Cisco Wide Area Application Engine 7341, 7371, and 674 Hardware Installation Guide
WAE Inline Network Adapter
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WAE Inline Network Adapter

Table Of Contents

WAE Inline Network Adapter

Inline Network Adapter Description

Ports and LED Indicators

Adapter Specifications

Inline Network Adapter Cabling Requirements

Installation Scenarios and Cabling Examples for Fast Ethernet Connections


WAE Inline Network Adapter


This chapter describes the following features of the Cisco WAE inline network adapter.

Inline Network Adapter Description

Ports and LED Indicators

Inline Network Adapter Cabling Requirements

Installation Scenarios and Cabling Examples for Fast Ethernet Connections

For adapter specifications, see Table A-2 in Appendix A.

Inline Network Adapter Description

WAAS software versions prior to 4.2.1 support one optional 4-port Ethernet inline network adapter on the WAE appliance. Up to two inline network adapters are supported using WAAS software version 4.2.1 or later.

The inline network adapter is a full-height, three-quarter-length PCI-X network interface card that contains four independent Gigabit Ethernet ports. (See Figure 5-1.)

Figure 5-1 Inline Network Adapter

The Cisco WAE inline network adapter provides an inline traffic interception capability for your appliance. When you configure the WAE appliance for inline interception mode, you can set attributes to control which interfaces are to be used over which VLANs. By default, the adapter operates on all inline-capable interfaces and VLANs. You can configure the inline redirection feature using the WAAS CLI or the WAAS Central Manager GUI.

The WAAS software defines two new interface types: A group interface that represents an inline pair grouping and a port interface that represents the individual port. These interfaces are referred to as inlineGroup and inlinePort. The sh interface command can be used to see information on inline ports and groups.

InlineGroup interfaces are numbered using the format slot/group. The slot number is the slot in which the adapter is inserted. (In the WAE 500 series and 600 series appliances, you must insert the adapter in slot 1 only.) The group number is either 0 or 1 (each adapter has 2 group pairs). The group number is displayed on the adapter label.

InlinePort interfaces are numbered slot/group/lan or slot/group/wan. The last attribute is the LAN or WAN designator.

The inline network adapter also includes an onboard programmable watch dog timer (WDT) controller that allows you to set the time to wait after a failure event, such as a power outage or a kernel crash, before the unit begins to operate in mechanical bypass mode. In mechanical bypass mode, traffic is bridged between the LAN and WAN ports of each group. Mechanical bypass mode prevents the WAE from becoming a single point of failure and allows traffic to continue to flow between the router and the client while it passes through an unresponsive WAE without being processed.

For more information about configuring the inline network adapter, see the Cisco Wide Area Application Services Configuration Guide.

Ports and LED Indicators

Figure 5-2 shows the inline network adapter port numbers, interface designations, and LEDs.

Figure 5-2 Inline Network Adapter Port Numbering and LEDs

W1

Port WAN1; Group 1 WAN interface

L1

Port LAN1; Group 1 LAN interface

W0

Port WAN0; Group 0 WAN interface

L0

Port LAN0: Group 0 LAN interface


The inline network adapter has three LEDs that correspond to each port (the W1 LEDs correspond to Port W1, and so forth). Table 5-1 describes the LEDs.

Table 5-1 Inline Network Adapter LEDs 

LEDs
State
Description

Link / Activity

On

The 10/100/1000BASE-T interface is receiving power.

Blinking

The Ethernet link is transmitting data.

100

On

The speed of the Ethernet connection is 100BASE-TX.

1000

On

The speed of the Ethernet connection is 1000BASE-TX.

Bypass

Both the 100 and 1000 LEDs are on

The corresponding ports are in mechanical bypass mode.



Note On older inline network adapters, the LEDs are labelled 0, 1, 2, and 3. These correspond to W1, L1, W0, and L0 respectively.


Adapter Specifications

Table 5-2 describes the inline network adapter technical and general specifications.

Table 5-2 Inline Network Adapter Specifications 

Specification
Description
Copper Gigabit Ethernet Specifications

IEEE standard

Gigabit Ethernet, 1000BASE-T

Fast Ethernet, 100BASE-T

Ethernet, 10BASE-T

Full duplex and half duplex

Supports both half-duplex and full-duplex operation in all operating speeds

Autonegotiation

Autonegotiates between full-duplex and half-duplex operations and between 1000-Mbps, 100-Mbps, and 10-Mbps speeds

Data transfer rate

1000-Mbps, 100-Mbps, and 10-Mbps speeds per port in half-duplex mode

2000-Mbps, 200-Mbps, and 20-Mbps speeds per port in full-duplex mode

General Technical Specifications

Interface standard

PCI v2.2 32/64 bit, 33/66 MHz

PCI-X v1.0 32/64 bit, 66/100/133 MHz

Size

6.6 x 4.2 in. (167.64 x 106.68 mm)

PCI connector

Universal 64-bit connector

PCI voltage

+12 V (minimum 11.4 V, maximum 12.6 V)

+3.3 V (minimum 3.0 V, maximum 3.6 V)

Weight

6.18 oz (175 g)

Operating humidity

0 to 90%, noncondensing

Operating temperature

32 to -122oF (0 to 50oC)

Storage temperature

-4 to -149oF (-20 to -65oC)


Inline Network Adapter Cabling Requirements

The inline network adapter ships with two types of cables: crossover and straight-through. When you connect the WAE inline network adapter, the cable that you use depends on the link speed (Gigabit Ethernet or Fast Ethernet) and the types of devices (DCE or DTE) being connected.


Note You must retain the same link speed from one end of the connection to the other end. Inline adapter interfaces are able to autonegotiate link speeds. If you configure any of your connecting interfaces for Fast Ethernet (whether on a switch or a router), your WAE inline adapter uses Fast Ethernet. If you configure any of your connecting interfaces for Gigabit Ethernet, your WAE inline adapter uses Gigabit Ethernet. Speed and duplex settings are port specific so that two inline ports can negotiate different speeds independently.


If you are connecting a WAE inline appliance between two devices using Gigabit Ethernet, you can use either straight-through cables, crossover cables, or any combination of the two cable types, regardless of the type of device. However, for consistency, we recommend that you use straight-through cables for all Gigabit Ethernet connections.

Table 5-3 shows the cable requirements for WAE and non-WAE connections when you are using Gigabit Ethernet end to end.

Table 5-3 Cable Requirements for WAE Connections Using Gigabit Ethernet 

Connection
Required Cable

Switch to switch (no WAE)

Crossover or straight-through

Switch to router (no WAE)

Crossover or straight-through

Router to router (no WAE)

Crossover or straight-through

Switch to WAE and

WAE to Router

Crossover or straight-through

Crossover or straight-through

Switch to WAE and

WAE to Switch

Crossover or straight-through

Crossover or straight-through

Router to WAE and

WAE to Router

Crossover or straight-through

Crossover or straight-through

WAE to WAE

Crossover or straight-through


Some switches support automatic medium-dependent interface crossover (MDIX). You can configure MDIX by using the mdix auto global configuration switch command. If your switch supports MDIX, you do not need to follow these cabling rules because MDIX automatically adjusts transmit and receive pairs when an incorrect cable type (crossover or straight-through) is installed on a 10/100 Fast Ethernet port. However, when you configure MDIX, you must also configure the port to use autosense (not manual selection of speed/duplex).


Caution If you are connecting to Fast Ethernet ports on both the LAN and the WAN sides of the WAE inline appliance, you must consider the types of devices that are being connected, and you must use the correct cables. You must follow these cabling instructions for the inline network adapter to work properly. (See Table 5-4. For illustrations and examples, see the "Installation Scenarios and Cabling Examples for Fast Ethernet Connections" section.)

To connect the inline network adapter using the correct cables for Fast Ethernet connections, follow these steps:


Step 1 Determine the type of cable that you would use for a direct connection between your two end devices (without a WAE inline network appliance connected between them) by using the following standard cabling rules:

When you are directly connecting two network devices that are similar, such as two switches, use a crossover cable.

When you are directly connecting two network devices that are different, such as a switch and router, use a straight-through cable.


Note Because the inline network adapter has an internal crossover connection that becomes active when the InlineGroup interface is placed in mechanical bypass mode, you must decide which cable you would use to connect the two network devices directly, and then you must install the other cable type (on one side, usually the WAN side of the inline appliance) instead.


Table 5-4 shows the cable requirements for WAE and non-WAE connections when you are using Fast Ethernet end to end.

Table 5-4 Cable Requirements for WAE Connections Using Fast Ethernet 

Connection
Required Cable

Switch to switch (no WAE)

Crossover

Switch to router (no WAE)

Straight-through

Router to router (no WAE)

Crossover

Switch to WAE and

WAE to Router

Straight-through

Crossover

Switch to WAE and

WAE to Switch

Straight-through

Straight-through

Router to WAE and

WAE to Router

Straight-through

Straight-through

WAE to WAE

Crossover


Step 2 Connect Fast Ethernet ports on both the LAN and the WAN sides of the WAE inline appliance by using the following cable types:

On the LAN side of the connection, use a straight-through cable between the WAE inline appliance and the network device.

On the WAN side of the connection, use the cable that is different from the cable that you would use to connect the two network devices directly (as determined in Step 1).

For example, if you are connecting a router and a switch (two different devices) through the WAE inline appliance, use a straight-through cable on the LAN side of the connection and use a crossover cable on the WAN side of the connection. (If you were connecting the two different devices directly, you would use a straight-through cable, so use the crossover cable instead.)

If you are connecting two switches (or two similar devices), use straight-through cables on both the LAN and the WAN sides of the WAE inline appliance.

Figure 5-3 through Figure 5-5 show which cables to use for the WAE LAN and WAN connections between Fast Ethernet ports.


Installation Scenarios and Cabling Examples for Fast Ethernet Connections

WAE appliances can be installed physically between two network devices (such as the branch office router and branch office LAN switch) by connecting the WAE inline network adapter ports to the network devices using the proper cables.

If you are connecting a WAE inline appliance between two devices using Gigabit Ethernet, you can use either straight-through cables, crossover cables, or any combination of the two cable types, regardless of the type of device. This section shows cabling examples for Fast Ethernet connections only, because Fast Ethernet has specific cabling requirements.

The inline network adapter has four ports that are divided into two inline groups (see the "Ports and LED Indicators" section). The WAE can be physically placed inline between two distinct network paths, creating redundant WAN links. (See Figure 5-3.)

Two WAEs with inline network adapters can also be installed back-to-back in a serial fashion between two network devices for failover purposes. In this serial cluster configuration, if one WAE fails, the other WAE can provide optimization. (See Figure 5-4.)


Note When you connect two WAE inline appliances to each other serially, always use a crossover cable between the two WAEs. (See Figure 5-5.)


Figure 5-3 Cabling for a Single Inline WAE with Redundant WAN Connections

1

Connection: Management

Gigabit Ethernet: 1/0

Cable type: Straight-through (recommended)

2

Connection: WAE to LAN switch
(using InlineGroup 1/0)

Fast Ethernet: LAN0 (InlinePort 1/0/lan)

Cable type: Straight-through

3

Connection: WAE to LAN switch
(using InlineGroup 1/1)

Fast Ethernet: LAN1 (InlinePort 1/1/lan)

Cable type: Straight-through

4

Connection: WAE to WAN router A
(using InlineGroup 1/0)

Fast Ethernet: WAN0 (InlinePort 1/0/wan)

Cable type: Crossover

5

Connection: WAE to WAN router B
(using InlineGroup 1/1)

Fast Ethernet: WAN1 (InlinePort 1/1/wan)

Cable type: Crossover

   

Figure 5-4 Cabling for Serial Cluster Inline WAEs with a Single WAN Connection

1

Connection: WAE 1 to LAN switch

Fast Ethernet: LAN0 (InlinePort 1/0/lan)

Cable type: Straight-through

2

Connection: WAE 1 to WAE 2

Fast Ethernet: WAE1 WAN0 (InlinePort 1/0/wan) to WAE 2 LAN0 (InlinePort 1/0/lan)

Cable type: Crossover

3

Connection: WAE 2 to WAN router

Fast Ethernet: WAE 2 WAN0 (InlinePort 1/0/wan)

Cable type: Crossover

   

Figure 5-5 Cabling Between Two Inline WAEs

1

Connection: WAE 1 to LAN switch

Fast Ethernet: WAE 1 LAN0 (InlinePort 1/0/lan)

Cable type: Straight-through

2

Connection: WAE 1 to WAE 2

Fast Ethernet: WAE 1 WAN0
(InlinePort 1/0/wan) to WAE 2 LAN0 (InlinePort 1/0/lan)

Cable type: Crossover

3

Connection: WAE 2 to WAN router

Fast Ethernet: WAE 2 WAN0 (InlinePort 1/0/wan)

Cable type: Crossover