model with PA-2JT2.



Caution To prevent system problems, do not operate the VIP2 in Cisco 7000 series systems without the RSP7000 and RSP7000CI. The VIP2 will not operate properly with the Route Processor (RP), Switch Processor (SP), or Silicon Switch Processor (SSP) installed in the earlier host Cisco 7000 series routers.

List of Parts and Tools

You need the following tools and parts to install a JT2 port adapter. If you need additional equipment, contact a service representative for ordering information.

PA-2JT2(=) and a VIP2-40(=) motherboard, with at least one available port adapter slot, and, a Cisco 7500 series router with at least one available interface processor slot, or a Cisco 7000 series router (with an RSP7000 and RSP7000CI installed) with at least one available interface processor slot.

For specific VIP2 model requirements, refer to the note in the section "Software and Hardware Prerequisites" on page 3.

The appropriate Cisco IOS release loaded on your router. (For Cisco IOS software prerequisites, refer to the section "Software and Hardware Prerequisites" on page 3.)

One pair of unbalanced, 75-ohm (± 5% at 1 MHz), coaxial cables (with BNC connections) for each interface port, appropriate for the port adapter interfaces on your JT2 port adapter. (75-ohm coaxial cables are not supplied by Cisco systems; these cables are available from commercial cable vendors.)

The 75-ohm coaxial BNC connections must conform to JIS C5412-1976 high-frequency coaxial C02-type connectors, which are equivalent to MIL C 3608 BNC connectors and coaxial cables. (For specific cable requirements, refer to the section "JT2 Port Adapter Interface Connectors and Cables" on page 10.)

Further, the 75-ohm coaxial cables must have ferrite sleeves around them to reduce the effects of electromagnetic interference (EMI). Four ferrite sleeves are included with your JT2 port adapter have the following specifications: 275 ohms @ 100 MHz.

A B-type or C-type data service unit (DSU) with a 75-ohm, coaxial BNC input and an optical fiber output, to which you attach the 75-ohm coaxial cables from the receive (RX) and transmit (TX) ports on the JT2 port adapter. (Older A-type DSUs are not supported with PA-2JT2.)

Your DSU must be capable of, and set to accept, external grounding because the JT2 port adapter's TX and RX connections are grounded at the router-chassis side.

Number 1 Phillips and a 3/16-inch, flat-blade screwdriver.

Your own ESD-prevention equipment or the disposable grounding wrist strap included with all upgrade kits, FRUs, and spares.

FCC Class B Compliance

The equipment described in this publication generates and might radiate radio-frequency energy. If it is not installed in accordance with Cisco's installation instructions, it might cause interference with radio and television reception. This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device in accordance with the specifications in part 15 of the FCC rules. These specifications are designed to provide reasonable protection against such interference in a residential installation. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation.

You can determine whether your equipment is causing interference by turning it off. If the interference stops, it was probably caused by the Cisco equipment or one of its peripheral devices. If the equipment causes interference to radio or television reception, try to correct the interference by using one or more of the following measures:

Turn the television or radio antenna until the interference stops.

Move the equipment to one side or the other of the television or radio.

Move the equipment farther away from the television or radio.

Plug the equipment into an outlet that is on a different circuit from the television or radio. (That is, make certain the equipment and the television or radio are on circuits controlled by different circuit breakers or fuses.)

Modifications to this product not authorized by Cisco Systems, Inc. could void the FCC approval and negate your authority to operate the product.

Safety Guidelines

This section provides safety guidelines you should follow when working with any equipment that connects to electrical power or telephone wiring.

Safety Warnings

Safety warnings appear throughout this publication in procedures that, if performed incorrectly, might harm you. A warning symbol precedes each warning statement.

Warning This warning symbol means danger. You are in a situation that could cause bodily injury. Before you work on any equipment, be aware of the hazards involved with electrical circuitry and be familiar with standard practices for preventing accidents. To see translations of the warnings that appear in this publication, refer to the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information document that accompanied this device.

Waarschuwing

Dit waarschuwingssymbool betekent gevaar. U verkeert in een situatie die lichamelijk letsel kan veroorzaken. Voordat u aan enige apparatuur gaat werken, dient u zich bewust te zijn van de bij elektrische schakelingen betrokken risico's en dient u op de hoogte te zijn van standaard maatregelen om ongelukken te voorkomen. Voor vertalingen van de waarschuwingen die in deze publicatie verschijnen, kunt u het document Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information (Informatie over naleving van veiligheids- en andere voorschriften) raadplegen dat bij dit toestel is ingesloten.

Varoitus

Tämä varoitusmerkki merkitsee vaaraa. Olet tilanteessa, joka voi johtaa ruumiinvammaan. Ennen kuin työskentelet minkään laitteiston parissa, ota selvää sähkökytkentöihin liittyvistä vaaroista ja tavanomaisista onnettomuuksien ehkäisykeinoista. Tässä julkaisussa esiintyvien varoitusten käännökset löydät laitteen mukana olevasta Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information -kirjasesta (määräysten noudattaminen ja tietoa turvallisuudesta).

Attention

Ce symbole d'avertissement indique un danger. Vous vous trouvez dans une situation pouvant causer des blessures ou des dommages corporels. Avant de travailler sur un équipement, soyez conscient des dangers posés par les circuits électriques et familiarisez-vous avec les procédures couramment utilisées pour éviter les accidents. Pour prendre connaissance des traductions d'avertissements figurant dans cette publication, consultez le document Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information (Conformité aux règlements et consignes de sécurité) qui accompagne cet appareil.

Warnung

Dieses Warnsymbol bedeutet Gefahr. Sie befinden sich in einer Situation, die zu einer Körperverletzung führen könnte. Bevor Sie mit der Arbeit an irgendeinem Gerät beginnen, seien Sie sich der mit elektrischen Stromkreisen verbundenen Gefahren und der Standardpraktiken zur Vermeidung von Unfällen bewußt. Übersetzungen der in dieser Veröffentlichung enthaltenen Warnhinweise finden Sie im Dokument Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information (Informationen zu behördlichen Vorschriften und Sicherheit), das zusammen mit diesem Gerät geliefert wurde.

Avvertenza

Questo simbolo di avvertenza indica un pericolo. La situazione potrebbe causare infortuni alle persone. Prima di lavorare su qualsiasi apparecchiatura, occorre conoscere i pericoli relativi ai circuiti elettrici ed essere al corrente delle pratiche standard per la prevenzione di incidenti. La traduzione delle avvertenze riportate in questa pubblicazione si trova nel documento Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information (Conformità alle norme e informazioni sulla sicurezza) che accompagna questo dispositivo.

Advarsel

Dette varselsymbolet betyr fare. Du befinner deg i en situasjon som kan føre til personskade. Før du utfører arbeid på utstyr, må du vare oppmerksom på de faremomentene som elektriske kretser innebærer, samt gjøre deg kjent med vanlig praksis når det gjelder å unngå ulykker. Hvis du vil se oversettelser av de advarslene som finnes i denne publikasjonen, kan du se i dokumentet Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information (Overholdelse av forskrifter og sikkerhetsinformasjon) som ble levert med denne enheten.

Aviso

Este símbolo de aviso indica perigo. Encontra-se numa situação que lhe poderá causar danos físicos. Antes de começar a trabalhar com qualquer equipamento, familiarize-se com os perigos relacionados com circuitos eléctricos, e com quaisquer práticas comuns que possam prevenir possíveis acidentes. Para ver as traduções dos avisos que constam desta publicação, consulte o documento Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information (Informação de Segurança e Disposições Reguladoras) que acompanha este dispositivo.

¡Advertencia!

Este símbolo de aviso significa peligro. Existe riesgo para su integridad física. Antes de manipular cualquier equipo, considerar los riesgos que entraña la corriente eléctrica y familiarizarse con los procedimientos estándar de prevención de accidentes. Para ver una traducción de las advertencias que aparecen en esta publicación, consultar el documento titulado Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information (Información sobre seguridad y conformidad con las disposiciones reglamentarias) que se acompaña con este dispositivo.

Varning!

Denna varningssymbol signalerar fara. Du befinner dig i en situation som kan leda till personskada. Innan du utför arbete på någon utrustning måste du vara medveten om farorna med elkretsar och känna till vanligt förfarande för att förebygga skador. Se förklaringar av de varningar som förkommer i denna publikation i dokumentet Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information (Efterrättelse av föreskrifter och säkerhetsinformation), vilket medföljer denna anordning.


Electrical Equipment Guidelines

Follow these basic guidelines when working with any electrical equipment:

Before beginning any procedures requiring access to the chassis interior, locate the emergency power-off switch for the room in which you are working.

Disconnect all power and external cables before moving a chassis.

Do not work alone when potentially hazardous conditions exist.

Never assume that power has been disconnected from a circuit; always check.

Do not perform any action that creates a potential hazard to people or makes the equipment unsafe; carefully examine your work area for possible hazards such as moist floors, ungrounded power extension cables, and missing safety grounds.

Telephone Wiring Guidelines

Use the following guidelines when working with any equipment that is connected to telephone wiring or to other network cabling:

Never install telephone wiring during a lightning storm.

Never install telephone jacks in wet locations unless the jack is specifically designed for wet locations.

Never touch uninsulated telephone wires or terminals unless the telephone line has been disconnected at the network interface.

Use caution when installing or modifying telephone lines.

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

Electrostatic discharge (ESD) damage, which can occur when electronic cards or components are improperly handled, results in complete or intermittent failures. Port adapters and processor modules consist of printed circuit boards that are fixed in metal carriers. Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding and connectors are integral components of the carrier. Although the metal carrier helps to protect the board from ESD, use a preventive antistatic strap during handling.

Following are guidelines for preventing ESD damage:

Always use an ESD wrist or ankle strap and ensure that it makes good skin contact.

Connect the equipment end of the strap to an unfinished chassis surface.

When installing a component, use any available ejector levers or captive installation screws to properly seat the bus connectors in the backplane or midplane. These devices prevent accidental removal, provide proper grounding for the system, and help to ensure that bus connectors are properly seated.

When removing a component, use any available ejector levers or captive installation screws to release the bus connectors from the backplane or midplane.

Handle carriers by available handles or edges only; avoid touching the printed circuit boards or connectors.

Place a removed component board-side-up on an antistatic surface or in a static shielding container. If you plan to return the component to the factory, immediately place it in a static shielding container.

Avoid contact between the printed circuit boards and clothing. The wrist strap only protects components from ESD voltages on the body; ESD voltages on clothing can still cause damage.

Never attempt to remove the printed circuit board from the metal carrier.


Caution For safety, periodically check the resistance value of the antistatic strap. The measurement should be between 1 and 10 megohms.

What Is the JT2 Port Adapter?

PA-2JT2 (see ) is a port adapter used on the VIP2 in the Cisco 7500 series routers, and in Cisco 7000 series routers using the RSP7000 and RSP7000CI. The JT2 port adapter is available as a spare part: Product Number PA-2JT2=.

Figure 1 PA-2JT2, Two-Port JT2 Port Adapter (Front Panel View)

Following are JT2 port adapter features and capabilities:

Each JT2 interface port consists of two coaxial, BNC connectors.

Provides two data terminal equipment (DTE), synchronous serial interface ports, which are compatible with and specified by G.703a, and which permit Cisco 7000 series and Cisco 7500 series routers to communicate over a High Speed Digital 6.3 MHz (HSD 6.3) leased line service (specified in ITU Recommendation G.704).

Uses bipolar with 8-zero substitution (B8ZS) encoding.

Supports cyclic redundancy check (CRC). (Refer to the section "Configuring CRC5" on page 18.)

Operates at 6.312 Mbps, with 50-percent pulse-width B8Zs encoding.

Provides an internal fixed clock rate on each JT2 interface port of 6.144 Mbps (not configurable). The JT2 interfaces automatically use the internal clock for data transmission if no external clock is detected. When a JT2 interface is configured with the clock source internal command, external devices will return this clock on the JT2 interface's receive line; therefore, all clocking is properly synchronized. (Refer to the section "Using Software Configuration Commands Specific to the JT2 Port Adapter" on page 22

Provides the functions needed to frame a wideband payload to ITU G.704 and the Nippon Telegram and Telephone Corporation (NTT)-specified 6.144-Mbps frame format.

Designed to conform with the following emissions standards: FCC Class Limits (FCC 47 CFR Part 15, Subpart B), EN55022 Class Limits, and the Japanese Voluntary Control Council for Interference (VCCI) and CISPR 22 emission standards.

Designed to conform with the following safety standards: UL 1950 D3 Dev., CSA 22.2 No. 950, and TUV-IEC 950.

Received Approval Number N97-K013-0 from the Japan Approvals Institute for Telecommunications Equipment (JATE)

Port Adapter Locations on the VIP2

shows a VIP2 with two installed port adapters. shows a VIP2-50 with two installed port adapters. With the VIP2 oriented as shown, the left port adapter is in port adapter slot 0, and the right port adapter is in port adapter slot 1.

Port adapters have handles that allow for easy installation and removal; however, they are occasionally not shown in this publication to highlight port adapter faceplate detail.

In the Cisco 7000, Cisco 7507, and Cisco 7513 chassis the VIP2 is installed vertically. In the Cisco 7010 and Cisco 7505 chassis the VIP2 is installed horizontally. There are no interface processor or port adapter slot restrictions for the VIP2 and JT2 port adapter.

Figure 2 Two Port Adapters on the VIP2-40 (Horizontal Orientation Shown)

Figure 3 Two Port Adapters on a VIP2-50 (Horizontal Orientation Shown)

JT2 Port Adapter LEDs

The JT2 port adapter (see ) contains the enabled LED, which is standard on all port adapters; this green LED goes on after system initialization to indicate that the JT2 port adapter has been enabled for operation.

Figure 4 LEDs on the JT2 Port Adapter (Partial Front-Panel View)

The following conditions must be met before the enabled LED goes on:

The JT2 port adapter is correctly connected and receiving power.

The VIP2 contains a valid microcode version that has been downloaded successfully.

The bus recognizes the VIP2 attached to the backplane.

If any of these conditions is not met, or if the initialization fails for other reasons, the enabled LED does not go on. The JT2 port adapter has three additional status LEDs for each JT2 port, which are labeled and function as follows:

AIS—This red alarm indication signal LED indicates physical layer AIS when all ones are detected in the received bit stream.

RAI—This red remote alarm indication LED indicates the presence of 16 or more repeating RAI bit patterns (1111111100000000) present on the receive data channel. Recovery occurs when four or more consecutive patterns occur, which are not the RAI pattern received.

LOS—This red loss of signal LED indicates that a loss of signal has occurred on the receive data line when input data is zero for 20-32 consecutive clock cycles. Recovery occurs when the receive signal returns.

JT2 Port Adapter Interface Connectors and Cables

The interface connectors on the JT2 port adapter are coaxial BNC types, with one connector/cable for transmit (TX) and one for receive (RX) for each interface port. Each BNC connection requires an external B-type or C-type DSU (with external grounding capability), with an optical fiber output, and that uses 75-ohm BNC terminations. (Cisco Systems does not supply 75-ohm coaxial cables; they are available from commercial cable vendors.)


Caution Your coaxial cable's loss must be less than 6 dB when using maximum cable lengths. To prevent problems, you must check your 75-ohm coaxial cable's specifications when long cable lengths are required to connect the JT2 port adapter to your DSU. Unbalanced JT2 interfaces allow for a longer maximum cable length than those specified for balanced circuits. Ideally, the maximum cable length for unbalanced, 75-ohm coaxial cable is 1,968.5 feet (600 meters).


Note The 75-ohm coaxial BNC connections must conform to JIS C5412-1976 high-frequency, coaxial C02-type connectors, which are equivalent to MIL C 3608 BNC connectors and coaxial cables. The cables must be unbalanced, 75-ohm (± 5% at 1 MHz) coaxial cables.


You must install a ferrite sleeve (also called a common-mode choke) on each 75-ohm coaxial cable to reduce the effects of electro-magnetic interference (EMI). (Cisco Systems supplies four ferrite sleeves with your JT2 port adapter; one ferrite sleeve for each of four 75-ohm coaxial cables you can attach to PA-2JT2.)


Note Attach the ferrite sleeve on the end of the coaxial cable nearest the PA-2JT2, as close to the BNC connector as possible. (See .)



Caution The ferrite sleeve is a required component for proper system operation.

Figure 5 Attaching the Ferrite Sleeve around a Coaxial Cable

shows the typical 75-ohm coaxial cable you should use with PA-2JT2. Use only this type cable for all PA-2JT2 connections. Use one 75-ohm coaxial cable for each PA-2JT2 connection: RX0, TX0, RX1, and TX1.

Figure 6 75-Ohm Coaxial Cable with Ferrite Sleeve Attached

The pinout and signal descriptions for the BNC connectors on the JT2 port adapter are as follows:

Transmit (TX) tip and TX shield, for the 75-ohm coaxial cables that attach to the TX0 and TX1 BNC connectors

Receive (RX) tip and RX shield, for the 75-ohm coaxial cables that attach to the RX0 and RX1 BNC connectors

JT2 Frame Format Description

Japan T2 (JT2) is a 6.312 kilobits-per-second (kbps) line format specified in ITU Recommendation G.704, and described in the Japanese NTT document Technical Reference for High-Speed Digital Leased Circuit Services.

A frame consists of 789 bits, and the frame repetition rate is 8 KHz, for a frame duration of 125 microseconds. There are four frames in a multiframe. In each frame, there are 98, 8-bit time slots (bit 1 through bit 784), starting with bit 1 in time slot 1 (TS1).


Note Time slots 1 to 96 are used for the data payload, while time slots 97 and 98 are used for maintenance signaling by the DSU, the terminal equipment (TE), the network termination equipment (NT), or the line termination equipment (LT).


The last five bits of the frame, bit 785 through bit 789, are called the F-bits. The F-bits contain the frame and multiframe alignment signal, which consists of nine bits (110010100) carried in the first two frames of the multiframe.

VIP2 and the JT2 Port Adapter

This section describes the JT2 port adapter and its use with the VIP2.

The following sections provide additional information specific to the JT2 port adapter and its use on the VIP2 in Cisco 7000 series and Cisco 7500 series routers:

Installing or Replacing a Port Adapter on a VIP2, page 13

Attaching JT2 Port Adapter Interface Cables, page 14

Configuring the JT2 Interfaces, page 16

shows a VIP2-40 with two JT2 port adapters in port adapter slots 0 and 1. Port adapters can be installed in either (or both) port adapter slot 0 or port adapter slot 1. You can install VIP2s in any interface processor slots in your Cisco 7500 series or Cisco 7000 series router.

Figure 7 VIP2-40 with Two JT2 Port Adapters (Horizontal Orientation Shown)


Note Port adapters and VIP2 carriers have handles attached, but these handles are occasionally not shown in this publication to allow a full view of detail on each port adapter faceplate.


shows a VIP2-50 with two JT2 port adapters installed in port adapter slots 0 and 1.

Figure 8 VIP2-50 with Two JT2 Port Adapters (Horizontal Orientation Shown)


Note If a blank port adapter is installed on the VIP2 in which you want to install a new port adapter, you must first remove the VIP2 from the chassis, then remove the blank port adapter.



Caution
To prevent system problems, do not remove port adapters from the VIP2 motherboard or attempt to install other port adapters on the VIP2 motherboard while the system is operating. To install or replace port adapters, first remove the VIP2 from its interface processor slot.

When only one port adapter is installed on a VIP2, a blank port adapter must fill the empty slot to allow the VIP2 and router chassis to conform to electromagnetic interference (EMI) emissions requirements, and so that air flows through the chassis properly. If you plan to install a new port adapter, you must first remove the blank port adapter.


Note For specific VIP2 model requirements for the JT2 port adapter, refer to the section "Software and Hardware Prerequisites" on page 3.


Step 1

Step 2 Second-Generation Versatile Interface Processor (VIP2) Installation and Configuration


Caution

Step 3 Carefully slide the new port adapter into the port adapter slot until the connector on the port adapter is completely mated with the connector on the motherboard. (See .)


Attaching JT2 Port Adapter Interface Cables

The 75-ohm coaxial cable (see ) required for the connections to PA-2JT2 are not available from Cisco Systems; they are available from commercial cable vendors. Use only 75-ohm coaxial cables for all PA-2JT2 connections. (For specific cable requirements, refer to the section "JT2 Port Adapter Interface Connectors and Cables" on page 10.)


Note We recommend that you attach the ferrite sleeves included with PA-2JT2 to all 75-ohm coaxial cables you plan to use for your PA-2JT2 connections. Attach each ferrite sleeve as close to the port adapter end of each 75-ohm coaxial cable as possible.


Figure 9 75-Ohm Coaxial Cable with Ferrite Sleeve Attached

Each E1-G.703/G.704 interface requires separate receive and transmit connections to an external B-type or C-type DSU. A DSU is available from outside vendors.

Use the following procedure to connect the 75-ohm coaxial cables to the JT2 port adapter:


Step 1 Attach the 75-ohm coaxial cables directly to the BNC ports on the JT2 port adapter. Attach one end of a cable to the port labeled TX0 and one end of a second cable to the port labeled RX0. (See .)

Figure 10 Connecting 75-Ohm Coaxial BNC Cables (Horizontal Orientation Shown)


Note Older A-type DSUs are not supported with PA-2JT2.


Step 2 Referring to , attach the network ends of your two 75-ohm coaxial cables to your external DSU as follows:

Attach the coaxial cable from the JT2 port adapter's TX0 port to the RX port on your external DSU.

Attach the coaxial cable from the JT2 port adapter's RX0 port to the TX port on your external DSU.


Caution To prevent system problems and to maintain the proper connection sequences (PA-2JT2's RX port to the DSU's TX port and PA-2JT2's TX port to the DSU's RX port), connect the RX and TX ports on the JT2 port adapter as indicated in Steps 1 and 2.

Step 3 Make the appropriate setting on your DSU to establish an external ground. (See .) Remember that the JT2 port adapter's TX and RX connections are grounded at the router-chassis side.


Caution To prevent system grounding and signal problems, your DSU must be set to accept an external ground because the JT2 port adapter's TX and RX connections are grounded at the router-chassis side.

Figure 11 Connecting 75-Ohm Coaxial BNC Cables to a DSU and Setting the DSU's External Ground

Step 4 Repeat Steps 1 through 3 for the additional JT2 interface as required.


This completes the procedure for attaching cables to the JT2 port adapter and an external B-type or C-type DSU.

Configuring the JT2 Interfaces

If you installed a new JT2 port adapter or if you want to change the configuration of an existing interface, you must enter configuration mode using the configure command. If you replaced a JT2 port adapter that was previously configured, the system will recognize the new JT2 interfaces and bring them up in their existing configuration.

After you verify that the new JT2 port adapter is installed correctly (the enabled LED goes on), use the privileged-level configure command to configure the new interfaces. Be prepared with the information you will need, such as the following:

Protocols you plan to route on each new interface

Internet protocol (IP) addresses if you plan to configure the interfaces for IP routing

Whether the new interfaces will use bridging

For a summary of the configuration options available and additional instructions for configuring the JT2 interfaces on the JT2 port adapter, refer to the appropriate configuration publications listed in the section "Related Documentation" on page 2.

The configure command requires privileged-level access to the EXEC command interpreter, which usually requires a password. Contact your system administrator if necessary to obtain EXEC-level access.

Interface Processor Slot, Port Adapter Slot, and JT2 Interface Port Numbering

This section describes how to identify interface processor slot, port adapter slot, and interface port numbers.


Note Although the processor slots in the seven-slot Cisco 7000 and Cisco 7507 and 13-slot Cisco 7513 are vertically oriented and those in the five-slot Cisco 7010 and Cisco 7505 are horizontally oriented, all models use the same method for slot and port numbering.


In the router, physical port addresses specify the actual physical location of each interface port on the router interface processor end. (See .) This address is composed of a three-part number in the format interface processor slot number/port adapter number/interface port number, as follows:

The first number identifies the interface processor slot in which the JT2-equipped VIP2 is installed (as shown in the example system in ).

The second number identifies the physical port adapter number on the VIP2, and is either 0 or 1.

The third number identifies the interface ports on the JT2 port adapter, which are always numbered as 0 and 1. (Each individual interface port has two BNC connections, labeled RX and TX.)

Interface ports on the JT2-equipped VIP2 maintain the same addresses regardless of whether other interface processors are installed or removed. However, when you move a VIP2 to a different slot, the first number in the address changes to reflect the new interface processor slot number.

shows the port adapter slots and interface ports of a sample Cisco 7505 system. The JT2 interface addresses on a JT2 port adapter in the first port adapter slot in interface processor slot 3, would be 3/0/0 and 3/0/1, from left to right. The JT2 interfaces on a JT2 port adapter in port adapter slot 1 would be numbered 3/1/0 and 3/1/1, from left to right.


Note If you remove the JT2-equipped VIP2 from interface processor slot 3 and install it in interface processor slot 2, the addresses of those same ports become 2/0/0 and 2/0/1, respectively, and 2/1/0 and 2/1/1, respectively.


Figure 12 JT2 Interface Port Address Example (Cisco 7505 Shown)

You can identify interface ports by physically checking the slot/port-adapter/interface port location on the back of the router or by using show commands to display information about a specific interface or all interfaces in the router.

Configuring an Interface

This section describes a basic configuration. At any time you can exit the privileged level and return to the user level by entering disable at the prompt as follows:

Router# disable
Router> 

In the following basic configuration procedure, press the Return key after each step unless otherwise noted:


Step 1 At the privileged-level prompt, enter configuration mode and specify that the console terminal will be the source of the configuration subcommands as follows:

Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)#

Step 2 At the prompt, specify the first interface to configure by entering the subcommand interface, followed by the type (serial) and slot/port-adapter/interface (interface processor slot number). The example that follows is for the first interface of the first port adapter on a JT2 port adapter in interface processor slot 1:

Router(config)# interface serial 1/0/0

Step 3 If IP routing is enabled on the system, you can assign an IP address and subnet mask to the interface with the ip address configuration subcommand, as in the following example:

Router(config-int)# ip address 1.1.1.10 255.255.255.0 

Step 4 Add any additional configuration subcommands required to enable routing protocols and set the interface characteristics.

Step 5 Change the shutdown state to up and enable the interface as follows:

Router(config-int)# no shutdown

Step 6 Configure additional interfaces as required.

Step 7 When you have included all of the configuration subcommands to complete the configuration, press Ctrl-Z to exit configuration mode.

Step 8 Write the new configuration to nonvolatile memory as follows:

Router# copy running-config startup-config
[OK]
Router#


To check the interface configuration using show commands, proceed to the section "Checking the Configuration."

Configuring CRC5

For data transmission at JT2 (6.312 Mbps), the G.704 standard suggests a 5-bit CRC. (Refer to ITU Recommendation G.704 for the definition of CRC5.)

To enable CRC5 on the JT2 interfaces, specify the slot and port address of the interface and the number of bits to use in the CRC (using crc 32), followed by the command crc bits 5. Press Ctrl-Z after altering the configuration and before exiting configuration mode.

The example that follows shows how to enable CRC5 generation on a JT2 interface and also how to set the CRC size to 32 bits; the example refers to JT2 interface 0 on the first JT2 port adapter on a VIP2 in interface processor slot 3:

Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)# interface serial 3/0/0
Router(config-int)# crc 32
Router(config-int)# crc bits 5 
Router(config-int)# ^Z

To disable CRC5 and return to the default of no CRC error checking, specify the slot and port address and use the no crc bits 5 command.

Checking the Configuration

After configuring the new interface, use the show commands to display the status of the new interface or all interfaces, and use the ping command to check connectivity.

Using show Commands to Verify the New Interface Status

The following steps use show commands to verify that the new interfaces are configured and operating correctly.


Step 1 Display the system hardware configuration with the show version command to ensure that the list includes the new interfaces.

Step 2 Display all the current interface processors and their interfaces with the show controllers cbus command. Verify that the new JT2 port adapter appears in the correct slot.

Step 3 Specify one of the new interfaces with the show interfaces type slot/port-adapter/interface command and verify that the first line of the display specifies the interface with the correct slot number. Also verify that the interface and line protocol are in the correct state: up or down.

Step 4 Display the protocols configured for the entire system and specific interfaces with the show protocols command. If necessary, return to configuration mode to add or remove protocol routing on the system or specific interfaces.

Step 5 Display the running configuration file with the show running-config command. Display the configuration stored in NVRAM using the show startup-config command. Verify that the configuration is accurate for the system and each interface.


If the interface is down and you configured it as up, or if the displays indicate that the hardware is not functioning properly, ensure that the network interface is properly connected and terminated. If you still have problems bringing the interface up, contact a service representative for assistance.

Using show Commands to Display Interface and System Information

To display information about a specific interface, use the show interfaces command with the interface type and port address in the format show interfaces [type slot/port-adapter/port].

With the show interfaces [type slot/port-adapter/port] command, use arguments such as the interface type (serial) and the slot, port adapter, and port numbers (slot/port-adapter/port) to display information about a specific JT2 interface.

The following example shows all of the information specific to the first JT2 interface port (interface port 0) in interface processor slot 3, port adapter slot 0:

Router# sh int serial 3/0/0
Serial3/0/0 is up, line protocol is up 
  Hardware is cyBus Serial
  Internet address is 1.0.0.1/8
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 6312 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 26/255
  Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set, keepalive not set
  Last input 00:04:31, output 00:04:31, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:06:07
  Queueing strategy: fifo
  Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
  5 minute input rate 162000 bits/sec, 8 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 162000 bits/sec, 8 packets/sec
     20005 packets input, 20080520 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
     20005 packets output, 20080520 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
     0 carrier transitions
     0 cv errors, 0 crc5 errors, 0 frame errors
     rxLOS inactive, rxLOF inactive, rxPAIS inactive
     rxAIS inactive, rxRAI inactive, rxHBER inactive

The following counters appear in the output of the show interfaces serial command:

cv errors—B8ZS/B6ZS coding violation counter

crc5 errors—CRC5 error counter

frame errors—framing error counter

The following alarm indicators also appear in the output of the show interfaces serial command:

rxLOS—receive loss of signal alarm

rxLOF—receive loss of frame alarm

rxPAIS—receive payload alarm indication signal (AIS)

rxAIS—receive physical AIS

rxRAI—receive remote alarm indication signal

rxHBER—receive high bit error rate alarm

For complete command descriptions and examples, refer to the publications listed in the section "Related Documentation" on page 2.

The show version command displays the configuration of the system hardware (the number and type of each interface processor type installed), the software version, the names and sources of configuration files, and the boot images. Following is an example of the show version command:

Router# sh version
Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software 
IOS (tm) GS Software (RSP-JV-M), Version 11.1(12)CA1 [biff 137]
Synced to mainline version: 11.1(8)
Copyright (c) 1986-1997 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Sat 10-May-97 19:19 by biff
Image text-base: 0x600108A0, data-base: 0x609DA000

ROM: System Bootstrap, Version 5.3(16645) [biff 571], INTERIM SOFTWARE
ROM: GS Software (RSP-BOOT-M), Experimental Version 11.1(618) [biff 114]

Router uptime is 16 hours, 2 minutes
System restarted by reload
System image file is "biff/rsp-jv-mz.g703", booted via tftp from 1.1.1.254

cisco RSP2 (R4600) processor with 16384K bytes of memory.
R4600 processor, Implementation 32, Revision 2.0 
Last reset from power-on
G.703/E1 software, Version 1.0.
G.703/JT2 software, Version 1.0.
SuperLAT software copyright 1990 by Meridian Technology Corp).
Bridging software.
X.25 software, Version 2.0, NET2, BFE and GOSIP compliant.
TN3270 Emulation software (copyright 1994 by TGV Inc).
Chassis Interface.
1 VIP2 controllers (2 Serial).
2 Serial network interfaces.
125K bytes of non-volatile configuration memory.

16384K bytes of Flash PCMCIA card at slot 0 (Sector size 128K).
8192K bytes of Flash internal SIMM (Sector size 256K).
No slave installed in slot 7.
Configuration register is 0x2


The show controllers cbus command shows assorted information about the interfaces installed in the router. Following is an example of partial output from the show controllers cbus command, showing a JT2-equipped VIP2:

Router# sh cont cbus
MEMD at 40000000, 2097152 bytes (unused 4352, recarves 18, lost 0)
  RawQ 48000100, ReturnQ 48000108, EventQ 48000110
  BufhdrQ 48000130 (2643 items), LovltrQ 48000148 (16 items, 2016 bytes)
  IpcbufQ 48000158 (24 items, 4096 bytes)
  IpcbufQ_classic 48000150 (8 items, 4096 bytes)
  3570 buffer headers (48002000 - 4800FF10)
  pool0: 10 buffers, 256 bytes, queue 48000138
  pool1: 720 buffers, 1536 bytes, queue 48000140
  pool2: 145 buffers, 4512 bytes, queue 48000160
  pool3: 4 buffers, 4544 bytes, queue 48000168
  slot9: VIP2, hw 2.3, sw 21.40, ccb 5800FFA0, cmdq 480000C0, vps 8192
    software loaded from flash slot0:vip2_21-40
    IOS (tm) VIP2 Software (SVIP-DW-M), Version 11.1(12)CA1 [biff 162]
    ROM Monitor version 17.0 
  Mx JT2 Serial(2), HW Revision 0x2, FW Revision 1.26
    Serial5/0/0, applique is JT2 Unbalanced
      received clockrate 6155735       
      gfreeq 48000140, lfreeq 48000278 (1536 bytes), throttled 0
      rxlo 4, rxhi 60, rxcurr 0, maxrxcurr 1
      txq 48001A80, txacc 48001A82 (value 39), txlimit 39

To determine which type of port adapter is installed on a VIP2 in your system, use the show diag slot command. Specific port adapter information is displayed, as shown in the following example of an JT2 port adapter in a VIP2 in interface processor slot 9:

Router# sh diag 9
Slot 9:
        Physical slot 9, ~physical slot 0x6, logical slot 9, CBus 0
        Microcode Status 0x4
        Master Enable, LED, WCS Loaded
        Board is analyzed 
        Pending I/O Status: None
        EEPROM format version 1
        VIP2 controller, HW rev 2.3, board revision A0
        Serial number: 03515977  Part number: 73-1684-03
        Test history: 0x00        RMA number: 00-00-00
        Flags: cisco 7000 board; 7500 compatible

        EEPROM contents (hex):
          0x20: 01 15 02 03 00 35 A6 49 49 06 94 03 00 00 00 00
          0x30: 50 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

        Slot database information:
        Flags: 0x4      Insertion time: 0x3C58 (16:06:46 ago)

        Controller Memory Size: 16 MBytes DRAM, 1024 KBytes SRAM

        PA Bay 0 Information:
                JT2 Serial PA, 2 ports
                EEPROM format version 1
                HW rev 1.FF, Board revision UNKNOWN
                Serial number: 4294967295  Part number: 255-65535-255 

The show startup-config command displays the information from the configuration file used at system startup. Following is an example of partial output from the show startup-config command from a system with a JT2 port adapter installed and configured:

Router# sh startup-conf

(additional display text omitted)

hostname Router
!
interface Serial9/0/0
 ip address 28.0.0.1 255.0.0.0
 ip route-cache distributed
 no keepalive
 crc5
 clock source internal
 no cdp enable
!

Using Software Configuration Commands Specific to the JT2 Port Adapter

The JT2 port adapter is capable of clocking transmitted data using an internal clock source or a clock derived from the received data stream. The default is a line-derived clock source; however, each JT2 interface will use its internal clock if no external clock is detected.

The clock source internal command sets the clock source as indicated. The no clock source command restores the system default.

By default, the system uses no CRC5. The crc bits 5 interface command allows the frame alignment search criteria to use CRC5. The no crc bits 5 interface command allows CRC5 to be excluded from the frame alignment search criteria.

Using the ping Command to Verify Network Connection

The packet internet groper (ping) command allows you to verify that an interface port is functioning properly and to check the path between a specific port and connected devices at various locations on the network. This section provides brief descriptions of the ping command. After you verify that the system and JT2-equipped VIP2 have booted successfully and are operational, you can use this command to verify the status of interface ports. Refer to the publications listed in the section "Related Documentation" on page 2, for detailed command descriptions and examples.

The ping command sends an echo request out to a remote device at an IP address that you specify. After sending a series of signals, the command waits a specified time for the remote device to echo the signals. Each returned signal is displayed as an exclamation point (!) on the console terminal; each signal that is not returned before the specified time-out is displayed as a period (.). A series of exclamation points (!!!!!) indicates a good connection; a series of periods (.....) or the messages [timed out] or [failed] indicate that the connection failed.

Following is an example of a successful ping command to a remote server with the address 1.1.1.10:

Router# ping 1.1.1.10 <Return>
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echoes to 1.1.1.10, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 1/15/64 ms
Router#

If the connection fails, verify that you have the correct IP address for the server and that the server is active (powered on); then repeat the ping command.

For additional descriptions of interface subcommands and the configuration options available for JT2-related interfaces, refer to the publications listed in the section "Related Documentation" on page 2.

Obtaining Documentation

These sections explain how to obtain documentation from Cisco Systems.

World Wide Web

You can access the most current Cisco documentation on the World Wide Web at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com

Translated documentation is available at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/public/countries_languages.shtml

Documentation CD-ROM

Cisco documentation and additional literature are available in a Cisco Documentation CD-ROM package, which is shipped with your product. The Documentation CD-ROM is updated monthly and may be more current than printed documentation. The CD-ROM package is available as a single unit or through an annual subscription.

Ordering Documentation

You can order Cisco documentation in these ways:

Registered Cisco.com users (Cisco direct customers) can order Cisco product documentation from the Networking Products MarketPlace:

http://www.cisco.com/cgi-bin/order/order_root.pl

Registered Cisco.com users can order the Documentation CD-ROM through the online Subscription Store:

http://www.cisco.com/go/subscription

Nonregistered Cisco.com users can order documentation through a local account representative by calling Cisco Systems Corporate Headquarters (California, U.S.A.) at 408 526-7208 or, elsewhere in North America, by calling 800 553-NETS (6387).

Documentation Feedback

You can submit comments electronically on Cisco.com. In the Cisco Documentation home page, click the Fax or Email option in the "Leave Feedback" section at the bottom of the page.

You can e-mail your comments to bug-doc@cisco.com.

You can submit your comments by mail by using the response card behind the front cover of your document or by writing to the following address:

Cisco Systems
Attn: Document Resource Connection
170 West Tasman Drive
San Jose, CA 95134-9883
We appreciate your comments.

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Cisco provides Cisco.com as a starting point for all technical assistance. Customers and partners can obtain online documentation, troubleshooting tips, and sample configurations from online tools by using the Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) Web Site. Cisco.com registered users have complete access to the technical support resources on the Cisco TAC Web Site.

Cisco.com

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Cisco.com is a highly integrated Internet application and a powerful, easy-to-use tool that provides a broad range of features and services to help you with these tasks:

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Resolve technical issues with online support

Download and test software packages

Order Cisco learning materials and merchandise

Register for online skill assessment, training, and certification programs

If you want to obtain customized information and service, you can self-register on Cisco.com. To access Cisco.com, go to this URL:

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Technical Assistance Center

The Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) is available to all customers who need technical assistance with a Cisco product, technology, or solution. Two levels of support are available: the Cisco TAC Web Site and the Cisco TAC Escalation Center.

Cisco TAC inquiries are categorized according to the urgency of the issue:

Priority level 4 (P4)—You need information or assistance concerning Cisco product capabilities, product installation, or basic product configuration.

Priority level 3 (P3)—Your network performance is degraded. Network functionality is noticeably impaired, but most business operations continue.

Priority level 2 (P2)—Your production network is severely degraded, affecting significant aspects of business operations. No workaround is available.

Priority level 1 (P1)—Your production network is down, and a critical impact to business operations will occur if service is not restored quickly. No workaround is available.

The Cisco TAC resource that you choose is based on the priority of the problem and the conditions of service contracts, when applicable.

Cisco TAC Web Site

You can use the Cisco TAC Web Site to resolve P3 and P4 issues yourself, saving both cost and time. The site provides around-the-clock access to online tools, knowledge bases, and software. To access the Cisco TAC Web Site, go to this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/tac

All customers, partners, and resellers who have a valid Cisco service contract have complete access to the technical support resources on the Cisco TAC Web Site. The Cisco TAC Web Site requires a Cisco.com login ID and password. If you have a valid service contract but do not have a login ID or password, go to this URL to register:

http://www.cisco.com/register/

If you are a Cisco.com registered user, and you cannot resolve your technical issues by using the Cisco TAC Web Site, you can open a case online by using the TAC Case Open tool at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/tac/caseopen

If you have Internet access, we recommend that you open P3 and P4 cases through the Cisco TAC Web Site.

Cisco TAC Escalation Center

The Cisco TAC Escalation Center addresses priority level 1 or priority level 2 issues. These classifications are assigned when severe network degradation significantly impacts business operations. When you contact the TAC Escalation Center with a P1 or P2 problem, a Cisco TAC engineer automatically opens a case.

To obtain a directory of toll-free Cisco TAC telephone numbers for your country, go to this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/687/Directory/DirTAC.shtml

Before calling, please check with your network operations center to determine the level of Cisco support services to which your company is entitled: for example, SMARTnet, SMARTnet Onsite, or Network Supported Accounts (NSA). When you call the center, please have available your service agreement number and your product serial number.