Cisco Wide Area Application Services Command Reference (Software Version 4.0.13)
EXEC Mode Commands
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EXEC Mode Commands

Table Of Contents

EXEC Mode Commands

cd

cifs

clear

clock

cms

configure

copy cdrom

copy compactflash

copy disk

copy ftp

copy http

copy running-config

copy startup-config

copy sysreport

copy system-status

copy tech-support

copy tftp

cpfile

debug

delfile

deltree

dir

disable

disk

dnslookup

enable

exit

find-pattern

help

install

less

lls

ls

mkdir

mkfile

ntpdate

ping

pwd

reload

rename

restore

rmdir

scp

script

setup

show aaa accounting

show adapter

show alarms

show arp

show authentication

show auto-register

show banner

show bypass

show cdp

show cifs

show clock

show cms

show debugging

show device-mode

show disks

show egress-methods

show flash

show hardware

show hosts

show inetd

show interface

show inventory

show ip access-list

show ip routes

show kerberos

show key-manager

show logging

show memory

show ntp

show policy-engine application

show policy-engine status

show print-services

show processes

show radius-server

show running-config

show services

show smb-conf

show snmp

show ssh

show standby

show startup-config

show statistics authentication

show statistics cifs

show statistics content-distribution-network

show statistics dre

show statistics dre connection

show statistics dre peer

show statistics epm

show statistics flow

show statistics icmp

show statistics ip

show statistics key-manager

show statistics netstat

show statistics radius

show statistics services

show statistics snmp

show statistics tacacs

show statistics tcp

show statistics tfo

show statistics udp

show statistics wccp

show statistics windows-domain

show sysfs

show tacacs

show tcp

show tech-support

show telnet

show tfo accelerators

show tfo auto-discovery

show tfo bufpool

show tfo connection

show tfo egress-methods connection

show tfo filtering

show tfo status

show tfo synq

show transaction-logging

show user

show users administrative

show version

show wccp

show windows-domain

shutdown

snmp trigger

ssh

tcpdump

telnet

terminal

tethereal

traceroute

transaction-log

type

type-tail

undebug

wafs

whoami

windows-domain

write


EXEC Mode Commands


Use the EXEC mode for setting, viewing, and testing system operations. In general, the user EXEC commands allow you to connect to remote devices, change terminal line settings on a temporary basis, perform basic tests, and list system information.

The EXEC mode is divided into two access levels: user and privileged.

The user EXEC mode is used by local and general system administrators, while the privileged EXEC mode is used by the root administrator. Use the enable and disable commands to switch between the two levels. Access to the user-level EXEC command line requires a valid password.

The user-level EXEC commands are a subset of the privileged-level EXEC commands. The user-level EXEC prompt is the hostname followed by a right angle bracket (>). The prompt for the privileged-level EXEC command line is the pound sign (#). To execute an EXEC command, enter the command at the EXEC system prompt and press the Return key.


Note You can change the hostname using the hostname global configuration command.


In the following example, a user accesses the privileged-level EXEC command line from the user level:

WAE> enable
WAE#

To leave EXEC mode, use the exit command at the system prompt:

WAE# exit
WAE>


cd

To change from one directory to another directory in the WAAS software, use the cd EXEC command.

cd directoryname

Syntax Description

directoryname

Directory name.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use this command to navigate between directories and for file management. The directory name becomes the default prefix for all relative paths. Relative paths do not begin with a slash (/). Absolute paths begin with a slash (/).

Examples

The following example shows how to change to a directory using a relative path:

WAE(config)# cd local1

The following example shows how to change to a directory using an absolute path:

WAE(config)# cd /local1

Related Commands

deltree

dir

lls

ls

mkdir

pwd

cifs

To control CIFS adapter operations and run-time configurations, use the cifs EXEC command.

cifs {auto-discovery {disable | enable | reset-log} | mss value | restart [core | edge] | reverse-dns {active | disable | enable} | session disconnect [client-ip ipaddress | server-ip ipaddress]}

Syntax Description

auto-discovery

Controls CIFS auto-discovery configuration and debug.

disable

Disables CIFS server auto-discovery.

enable

Enables CIFS server auto-discovery.

reset-log

Resets the log memory.

mss

Sets the TCP maximum segment size (MSS) for the CIFS adapter.

value

Maximum segment size. This value must be an integer in the range of 512-1460.

restart

Restarts the CIFS application.

core

Restarts the CIFS application on the Core WAE.

edge

Restarts the CIFS application on the Edge WAE.

reverse-dns

Uses reverse DNS to resolve server names on the Core WAE.

active

Checks whether reverse DNS is active.

disable

Deactivates reverse DNS on the Core WAE.

enable

Activates reverse DNS on the Core WAE.

session

Configures operations on active CIFS sessions.

disconnect

Disconnects the CIFS sessions.

client-ip

Sets the client IP address or address set.

ipaddress

IP address.

server-ip

Sets the server IP address or address set.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

Usage Guidelines

Use the cifs restart command to restart the WAFS services for a configuration change without having to reboot the WAE.

Related Commands

show cifs

show statistics cifs

clear

To clear the hardware interface, statistics, and other settings, use the clear EXEC command.

clear arp-cache [ipaddress | interface {GigabitEthernet 1-2/port | PortChannel 1-2 | Standby 1-4}]

clear cache dre

clear cdp {counters | table}

clear ip access-list counters [acl-num | acl-name]

clear logging

clear statistics {all | authentication | epm | flow monitor tcpstat-v1 | history | icmp | inline | ip | radius | running | tacacs | tcp | udp | windows-domain}

clear statistics dre [connection | global | nack | peer]

clear statistics tfo {all | auto-discovery | blacklist | filtering | peer | policy-engine | synq}

clear users administrative

clear windows-domain-log

Syntax Description

arp-cache

Clears the ARP cache.

ipaddress

Clears all ARP entries for the IP address.

interface

Clears all ARP entries on the interface.

GigabitEthernet

GigabitEthernet interface.

1-2/port

GigabitEthernet slot/port.

PortChannel

PortChannel interface.

1-2

PortChannel number. Values are 1 or 2.

Standby

Standby interface.

1-4

Stand by interface number 1, 2, 3, or 4.

cache

Clears cached objects.

dre

Clears the DRE cache.

cdp

Resets the Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) statistical data.

counters

Clears the CDP counters.

table

Clears the CDP tables.

ip access-list

Clears the IP access list statistical information.

counters

Clears the IP access list counters.

acl-num

(Optional) Clears the counters for the specified access list, identified using a numeric identifier (standard access list: 1-99; extended access list: 100-199).

acl-name

(Optional) Clears the counters for the specified access list, identified using an alphanumeric identifier of up to 30 characters, beginning with a letter.

logging

Clears the syslog messages saved in the disk file.

statistics

Clears the statistics as specified.

all

Clears all statistics.

authentication

Clears the authentication statistics.

dre

Clears the Data Redundancy Elimination (DRE) statistics.

connection

(Optional) Clears all DRE connection statistics.

global

(Optional) Clears the global DRE statistics.

nack

(Optional) Clears all DRE NACK statistics.

peer

(Optional) Clears all DRE peer statistics.

epm

Clears the DCE-RPC EPM statistics.

flow

Clears the network traffic flow statistics.

monitor

Clears the monitor flow performance statistics.

tcpstat-v1

Clears the tcpstat-v1 collector statistics.

history

Clears the statistics history.

icmp

Clears the ICMP statistics.

inline

Clears the inline interception statistics.

ip

Clears the IP statistics.

radius

Clears the RADIUS statistics.

running

Clears the running statistics.

tacacs

Clears the TACACS+ statistics.

tcp

Clears the TCP statistics.

udp

Clears the UDP statistics.

windows-domain

Clears the Windows domain statistics.

tfo

Clears the TCP flow optimization (TFO) statistics.

all

Clears all of the TFO statistics.

auto-discovery

Clears the TFO auto-discovery statistics.

blacklist

Clears the TFO blacklist statistics.

filtering

Clears the TFO filter table statistics.

peer

Clears the TFO peer statistics.

policy-engine

Clears the TFO application and pass-through statistics.

synq

Clears the TFO SynQ module statistics.

users

Clears the connections (login) of authenticated users.

administrative

Clears the connections of administrative users authenticated through a remote login service.

windows-domain-log

Clears the Samba, Kerberos, and Winbind log files.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

After you use the clear cache dre command, the first 1 MB of data is not optimized. Cisco WAAS does not optimize the first 1 MB of data after a restart of the tcpproxy service. Data transmitted after the first 1 MB of data will be optimized according to the configured policy.

The clear logging command removes all current entries from the syslog.txt file, but does not make an archive of the file. It puts a "Syslog cleared" message in the syslog.txt file to indicate that the syslog has been cleared, as shown in the following example.

Feb 14 12:17:18 WAE# exec_clear_logging:Syslog cleared

The clear statistics command clears all statistical counters from the parameters given. Use this command to monitor fresh statistical data for some or all features without losing cached objects or configurations.

The clear users administrative command clears the connections for all administrative users who are authenticated through a remote login service, such as TACACS. This command does not affect an administrative user who is authenticated through the local database.

The clear windows-domain-log command removes all current entries from the Windows domain log file.

Examples

In the following example, all entries in the syslog.txt file are cleared on the WAAS device:

WAE# clear logging

In the following example, all authentication, RADIUS and TACACS+ information is cleared on the WAAS device:

WAE# clear statistics radius
WAE# clear statistics tacacs
WAE# clear statistics authentication

In the following example, all entries in the Windows domain log file are cleared on the WAAS device:

WAE# clear windows-domain-log

Related Commands

show interface

show wccp

clock

To set clock functions or update the calendar, use the clock EXEC command. To clear clock functions and calendar, use the no form of this command.

clock {read-calendar | set time day month year | update-calendar}

Syntax Description

read-calendar

Reads the calendar and updates the system clock.

set

Sets the time and date.

time

Current time in hh:mm:ss format (hh: 00-23; mm: 00-59; ss: 00-59).

day

Day of the month (1-31).

month

Month of the year (January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December).

year

Year (1993-2035).

update-calendar

Updates the calendar with the system clock.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

If you have an outside source on your network that provides time services (such as a NTP server), you do not need to set the system clock manually. When setting the clock, enter the local time. The WAAS device calculates the UTC based on the time zone set by the clock timezone global configuration command.

Two clocks exist in the system: the software clock and the hardware clock. The software uses the software clock. The hardware clock is used only at bootup to initialize the software clock.

The set keyword sets the software clock.

Examples

The following example sets the software clock on the WAAS device:

WAE# clock set 13:32:00 01 February 2005

Related Commands

show clock

cms

To configure the Centralized Management System (CMS) embedded database parameters for a WAAS device, use the cms EXEC command.

cms {config-sync | database {backup | create | delete | downgrade [script filename] |
lcm {enable | disable} | maintenance {full | regular} | restore filename | validate} | deregister [force] | recover {identity word}}

Syntax Description

config-sync

Sets the node to synchronize configuration with the WAAS Central Manager.

database

Creates, backs up, deletes, restores, or validates the CMS-embedded database management tables or files.

backup

Backs up the database management tables.

create

Creates the embedded database management tables.

delete

Deletes the embedded database files.

downgrade

Downgrades the CMS database.

script

(Optional) Downgrades the CMS database by applying a downgrade script.

filename

Downgraded script filename.

lcm

Configures local/central management on a WAAS device that is registered with the WAAS Central Manager.

enable

Enables synchronization of the WAAS network configuration of the device with the local CLI configuration.

disable

Disables synchronization of the WAAS network configuration of the device with the local CLI configuration.

maintenance

Cleans and reindexes the embedded database tables.

full

Specifies a full maintenance routine for the embedded database tables.

regular

Specifies a regular maintenance routine for the embedded database tables.

restore

Restores the database management tables using the backup local filename.

filename

Database local backup filename.

validate

Validates the database files.

deregister

Removes the registration of the CMS proto device.

force

(Optional) Forces the removal of the node registration.

recover

Recovers the identity of a WAAS device.

identity

Specifies the identity of the recovered device.

word

Identity of the recovered device.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

The WAAS network is a collection of WAAS device and WAAS Central Manager nodes. One primary WAAS Central Manager retains the WAAS network settings and provides other WAAS network nodes with updates. Communication between nodes occurs over secure channels using the Secure Shell Layer (SSL) protocol, where each node on the WAAS network uses a Rivest, Shamir, Adelman (RSA) certificate-key pair to communicate with other nodes.

Use the cms config-sync command to enable registered WAAS devices and standby WAAS Central Manager to contact the primary WAAS Central Manager immediately for a getUpdate (get configuration poll) request before the default polling interval of 5 minutes. For example, when a node is registered with the primary WAAS Central Manager and activated, it appears as Pending in the WAAS Central Manager GUI until it sends a getUpdate request. The cms config-sync command causes the registered node to send a getUpdate request at once, and the status of the node changes as Online.

Use the cms database create command to initialize the CMS database. Before a node can join a WAAS network, it must first be registered and then activated. The cms enable global configuration command automatically registers the node in the database management tables and enables the CMS. The node sends its attribute information to the WAAS Central Manager over the SSL protocol and then stores the new node information. The WAAS Central Manager accepts these node registration requests without admission control and replies with registration confirmation and other pertinent security information required for getting updates. Activate the node using the WAAS Central Manager GUI.

Once the node is activated, it automatically receives configuration updates and the necessary security RSA certificate-key pair from the WAAS Central Manager. This security key allows the node to communicate with any other node in the WAAS network. The cms deregister command removes the node from the WAAS network by deleting registration information and database tables.

To back up the existing management database for the WAAS Central Manager, use the cms database backup command. For database backups, specify the following items:

Location, password, and user ID

Dump format in PostgreSQL plain text syntax

The naming convention for backup files includes the time stamp.


Note For information on the procedure to back up and restore the CMS database on the WAAS Central Manager, see the Cisco Wide Area Application Services Configuration Guide.


When you use the cms recover identity word command when recovering lost registration information, or replacing a failed node with a new node that has having the same registration information, you must specify the device recovery key that you configured in the Modifying Config Property, System.device.recovery.key window of the WAAS Central Manager GUI.

Use the lcm command to configure local/central management (LCM) on a WAE. The LCM feature allows settings that are configured using the device CLI or GUI to be stored as part of the WAAS network-wide configuration data (enable or disable).

When you enter the cms lcm enable command, the CMS process running on WAEs and the standby WAAS Central Manager detects the configuration changes that you made on these devices using CLIs and sends the changes to the primary WAAS Central Manager.

When you enter the cms lcm disable command, the CMS process running on the WAEs and the standby WAAS Central Manager does not send the CLI changes to the primary WAAS Central Manager. Settings configured using the device CLIs will not be sent to the primary WAAS Central Manager.

If LCM is disabled, the settings configured through the WAAS Central Manager GUI will overwrite the settings configured from the WAEs; however, this rule applies only to those local device settings that have been overwritten by the WAAS Central Manager when you have configured the local device settings. If you (as the local CLI user) change the local device settings after the particular configuration has been overwritten by the WAAS Central Manager, the local device configuration will be applicable until the WAAS Central Manager requests a full device statistics update from the WAEs (clicking the Force full database update button from the Device Home window of the WAAS Central Manager GUI triggers a full update). When the WAAS Central Manager requests a full update from the device, the WAAS Central Manager settings will overwrite the local device settings.

Examples

The following example backs up the cms database management tables on the WAAS Central Manager named waas-cm:

waas-cm# cms database backup 
creating backup file with label `backup'
backup file local1/acns-db-9-22-2002-17-36.dump is ready. use `copy' commands to move the 
backup file to a remote host.

The following example validates the cms database management tables on the WAAS Central Manager named waas-cm:

waas-cm# cms database validate 
Management tables are valid

Related Commands

(config) cms

show cms

configure

To enter global configuration mode, use the configure EXEC command. You must be in global configuration mode to enter global configuration commands.

configure

To exit global configuration mode, use the end or exit commands. You can also press Ctrl-Z to exit from global configuration mode.

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use this command to enter global configuration mode.

Examples

The following example shows how to enable global configuration mode on a WAAS device:

WAE# configure 
WAE(config)# 

Related Commands

(config) end

(config) exit

show running-config

show startup-config

copy cdrom

To copy software release files from a CD-ROM, use the copy cdrom EXEC command.

copy cdrom install filedir filename

Syntax Description

cdrom

Copies a file from the CD-ROM.

install

Installs the software release file.

filedir

Directory location of the software release file.

filename

Filename of the software release file.


Defaults

No default behaviors or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Related Commands

install

reload

show running-config

show startup-config

wafs

write

copy compactflash

To copy software release files from a CompactFlash card, use the copy compactflash EXEC command.

copy compactflash install filename

Syntax Description

compactflash

Copies a file from the CompactFlash card.

install

Installs a software release file.

filename

Image filename.


Defaults

No default behaviors or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Related Commands

install

reload

show running-config

show startup-config

wafs

write

copy disk

To copy the configuration or image data from a disk to a remote location using FTP or to the startup configuration, use the copy disk EXEC command.

copy disk {ftp {hostname | ip-address} remotefiledir remotefilename localfilename | startup-config filename}

Syntax Description

disk

Copies a local disk file.

ftp

Copies to a file on an FTP server.

hostname

Hostname of the FTP server.

ip-address

IP address of the FTP server.

remotefiledir

Directory on the FTP server to which the local file is copied.

remotefilename

Name of the local file once it has been copied to the FTP server.

localfilename

Name of the local file to be copied.

startup-config

Copies the configuration file from the disk to startup configuration (NVRAM).

filename

Name of the existing configuration file.


Defaults

No default behaviors or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use the copy disk ftp EXEC command to copy files from a SYSFS partition to an FTP server. Use the copy disk startup-config EXEC command to copy a startup configuration file to NVRAM.

Related Commands

install

reload

show running-config

show startup-config

wafs

write

copy ftp

To copy software configuration or image data from an FTP server, use the copy ftp EXEC command.

copy ftp {central {hostname | ip-address} remotefiledir remotefilename slotnumber [username username password | proxy {hostname | ip-address} proxy_portnum [username username password] | port port-num | md5 md5sum] | disk {hostname | ip-address} remotefiledir remotefilename localfilename | install {hostname | ip-address} remotefiledir remotefilename}

Syntax Description

ftp

Copies a file from an FTP server.

central

Copies a file to the software upgrade image repository.

hostname

Hostname of the FTP server.

ip-address

IP address of the FTP server.

remotefiledir

Directory on the FTP server where the image file to be copied is located.

remotefilename

Name of the file to be copied to the image repository.

slotnumber

Slot location (1-5) into which the upgrade image is to be copied.

username

(Optional) Specifies FTP authentication.

username

(Optional) Clear text of the username.

password

(Optional) Password for FTP authentication.

proxy

(Optional) Specifies proxy address.

hostname

(Optional) Hostname of the proxy server.

ip-address

(Optional) IP address of the proxy server.

proxy_portnum

(Optional) Port number on the proxy server.

username

(Optional) Specifies the proxy server authentication username.

username

(Optional) Clear text of the username.

password

(Optional) Password for proxy server authentication.

port

(Optional) Specifies port at which to connect to the FTP server.

port-num

(Optional) Port number on the FTP server.

md5

(Optional) Specifies MD5 signature of the file being copied.

md5sum

(Optional) MD5 signature.

disk

Copies a file to a local disk.

hostname

Hostname of the FTP server.

ip-address

IP address of the FTP server.

remotefiledir

Directory on the FTP server where the file to be copied is located.

remotefilename

(Optional) Name of the file to be copied to the local disk.

localfilename

(Optional) Name of the copied file as it appears on the local disk.

install

(Optional) Copies the file from an FTP server and installs the software release file to the local device.

hostname

(Optional) Name of the FTP server.

ip-address

(Optional) IP address of the FTP server.

remotefiledir

Remote file directory.

remotefilename

Remote filename.


Defaults

No default behaviors or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use the copy ftp disk EXEC command to copy a file from an FTP server to a SYSFS partition on the WAAS device.

Use the copy ftp install EXEC command to install an image file from an FTP server on a WAAS device. Part of the image goes to disk and part goes to flash memory. Use the copy ftp central EXEC command to download a software image into the repository from an FTP server.

You can also use the copy ftp install EXEC commands to redirect your transfer to a different location. A username and a password have to be authenticated with a primary domain controller (PDC) before the transfer of the software release file to the WAAS device is allowed.

Upgrading the BIOS

You can remotely upgrade the BIOS on the WAE-511, WAE-512, WAE-611, WAE-612, and the WAE-7326. All computer hardware has to work with software through an interface. The Basic Input Output System (BIOS) provides such an interface. It gives the computer a built-in starter kit to run the rest of the software from the hard disk drive. The BIOS is responsible for booting the computer by providing a basic set of instructions. It performs all the tasks that need to be done at start-up time, such as Power-On Self Test (POST) operations and booting the operating system from the hard disk drive. Furthermore, it provides an interface between the hardware and the operating system in the form of a library of interrupt handlers. For instance, each time a key is pressed, the CPU performs an interrupt to read that key, which is similar for other input/output devices, such as serial and parallel ports, video cards, sound cards, hard disk controllers, and so forth. Some older PCs cannot interoperate with all the modern hardware because their BIOS does not support that hardware; the operating system cannot call a BIOS routine to use it. This problem can be solved by replacing the BIOS with a newer one that does support your new hardware or by installing a device driver for the hardware.

All BIOS files needed for a particular hardware model BIOS update are available on Cisco.com as a single .bin package file. This file is a special <WAAS-installable>.bin file that you can install by using the normal software update procedure.

To update the BIOS version on a WAAS device that supports BIOS version updates, you need the following items:

FTP server with the software files

Network connectivity between the device to be updated and the server hosting the update files

Appropriate .bin BIOS update file:

511_bios.bin

611_bios.bin

7326_bios.bin


Caution Be extraordinarily careful when upgrading a Flash BIOS. Make absolutely sure that the BIOS upgrade patch is the exact one required. If you apply the wrong patch, you can render the system unbootable, making it difficult or impossible to recover even by reapplying the proper patch.


Caution Because a failed Flash BIOS update can have dire results, never update a Flash BIOS without first connecting the system to an uninterruptible power supply (UPS).

To remotely install a BIOS update file, use the copy ftp install EXEC command as follows:

WAE# copy ftp install ftp-server remote_file_dir 7326_bios.bin

After the BIOS update file is copied to your system, use the reload EXEC command to reboot as follows:

WAE# reload

The new BIOS takes effect after the system reboots.

Examples

The following example shows how to copy an image file from an FTP server and install the file on the local device:

WAE# copy ftp install 10.1.1.1 //ftp-sj.cisco.com/cisco/waas/4.0 WAAS-4.0.0-k9.bin
Enter username for remote ftp server:biff
Enter password for remote ftp server:*****
Initiating FTP download...
printing one # per 1MB downloaded
Sending:USER biff
10.1.1.1 FTP server (Version) Mon Feb 28 10:30:36 EST
2000) ready.
Password required for biff.
Sending:PASS ***** 
User biff logged in.
Sending:TYPE I
Type set to I.
Sending:PASV
Entering Passive Mode (128,107,193,244,55,156)
Sending:CWD //ftp-sj.cisco.com/cisco/waas/4.0
CWD command successful.
Sending PASV
Entering Passive Mode (128,107,193,244,55,156)
Sending:RETR WAAS-4.0.0-k9.bin
Opening BINARY mode data connection for ruby.bin (87376881 bytes).
###################################################################################
writing flash component:
.................................................................
The new software will run after you reload.

The following example shows how to upgrade the BIOS. All output is written to a separate file (/local1/.bios_upgrade.txt) for traceability. The hardware dependant files that are downloaded from Cisco.com for the BIOS upgrade are automatically deleted from the WAAS device after the BIOS upgrade procedure has been completed.

WAE-7326# copy ftp install upgradeserver /bios/update53/derived/ 7326_bios.bin
Enter username for remote ftp server:myusername
Enter password for remote ftp server:*****
Initiating FTP download...
printing one # per 1MB downloaded
Sending:USER myusername
upgradeserver.cisco.com FTP server (Version wu-2.6.1-18) ready.
Password required for myusername.
Sending:PASS ********
Please read the file README_dotfiles
 it was last modified on Wed Feb 19 16:10:26 2005- 94 days ago
Please read the file README_first
 it was last modified on Wed Feb 19 16:05:29 2005- 94 days ago
User myusername logged in.
Sending:TYPE I
Type set to I.
Sending:PASV
Entering Passive Mode (128,107,193,240,57,37)
Sending:CWD /bios/update53/derived/
CWD command successful.
Sending PASV
Entering Passive Mode (128,107,193,240,146,117)
Sending:RETR 7326_bios.bin
Opening BINARY mode data connection for 7326_bios.bin (834689 bytes).
Fri Jan  7 15:29:07 UTC 2005
BIOS installer running!
Do not turnoff the system till BIOS installation is complete.
Flash chipset:Macronix 29LV320B
0055000.FLS:280000 [80000]
Erasing block 2f:280000 - 28ffff
Erasing block 30:290000 - 29ffff
Erasing block 31:2a0000 - 2affff
Erasing block 32:2b0000 - 2bffff
Erasing block 33:2c0000 - 2cffff
Erasing block 34:2d0000 - 2dffff
Erasing block 35:2e0000 - 2effff
Erasing block 36:2f0000 - 2fffff
Programming block 2f:280000 - 28ffff
Programming block 30:290000 - 29ffff
Programming block 31:2a0000 - 2affff
Programming block 32:2b0000 - 2bffff
Programming block 33:2c0000 - 2cffff
Programming block 34:2d0000 - 2dffff
Programming block 35:2e0000 - 2effff
Programming block 36:2f0000 - 2fffff
SCSIROM.BIN:260000 [20000]
Erasing block 2d:260000 - 26ffff
Erasing block 2e:270000 - 27ffff
Programming block 2d:260000 - 26ffff
Programming block 2e:270000 - 27ffff
PXEROM.BIN:250000 [10000]
Erasing block 2c:250000 - 25ffff
Programming block 2c:250000 - 25ffff
Primary BIOS flashed successfully
Cleanup BIOS related files that were downloaded....
The new software will run after you reload.
WAE-7326#

Related Commands

install

reload

show running-config

show startup-config

wafs

write

copy http

To copy configuration or image files from an HTTP server to the WAAS device, use the copy http EXEC command.

copy http install {hostname | ip-address}remotefiledir remotefilename [port portnum] [proxy proxy_portnum] [username username password]

Syntax Description

http

Copies the file from an HTTP server.

install

Copies the file from an HTTP server and installs the software release file to the local device.

hostname

Name of the HTTP server.

ip-address

IP address of the HTTP server.

remotefiledir

Remote file directory.

remotefilename

Remote filename.

port

(Optional) Port to connect to the HTTP server (default is 80).

portnum

HTTP server port number (1-65535).

proxy

(Optional) Allows the request to be redirected to an HTTP proxy server.

proxy_portnum

HTTP proxy server port number (1-65535).

username

(Optional) Username to access the HTTP proxy server.

username

User login name.

password

Establishes password authentication.


Defaults

HTTP server port: 80

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use the copy http install EXEC command to install an image file from an HTTP server and install it on a WAAS device. It transfers the image from an HTTP server to the WAAS device using HTTP as the transport protocol and installs the software on the device. Part of the image goes to disk and part goes to flash memory. Use the copy http central EXEC command to download a software image into the repository from an HTTP server.

You can also use the copy http install EXEC commands to redirect your transfer to a different location or HTTP proxy server, by specifying the proxy hostname | ip-address option. A username and a password have to be authenticated with a primary domain controller (PDC) before the transfer of the software release file to the WAAS device is allowed.

Upgrading the BIOS

You can remotely upgrade the BIOS on the WAE-511, WAE-512, WAE-611, WAE-612, and the WAE-7326. All computer hardware has to work with software through an interface. The Basic Input Output System (BIOS) provides such an interface. It gives the computer a built-in starter kit to run the rest of the software from the hard disk drive. The BIOS is responsible for booting the computer by providing a basic set of instructions. It performs all the tasks that need to be done at start-up time, such as Power-On Self Test (POST) operations and booting the operating system from the hard disk drive. Furthermore, it provides an interface between the hardware and the operating system in the form of a library of interrupt handlers. For instance, each time a key is pressed, the CPU performs an interrupt to read that key, which is similar for other input/output devices, such as serial and parallel ports, video cards, sound cards, hard disk controllers, and so forth. Some older PCs cannot interoperate with all the modern hardware because their BIOS does not support that hardware; the operating system cannot call a BIOS routine to use it. This problem can be solved by replacing the BIOS with a newer one that does support your new hardware or by installing a device driver for the hardware.

All BIOS files needed for a particular hardware model BIOS update are available on Cisco.com as a single .bin package file. This file is a special <WAAS-installable>.bin file that you can install by using the normal software update procedure.

To update the BIOS version on a WAAS device that supports BIOS version updates, you need the following items:

HTTP server with the software files

Network connectivity between the device to be updated and the server hosting the update files

Appropriate .bin BIOS update file:

511_bios.bin

611_bios.bin

7326_bios.bin


Caution Be extraordinarily careful when upgrading a Flash BIOS. Make absolutely sure that the BIOS upgrade patch is the exact one required. If you apply the wrong patch, you can render the system unbootable, making it difficult or impossible to recover even by reapplying the proper patch.


Caution Because a failed Flash BIOS update can have dire results, never update a Flash BIOS without first connecting the system to an uninterruptible power supply (UPS).

To install the BIOS update file on a WAAS device, use the copy http install EXEC command as follows:

WAE# copy http install http-server remote_file_dir 7326_bios.bin 
[portnumber]

After the BIOS update file is copied to your system, use the reload EXEC command to reboot the WAAS device as follows:

WAE# reload

The new BIOS takes effect after the system reboots.

Examples

The following example shows how to copy an image file from an HTTP server and install the file on the WAAS device:

WAE# copy http install 10.1.1.1 //ftp-sj.cisco.com/cisco/waas/4.0 WAAS-4.0.0-k9.bin
Enter username for remote ftp server:biff
Enter password for remote ftp server:*****
Initiating FTP download...
printing one # per 1MB downloaded
Sending:USER biff
10.1.1.1 FTP server (Version) Mon Feb 28 10:30:36 EST
2000) ready.
Password required for biff.
Sending:PASS ***** 
User biff logged in.
Sending:TYPE I
Type set to I.
Sending:PASV
Entering Passive Mode (128,107,193,244,55,156)
Sending:CWD //ftp-sj.cisco.com/cisco/waas/4.0
CWD command successful.
Sending PASV
Entering Passive Mode (128,107,193,244,55,156)
Sending:RETR WAAS-4.0.0-k9.bin
Opening BINARY mode data connection for ruby.bin (87376881 bytes).
###################################################################################
writing flash component:
.................................................................
The new software will run after you reload.

The following example shows how to upgrade the BIOS. All output is written to a separate file (/local1/.bios_upgrade.txt) for traceability. The hardware dependant files that are downloaded from Cisco.com for the BIOS upgrade are automatically deleted from the WAAS device after the BIOS upgrade procedure has been completed.

WAE-7326# copy ftp install upgradeserver /bios/update53/derived/ 7326_bios.bin
Enter username for remote ftp server:myusername
Enter password for remote ftp server:*****
Initiating FTP download...
printing one # per 1MB downloaded
Sending:USER myusername
upgradeserver.cisco.com FTP server (Version wu-2.6.1-18) ready.
Password required for myusername.
Sending:PASS ********
Please read the file README_dotfiles
 it was last modified on Wed Feb 19 16:10:26 2005- 94 days ago
Please read the file README_first
 it was last modified on Wed Feb 19 16:05:29 2005- 94 days ago
User myusername logged in.
Sending:TYPE I
Type set to I.
Sending:PASV
Entering Passive Mode (128,107,193,240,57,37)
Sending:CWD /bios/update53/derived/
CWD command successful.
Sending PASV
Entering Passive Mode (128,107,193,240,146,117)
Sending:RETR 7326_bios.bin
Opening BINARY mode data connection for 7326_bios.bin (834689 bytes).
Fri Jan  7 15:29:07 UTC 2005
BIOS installer running!
Do not turnoff the system till BIOS installation is complete.
Flash chipset:Macronix 29LV320B
0055000.FLS:280000 [80000]
Erasing block 2f:280000 - 28ffff
Erasing block 30:290000 - 29ffff
Erasing block 31:2a0000 - 2affff
Erasing block 32:2b0000 - 2bffff
Erasing block 33:2c0000 - 2cffff
Erasing block 34:2d0000 - 2dffff
Erasing block 35:2e0000 - 2effff
Erasing block 36:2f0000 - 2fffff
Programming block 2f:280000 - 28ffff
Programming block 30:290000 - 29ffff
Programming block 31:2a0000 - 2affff
Programming block 32:2b0000 - 2bffff
Programming block 33:2c0000 - 2cffff
Programming block 34:2d0000 - 2dffff
Programming block 35:2e0000 - 2effff
Programming block 36:2f0000 - 2fffff
SCSIROM.BIN:260000 [20000]
Erasing block 2d:260000 - 26ffff
Erasing block 2e:270000 - 27ffff
Programming block 2d:260000 - 26ffff
Programming block 2e:270000 - 27ffff
PXEROM.BIN:250000 [10000]
Erasing block 2c:250000 - 25ffff
Programming block 2c:250000 - 25ffff
Primary BIOS flashed successfully
Cleanup BIOS related files that were downloaded....
The new software will run after you reload.

Related Commands

install

reload

show running-config

show startup-config

wafs

write

copy running-config

To copy a configuration or image data from the current configuration, use the copy running-config EXEC command.

copy running-config {disk filename | startup-config | tftp {hostname | ip-address} remotefilename}

Syntax Description

running-config

Copies the current system configuration.

disk

Copies the current system configuration to a disk file.

filename

Name of the file to be created on disk.

startup-config

Copies the running configuration to startup configuration (NVRAM).

tftp

Copies the running configuration to a file on a TFTP server.

hostname

Hostname of the TFTP server.

ip-address

IP address of the TFTP server.

remotefilename

Remote filename of the configuration file to be created on the TFTP server. Use the complete pathname.


Defaults

No default behaviors or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use the copy running-config EXEC command to copy the WAAS device's running system configuration to a SYSFS partition, flash memory, or TFTP server. The copy running-config startup-config EXEC command is equivalent to the write memory EXEC command.

Related Commands

install

reload

show running-config

show startup-config

wafs

write

copy startup-config

To copy configuration or image data from the startup configuration, use the copy startup-config EXEC command.

copy startup-config {disk filename | running-config | tftp {hostname | ip-address} remotefilename}

Syntax Description

startup-config

Copies the startup configuration.

disk

Copies the startup configuration to a disk file.

filename

Name of the startup configuration file to be copied to the local disk.

running-config

Copies the startup configuration to running configuration.

tftp

Copies the startup configuration to a file on a TFTP server.

hostname

Hostname of the TFTP server.

ip-address

IP address of the TFTP server.

remotefilename

Remote filename of the startup configuration file to be created on the TFTP server. Use the complete pathname.


Defaults

No default behaviors or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use the copy startup-config EXEC command to copy the startup configuration file to a TFTP server or to a SYSFS partition.

Related Commands

install

reload

show running-config

show startup-config

wafs

write

copy sysreport

To copy system troubleshooting information from the device, use the copy sysreport EXEC command.

copy sysreport {disk filename | ftp {hostname | ip-address} remotedirectory remotefilename | tftp {hostname | ip-address} remotefilename} [start-date {day month | month day} year [end-date {day month | month day} year]]

Syntax Description

sysreport

Generates and saves a report containing WAAS system information in a file.

disk

Copies system information to a disk file.

filename

Name of the file to be created on disk. Note that .tar.gz is appended to the filename that you specify.

ftp

Copies system information to a FTP server.

hostname

Hostname of the FTP server.

ip-address

IP address of the FTP server.

remotedirectory

Remote directory where the system information file is to be created on the FTP server.

remotefilename

Remote filename of the system information file to be created on the FTP server.

tftp

Copies system information to a TFTP server.

hostname

Hostname of the TFTP server.

ip-address

IP address of the TFTP server.

remotefilename

Remote filename of the system information file to be created on the TFTP server. Use the complete pathname.

start-date

(Optional) Start date of information in the generated system report.

day month

Start date day of the month (1-31) and month of the year (January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December). You can alternately specify the month first, followed by the day.

year

Start date year (1993-2035).

end-date

(Optional) End date of information in the generated system report. If omitted, this date defaults to today's date. The report includes files through the end of this day.

day month

End date day of the month (1-31) and month of the year (January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December). You can alternately specify the month first, followed by the day.

year

End date year (1993-2035).


Defaults

If end-date is not specified, today's date is used.

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

The copy sysreport command consumes significant CPU and disk resources and can adversely affect system performance while it is running.

Examples

The following example shows how to copy system information to the file mysysinfo on the local WAAS device:

WAE# copy sysreport disk mysysinfo start-date 1 April 2006 end-date April 30 2006

The following example shows how to copy system information by FTP to the file foo in the root directory of the FTP server named myserver:

WAE# copy sysreport ftp myserver / foo start-date 1 April 2006 end-date April 30 2006

Related Commands

show running-config

show startup-config

wafs

copy system-status

To copy status information from the system for debugging, use the copy system-status EXEC command.

copy system-status disk filename

Syntax Description

system-status disk

Copies the system status to a disk file.

filename

Name of the file to be created on the disk.


Defaults

No default behaviors or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use the copy system-status EXEC command to create a file on a SYSFS partition that contains hardware and software status information.

Related Commands

install

reload

show running-config

show startup-config

wafs

write

copy tech-support

To copy the configuration or image data from the system to use when working with Cisco TAC, use the copy tech-support EXEC command.

copy tech-support {disk filename | tftp {hostname | ip-address} remotefilename}

Syntax Description

tech-support

Copies system information for technical support.

disk

Copies system information for technical support to disk file.

filename

Name of the file to be created on disk.

tftp

Copies system information for technical support to a TFTP server.

hostname

Hostname of the TFTP server.

ip-address

IP address of the TFTP server.

remotefilename

Remote filename of the system information file to be created on the TFTP server. Use the complete pathname.


Defaults

No default behaviors or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use the copy tech-support tftp EXEC command to copy technical support information to a TFTP server or to a SYSFS partition.

Related Commands

install

reload

show running-config

show startup-config

wafs

write

copy tftp

To copy configuration or image data from a TFTP server, use the copy tftp EXEC command.

copy tftp {disk {hostname | ip-address} remotefilename localfilename | running-config
{
hostname | ip-address} remotefilename | startup-config {hostname | ip-address} remotefilename}

Syntax Description

tftp

Copies an image from a TFTP server.

disk

Copies an image from a TFTP server to a disk file.

hostname

Hostname of the TFTP server.

ip-address

IP address of the TFTP server.

remotefilename

Name of the remote image file to be copied from the TFTP server. Use the complete pathname.

localfilename

Name of the image file to be created on the local disk.

running-config

Copies an image from a TFTP server to the running configuration.

hostname

Hostname of the TFTP server.

ip-address

IP address of the TFTP server.

remotefilename

Name of the remote image file to be copied from the TFTP server. Use the complete pathname.

startup-config

Copies an image from a TFTP server to the startup configuration.

hostname

Hostname of the TFTP server.

ip-address

IP address of the TFTP server.

remotefilename

Name of the remote image file to be copied from the TFTP server. Use the complete pathname.


Defaults

No default behaviors or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use the copy tftp disk EXEC command to copy a file from a TFTP server to disk.

Related Commands

install

reload

show running-config

show startup-config

wafs

write

cpfile

To make a copy of a file, use the cpfile EXEC command.

cpfile oldfilename newfilename

Syntax Description

oldfilename

Name of the file to copy.

newfilename

Name of the copy to be created.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use this EXEC command to create a copy of a file. Only SYSFS files can be copied.

Examples

The following example shows how to create a copy of a file.

WAE# cpfile fe511-194616.bin fd511-194618.bin

Related Commands

deltree

dir

lls

ls

mkdir

pwd

rename

debug

To monitor and record the WAAS application acceleration and central manager functions, use the debug EXEC command. To disable debugging, use the no form of the command. (See also the undebug command.)

In the application-accelerator device mode, the debug commands are as follows:

debug authentication {content-request | user | windows-domain}

debug buf {all | dmbuf | dmsg}

debug cdp {adjacency | events | ip | packets}

debug cli {all | bin | parser}

debug cms

debug dataserver {all | clientlib | server}

debug dhcp

debug dre {aggregation | all | cache | connection {aggregation [acl] | cache [acl] | core [acl] | message [acl] | misc [acl] | acl} | core | lz | message | misc}

debug epm

debug flow monitor tcpstat-v1

debug logging all

debug ntp

debug print-spooler {all | brief | errors | warnings}

debug rbcp

debug snmp {all | cli | main | mib | traps}

debug stats {all | collections | computation | history}

debug tfo {buffer-mgr | connection [auto-discovery [acl] | comp-mgr [acl] | conn-mgr [acl] | egress-method [acl] | filtering [acl] | netio-engine [acl] | policy-engine [acl] | synq [acl] | acl] | stat-mgr | translog}

debug translog export

debug wafs {{all | core-fe | edge-fe | manager | utilities} {debug | error | info | warn}}

debug wccp {all | detail | error | events | keepalive | packets | slowstart}


Note The dre, epm, flow monitor, print-spooler, rbcp, tfo, translog, wafs, and wccp command options are supported in the application-accelerator device mode only.


In the central manager device mode, the debug commands are as follows:

debug aaa accounting

debug all

debug authentication {content-request | user | windows-domain}

debug buf {all | dmbuf | dmsg}

debug cdp {adjacency | events | ip | packets}

debug cli {all | bin | parser}

debug cms

debug dataserver {all | clientlib | server}

debug dhcp

debug emdb [level [levelnum]]

debug key-manager

debug logging all

debug ntp

debug rpc {detail | trace}

debug snmp {all | cli | main | mib | traps}

debug stats {all | collections | computation | history}


Note The emdb and rpc command options are supported in the central manager device mode only.


Syntax Description

aaa accounting

(Optional) Enables AAA accounting actions.

all

(Optional) Enables all debugging options.

authentication

(Optional) Enables authentication debugging.

content-request

Enables content request authentication debugging.

user

Enables debugging of the user login against the system authentication.

windows-domain

Enables Windows domain authentication debugging.

buf

(Optional) Enables buffer manager debugging.

all

Enables all buffer manager debugging.

dmbuf

Enables only dmbuf debugging.

dmsg

Enables only dmsg debugging.

cdp

(Optional) Enables CDP debugging.

adjacency

Enables CDP neighbor information debugging.

events

Enables CDP events debugging.

ip

Enables CDP IP debugging.

packets

Enables packet-related CDP debugging.

cli

(Optional) Enables CLI debugging.

all

Enables all CLI debugging.

bin

Enables CLI command binary program debugging.

parser

Enables CLI command parser debugging.

cms

(Optional) Enables CMS debugging.

dataserver

(Optional) Enables data server debugging.

all

Enables all data server debugging.

clientlib

Enables data server client library module debugging.

server

Enables data server module debugging.

dhcp

(Optional) Enables DHCP debugging.

dre

(Optional) Enables DRE debugging.

aggregation

Enables DRE chunk-aggregation debugging.

all

Enables the debugging of all DRE commands.

cache

Enables DRE cache debugging.

connection

Enables DRE connection debugging.

aggregation [acl]

Enables DRE chunk-aggregation debugging for a specified connection.

cache [acl]

Enables DRE cache debugging for a specified connection.

core [acl]

Enables DRE core debugging for a specified connection.

message [acl]

Enables DRE message debugging for a specified connection.

misc [acl]

Enables DRE other debugging for a specified connection.

acl

ACL to limit connections traced.

core

Enables DRE core debugging.

message

Enables DRE message debugging.

misc

Enables DRE other debugging.

epm

(Optional) Enables the DCE-RPC EPM debugging.

flow

(Optional) Enables network traffic flow debugging.

monitor

Enables monitor flow performance debugging commands.

tcpstat-v1

Enables tcpstat-v1 debugging.

logging

(Optional) Enables logging debugging.

all

Enables all logging debugging.

ntp

(Optional) Enables NTP debugging.

print-spooler

(Optional) Enables print spooler debugging.

all

Enables print spooler debugging using all debug features.

brief

Enables print spooler debugging using only brief debug messages.

errors

Enables print spooler debugging using only the error conditions.

warnings

Enables print spooler debugging using only the warning conditions.

rbcp

(Optional) Enables RBCP debugging.

snmp

(Optional) Enables SNMP debug commands.

all

Enables all SNMP debug commands.

cli

Enables SNMP CLI debugging.

main

Enables SNMP main debugging.

mib

Enables SNMP MIB debugging.

traps

Enables SNMP trap debugging.

stats

(Optional) Enables statistics debugging.

all

Enables all statistics debug commands.

collection

Enables collection statistics debugging.

computation

Enables computation statistics debugging.

history

Enables history statistics debugging.

tfo

(Optional) Enables TFO debugging.

buffer-mgr

Enables TFO buffer manager debugging.

connection

Enables TFO connection debugging.

auto-discovery [acl]

Enables TFO connection debugging for the auto-discovery module.

comp-mgr [acl]

Enables TFO connection debugging for the compression module.

conn-mgr [acl]

Enables TFO connection debugging for the connection manager.

egress-method [acl]

Enables TFO connection debugging for the connection egress method.

filtering [acl]

Enables TFO connection debugging for filtering module.

netio-engine [acl]

Enables TFO connection debugging for network input/output module.

policy-engine [acl]

Enables TFO connection debugging of application policies.

synq [acl]

Enables TFO connection debugging for the SynQ module.

acl

ACL to limit TFO connections.

stat-mgr

Enables TFO statistics manager debugging.

translog

Enables TFO transaction log debugging.

translog

(Optional) Enables transaction logging debug commands.

export

Enables transaction log FTP export debugging.

wafs

(Optional) Unsets the notification level (debug, info, warn, error) at which messages from the WAAS software component and utilities are logged.

all

Unsets the logging level for all software components and utilities at once.

core-fe

Unsets the logging level for WAEs s acting as a core File Engine.

edge-fe

Unsets the logging level for WAEs acting as an edge File Engine.

manager

Unsets the logging level for the Device Manager.

utilities

Unsets the logging level for WAAS utilities.

wccp

(Optional) Enables the WCCP information debugging.

all

Enables all WCCP debugging functions.

detail

Enables the WCCP detail debugging.

error

Enables the WCCP error debugging.

events

Enables the WCCP events debugging.

keepalive

Enables the debugging for WCCP keepalives that are sent to the applications.

packets

Enables the WCCP packet-related information debugging.

slowstart

Enables the WCCP slow-start debugging.


The following syntax table describes the options that are available in the central manager device mode:

emdb

(Optional) Enables embedded database debugging.

level

(Optional) Enables the specified debug level for EMDB service.

levelnum

(Optional) Debug level to disable. (Level 0 disables debugging.)

key-manager

(Optional) Enables the Central Manager key manager debugging.

rpc

(Optional) Enables the remote procedure calls (RPC) logs.

detail

Enables the RPC logs of priority "detail" level or higher.

trace

Enables the RPC logs of priority "trace" level or higher.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Because the performance of the WAAS device degrades when you use the debug command, we recommend that you use this command only at the direction of Cisco TAC. For more information, see the "Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines" section on page 16.

If the watchdog utility is not running, the message "WAAS is not running" appears.

Use the show debugging command to display enabled debug options.

Examples

The following example shows how to enable debug monitoring of user authentication, verify it is enabled, and then disable debug monitoring:

WAE# debug authentication user
WAE# show debugging
Debug authentication (user) is ON
WAE# no debug authentication user

The following example shows how to set the logging level to debug for the Core WAEs in your system, then return the logging level to its default (info):

WAE# debug wafs ?
  all        log level for all components
  core-fe    log level for Core FE
  edge-fe    log level for Edge FE
  manager    log level for Manager
  utilities  log level for Utilities
WAE# debug wafs core-fe ?
  debug  set log level to DEBUG
  error  set log level to ERROR
  info   set log level to INFO (default)
  warn   set log level to WARN
WAE# debug wafs core-fe debug
corefe log level set to DEBUG

Related Commands

show debugging

undebug

delfile

To delete a file from the current directory, use the delfile EXEC command.

delfile filename

Syntax Description

filename

Name of the file to delete.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use this EXEC command to remove a file from a SYSFS partition on the disk drive of the WAAS device.

Examples

The following example shows how to delete a temporary file from the /local1 directory using an absolute path.

WAE# delfile /local1/tempfile

Related Commands

cpfile

dir

lls

ls

mkdir

pwd

rename

deltree

To remove a directory along with all of its subdirectories and files, use the deltree EXEC command.

deltree directory

Syntax Description

directory

Name of the directory tree to delete.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use this EXEC command to remove a directory and all files within the directory from the WAAS SYSFS file system. No warning is given that you are removing the subdirectories and files.


Note Be sure you do not remove files or directories required for the WAAS device to function properly.


Examples

The following example shows how to delete the testdir directory from the /local1 directory:

WAE# deltree /local1/testdir

Related Commands

cpfile

dir

lls

ls

mkdir

pwd

rename

dir

To view details of one file or all files in a directory, use the dir EXEC command.

dir [directory]

Syntax Description

directory

(Optional) Name of the directory to list.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use this EXEC command to view a detailed list of files contained within the working directory, including names, sizes, and time created. The lls EXEC command produces the same output.

Examples

The following example shows a detailed list of all the files for the current directory:

WAE# dir   
size          time of last change             name
-------------  -------------------------          -----------
         4096  Fri Feb 24 14:40:00 2006  <DIR>    actona
         4096  Tue Mar 28 14:42:44 2006  <DIR>    core_dir
         4096  Wed Apr 12 20:23:10 2006  <DIR>    crash
         4506  Tue Apr 11 13:52:45 2006           dbupgrade.log
         4096  Tue Apr  4 22:50:11 2006  <DIR>    downgrade
         4096  Sun Apr 16 09:01:56 2006  <DIR>    errorlog
         4096  Wed Apr 12 20:23:41 2006  <DIR>    logs
        16384  Thu Feb 16 12:25:29 2006  <DIR>    lost+found
         4096  Wed Apr 12 03:26:02 2006  <DIR>    sa
        24576  Sun Apr 16 23:38:21 2006  <DIR>    service_logs
         4096  Thu Feb 16 12:26:09 2006  <DIR>    spool
      9945390  Sun Apr 16 23:38:20 2006           syslog.txt
     10026298  Thu Apr  6 12:25:00 2006           syslog.txt.1
     10013564  Thu Apr  6 12:25:00 2006           syslog.txt.2
     10055850  Thu Apr  6 12:25:00 2006           syslog.txt.3
     10049181  Thu Apr  6 12:25:00 2006           syslog.txt.4
         4096  Thu Feb 16 12:29:30 2006  <DIR>    var
          508  Sat Feb 25 13:18:35 2006           wdd.sh.signed

The following example shows only the detailed information for the logs directory:

WAE# dir logs
size          time of last change             name
-------------  -------------------------          -----------
         4096  Thu Apr  6 12:13:50 2006  <DIR>    actona
         4096  Mon Mar  6 14:14:41 2006  <DIR>    apache
         4096  Sun Apr 16 23:36:40 2006  <DIR>    emdb
         4096  Thu Feb 16 11:51:51 2006  <DIR>    export
           92  Wed Apr 12 20:23:20 2006           ftp_export.status
         4096  Wed Apr 12 20:23:43 2006  <DIR>    rpc_httpd
            0  Wed Apr 12 20:23:41 2006           snmpd.log
         4096  Sun Mar 19 18:47:29 2006  <DIR>    tfo

Related Commands

lls

ls

disable

To turn off privileged EXEC commands, use the disable EXEC command.

disable

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use the WAAS software CLI EXEC mode for setting, viewing, and testing system operations. This command mode is divided into two access levels, user and privileged. To access privileged-level EXEC mode, enter the enable EXEC command at the user access level prompt and specify a privileged EXEC password (superuser or admin-equivalent password) when prompted for a password.

WAE> enable

Password:

The disable command places you in the user-level EXEC shell (notice the prompt change).

Examples

The following example enters the user-level EXEC mode from the privileged EXEC mode:

WAE# disable
WAE>

Related Commands

enable

disk

To configure disks on a WAAS device, use the disk EXEC command.

disk delete-partitions diskname

disk disk-name diskxx replace

disk insert diskname

disk recreate-raid

disk reformat diskname

disk scan-errors diskname

delete-partitions

Deletes data on the specified logical disk drive. After using this command, the WAAS software treats the specified disk drive as blank. All previous data on the drive is inaccessible.

diskname

Name of the disk from which to delete partitions (disk00, disk01).

For RAID-5 systems, this option is not available because only one logical drive is available.

disk-name diskxx replace

Shuts down the physical disk with the name diskxx (disk00, disk01, etc.) so that it can be replaced in the RAID-5 array.

Note This option is available only on RAID-5 systems.

insert

Instructs the SCSI host to rescan the bus to detect and mount the newly inserted disk.

Note This option is available only on WAE-612 and WAE-7326 models.

diskname

Name of the disk to be inserted (disk00, disk01).

recreate-raid

Recreates the RAID-5 array.

Note This option is available only on RAID-5 systems.

reformat

Performs a low-level reformatting of a SCSI disk drive and remaps bad sectors.


Caution Use this command with extreme caution to avoid loss of data.

Note This option is not available on RAID-5 systems.

diskname

Name of the disk to be reformatted (disk00, disk01).

scan-errors

Scans SCSI or IDE disks for errors and remaps the bad sectors, if they are unused.

For RAID-5 systems, this command scans the logical RAID device for errors. On these systems, there is no diskname option.

diskname

Name of the disk to be reformatted (disk00, disk01).


Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Logical Disk Handling with RAID-5

Logical disk handling with Redundant Array of Independent Disks-5 (RAID-5) is implemented in WAAS as a hardware feature. RAID-5 devices can create a single logical disk drive that may contain up to six physical hard disk drives, providing increased logical disk capacity. (The WAE-7341 supports four disks, and the WAE-7371 supports six disks.)

Systems with RAID-5 continue operating if one of the physical drives fails (RAID-5 moves the drive to the Defunct state). RAID-5 also permits hot-swapping of the disk hardware after the failed drive is properly shutdown. (For the disk removal and replacement procedure for RAID-5 systems, see the Cisco Wide Area Application Services Configuration Guide, Chapter 14.)

Logical Disk Handling with RAID-1

RAID-1 is implemented in WAAS as a software feature. A RAID-1 WAAS device can use two disk drives to increase reliability. RAID-1 provides disk mirroring (data is written redundantly to two or more drives). The goal is higher reliability through redundancy. With RAID-1, file system write performance may be affected because each disk write must be executed against two disk drives. RAID-1 (mirroring) is used for all file systems on the RAID-1 device. This setup ensures reliable execution of the software in all cases.


Note The WAAS software uses the CONTENT file system for both the Wide Area File Services (WAFS) file system and the data redundancy elimination (DRE) cache.


Hot Swap for WAE-612, WAE-7326, WAE-7341, and WAE-7371 Disk Drives

This release of WAAS supports hot swap functionality for both failed disk replacement and scheduled disk maintenance. On the WAE-612 and WAE-7326, use the disk disk-name diskxx shutdown global configuration command to shut down a disk for scheduled disk maintenance. On the WAE-7341 and WAE-7371, use the disk disk-name diskxx replace EXEC command to shut down a disk. (For the scheduled disk maintenance procedure, see the Cisco Wide Area Application Services Configuration Guide, Chapter 14.)

You must wait for the disk to be completely shut down before you physically remove the disk from the WAE. When the RAID removal process is complete, WAAS generates a disk failure alarm and trap. In addition, a syslog ERROR message is logged.

If the software removes a failed disk during the RAID rebuild process, a RAID rebuild failure alarm is generated. If you administratively shut down the disk during the RAID rebuild process, a RAID rebuild abort alarm is generated instead.

If the removal event occurs while the RAID is in the rebuild process, the RAID removal process may take up to one minute before it is successful. The exact duration of this process depends on the size of the disk.

Automatic Failed Disk Handling

The disk hot swap functionality automatically disables a failed disk if the system detects one critical disk alarm. The software removes the failed disk automatically regardless of the setting for disk error-handling.

Replacing a Failed Disk

For WAE-7341 and WAE-7371 models, when you replace a failed disk that was automatically disabled by the software, the disk automatically returns to service. For WAE-612 and WAE-7326 models, when you replace a failed disk that was automatically disabled by the software, use the disk insert command in EXEC mode to bring the disk back into service. For all other models, see the (config) disk disk-name command section.

Recreating the RAID-5 Disk Array

To recreate the logical disk array for RAID-5 systems, use the EXEC mode disk recreate-raid command, as shown in following configuration sequence:

WAE-7341(config)# disk logical shutdown
WAE-7341# reload
WAE-7341# copy running-config startup-config

Wait for the system to boot up.

WAE-7341# disk recreate-raid
WAE-7341(config)# no disk logical shutdown
WAE-7341# reload
WAE-7341# copy running-config startup-config

After the system boots, wait approximately half an hour for all of the filesystems to be recreated.


Caution When you recreate the RAID-5 disk array, you lose all data on the drives.

Reinstall the software by entering copy ftp install in EXEC mode.

For 300 GB SAS drives, recreating and synchronizing the RAID array may take up to five hours. While the RAID-5 synchronization is running in the background, the system will be fully functional; however, performance may be affected by the background operation.

Disk Information

To identify which disks have been identified as failed or bad, use the show disks failed-disk-id EXEC command. Do not reinsert any disk with a serial number shown in this list.


Note This command is not available on WAE-7341 and WAE-7371 models.


Reformatting a SCSI Disk Drive

Use the disk reformat EXEC command to reformat a SCSI disk drive on a WAAS device. The SCSI drive cannot be in use when you execute this command.


Caution To avoid loss of data, use this command with extreme caution.


Note This command is only available on WAE-612 systems with SCSI drives. This command is removed for WAE-611 and WAE-7326 systems in WAAS 4.0.13.


The following scenario shows how to reformat a SCSI drive:

1. Unmount the filesystem and remove the disk from the RAID-1 array by using the disk disk-name diskxx shutdown command in global configuration mode.

WAE611(config)# disk disk-name disk01 shutdown

2. Reformat the disk. On completion of this command the drive is blank.

WAE611# disk reformat disk01

3. Bring the disk back into service by using the no disk disk-name diskxx shutdown command in global configuration mode.

WAE611(config)# no disk disk-name disk01 shutdown

To use the disk scan errors command, follow the same procedure as for the disk reformat command.

Removing All Disk Partitions on a Single Disk Drive and
Removing the Disk Partition on the Logical Drive for RAID-5 Systems

Use the disk delete-partitions EXEC command to remove all disk partitions on a single disk drive on a WAAS device or to remove the disk partition on the logical drive for RAID-5 systems.


Caution After using the disk delete-partitions EXEC command, the WAAS software treats the specified disk drive as blank. All previous data on the drive is inaccessible.

Use this command when you want to add a new disk drive that was previously used with another operating system (for example, a Microsoft Windows or Linux operating system). When asked if you want to erase everything on the disk, specify "yes" to proceed, as follows:

WAE# disk delete-partitions disk01 
This will erase everything on disk. Are you sure? [no] yes


Note When you use the disk delete-partitions EXEC command on the WAE-7341 or WAE-7371 models, the command deletes the entire logical volume. The individual disk name option is not available on these platforms.


Related Commands

(config) disk disk-name

(config) disk error-handling

(config) disk logical shutdown

show disks

dnslookup

To resolve a host or domain name to an IP address, use the dnslookup EXEC command.

dnslookup {hostname | domainname}

Syntax Description

hostname

Name of DNS server on the network.

domainname

Name of domain.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

The following three examples show how the dnslookup command is used to resolve the hostname myhost to IP address 172.31.69.11, abd.com to IP address 192.168.219.25, and an IP address used as a hostname to 10.0.11.0:

WAE# dnslookup myhost
official hostname: myhost.abc.com
          address: 172.31.69.11

WAE# dnslookup abc.com
official hostname: abc.com
         address: 192.168.219.25

WAE# dnslookup 10.0.11.0
official hostname: 10.0.11.0
          address: 10.0.11.0

enable

To access privileged EXEC commands, use the enable EXEC command.

enable

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use the WAAS software CLI EXEC mode for setting, viewing, and testing system operations. This command mode is divided into two access levels: user and privileged. To access privileged-level EXEC mode, enter the enable EXEC command at the user access level prompt and specify a privileged EXEC password (superuser or admin-equivalent password) when prompted for a password.

In TACACS+, there is an enable password feature that allows an administrator to define a different enable password per administrative-level user. If an administrative-level user logs in to the WAAS device with a normal-level user account (privilege level of 0) instead of an admin or admin-equivalent user account (privilege level of 15), that user must enter the admin password to access privileged-level EXEC mode.

WAE> enable

Password:


Note This caveat applies even if the WAAS users are using TACACS+ for login authentication.


The disable command takes you from privileged EXEC mode to user EXEC mode.

Examples

The following example shows how to access privileged EXEC mode:

WAE> enable
WAE#

Related Commands

disable

exit

exit

To terminate privileged-level EXEC mode and return to the user-level EXEC mode, use the exit command.

exit

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

All modes

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

This command is equivalent to the Ctrl-Z or the end command. The exit command issued in the user level EXEC shell terminates the console or Telnet session.

Examples

The following example shows how to terminate privileged-level EXEC mode and return to the user-level EXEC mode:

WAE# exit
WAE>

find-pattern

To search for a particular pattern in a file, use the find-pattern command in EXEC mode.

find-pattern {binary reg-express filename | case {binary reg-express filename | count reg-express filename | lineno reg-express filename | match reg-express filename | nomatch reg-express filename | recursive reg-express filename} | count reg-express filename | lineno reg-express filename | match reg-express filename | nomatch reg-express filename | recursive reg-express filename}

Syntax Description

binary

Does not suppress the binary output.

reg-express

Regular expression to be matched.

filename

Filename.

case

Matches case-sensitive pattern.

count

Prints the number of matching lines.

lineno

Prints the line number with output.

match

Prints the matching lines.

nomatch

Prints the nonmatching lines.

recursive

Searches a directory recursively.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use this EXEC command to search for a particular regular expression pattern in a file.

Examples

The following example shows how to search a file recursively for a case-sensitive pattern:

WAE# find-pattern case recursive admin removed_core
-rw-------    1 admin    root     95600640 Oct 12 10:27 /local/local1/core_dir/
core.3.0.0.b5.eh.2796
-rw-------    1 admin    root     97054720 Jan 11 11:31 /local/local1/core_dir/
core.cache.3.0.0.b131.cnbuild.14086
-rw-------    1 admin    root     96845824 Jan 11 11:32 /local/local1/core_dir/
core.cache.3.0.0.b131.cnbuild.14823
-rw-------    1 admin    root     101580800 Jan 11 12:01 /local/local1/core_dir/
core.cache.3.0.0.b131.cnbuild.15134
-rw-------    1 admin    root     96759808 Jan 11 12:59 /local/local1/core_dir/
core.cache.3.0.0.b131.cnbuild.20016
-rw-------    1 admin    root     97124352 Jan 11 13:26 /local/local1/core_dir/
core.cache.3.0.0.b131.cnbuild.8095

The following example shows how to search a file for a pattern and print the matching lines:

WAE# find-pattern match 10 removed_core
Tue Oct 12 10:30:03 UTC 2004
-rw-------    1 admin    root     95600640 Oct 12 10:27 /local/local1/core_dir/
core.3.0.0.b5.eh.2796
-rw-------    1 admin    root     101580800 Jan 11 12:01 /local/local1/core_dir/
core.cache.3.0.0.b131.cnbuild.15134

The following example shows how to search a file for a pattern and print the number of matching lines:

WAE# find-pattern count 10 removed_core
3

Related Commands

cd

dir

lls

ls

help

To obtain online help for the command-line interface, use the help EXEC command.

help

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC and global configuration

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

You can obtain help at any point in a command by entering a question mark (?). If nothing matches, the help list will be empty, and you must back up until entering a ? shows the available options.

Two styles of help are provided:

Full help is available when you are ready to enter a command argument (for example, show ?) and describes each possible argument.

Partial help is provided when you enter an abbreviated command and you want to know what arguments match the input (for example, show stat?).

Examples

The following example shows the output of the help EXEC command:

WAE# help
Help may be requested at any point in a command by entering a question mark '?'. If 
nothing matches, the help list will be empty and you must backup until entering a '?' 
shows the available options.

Two styles of help are provided:
1. Full help is available when you are ready to enter a command argument.
2. Partial help is provided when an abbreviated argument is entered.

install

To install a new software image (such as the WAAS software) into flash on the WAAS device, use the install EXEC command.

install imagefilename

Syntax Description

imagefilename

Name of the .bin file you want to install.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

The install command loads the system image into flash memory and copies components of the optional software to the software file system (swfs) partition.


Note If you are installing a system image that contains optional software, make sure that an SWFS partition is mounted on disk00.


To install a system image, copy the image file to the SYSFS directory, local1 or local2. Before executing the install command, change the present working directory to the directory where the system image resides. When the install command is executed, the image file is expanded. The expanded files overwrite the existing files on the WAAS device. The newly installed version takes effect after the system image is reloaded.


Note The install command does not accept .pax files. Files should be of the type .bin (for example, cache-sw.bin). Also, if the release being installed does not require a new system image, then it may not be necessary to write to Flash memory. If the newer version has changes that require a new system image to be installed, then the install command may result in a write to Flash memory.


Examples

The following example loads the system image contained in the wae511-cache-300.bin file:

WAE# install wae511-cache-300.bin 

Related Commands

copy disk

reload

less

To display a file using the LESS application, use the less EXEC command.

less file_name

Syntax Description

file_name

Name of the file to be displayed.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

LESS is an application that displays text files a page at a time. You can use LESS to view the contents of a file, but not edit it. LESS offers some additional features when compared to conventional text file viewer applications such as type. These features are as follows:

Backward movement—LESS allows you to move backward in the displayed text. Use k, Ctrl-k, y, or Ctrl-y to move backward. See the summary of LESS commands for more details; to view the summary, press h or H while displaying a file in LESS.

Searching and highlighting—LESS allows you to search for text in the file that you are viewing. You can search forward and backward. LESS highlights the text that matches your search to make it easy to see where the match is.

Multiple file support—LESS allows you to switch between different files, remembering your position in each file. You can also do a search that spans all the files you are working with.

Examples

To display the text of the syslog.txt file using the LESS application, enter the following command:

WAE# less syslog.txt

lls

To view a long list of directory names, use the lls EXEC command.

lls [directory]

Syntax Description

directory

(Optional) Name of the directory for which you want a long list of files.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

This command provides detailed information about files and subdirectories stored in the present working directory (including size, date, time of creation, SYSFS name, and long name of the file). This information can also be viewed with the dir command.

Examples

The following example provides a detailed list of the files in the current directory:

WAE# lls 
size          time of last change             name
--------------  -------------------------          -----------
          4096  Fri Feb 24 14:40:00 2006  <DIR>    actona
          4096  Tue Mar 28 14:42:44 2006  <DIR>    core_dir
          4096  Wed Apr 12 20:23:10 2006  <DIR>    crash
          4506  Tue Apr 11 13:52:45 2006           dbupgrade.log
          4096  Tue Apr  4 22:50:11 2006  <DIR>    downgrade
          4096  Sun Apr 16 09:01:56 2006  <DIR>    errorlog
          4096  Wed Apr 12 20:23:41 2006  <DIR>    logs
         16384  Thu Feb 16 12:25:29 2006  <DIR>    lost+found
          4096  Wed Apr 12 03:26:02 2006  <DIR>    sa
         24576  Sun Apr 16 23:54:30 2006  <DIR>    service_logs
          4096  Thu Feb 16 12:26:09 2006  <DIR>    spool
       9951236  Sun Apr 16 23:54:20 2006           syslog.txt
      10026298  Thu Apr  6 12:25:00 2006           syslog.txt.1
      10013564  Thu Apr  6 12:25:00 2006           syslog.txt.2
      10055850  Thu Apr  6 12:25:00 2006           syslog.txt.3
      10049181  Thu Apr  6 12:25:00 2006           syslog.txt.4
          4096  Thu Feb 16 12:29:30 2006  <DIR>    var
           508  Sat Feb 25 13:18:35 2006           wdd.sh.signed

Related Commands

dir

lls

ls

ls

To view a list of files or subdirectory names within a directory, use the ls EXEC command.

ls [directory]

Syntax Description

directory

(Optional) Name of the directory for which you want a list of files.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use the ls directory command to list the filenames and subdirectories within a particular directory.

Use the ls command to list the filenames and subdirectories of the current working directory.

Use the pwd command to view the present working directory.

Examples

The following example shows the files and subdirectories that are listed within the root directory:

WAE# ls
actona
core_dir
crash
dbupgrade.log
downgrade
errorlog
logs
lost+found
sa
service_logs
spool
syslog.txt
syslog.txt.1
syslog.txt.2
syslog.txt.3
syslog.txt.4
var
wdd.sh.signed

Related Commands

dir

lls

pwd

mkdir

To create a directory, use the mkdir EXEC command.

mkdir directory

Syntax Description

directory

Name of the directory to create.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use this EXEC command to create a new directory or subdirectory in the WAAS file system.

Examples

The following example shows how to create a new directory, oldpaxfiles:

WAE# mkdir /oldpaxfiles

Related Commands

cpfile

dir

lls

ls

pwd

rename

rmdir

mkfile

To create a new file, use the mkfile EXEC command.

mkfile filename

Syntax Description

filename

Name of the file you want to create.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use this EXEC command to create a new file in any directory of the WAAS device.

Examples

The following example shows how to create a new file, traceinfo, in the root directory:

WAE# mkfile traceinfo

Related Commands

cpfile

dir

lls

ls

mkdir

pwd

rename

ntpdate

To set the software clock (time and date) on a WAAS device using a NTP server, use the ntpdate EXEC command.

ntpdate {hostname | ip-address}

Syntax Description

hostname

NTP hostname.

ip-address

NTP server IP address.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use NTP to find the current time of day and set the current time on the WAAS device to match. The time must be saved to the hardware clock using the clock save command if it is to be restored after a reload.

Examples

The following example shows how to set the software clock on the WAAS device using a NTP server:

WAE# ntpdate 10.11.23.40

Related Commands

clock

(config) clock

show clock

show ntp

ping

To send echo packets for diagnosing basic network connectivity on networks, use the ping EXEC command.

ping {hostname | ip-address}

Syntax Description

hostname

Hostname of system to ping.

ip-address

IP address of system to ping.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

To use this command with the hostname argument, be sure that DNS functionality is configured the WAAS device. To force the timeout of a nonresponsive host, or to eliminate a loop cycle, press Ctrl-C.

Examples

The following example shows how to send echo packets to a machine with address 172.19.131.189 to verify its availability on the network:

WAE# ping 172.19.131.189
PING 172.19.131.189 (172.19.131.189) from 10.1.1.21 : 56(84) bytes of
data.
64 bytes from 172.19.131.189: icmp_seq=0 ttl=249 time=613 usec
64 bytes from 172.19.131.189: icmp_seq=1 ttl=249 time=485 usec
64 bytes from 172.19.131.189: icmp_seq=2 ttl=249 time=494 usec
64 bytes from 172.19.131.189: icmp_seq=3 ttl=249 time=510 usec
64 bytes from 172.19.131.189: icmp_seq=4 ttl=249 time=493 usec

--- 172.19.131.189 ping statistics ---
5 packets transmitted, 5 packets received, 0% packet loss
round-trip min/avg/max/mdev = 0.485/0.519/0.613/0.047 ms
WAE#

pwd

To view the present working directory on a WAAS device, use the pwd EXEC command.

pwd

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use this EXEC command to display the present working directory of the WAAS device.

Examples

The following example shows how to display the current working directory:

WAE# pwd
/local1

Related Commands

cd

dir

lls

ls

reload

To halt and perform a cold restart on a WAAS device, use the reload EXEC command.

reload [force]

Syntax Description

force

(Optional) Forces a reboot without further prompting.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

To reboot a WAAS device, use the reload command. If no configurations are saved to flash memory, you are prompted to enter configuration parameters upon restart. Any open connections are dropped after you issue this command, and the file system is reformatted upon restart.

Examples

The following example shows how to halt operation of the WAAS device and reboot it with the configuration saved in flash memory. You are not prompted for confirmations during the process.

WAE# reload force

Related Commands

write

rename

To rename a file on a WAAS device, use the rename EXEC command.

rename oldfilename newfilename

Syntax Description

oldfilename

Original filename.

newfilename

New filename.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use this command to rename any SYSFS file without making a copy of the file.

Examples

The following example shows how to rename the errlog.txt file to old_errlog.txt:

WAE# rename errlog.txt old_errlog.txt

Related Commands

cpfile

restore

To restore the device to its manufactured default status, removing user data from disk and flash memory, use the restore EXEC command.

restore {factory-default [preserve basic-config] | rollback}

Syntax Description

factory-default

Resets the device configuration and data to their manufactured default status.

preserve

(Optional) Preserves certain configurations and data on the device.

basic-config

(Optional) Selects basic network configurations.

rollback

Roll back configuration to the last functional software and device configuration.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use this EXEC command to restore data on disk and in flash memory to the factory default, while preserving particular time stamp evaluation data, or to roll back the configuration to the last functional data and device configuration.

This command erases all existing content on the device; however, your network settings are preserved and the device is accessible through a Telnet and Secure Shell (SSH) session after it reboots.

Backing up the Central Manager Database

Before you use the restore factory-default command on your primary WAAS Central Manager or change over from the primary to a standby WAAS Central Manager, be sure to back up the WAAS Central Manager database and copy the backup file to a safe location that is separate from that of the WAAS Central Manager. You must halt the operation of the WAAS Central Manager before you enter the backup and restore commands.


Caution This command erases user-specified configuration information stored in the flash image, removes data on disk, user-defined disk partitions, and the entire Central Manager database. User-defined disk partitions that are removed include the SYSFS, WAAS, and PRINTSPOOLFS partitions. The configuration being removed includes the starting configuration of the device.

By removing the WAAS Central Manager database, all configuration records for the entire WAAS network are deleted. If you do not have a valid backup file or a standby WAAS Central Manager, you must reregister every WAE with the WAAS Central Manager because all previously configured data is lost.

If you used your standby WAAS Central Manager to store the database while you reconfigured the primary, you can simply register the former primary as a new standby WAAS Central Manager.

If you created a backup file while you configured the primary WAAS Central Manager, you can copy the backup file to this newly reconfigured WAAS Central Manager.

Rolling Back the Configuration

You can roll back the software and configuration of a WAAS device to a previous version using the restore rollback command. You would roll back software only in cases in which a newly installed version of the WAAS software is not functioning properly.

The restore rollback command installs the last saved WAAS.bin image on the system disk. A WAAS.bin image is created during software installation and stored on the system disk. If the WAAS device does not have a saved version, the software is not rolled back.


Note While WAFS to WAAS migration is supported, rollback from WAAS to WAFS is not supported.


Examples

The following two examples show how to use the restore factory-default and restore factory-default preserve basic-config commands. Because configuration parameters and data are lost, prompts are given before initiating the restore operation to ensure that you want to proceed.

WAE# restore factory-default 
This command will wipe out all of data on the disks
and wipe out WAAS CLI configurations you have ever made. 
If the box is in evaluation period of certain product,
the evaluation process will not be affected though.

It is highly recommended that you stop all active services
before this command is run.

Are you sure you want to go ahead?[yes/no]

WAE# restore factory-default preserve basic-config 
This command will wipe out all of data on the disks
and all of WAAS CLI configurations except basic network 
configurations for keeping the device online.
The to-be-preserved configurations are network interfaces,
default gateway, domain name, name server and hostname.
If the box is in evaluation period of certain product,
the evaluation process will not be affected.

It is highly recommended that you stop all active services
before this command is run.

Are you sure you want to go ahead?[yes/no]

Note You can enter basic configuration parameters (such as IP address, hostname, and name server) at this point, or later through entries in the command-line interface.


In the following example, entering the show disks details command after the restore command is used verifies that the restore command has removed data from the partitioned file systems: SYSFS, WAAS, and PRINTSPOOLFS.

WAE# show disks details

Physical disk information:

  disk00: Normal                (h00 c00 i00 l00 - DAS)    140011MB(136.7GB)
  disk01: Normal                (h00 c00 i01 l00 - DAS)    140011MB(136.7GB)


Mounted filesystems:

  MOUNT POINT       TYPE       DEVICE           SIZE    INUSE     FREE USE%
  /                 root       /dev/root        35MB     30MB      5MB  85%
  /swstore          internal   /dev/md1        991MB    333MB    658MB  33%
  /state            internal   /dev/md2       3967MB     83MB   3884MB   2%
  /disk00-04        CONTENT    /dev/md4     122764MB     33MB 122731MB   0%
  /local/local1     SYSFS      /dev/md5       3967MB    271MB   3696MB   6%
  .../local1/spool  PRINTSPOOL /dev/md6        991MB     16MB    975MB   1%
  /sw               internal   /dev/md0        991MB    424MB    567MB  42%


Software RAID devices:

  DEVICE NAME  TYPE     STATUS                PHYSICAL DEVICES AND STATUS
  /dev/md0     RAID-1   NORMAL OPERATION      disk00/00[GOOD]  disk01/00[GOOD]
  /dev/md1     RAID-1   NORMAL OPERATION      disk00/01[GOOD]  disk01/01[GOOD]
  /dev/md2     RAID-1   NORMAL OPERATION      disk00/02[GOOD]  disk01/02[GOOD]
  /dev/md3     RAID-1   NORMAL OPERATION      disk00/03[GOOD]  disk01/03[GOOD]
  /dev/md4     RAID-1   NORMAL OPERATION      disk00/04[GOOD]  disk01/04[GOOD]
  /dev/md5     RAID-1   NORMAL OPERATION      disk00/05[GOOD]  disk01/05[GOOD]
  /dev/md6     RAID-1   NORMAL OPERATION      disk00/06[GOOD]  disk01/06[GOOD]
Currently content-filesystems RAID level is not configured to change.

The following example shows how to upgrade or restore an older version of the WAAS software. In the first example below, version Y of the software is installed (using the copy command), but the administrator has not switched over to it yet, so the current version is still version X. The system is then reloaded (using the reload command), and it verifies that version Y is the current version running.

The final example shows that the software is rolled back to version X (using the restore rollback command), and the software is reloaded again.

WAE# copy ftp install server path waas.versionY.bin
WAE# show version
Cisco Wide Area Application Services Software (WAAS)
Copyright (c) 1999-2006 by Cisco Systems, Inc.
Cisco Wide Area Application Services Software Release 4.0.0 (build b340 Mar 25 2
006)
Version: fe611-4.0.0.340

Compiled 17:26:17 Mar 25 2006 by cnbuild

System was restarted on Mon Mar 27 15:25:02 2006.
The system has been up for 3 days, 21 hours, 9 minutes, 17 seconds.

WAE# show version last
	Nothing is displayed.
WAE# show version pending
WAAS 4.0.1 Version Y
WAE# reload
...... reloading ......
WAE# show version
Cisco Wide Area Application Services Software (WAAS)
...
WAE# restore rollback
WAE# reload
...... reloading ......

Because flash memory configurations were removed after the restore command was used, the show startup-config command does not return any flash memory data. The show running-config command returns the default running configurations.

Related Commands

reload

show disks

show running-config

show startup-config

show version

rmdir

To delete a directory on a WAAS device, use the rmdir EXEC command.

rmdir directory

Syntax Description

directory

Name of the directory that you want to delete.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use this EXEC command to remove any directory from the WAAS file system. The rmdir command only removes empty directories.

Examples

The following example shows how to delete the oldfiles directory from the local1 directory:

WAE# rmdir /local1/oldfiles

Related Commands

cpfile

dir

lls

ls

mkdir

pwd

rename

scp

To copy files between network hosts, use the scp command.

scp [1][2][4][6][B][C][p][q][r][v] [c cipher] [F config-file] [i id-file] [l limit]
[o ssh_option] [P port] [S program] [[user @] host : file] [...] [[user-n @] host-n : file-n]

Syntax Description

1

(Optional) Forces this command to use protocol 1.

2

(Optional) Forces this command to use protocol 2.

4

(Optional) Forces this command to use only IPv4 addresses.

6

(Optional) Forces this command to use only IPv6 addresses.

B

(Optional) Specifies the batch mode. In this mode, the scp command does not ask for passwords or passphrases.

C

(Optional) Enables compression. The scp command passes this option to the ssh command to enable compression.

p

(Optional) Preserves the following information from the source file: modification times, access times, and modes.

q

(Optional) Disables the display of progress information.

r

(Optional) Recursively copies directories and their contents.

v

(Optional) Specifies the verbose mode. Causes the scp and ssh commands to print debugging messages about their progress. This option can be helpful when troubleshooting connection, authentication, and configuration problems.

c

(Optional) Specifies the cipher to use for encrypting the data being copied. The scp command directly passes this option to the ssh command.

cipher

The cipher to use for encrypting the data being copied.

F

(Optional) Specifies an alternative per-user configuration file for Secure Shell (SSH). The scp command directly passes this option to the ssh command.

config-file

Name of the configuration file.

i

(Optional) Specifies the file containing the private key for RSA authentication. The scp command directly passes this information to the ssh command.

id-file

The name of the file containing the private key for RSA authentication.

l

(Optional) Limits the use of bandwidth.

limit

The bandwidth to use for copying files in kbps.

o

(Optional) Passes options to the ssh command in the format used in ssh_config5.

ssh_option

See the ssh command for more information about the possible options.

P

(Optional) Specifies the port to connect to on the remote host.

port

The port to connect to on the remote host.

S

(Optional) Specifies the program to use for the encrypted connection.

program

Name of the program to use for the encrypted connection.

user

(Optional) Username.

host

(Optional) Hostname.

file

(Optional) Name of the file to copy.


Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

The scp command uses SSH for transferring data between hosts.

This command prompts you for passwords or pass phrases when needed for authentication.

Related Commands

ssh

script

To execute a script provided by Cisco or check the script for errors, use the script EXEC command.

script {check | execute} file_name

Syntax Description

check

Checks the validity of the script.

execute

Executes the script. The script file must be a SYSFS file in the current directory.

file_name

Name of the script file.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

The script EXEC command opens the script utility, which allows you to execute Cisco-supplied scripts or check errors in those scripts. The script utility can read standard terminal input from the user if the script you run requires input from the user.


Note The script utility is designed to run only Cisco-supplied scripts. You cannot execute script files that lack Cisco signatures or that have been corrupted or modified.


Examples

The following example shows how to check for errors in the script file test_script.pl:

WAE# script check test_script.pl

setup

To configure basic configuration settings (general settings, device network settings, and disk configuration) on the WAAS device or to complete basic configuration after upgrading to WAAS software, use the setup EXEC command.

setup

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

For instructions on using the setup command, see the Cisco Wide Area Application Services Quick Configuration Guide.

Examples

The following example shows the first screen of the wizard when you enter the setup EXEC command on a WAAS device that is running the WAAS software:

WAE# setup
Please choose an interface to configure from the following list:
1: GigabitEthernet 1/0
2: GigabitEthernet 2/0

Enter choice:

.
.
.
Press the ESC key at any time to quit this session

show aaa accounting

To display the AAA accounting configuration information for a WAAS device, use the show aaa EXEC command.

show aaa accounting

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use this EXEC command to display configuration information for the following AAA accounting types:

Exec shell

Command (for normal users and superusers)

System

Examples

Table 3-1 describes the fields shown in the show aaa accounting display.

Table 3-1 Field Descriptions for the show aaa accounting Command 

Field
Description

Accounting Type

Displays the AAA accounting configuration for the following types of user accounts:

Exec
Command level 0
Command level 15
System

Record Event(s)

Displays the configuration of the AAA accounting notice that is sent to the accounting server.

stop-only

The WAAS device sends a stop record accounting notice at the end of the specified activity or event to the TACACS+ accounting server.

start-stop

The WAAS device sends a start record accounting notice at the beginning of an event and a stop record at the end of the event to the TACACS+ accounting server.

The start accounting record is sent in the background. The requested user service begins regardless of whether or not the start accounting record was acknowledged by the TACACS+ accounting server.

wait-start

The WAAS device sends both a start and a stop accounting record to the TACACS+ accounting server. However, the requested user service does not begin until the start accounting record is acknowledged. A stop accounting record is also sent.

disabled

Accounting is disabled for the specified event.

Protocol

Displays the accounting protocol that is configured.


Related Commands

(config) aaa accounting

show adapter

To display the status and configuration of the EndPoint Mapper (EPM) adapter, use the show adapter EXEC command.

show adapter epm

Syntax Description

epm

Specifies the Microsoft PortMapper adapter.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

Usage Guidelines

This command is valid for the WAE application-accelerator appliances; it is not valid for the Central Manager (CM) appliance.

Examples

Table 3-2 describes the fields shown in the show adapter epm display.

Table 3-2 Field Description for the show adapter epm Command

Field
Description

EPM (MS-PortMapper) adapter is enabled.

Configuration status of the EPM adapter.

EPM (MS-PortMapper) adapter is disabled.


Related Commands

(config) adapter

show statistics epm

show alarms

To display information on various types of alarms, their status, and history on a WAAS device, use the show alarms EXEC command.

show alarms [critical [detail [support]] | detail [support] | history [start_num [end_num [detail [support]]] | critical [start_num [end_num [detail [support]]]] | detail [support] | major [start_num [end_num [detail [support]]]] | minor [start_num [end_num [detail [support]]]]] | detail [support] | major [detail [support]] | minor [detail [support]] | status]

Syntax Description

critical

(Optional) Displays critical alarm information.

detail

(Optional) Displays detailed information for each alarm.

support

(Optional) Displays additional information about each alarm.

history

(Optional) Displays information about the history of various alarms.

start_num

(Optional) Alarm number that appears first in the alarm history.

end_num

(Optional) Alarm number that appears last in the alarm history.

major

(Optional) Displays information about major alarms.

minor

(Optional) Displays information about minor alarms.

status

(Optional) Displays the status of various alarms and alarm overload settings.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

The Node Health Manager in the WAAS software enables WAAS applications to raise alarms to draw attention in error/significant conditions. The Node Health Manager, which is the data repository for such alarms, aggregates the health and alarm information for the applications, services, and resources (for example, disk drives) that are being monitored on the WAAS device. For example, this feature gives you a mechanism to determine if a WAE is receiving overwhelming number of alarms. These alarms are referred to as "WAAS software alarms."

WAAS software uses SNMP to report error conditions by generating SNMP traps. The following WAAS applications can generate a WAAS software alarm:

Node Health Manager (Alarm overload condition)

System Monitor (sysmon) for disk failures

The three levels of alarms in WAAS software are as follows:

Critical—Alarms that affect the existing traffic through the WAE, and are considered fatal (the WAE cannot recover and continue to process traffic).

Major—Alarms which indicate a major service (for example, the cache service) has been damaged or lost. Urgent action is necessary to restore this service. However, other node components are fully functional and the existing service should be minimally impacted.

Minor—Alarms which indicate that a condition that will not affect a service has occurred, but that corrective action is required to prevent a serious fault from occurring.

You can configure alarms using the snmp-server enable traps alarms global configuration command.

Use the show alarms critical EXEC command to display the current critical alarms being generated by WAAS software applications. Use the show alarms critical detail EXEC command to display additional details for each of the critical alarms being generated. Use the show alarms critical detail support EXEC command to display an explanation about the condition that triggered the alarm and how you can find out the cause of the problem. Similarly, you can use the show alarms major and show alarms minor EXEC commands to display the details of major and minor alarms.

Use the show alarms history EXEC command to display a history of alarms that have been raised and cleared by WAAS software on the WAAS device since the last software reload. The WAAS software retains the last 100 alarm raise and clear events only.

Use the show alarms status EXEC command to display the status of current alarms, and the WAAS device's alarm overload status and alarm overload configuration.

Examples

Table 3-3 describes the fields shown in the show alarms history display.

Table 3-3 Field Descriptions for the show alarms history Command

Field
Description

Op

Operation status of the alarm. Values are R-Raised or C-Cleared.

Sev

Severity of the alarm. Values are Cr-Critical, Ma-Major, or Mi-Minor.

Alarm ID

Type of event that caused the alarm. For example: wafs_edge_down, wafs_core_down.

Module/Submodule

Software module affected. For example: wafs

Instance

Object that this alarm event is associated with. For example, for an alarm event with the Alarm ID disk_failed, the instance would be the name of the disk that failed. The Instance field does not have pre-defined values and is application specific.


Table 3-4 describes the fields shown in the show alarms status display.

Table 3-4 Field Descriptions for the show alarms status Command 

Field
Description

Critical Alarms

Number of critical alarms.

Major Alarms

Number of major alarms.

Minor Alarms

Number of minor alarms.

Overall Alarm Status

Aggregate status of alarms.

Device is NOT in alarm overload state.

Status of the device alarm overload state.

Device enters alarm overload state @ 999 alarms/sec.

Threshold number of alarms per second at which the device enters the alarm overload state.

Device exits alarm overload state @ 99 alarms/sec.

Threshold number of alarms per second at which the device exits the alarm overload state.

Overload detection is ENABLED.

Status of whether overload detection is enabled on the device.


Related Commands

(config) alarm overload-detect

(config) snmp-server enable traps

show arp

To display the ARP table for a WAAS device, use the show arp EXEC command.

show arp

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use the show arp command to display the Internet-to-Ethernet address translation tables of the Address Resolution Protocol. Without flags, the current ARP entry for the host name is displayed.

Examples

Table 3-5 describes the fields shown in the show arp display.

Table 3-5 Field Descriptions for the show arp Command

Field
Description

Protocol

Type of protocol.

Address

IP address of the host name.

Flags

Current ARP flag status.

Hardware Addr

Hardware IP address given as six hexadecimal bytes separated by colons.

Type

Type of wide-area network.

Interface

Name and slot/port information for the interface.


show authentication

To display the authentication configuration for a WAAS device, use the show authentication EXEC command.

show authentication {user | content-request}

Syntax Description

user

Displays authentication configuration for user login to the system.

content-request

Displays content request authentication configuration information in the disconnected mode.


s

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

When the WAAS device authenticates a user through an NTLM, LDAP, TACACS+, RADIUS, or Windows domain server, a record of the authentication is stored locally. As long as the entry is stored, subsequent attempts to access restricted Internet content by the same user do not require additional server lookups. To display the local and remote authentication configuration for user login, use the show authentication user EXEC command.

To display the content request authentication configuration information in the disconnected mode, use the show authentication content-request EXEC command.

Examples

Table 3-6 describes the fields shown in the show authentication user display.

Table 3-6 Field Descriptions for the show authentication user Command 

Field
Description

Login Authentication: Console/Telnet/Ftp/SSH Session

Displays which authentication service is enabled for login authentication and the configured status of the service.

Windows domain

Operation status of the authentication service. Values are enabled or disabled.

Priority status of each authentication service. Values are primary, secondary, or tertiary.

RADIUS

TACACS+

Local

Configuration Authentication: Console/Telnet/Ftp/SSH Session

Displays which authentication service is enabled for configuration authentication and the configured status of the service.

Windows domain

Operation status of the authentication service. Values are enabled or disabled.

Priority status of each authentication service. Values are primary, secondary, or tertiary.

RADIUS

TACACS+

Local


Table 3-7 describes the field in the show authentication content-request display.

Table 3-7 Field Description for the show authentication content-request Command

Field
Description

The content request authentication in disconnected mode is XXX.

Operation status of content request authentication in disconnected mode. Values are enabled or disabled.


Related Commands

(config) authentication

clear

show statistics authentication

show auto-register

To display the status of a WAE's automatic registration feature, use the show auto-register EXEC command.

show auto-register

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

Examples

Table 3-8 describes the output in the show auto-register display.

Table 3-8 Field Description for the show auto-register Command

Field
Description

Auto registration is enabled.

Configuration status of the autoregistration feature.

Auto registration is disabled.


Related Commands

(config) auto-register

show banner

To display the message of the day (MOTD), login, and EXEC banner settings, use the show banner EXEC command.

show banner

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

Table 3-9 describes the fields shown in the show banner display.

Table 3-9 Field Descriptions for the show banner Command

Field
Description

Banner is enabled.

Configuration status of the banner feature.

MOTD banner is: abc

(Message of the day) Displays the configured message of the day.

Login banner is: acb

Displays the configured login banner.

Exec banner is: abc

Displays the configured EXEC banner.


Related Commands

(config) auto-register

show bypass

To display static bypass configuration information for a WAE, use the show bypass EXEC command.

show bypass list

Syntax Description

list

Displays the bypass list entries. Maximum of 50.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

Usage Guidelines

The maximum number of static bypass entries is 50.

Examples

Table 3-10 describes the fields shown in the show bypass list display.

Table 3-10 Field Descriptions for the show bypass list Command

Field
Description

Client

IP address and port of the client. For any client with this IP address, the WAE will not process the packet, but will bypass it and send it back to the router.

Server

IP address and port of the server.

Entry type

Type of bypass list entry. The Entry type field contains one of the following values: static-config, auth-traffic, server-error, or accept.

A static-config entry is a bypass list entry that is user-configured. An auth-traffic entry is a type of dynamic entry that the internal software adds automatically when the server requests authentication.


Related Commands

(config) bypass

show cdp

To display CDP configuration information, use the show cdp EXEC command.

show cdp [entry neighbor [protocol | version [protocol]] | holdtime | interface [FastEthernet slot/port | GigabitEthernet slot/port] | neighbors [detail | FastEthernet slot/port [detail] | GigabitEthernet slot/port [detail]] | run | timer | traffic]

Syntax Description

entry

(Optional) Displays information for a specific neighbor entry.

neighbor

Name of CDP neighbor entry.

protocol

(Optional) Displays the CDP protocol information.

version

(Optional) Displays the CDP version.

holdtime

(Optional) Displays length of time that CDP information is held by neighbors.

interface

(Optional) Displays interface status and configuration.

FastEthernet

(Optional) Displays Fast Ethernet configuration.

slot/port

Fast Ethernet slot (0-3) and port number.

GigabitEthernet

(Optional) Displays Gigabit Ethernet configuration.

slot/port

Gigabit Ethernet slot (1-2) and port number.

neighbors

(Optional) Displays CDP neighbor entries.

detail

(Optional) Displays detailed neighbor entry information.

FastEthernet

(Optional) Displays neighbor Fast Ethernet information.

slot/port

Neighbor Fast Ethernet slot (0-3) and port number.

detail

Displays detailed neighbor Fast Ethernet network information.

GigabitEthernet

(Optional) Displays neighbor Gigabit Ethernet information.

slot/port

Neighbor Gigabit Ethernet slot (1-2) and port number.

detail

(Optional) Displays detailed Gigabit Ethernet neighbor network information.

run

(Optional) Displays the CDP process status.

timer

(Optional) Displays the time when CDP information is resent to neighbors.

traffic

(Optional) Displays CDP statistical information.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

The show cdp command displays information regarding how frequently CDP packets are resent to neighbors, the length of time that CDP packets are held by neighbors, the disabled status of CDP Version 2 multicast advertisements, CDP Ethernet interface ports, and general CDP traffic information.

Examples

Table 3-11 describes the fields shown in the show cdp display.

Table 3-11 Field Descriptions for the show cdp Command

Field
Description

Sending CDP packets every XX seconds

Interval (in seconds) between transmissions of CDP advertisements. This field is controlled by the cdp timer command.

Sending a holdtime value of XX seconds

Time (in seconds) that the device directs the neighbor to hold a CDP advertisement before discarding it. This field is controlled by the cdp holdtime command.

Sending CDPv2

advertisements is XX

Transmission status for sending CDP Version-2 type advertisements. Possible values are enabled or disabled.


Table 3-12 describes the fields shown in the show cdp entry neighbor display.

Table 3-12 Field Descriptions for the show cdp entry Command 

Field
Description

Device ID

Name of the neighbor device and either the MAC address or the serial number of this device.

Entry address(es)

IP address

IP address of the neighbor device.

CLNS address

Non-IP network address. Depends on type of neighbor.

DECnet address

Non-IP network address. Depends on type of neighbor.

Platform

Product name and number of the neighbor device.

Interface

Protocol being used by the connectivity media.

Port ID (outgoing port)

Port number of the port on the neighbor device.

Capabilities

Capability code discovered on the neighbor device. This is the type of the device listed in the CDP Neighbors table. Possible values are:

R—Router

T—Transparent bridge

B—Source-routing bridge

S—Switch

H—Host

I—IGMP device

r—Repeater

Holdtime

Time (in seconds) that the current device will hold the CDP advertisement from a transmitting router before discarding it.

Version

Software version running on the neighbor device.


Table 3-13 describes the fields shown in the show cdp entry neighbor protocol display.

Table 3-13 Field Descriptions for the show cdp entry protocol Command

Field
Description

Protocol information for XX

Name or identifier of the neighbor device.

IP address

IP address of the neighbor device.

CLNS address

Non-IP network address. Depends on type of neighbor.

DECnet address

Non-IP network address. Depends on type of neighbor.


Table 3-14 describes the fields shown in the show cdp entry neighbor version display.

Table 3-14 Field Descriptions for the show cdp entry version Command

Field
Description

Version information for XX

Name or identifier of the neighbor device.

Software, Version

Software and version running on the neighbor device.

Copyright

Copyright information for the neighbor device.


Table 3-15 describes the field in the show cdp holdtime display.

Table 3-15 Field Descriptions for the show cdp holdtime Command

Field
Description

XX seconds

Time (in seconds) that the current device will hold the CDP advertisement from a transmitting router before discarding it.


Table 3-16 describes the fields shown in the show cdp interface display.

Table 3-16 Field Descriptions for the show cdp interface Command

Field
Description

Interface_slot/port is XX

Operation status of the CDP interface. Values are up or down.

CDP protocol is XX

Protocol being used by the connectivity media.


Table 3-17 describes the fields shown in the show cdp neighbors display.

Table 3-17 Field Descriptions for the show cdp neighbors Command

Field
Description

Device ID

Configured ID (name), MAC address, or serial number of the neighbor device.

Local Intrfce

(Local Interface) Protocol being used by the connectivity media.

Holdtime

Time (in seconds) that the current device will hold the CDP advertisement from a transmitting router before discarding it.

Capability

Capability code discovered on the device. This is the type of the device listed in the CDP Neighbors table. Possible values are:

R—Router

T—Transparent bridge

B—Source-routing bridge

S—Switch

H—Host

I—IGMP device

r—Repeater

Platform

Product number of the device.

Port ID (outgoing port)

Port number of the device.


Table 3-18 describes the fields shown in the show cdp neighbors detail display.

Table 3-18 Field Descriptions for the show cdp neighbors detail Command 

Field
Description

Device ID

Configured ID (name), MAC address, or serial number of the neighbor device.

Entry address (es)

List of network addresses of neighbor devices.

Platform

Product name and number of the neighbor device.

Capabilities

Device type of the neighbor. This device can be a router, a bridge, a transparent bridge, a source-routing bridge, a switch, a host, an IGMP device, or a repeater.

Interface

Protocol being used by the connectivity media.

Port ID (outgoing port)

Port number of the port on the neighbor device.

Holdtime

Time (in seconds) that the current device will hold the CDP advertisement from a transmitting router before discarding it.

Version

Software version running on the neighbor device.

Copyright

Copyright information for the neighbor device.

advertisement version

Version of CDP being used for CDP advertisements.

VTP Management Domain

VLAN trunk protocol management domain. The VLAN information is distributed to all switches that are part of the same domain.

Native VLAN

VLAN to which the neighbor interface belongs.


Table 3-19 describes the field in the show cdp run display.

Table 3-19 Field Description for the show cdp run Command

Field
Description

CDP is XX.

Shows whether CDP is enabled or disabled.


Table 3-20 describes the field in the show cdp timer display.

Table 3-20 Field Description for the show cdp timer Command

Field
Description

cdp timer XX

Time when CDP information is resent to neighbors.


Table 3-21 describes the fields shown in the show cdp traffic display.

Table 3-21 Field Descriptions for the show cdp traffic Command 

Field
Description

Total packets Output

(Total number of packets sent) Number of CDP advertisements sent by the local device. Note this value is the sum of the CDP Version 1 advertisements output and CDP Version 2 advertisements output fields.

Input

(Total number of packets received) Number of CDP advertisements received by the local device. Note this value is the sum of the CDP Version-1 advertisements input and CDP Version 2 advertisements input fields.

Hdr syntax

(Header Syntax) Number of CDP advertisements with bad headers, received by the local device.

Chksum error

(CheckSum Error) Number of times the checksum (verifying) operation failed on incoming CDP advertisements.

Encaps failed

(Encapsulations Failed) Number of times CDP failed to transmit advertisements on an interface because of a failure caused by the bridge port of the local device.

No memory

Number of times the local device did not have enough memory to store the CDP advertisements in the advertisement cache table when the device was attempting to assemble advertisement packets for transmission and parse them when receiving them.

Invalid packet

Number of invalid CDP advertisements received and sent by the local device.

Fragmented

Number of times fragments or portions of a single CDP advertisement were received by the local device instead of the complete advertisement.

CDP version 1 advertisements Output

Number of CDP Version 1 advertisements sent by the local device.

Input

Number of CDP Version 1 advertisements received by the local device.

CDP version 2 advertisements Output

Number of CDP Version 2 advertisements sent by the local device.

Input

Number of CDP Version 2 advertisements received by the local device.


Related Commands

(config) cdp

(config-if) cdp

clear

show cifs

To display CIFS run-time information, use the show cifs EXEC command.

show cifs {auto-discovery [enabled | host-db | last] | cache {disk-use | entry-count} | connectivity peers | mss | requests {count | waiting} | sessions {count | list}}

Syntax Description

auto-discovery

CIFS auto-discovery status and run-time data.

enabled

Displays current state of CIFS auto-discovery.

host-db

Displays currently known hosts.

last

Displays last auto-discovered entries.

cache

Displays CIFS cache information.

disk-use

Displays total disk usage for CIFS cache.

entry-count

Count of cached file and directory entries.

connectivity

Displays Run-time information on Edge-Core connectivity.

peers

Displays list of connected Cores.

mss

Displays the TCP maximum segment size (MSS) for CIFS adapter. The segment size range is 512-1460.

requests

Displays run-time information on active CIFS requests.

count

Number of pending CIFS requests.

waiting

Number of waiting CIFS requests.

sessions

Displays run-time information on active CIFS sessions.

count

Connected session count.

list

List of connected CIFS sessions.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

Usage Guidelines

Use the show cifs cache command to view information about caching efficiency. You might use this command to determine if the cache contains sufficient space or if more space is needed. If you have a performance issue, you might use this command to see whether or not the cache is full.

Use the show cifs connectivity peers command to validate the WAN link state and the Edge to Core connectivity. This command is useful for general monitoring and debugging.

Use the show cifs requests count or show cifs requests waiting command to monitor the load for CIFS traffic. You might also use this command for debugging purposes to isolate requests that are not processing.

Use the show cifs sessions count or show cifs sessions list command to view session information. You might use this command to monitor connected users during peak and off-peak hours.

Related Commands

cifs

show clock

To display information about the system clock on a WAAS device, use the show clock EXEC command.

show clock [detail | standard-timezones {all | details timezone | regions | zones region-name}]

Syntax Description

detail

(Optional) Displays detailed information; indicates the clock source (NTP) and the current summer time setting (if any).

standard-timezones

(Optional) Displays information about the standard time zones.

all

Displays all of the standard time zones (approximately 1500 time zones). Each time zone is listed on a separate line.

details

Displays detailed information for the specified time zone.

timezone

Name of the time zone.

regions

Displays the region name of all the standard time zones. All 1500 time zones are organized into directories by region.

zones

Displays the name of every time zone that is within the specified region.

region-name

Name of the region.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

The WAAS device has several predefined "standard" time zones. Some of these time zones have built-in summer time information while others do not. For example, if you are in an eastern region of the United States (US), you must use US/Eastern time zone that includes summer time information for the system clock to adjust automatically every April and October. There are about 1500 "standard" time zone names.

Strict checking disables the clock summertime command when a standard time zone is configured. You can only configure summertime if the time zone is not a standard time zone (that is, if the time zone is a "customized zone").

The show clock standard-timezones all EXEC command enables you to browse through all standard timezones and choose from these predefined time zones. This enables you to choose a customized name that does not conflict with the predefined names of the standard time zones. Most predefined names of the standard time zones have two components, a region name and a zone name. You can list time zones by several criteria, such as regions and zones. To display all first level time zone names organized into directories by region, use the show clock standard-timezones region EXEC command.

The show clock command displays the local date and time information and the show clock detail command shows optional detailed date and time information.

Examples

Table 3-22 describes the field in the show clock display.

Table 3-22 Field Description for the show clock Command

Field
Description

Local time

Day of the week, month, date, time (hh:mm:ss), and year in local time relative to the UTC offset.


Table 3-23 describes the fields shown in the show clock detail display.

Table 3-23 Field Descriptions for the show clock detail Command

Field
Description

Local time

Local time relative to UTC.

UTC time

Universal time clock date and time.

Epoch

Number of seconds since Jan. 1, 1970.

UTC offset

UTC offset in seconds, hours, and minutes.


Related Commands

clock

(config) clock

show cms

To display Centralized Management System (CMS) embedded database content and maintenance status and other information for a WAAS device, use the show cms EXEC command.

show cms {database content {dump filename | text | xml} | info | processes}

Syntax Description

database

Displays embedded database maintenance information.

content

Writes the database content to a file.

dump

Dumps all database content to a text file.

filename

Name of the file to be saved under local1 directory.

text

Writes the database content to a file in text format.

xml

Writes the database content to a file in XML format.

info

Displays CMS application information.

processes

Displays CMS application processes.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

Table 3-24 describes the fields shown in the show cms info display for WAAS application engines.

Table 3-24 Field Descriptions for the show cms info Command for WAAS Application Engines 

Field
Description

Device registration information

Device Id

Unique identifier given to the device by the Central Manager at registration, which is used to manage the device.

Device registered as

Type of device used during registration: WAAS Application Engine or WAAS Central Manager.

Current WAAS Central Manager

Address of the Central Manager as currently configured in the central-manager address global configuration command. This address may differ from the registered address if a standby Central Manager is managing the device instead of the primary Central Manager with which the device is registered.

Registered with WAAS Central Manager

Address of the Central Manager with which the device is registered.

Status

Connection status of the device to the Central Manager. This field may contain one of 3 values: online, offline, or pending.

Time of last config-sync

Time when the device management service last contacted the Central Manager for updates.

CMS services information

Service cms_ce is running

Status of the WAE device management service (running or not running). This field is specific to the WAE only.


Table 3-25 describes the fields shown in the show cms info display for WAAS Central Managers.

Table 3-25 Field Descriptions for the show cms info Command for WAAS Central Managers 

Field
Description

Device registration information

Device Id

Unique identifier given to the device by the Central Manager at registration, which is used to manage the device.

Device registered as

Type of device used during registration: WAAS Application Engine or WAAS Central Manager.

Current WAAS Central Manager role

Role of the current Central Manager: Primary or Standby.

Note The output for primary and standby Central Manager devices is different. On a standby, the output includes the following additional information: Current WAAS Central Manager and Registered with WAAS Central Manager.

Current WAAS Central Manager

Address of the standby Central Manager as currently configured in the central-manager address global configuration command.

Registered with WAAS Central Manager

Address of the standby Central Manager with which the device is registered.

CMS services information

Service cms_httpd is running

Status of the management service (running or not running). This field is specific to the Central Manager only.

Service cms_cdm is running

Status of the management service (running or not running). This field is specific to the Central Manager only.


Table 3-26 describes the field in the show cms database content text display.

Table 3-26 Field Description for the show cms database content text Command 

Field
Description

Database content can be found in /local1/cms-db-12-12-2002-17:06:08:070.txt.

Name and location of the database content text file. This command requests the management service to write its current configuration to an automatically generated file in text format.


Table 3-27 describes the field in the show cms database content xml display.

Table 3-27 Field Description for the show cms database content xml Command

Field
Description

Database content can be found in /local1/cms-db-12-12-2002-17:07:11:629.xml.

Name and location of the database content XML file. This command requests the management service to write its current configuration to an automatically generated file in XML format.


Related Commands

cms

(config) cms

show debugging

To display the state of each debugging option that was previously enabled on a WAAS device, use the show debugging EXEC command.

show debugging

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

This command shows which debug options have been enabled or disabled. If there are no debug options configured, this command shows no output.

The dre, epm, flow, print-spooler, rbcp, tfo, translog, wafs, and wccp command options are supported in the application-accelerator device mode only. The emdb and rpc command options are supported in the central manager device mode only.

This command displays only the type of debugging enabled, not the specific subset of the command.

Examples

In the following example, the debug tfo buffer-mgr and the debug tfo connection commands coupled with the show debugging command display the states of tfo buffer-mgr and tfo connection debugging options:

WAE# debug tfo buffer-mgr
WAE# debug tfo connection
WAE# show debugging
tfo bufmgr debugging is on
tfo compmgr debugging is on
tfo connmgr debugging is on
tfo netio debugging is on
tfo statmgr debugging is on
tfo translog debugging is on

Related Commands

debug

undebug

show device-mode

To display the configured or current device mode of a WAAS device, use the show device-mode EXEC command.

show device-mode {configured | current}

Syntax Description

configured

Displays the configured device mode, which has not taken effect yet.

current

Displays the current device mode.


Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

You must deploy the WAAS Central Manager on a dedicated appliance. The device mode feature allows you to deploy a WAAS device as either a WAAS Central Manager or a WAE. Because you must deploy a WAAS Central Manager on a dedicated appliance, a WAAS device can only operate in one device mode; either in central-manager mode or application-accelerator mode.

If the configured and current device modes differ, a reload is required for the configured device mode to take effect.

To display the current device mode of a WAAS device, enter the show device mode EXEC command:

WAE# show device mode

To display the current mode in which the WAAS device is operating, enter the show device-mode current EXEC command:

WAE# show device-mode current
Current device mode: application-accelerator

To display the configured device mode that has not yet taken effect, enter the show device-mode configured EXEC command. For example, if you had entered the device mode central-manager global configuration command on a WAAS device to change its device mode to central manager but have not yet entered the copy run start EXEC command to save the running configuration on the device, then if you were to enter the show device-mode configured command on the WAAS device, the command output would indicate that the configured device mode is central-manager:

WAE# show device-mode configured
Configured device mode: central-manager

Examples

Table 3-28 describes the field in the show device-mode current display.

Table 3-28 Field Description for the show device-mode current Command

Field
Description

Current device mode

Current mode in which the WAAS device is operating.


Table 3-29 describes the field in the show device-mode configured display.

Table 3-29 Field Description for the show device-mode configured Command

Field
Description

Configured device mode

Device mode that has been configured, but has not yet taken effect.


Related Commands

(config) device mode

show disks

To view information about the WAAS device disks, use the show disks EXEC command.

show disks {details | failed-disk-id | failed-sectors [disk_name] | tech-support [details]}

Syntax Description

details

Displays currently effective configurations with more details.

failed-disk-id

Displays a list of disk serial numbers that have been identified as failed.

Note This option is not available on WAE-7341 and WAE-7371 models.

failed-sectors

Displays a list of failed sectors on all the disks.

disk_name

(Optional) Name of the disk for which failed sectors are displayed (disk00 or disk01).

tech-support

Displays hard drive diagnostic information and information about impending disk failures.

Displays all available information from the RAID controller, including disk status (logical and physical), disk vendor ID, and serial numbers.

This command replaces the show disk smart-info EXEC command.

details

(Optional) Displays more detailed SMART disk monitoring information.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

The show disks details EXEC command displays the percentage or amount of disk space allocated to each file system, and the operational status of the disk drives, after reboot.

The WAAS software supports filtering of multiple syslog messages for a single, failed section on IDE, SCSI, and SATA disks. Enter the show disks failed-sectors EXEC command to display a list of failed sectors on all disk drives.

WAE# show disks failed-sectors
disk00
=========
89923
9232112

disk01
=========
(None)

To display a list of failed sectors for only a specific disk drive, specify the name of the disk when entering the show disks failed-sectors command. The following example shows how to display a list of failed sectors for disk01:

WAE# show disks failed-sectors disk01
disk01
=========
(None)

If there are disk failures, a message is displayed, notifying you about this situation when you log in.

Proactively Monitoring Disk Health with SMART

The ability to proactively monitor the health of disks is available using SMART. SMART provides you with hard drive diagnostic information and information about impending disk failures.

SMART is supported by most disk vendors and is a standard method used to determine how healthy a disk is. SMART attributes include several read-only attributes (for example, the power on hours attribute, the load and unload count attribute) that provide the WAAS software with information regarding the operating and environmental conditions that may indicate an impending disk failure.

SMART support is vendor and drive technology (IDE or SCSI disk drives) dependent. Each disk vendor has a different set of supported SMART attributes.

Even though SMART attributes are vendor dependent there is a common way of interpreting most SMART attributes. Each SMART attribute has a normalized current value and a threshold value. When the current value exceeds the threshold value, the disk is considered to have "failed." The WAAS software monitors the SMART attributes and reports any impending failure through syslog messages, SNMP traps, and alarms.

To display SMART information, use the show disks tech-support EXEC command. To display more detailed SMART information, enter the show disks tech-support details EXEC command. The output from the show tech-support EXEC command also includes SMART information.

Examples

Table 3-30 describes the fields shown in the show disks failed-disk-id display.

Table 3-30 Field Description for the show disks failed-disk-id Command

Field
Description

Diskxx

Number and location of the physical disk.

Alpha-numeric string

Serial number of the disk.


Table 3-31 describes the fields shown in the show disks details display.

Table 3-31 Field Descriptions for the show disks details Command 

Field
Description

Physical disk information

Lists the disks by number. WAE 7300 series appliances show information for 6 disk drives and WAE 500 and 600 series appliances show information for 2 disk drives.

disk00

Availability of the disk: Present, Not present or Not responding, or Not used (*).

Disk identification number and type, for example: (h00 c00i00 100 - DAS).

Disk size in megabytes and gigabytes, for example: 140011MB (136.7GB).

disk01

Same type of information is shown for each disk.

Mounted filesystems

Table containing the following column heads:

Mount point

Mount point for the file system. For example, the mount point for SYSFS is /local/local1.

Type

Type of the file system. Values include root, internal, CONTENT, SYSFS, and PRINTSPOOL.

Device

Path to the partition on the disk.

Size

Total size of the file system in megabytes.

Inuse

Amount of disk space being used by the file system.

Free

Amount of unused disk space for the file system.

Use%

Percentage of the total available disk space being used by the file system.

Software RAID devices

If present, lists the software RAID devices and provides the following information for each:

Device name

Path to the partition on the disk. The partition name "md1" indicates that the partition is a raided partition and that the RAID type is RAID-1.

Type

Type of RAID, for example RAID-1.

Status

Operational status of the RAID device. Status may contain NORMAL OPERATION or REBUILDING.

Physical devices and status

Disk number and operational status of the disk, such as [GOOD] or [BAD].


In the following example, the output shows that partition 04 and partition 05 on disks disk00 and disk01 are GOOD, and the RAIDed partitions /dev/md4 & /dev/md5 are in NORMAL OPERATION. However, the RAIDed partition /dev/md8 has an issue with one of the drives. Disk04 with partition 00 is GOOD, but the status shows ONE OR MORE DRIVES ABNORMAL because there is no pair on this partition.

/dev/md4     RAID-1   NORMAL OPERATION      disk00/04[GOOD]
disk01/04[GOOD]  
/dev/md5     RAID-1   NORMAL OPERATION      disk00/05[GOOD]
disk01/05[GOOD]  
...
/dev/md8     RAID-1   ONE OR MORE DRIVES ABNORMAL  disk04/00[GOOD]

Table 3-32 describes some typical fields in the show disks tech-support display for a RAID-1 appliance that supports SMART. SMART attributes are vendor dependent; each disk vendor has a different set of supported SMART attributes.

Table 3-32 Field Descriptions for the show disks tech-support Command 

Field
Description

disk00—disk05

WAE 7300 series appliances show information for 6 disk drives, and WAE 500 and 600 series appliances show information for 2 disk drives.

Device

Vendor number and version number of the disk.

Serial Number

Serial number for the disk.

Device type

Type of device is disk.

Transport protocol

Physical layer connector information, for example: Parallel SCSI (SPI-4).

Local time is

Day of the week, month, date, time hh:mm:ss, year, clock standard. For example, Mon Mar 19 23:33:12 2007 UTC.

Device supports SMART and is Enabled

Status of SMART support: Enabled or Disabled.

Temperature Warning Enabled

Temperature warning status: Enabled or Disabled.

SMART Health Status:

Health status of the disk: OK or Failed.


Table 3-33 describes the fields in the show disks tech-support details display for a RAID-1 appliance that supports SMART. Details in this display depend on the drive manufacturer and vary between drives.

Table 3-33 Field Descriptions for the show disks tech-support details Command 

Field
Description

disk00—disk05

WAE 7300 series appliances show information for 6 disk drives and WAE 500 and 600 series appliances show information for 2 disk drives.

Device

Vendor number and version number of the disk.

Serial Number

Serial number for the disk.

Device type

Type of device is disk.

Transport protocol

Physical layer connector information, for example: Parallel SCSI (SPI-4).

Local time is

Day of the week, month, date, time hh:mm:ss, year, clock standard. For example, Mon Mar 19 23:33:12 2007 UTC.

Device supports SMART and is Enabled

Status of SMART support: Enabled or Disabled.

Temperature Warning Enabled

Temperature warning status: Enabled or Disabled.

SMART Health Status:

Health status of the disk: OK or Failed.

Current Drive Temperature

Temperature of the drive in degrees Celsius.

Manufactured in week XX of year

Manufacturing details.

Current start stop count

Number of times the device has stopped or started.

Recommended maximum start stop count

Maximum recommended count used to gauge the life expectancy of the disk.

Error counter log

Table displaying the error counter log. Counters for various types of disk errors.


Table 3-34 describes the fields shown in the show disks tech-support display for a RAID-5 appliance.

Table 3-34 Field Descriptions for the show disks tech-support Command

Field
Description

Controllers found

Number of RAID controllers found.

Controller information

Controller Status

Functional status of the controller.

Channel description

Description of the channel transport protocols.

Controller Model

Make and model of the controller.

Controller Serial Number

Serial number of the ServeRAID controller

Physical Slot

Slot number.

Installed memory

Amount of memory for the disk.

Copyback

Status of whether copyback is enabled or disabled.

Data scrubbing

Status of whether data scrubbing is enabled or disabled.

Defunct disk drive count

Number of defunct disk drives.

Logical drives/Offline/Critical

Number of logical drives, number of drives that are offline, and number of critical alarms.

Controller Version Information

BIOS

Version number of the BIOS.

Firmware

Version number of the Firmware.

Driver

Version number of the Driver.

Boot Flash

Version number of the Boot Flash.

Controller Battery Information

Status

Functional status of the controller battery.

Over temperature

Over temperature condition of the battery.

Capacity remaining

Percent of remaining battery capacity.

Time remaining (at current draw)

Number of days, hours, and minutes of battery life remaining based on the current draw.

Controller Vital Product Data

VPD Assigned#

Number assigned to the controller vital product data (VPD).

EC Version#

Version number.

Controller FRU#

Number assigned to the controller field-replaceable part.

Battery FRU#

Number assigned to the battery field-replaceable part.

Logical drive information

Logical drive number

Number identifying the logical drive to which the information applies.

Logical drive name

Name of the logical drive.

RAID level

RAID level of the logical drive.

Status of logical drive

Functional status of the logical drive.

Size

Size (in megabytes) of the logical drive.

Read-cache mode

Configuration status of read-cache mode: Enabled or Disabled.

Write-cache mode

Configuration status of write-cache mode for write-back: Enabled or Disabled.

Write-cache setting

Configuration status of the write-cache setting for write-back: Enabled or Disabled.

Partitioned

Partition state. Values are Yes or No.

Number of chunks

Number of disks participating in the RAID-5 array.

Stripe-unit size

Amount of data storage per stripe unit. The default is 256 KB per disk in the logical array. This parameter is not configurable.

Stripe order (Channel,Device)

Order in which data is striped across a group of physical drives that are grouped in a RAID array.

Bad stripes

Flag for bad stripes. Flag values are Yes or No.

Physical drive information

Device #

Device number for which the information applies.

Device is a xxxx

Type of device.

State

State of the device: Online or Offline.

Supported

Status showing if the device is supported.

Transfer Speed

Device transfer speed.

Reported Channel,Device

Provides channel information for all the disks participating in the RAID-5 array.

Reported Enclosure,Slot

Device number and slot number.

Vendor

Vendor identification number.

Model

Model number.

Firmware

Firmware number.

Serial number

Serial number.

Size

Size (in megabytes) of the physical drive.

Write Cache

Status of whether the write cache is enabled.

FRU

Field Replaceable Unit number. A RAID defunct drive FRU event occurs when a specified hard disk drive with the provided FRU number fails in a RAID configuration. The default value for this field is NONE.

PFA

Predictive Failure Analysis flag. The flag default value is No. If the RAID predicts a drive failure, this field is set to Yes and a critical alarm is raised on the WAE.


Related Commands

disk

(config) disk error-handling

show tech-support

show egress-methods

To view the egress method that is configured and that is being used on a particular WAE, use the show egress-methods EXEC command.

show egress-methods

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

Examples

Table 3-35 describes the fields shown in the show egress-methods display.

Table 3-35 Field Descriptions for the show egress-methods Command

Field
Description

Intercept method

Intercept method used by router to send packets to the WAE.

TCP Promiscuous 61 or 62

WCCP service number.

WCCP negotiated return method

WCCP return method being used by the router. Values include WCCP_GRE, WCCP_L2, NEG_RTN_PENDING (negotiation is pending), and UNKNOWN.

Destination

This value is not configurable. The value of this field is always ANY.

Egress Method Configured

Egress method configured in the CLI.

Egress Method Used

Egress method being used.


Related Commands

show tfo egress-methods connection

(config) egress-method

show flash

To display the flash memory version and usage information for a WAAS device, use the show flash EXEC command.

show flash

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

Table 3-36 describes the fields shown in the show flash display.

Table 3-36 Field Descriptions for the show flash Command

Field
Description

WAAS software version (disk-based code)

WAAS software version and build number that is running on the device.

System image on flash:

Version

Version and build number of the software that is stored in flash memory.

System flash directory:

System image

Number of sectors used by the system image.

Bootloader, rescue image, and other reserved areas

Number of sectors used by the bootloader, rescue image, and other reserved areas.

XX sectors total, XX sectors free

Total number of sectors. Number of free sectors.


show hardware

To display system hardware status for a WAAS device, use the show hardware EXEC command.

show hardware

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

The show hardware command lists the system hardware status, including the version number, the startup date and time, the run time since startup, the microprocessor type and speed, the amount of physical memory available, and a list of disk drives.

Examples

Table 3-37 describes the fields shown in the show hardware display.

Table 3-37 Field Descriptions for the show hardware Command 

Field
Description

Cisco Wide Area Application Services Software (WAAS)

Copyright (c) year by Cisco Systems, Inc.

Cisco Wide Area Application Services Software Release XXX (build bXXX month day year)

Software application, copyright, release, and build information.

Version

Version number of the software that is running on the device.

Compiled hour:minute:second month day year by cnbuild

Compile information for the software build.

System was restarted on day of week month day hour:minute:second year

Date and time that the system was last restarted.

The system has been up for X hours, X minutes, X seconds

Length of time the system has been running since the last reboot.

CPU 0 is

CPU manufacturer information.

Total X CPU

Number of CPUs on the device.

XXXX Mbytes of Physical memory

Number of megabytes of physical memory on the device.

X CD ROM drive

Number of CD-ROM drives on the device.

X GigabitEthernet interfaces

Number of Gigabit Ethernet interfaces on the device.

X InlineGroup interfaces

Number of InlineGroup interfaces on the device.

X Console interface

Number of console interfaces on the device.

Manufactured As

Product identification information.

BIOS Information

Information about the BIOS.

Vendor

Name of the BIOS vendor.

Version

BIOS version number.

Rel. Date

(Release date) Date that the BIOS was released.

Cookie info

SerialNumber

Serial number of the WAE.

SerialNumber (raw)

Serial number of the WAE as an ASCII value.

TestDate

Date that the WAE was tested.

ExtModel

Hardware model of the device, for example WAE612.

ModelNum (raw)

Internal model number (ASCII value) that corresponds to the ExtModel number.

HWVersion

Number of the current hardware version.

PartNumber

Not implemented.

BoardRevision

Number of revisions for the current system board.

ChipRev

Number of revisions for the current chipset.

VendID

Vendor ID of the cookie.

CookieVer

Version number of the cookie.

Chksum

Checksum of the cookie. showing whether the cookie is valid.

List of all disk drives

Physical disk information

Disks listed by number. WAE 7300 series appliances show information for 6 disk drives and WAE 500 and 600 series appliances show information for 2 disk drives.

disk00

Availability of the disk: Present, Not present or not responding, or Not used (*).

Disk identification number and type, for example:(h00 c00i00 100 - DAS).

Disk size in megabytes and gigabytes, for example: 140011MB (136.7GB).

disk01

Same type of information is shown for each disk.

Mounted filesystems

Table containing the following column heads:

Mount point

Mount point for the file system. For example the mount point for SYSFS is /local/local1.

Type

Type of the file system. Values include root, internal, CONTENT, SYSFS, and PRINTSPOOL.

Device

Path to the partition on the disk.

Size

Total size of the file system in megabytes.

Inuse

Amount of disk space being used by the file system.

Free

Amount of unused disk space for the file system.

Use%

Percentage of the total available disk space being used by the file system.

Software RAID devices

If present, lists the software RAID devices and provides the following information for each:

Device name

Path to the partition on the disk. The partition name "md1" indicates that the partition is a raided partition and that the RAID type is RAID-1. (RAID-1 is the only RAID type supported in WAAS.)

Type

Type of RAID, for example RAID-1.

Status

Operational status of the RAID device. Status may contain NORMAL OPERATION or REBUILDING.

Physical devices and status

Disk number and operational status of the disk, such as [GOOD] or [BAD].


Related Commands

show disks

show version

show hosts

To view the hosts on a WAAS device, use the show hosts EXEC command.

show hosts

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

The show hosts command lists the name servers and their corresponding IP addresses. It also lists the host names, their corresponding IP addresses, and their corresponding aliases (if applicable) in a host table summary.

Examples

Table 3-38 describes the fields shown in the show hosts display.

Table 3-38 field Descriptions for the show hosts Command

Field
Description

Domain names

Domain names used by the WAE to resolve the IP address.

Name Server(s)

IP address of the DNS name server or servers.

Host Table

hostname

FQDN (hostname and domain) of the current device.

inet address

IP address of the current host device.

aliases

Name configured for the current device based on the host global configuration command.


show inetd

To display the status of TCP/IP services on a WAAS device, use the show inetd EXEC command.

show inetd

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

The show inetd EXEC command displays the enabled or disabled status of TCP/IP services on the WAAS device. You can ignore the TFTP service status because TFTP is not supported on WAAS.

Examples

Table 3-39 describes the fields shown in the show inetd display.

Table 3-39 Field Descriptions for the show inetd Command

Field
Description

Inetd service configurations:

 

ftp

Status of whether the FTP service is enabled or disabled.

rcp

Status of whether the RCP service is enabled or disabled.

tftp

Status of whether the TFTP service is enabled or disabled.


Related Commands

(config) inetd

show interface

To display the hardware interface information for a WAAS device, use the show interface EXEC command.

show interface {GigabitEthernet slot/port} | {ide control_num} | {InlineGroup slot/grpnumber} | {InlinePort slot/grpnumber/{lan | wan}} | {PortChannel port-num} | {scsi device_num}
| {
Standby group_num | usb}

Syntax Description

GigabitEthernet

Displays the Gigabit Ethernet interface device information (only on suitably equipped systems).

slot/port

Slot and port number for the Gigabit Ethernet interface. The slot range is 0-3; the port range is 0-3. The slot number and port number are separated with a forward slash character (/).

ide

Displays the IDE interface device information.

control_num

IDE controller number (0-1).

InlineGroup

Displays the inline group information.

slot/grpnumber

Slot and inline group number for the selected interface.

InlinePort

Displays the inline port information.

slot/grpnumber/

Slot and inline group number for the selected interface.

lan

Displays the inline port information for the LAN port.

wan

Displays the inline port information for the WAN port.

PortChannel

Displays the port channel interface device information.

port-num

Port number for the port channel interface (1-2).

scsi

Displays the SCSI interface device information.

device_num

SCSI device number (0-7).

Standby

Displays the standby group information.

group_num

Standby group number (1-4).

usb

Displays the USB interface device information.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

Table 3-40 describes the fields shown in the show interface GigabitEthernet display.

Table 3-40 Field Descriptions for the show interface GigabitEthernet Command 

Field
Description

Description

Description of the device, as configured by using the description option of the interface global configuration command.

Type

Type of interface. Always Ethernet.

Ethernet address

Layer-2 MAC address.

Internet address

Internet IP address configured for this interface.

Broadcast address

Broadcast address configured for this interface.

Netmask

Netmask configured for this interface.

Maximum Transfer Unit Size

Current configured MTU value.

Metric

Metric setting for the interface. The default is 1. The routing metric is used by the routing protocol to determine the most favorable route. Metrics are counted as additional hops to the destination network or host; the higher the metric value, the less favorable the route.

Packets Received

Total number of packets received by this interface.

Input Errors

Number of incoming errors on this interface.

Input Packets Dropped

Number of incoming packets that were dropped on this interface.

Input Packets Overruns

Number of incoming packet overrun errors.

Input Packets Frames

Number of incoming packet frame errors.

Packet Sent

Total number of packets sent from this interface.

Output Errors

Number of outgoing packet errors.

Output Packets Dropped

Number of outgoing packets that were dropped by this interface.

Output Packets Overruns

Number of outgoing packet overrun errors.

Output Packets Carrier

Number of outgoing packet carrier errors.

Output Queue Length

Output queue length in bytes.

Collisions

Number of packet collisions at this interface.

Interrupts

Number of packet interrupts at this interface.

Base address

Base address. hexidecimal value.

Flags

Interface status indicators. Values include Up, Broadcast, Running, and Multicast.

Mode

Speed setting, transmission mode, and transmission speed for this interface.


The following example displays information for inlineGroup 0 in slot 1 configured on the WAE inline network adapter:

WAE612# show interface inlineGroup 1/0
Interface is in intercept operating mode.
Standard NIC mode is off.
Disable bypass mode is off.
VLAN IDs configured for inline interception: All
Watchdog timer is enabled.
Timer frequency: 1600 ms.
Autoreset frequency 500 ms.
The watchdog timer will expire in 1221 ms.

Table 3-41 describes the fields shown in the show interface InlinePort display.

Table 3-41 Field Descriptions for the show interface InlinePort Command 

Field
Description

Device name

Number identifier for this inlineport interface, such as eth0, eth1, and so forth.

Packets Received

Total number of packets received on this inlineport interface.

Packets Intercepted

Total number of packets intercepted. (Only TCP packets are intercepted.)

Packets Bridged

Number of packets that are bridged. Packets which are not intercepted are bridged.

Packets Forwarded

Number of packets sent from the inline interface.

Packets Dropped

Number of packets dropped.

Packets Received on native

Number of packets forwarded by the inline module that are received on the native (GigabitEthernet 1/0) interface.

n flows through this interface

Number of active TCP connections on this inlineport interface.

Ethernet Driver Status

Type

Type of interface. Always Ethernet.

Ethernet address

Layer-2 MAC address.

Maximum Transfer Unit Size

Current configured MTU value.

Metric

Metric setting for the interface. The default is 1. The routing metric is used by the routing protocol to determine the most favorable route. Metrics are counted as additional hops to the destination network or host; the higher the metric value, the less favorable the route.

Packets Received

Total number of packets received by this interface.

Input Errors

Number of incoming errors on this interface.

Input Packets Dropped

Number of incoming packets that were dropped on this interface.

Input Packets Overruns

Number of incoming packet overrun errors.

Input Packets Frames

Number of incoming packet frame errors.

Packet Sent

Total number of packets sent from this interface.

Output Errors

Number of outgoing packet errors.

Output Packets Dropped

Number of outgoing packets that were dropped by this interface.

Output Packets Overruns

Number of outgoing packet overrun errors.

Output Packets Carrier

Number of outgoing packet carrier errors.

Output Queue Length

Output queue length in bytes.

Collisions

Number of packet collisions at this interface.

Base address

Base address. hexidecimal value.

Flags

Interface status indicators. Values include Up, Broadcast, Running, and Multicast.

Mode

Speed setting, transmission mode, and transmission speed for this interface.


Table 3-42 describes the fields shown in the show interface PortChannel display.

Table 3-42 Field descriptions for the show interface PortChannel Command 

Field
Description

Type

Type of interface. Always Ethernet.

Ethernet address

Layer-2 MAc address.

Maximum Transfer Unit Size

Current configured MTU value.

Metric

Metric setting for the interface. The default is 1. The routing metric is used by the routing protocol. Higher metrics have the effect of making a route less favorable; metrics are counted as addition hops to the destination network or host.

Packets Received

Total number of packets received by this interface.

Input Errors

Number of incoming errors on this interface.

Input Packets Dropped

Number of incoming packets that were dropped on this interface.

Input Packets Overruns

Number of incoming packet overrun errors.

Input Packets Frames

Number of incoming packet frame errors.

Packet Sent

Total number of packets sent from this interface.

Output Errors

Number of outgoing packet errors.

Output Packets Dropped

Number of outgoing packets that were dropped by this interface.

Output Packets Overruns

Number of outgoing packet overrun errors.

Output Packets Carrier

Number of outgoing packet carrier errors.

Output Queue Length

Output queue length in bytes.

Collisions

Number of packet collisions at this interface.

Flags

Interface status indicators. Values include Up, Broadcast, Running, and Multicast.


Table 3-43 describes the field shown in the show interface scsi display.

Table 3-43 Field Description for the show interface scsi Command

Field
Description

SCSI interface X

Information for SCSI device number X. Shows the make, device ID number, model number, and type of SCSI device.


Table 3-44 describes the fields shown in the show interface standby display.

Table 3-44 Field Descriptions for the show interface standby Command

Field
Description

Standby Group

Number that identifies the standby group.

Description

Description of the device, as configured by using the description option of the interface global configuration command.

IP address, netmask

IP address and netmask of the standby group.

Member interfaces

Member interfaces of the standby group. Shows which physical interfaces are part of the standby group. Shows the interface definition, such as GigibitEthernet 1/0.

Active interface

Interfaces that are currently active in the standby group.


Related Commands

(config) interface

show running-config

show startup-config

show inventory

To display the system inventory information for a WAAS device, use the show inventory EXEC command.

show inventory

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

The show inventory EXEC command allows you to view the UDI for a WAAS device. This identity information is stored in the WAAS device's nonvolatile memory.

The UDI is electronically accessed by the product operating system or network management application to enable identification of unique hardware devices. The data integrity of the UDI is vital to customers. The UDI that is programmed into the WAAS device's nonvolatile memory is equivalent to the UDI that is printed on the product label and on the carton label. This UDI is also equivalent to the UDI that can be viewed through any electronic means and in all customer-facing systems and tools. Currently, there is only CLI access to the UDI; there is no SNMP access to the UDI information.

You can also use the show tech-support EXEC command to display the WAAS device UDI.

Examples

Table 3-45 describes the fields shown in the show inventory display.

Table 3-45 Field Descriptions for the show inventory Command

Field
Description

PID

Product identification (ID) number of the device.

VID

Version ID number of the device. Displays as 0 if the version number is not available.

SN

Serial number of the device.


Related Commands

show tech-support

show ip access-list

To display the access lists that are defined and applied to specific interfaces or applications on a WAAS device, use the show ip access-list EXEC command.

show ip access-list [acl-name | acl-num]

Syntax Description

acl-name

(Optional) Information for a specific access list, using an alphanumeric identifier up to 30 characters, beginning with a letter.

acl-num

(Optional) Information for a specific access list, using a numeric identifier (0-99 for standard access lists and100-199 for extended access lists).


Defaults

Displays information about all defined access lists.

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip access-list EXEC command to display the access lists that have been defined on the WAAS device. Unless you identify a specific access list by name or number, the system displays information about all the defined access lists, including the following sections:

Available space for new lists and conditions

Defined access lists

References by interface and application

Examples

Table 3-46 describes the fields shown in the show ip access-list display.

Table 3-46 Field Descriptions for the show ip access-list Command 

Field
Description

Space available:

XX access lists

Number of access lists remaining out of 50 maximum lists allowed.

XXX access list conditions

Number of access list conditions remaining out of 500 maximum conditions allowed.

Standard IP access list

Name of a configured standard IP access list. Displays a list of the conditions configured for this list.

Extended IP access list

Name of a configured extended IP access list. Displays a list of the conditions configured for this list.

Interface access list references

List of interfaces and the access lists with which they are associated, displayed in the following format:

interface slot/port

interface direction

access list number

Application access list references

List of applications and the access lists with which they are associated, displayed in the following format:

application type

access list type and number

associated port


Related Commands

clear

(config) ip access-list

show ip routes

To display the IP routing table for a WAAS device, use the show ip routes EXEC command.

show ip routes

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

This command displays the IP route table, which lists all of the different routes that are configured on the WAE. The WAE uses this table to determine the next hop. This table includes routes from three sources: the WAE GigabitEthernet interfaces, any user-configured static routes, and the default gateway. The last line in this table shows the default route.

Examples

Table 3-47 describes the fields shown in the show ip routes display.

Table 3-47 Field Descriptions for the show ip routes Command

Field
Description

Destination

Destination IP addresses for each route.

Gateway

Gateway addresses for each route.

Netmask

Netmasks for each route.

Number of route cache entries

Number of entries in the route cache.

The route cache is a separate entity and this field is not associated with the entries in the IP route table. The number of entries in the route cache can vary depending on the number of connections that are open.


Related Commands

(config) ip

(config-if) ip

show kerberos

To display the Kerberos authentication configuration for a WAAS device, use the show kerberos EXEC command.

show kerberos

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use the system message log to view information about events that have occurred on a WAAS device. The syslog.txt file is contained in the /local1 directory.

Examples

Table 3-48 describes the fields shown in the show kerberos display.

Table 3-48 Field Descriptions for the show kerberos Command

Field
Description

Kerberos Configuration

Local Realm

Local realm name.

DNS suffix

DNS suffix for the realm.

Realm for DNS suffix

DNS addresses of the computers that are part of this realm.

Name of host running KDC for realm

Name of the host running the Key Distribution Center for the realm.

Master KDC

Primary or main Key Distribution Center.

Port

Port that the Kerberos server is using for incoming requests from clients. The default is port 88.


Related Commands

clear

(config) logging

show key-manager

To display key manager information for each WAAS device, use the show key-manager EXEC command.

show key-manager {key | status}

Syntax Description

key

Shows detailed key manager information for each WAE device that is registered to the Central Manager.

status

Displays the overall encryption status information


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

central-manager

Examples

Table 3-48 describes the fields shown in the show key-manager key display.

Table 3-49 Field Descriptions for the show key-manager status Command

Field
Description

WAE Device

Device name.

Key ID

Encryption key identification number.

Creation Time

Time the key was created.

Encryption Algorithm

Encryption algorithm.


Related Commands

show statistics key-manager

show logging

To display the system message log configuration for a WAAS device, use the show logging EXEC command.

show logging

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use the system message log to view information about events that have occurred on a WAAS device. The syslog.txt file is contained in the /local1 directory.

Examples

The following example displays the syslog host configuration on a WAAS device:

WAE# show logging
Syslog to host is disabled
Priority for host logging is set to:  warning

Syslog to console is disabled
Priority for console logging is set to:  warning

Syslog to disk is enabled
Priority for disk logging is set to:  notice
Filename for disk logging is set to:  /local1/syslog.txt

Syslog facility is set to *

Syslog disk file recycle size is set to 1000000

Related Commands

clear

(config) logging

show sysfs

show memory

To display memory blocks and statistics for a WAAS device, use the show memory EXEC command.

show memory

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

Table 3-50 describes the fields shown in the show memory display.

Table 3-50 Field Descriptions for the show memory Command

Field
Description

Total physical memory

Total amount of physical memory in kilobytes (KB).

Total free memory

Total available memory (in kilobytes).

Total buffer memory

Total amount of memory (in kilobytes) in the memory buffer.

Total cached memory

Total amount of memory (in kilobytes) in the memory cache.

Total swap

Total amount of memory (in kilobytes) for swap purposes.

Total free swap

Total available memory (in kilobytes) for swap purposes.


show ntp

To display the NTP parameters for a WAAS device, use the show ntp EXEC command.

show ntp status

Syntax Description

status

Displays NTP status.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

Table 3-51 describes the fields shown in the show ntp status display.

Table 3-51 Field Descriptions for the show ntp status Command 

Field
Description

NTP

Indicates whether NTP is enabled or disabled.

server list

NTP server IP and subnet addresses.

remote

Name (first 15 characters) of remote NTP server.

*

In the remote column, identifies the system peer to which the clock is synchronized.

+

In the remote column, identifies a valid or eligible peer for NTP synchronization.

space

In the remote column, indicates that the peer was rejected. (The peer could not be reached or excessive delay occurred in reaching the NTP server.)

x

In the remote column, indicates a false tick and is ignored by the NTP server.

-

In the remote column, indicates a reading outside the clock tolerance limits and is ignored by the NTP server.

refid

Clock reference ID to which the remote NTP server is synchronized.

st

Clock server stratum or layer. In this example, stratum 1 is the top layer.

t

Type of peer (local, unicast, multicast, or broadcast).

when

Indicates when the last packet was received from the server in seconds.

poll

Time check or correlation polling interval in seconds.

reach

8-bit reachability register. If the server was reachable during the last polling interval, a 1 is recorded; otherwise, a 0 is recorded. Octal values 377 and above indicate that every polling attempt reached the server.

delay

Estimated delay (in milliseconds) between the requester and the server.

offset

Clock offset relative to the server.

jitter

Clock jitter.


Related Commands

clock

(config) clock

(config) ntp

show policy-engine application

To display application policy information for a WAE, use the show policy-engine application EXEC command.

show policy-engine application {classifier [app-classifier] | dynamic | name}

Syntax Description

classifier

Displays information about the specified application classifier. If no classifier is specified, this command displays information about all classifiers. Every application classifier with a single match is displayed in one line.

app-classifier

(Optional) Name of an application classifier. The name should not exceed 30 characters.

dynamic

Shows the application dynamic match information.

name

Shows the application names list.


Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

Usage Guidelines

Use the show policy-engine application dynamic command to display auto-discovered CIFS file servers that are added to the list. The servers are visible in the dynamic listing for a limited time (3 minutes by default) after any activity stops, and then they are dropped from the dynamic list until another client request causes them to be auto-discovered again.

Examples

Table 3-52 describes the fields shown in the show policy-engine application classifier display.

Table 3-52 Field Descriptions for the show policy-engine application classifier Command 

Field
Description

Number of Application Classifiers:

Number of application classifiers configured.

0 to N

Numbered list that includes the application name and the match statement that defines which traffic is interesting. For example:

0) AFS 
          match  dst port range 7000 7009

1) Altiris-CarbonCopy
         match   dst port eq 1680


Table 3-53 describes the fields shown in the show policy-engine application dynamic display.

Table 3-53 Field Descriptions for the show policy-engine application dynamic Command

Field
Description

Dynamic Match Freelist Information

Allocated

Total number dynamic policies that can be allocated.

In Use

Number of dynamic matches that are currently in use.

Max In Use

Maximum number of dynamic matches that have been used since the last reboot.

Allocations

Number times that the dynamic match entries have been added.

Individual Dynamic Match Information:

Displays the internally-configured match values for dynamic applications. Dynamic applications do not use statically assigned ports, but they negotiate for a port to handle that application traffic.

Number

Number of the match condition in the list.

Type

Type of traffic to match. For example, Any-->Local tests traffic from any source to the local WAE.

User Id

Name of the accelerator that inserted the entry.

Src

Value for the source match condition. Values can be ANY, LOCAL, an IP address, or a port to which the application applies.

Dst

Value for the destination match condition. Values can be ANY, LOCAL, an IP address, or a port to which the application applies.

Map Name

Policy engine application map that is invoked if the dynamic match entry matches a connection.

Flags

Operation flags specifying different connection handling options.

Seconds

Number of seconds specified as the time limit for the dynamic match entry to exist.

Remaining

Number of seconds remaining before the dynamic match entry expires and is deleted.

Hits

Number of connections that have matched.


Table 3-54 describes the fields shown in the show policy-engine application name display.

Table 3-54 Field Descriptions for the show policy-engine application name Command

Field
Description

Number of Applications: X

Number of applications defined on the WAE, including all of the default applications. WAAS includes over 150 default application policies. (For a list of default application policies, see the Cisco Wide Area Application Services Configuration Guide, Appendix A.

The display next lists each application that is defined on the WAE by name:

1) Authentication (15)

Name of the application and its internal numerical identifier, which is used to manage the application name in the policy engine.

2) Backup (18)

3) Call-Management (17)

4) Conferencing (8)

5) Console (4)

6) Content-Management (21)

7) Directory-Services (6)

8) Email-and-Messaging (12)

9) Enterprise-Applications (13)

10) File-System (2)

11) File-Transfer (16)

12) Instant-Messaging (22)

13) Name-Services (25)

14) Network-Analysis (26)

15) P2P (7)

16) Printing (14)

17) Remote-Desktop (5)

18) Replication (20)

19) SQL (1)

20) SSH (24)

21) Storage (27)

22) Streaming (11)

23) Systems-Management (3)

24) VPN (23)

25) Version-Management (9)

26) WAFS (10)

27) Web (19)

28) Other (0)


Related Commands

(config) policy-engine application classifier

(config) policy-engine application map adaptor EPM

(config) policy-engine application map adaptor WAFS transport

(config) policy-engine application map basic delete

(config) policy-engine application map basic disable

(config) policy-engine application map basic insert

(config) policy-engine application map basic list

(config) policy-engine application map basic move

(config) policy-engine application map basic name

(config) policy-engine application map other optimize DRE

(config) policy-engine application map other optimize full

(config) policy-engine application map other pass-through

(config) policy-engine application name

(config) policy-engine config

show policy-engine status

To display high-level information about a WAE's policy engine, use the show policy-engine status EXEC command. This information includes the usage of the available resources, which include application names, classifiers, and conditions.

show policy-engine status

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

Examples

Table 3-55 describes the fields shown in the show policy-engine status display.

Table 3-55 Field Descriptions for the show policy-engine status Command

Field
Description

Policy-engine resources usage:

Table columns are Total, Used, and Available.

Application names

Total number of application names. Number of application names being used. Number of application names available.

Classifiers

Total number of classifiers configured. Number of classifiers being used. Number of classifiers available. The maximum number of classifiers allowed is 512.

Conditions

Total number of conditions configured. Number of conditions being used. Number of conditions available. The maximum number of match conditions allowed is 1024.

Policies

Total number of policies configured. Number of policies being used. Number of policies available. The maximum number of policies allowed is 512.


Related Commands

(config) policy-engine application classifier

(config) policy-engine application map adaptor EPM

(config) policy-engine application map adaptor WAFS transport

(config) policy-engine application map basic delete

(config) policy-engine application map basic disable

(config) policy-engine application map basic insert

(config) policy-engine application map basic list

(config) policy-engine application map basic move

(config) policy-engine application map basic name

(config) policy-engine application map other optimize DRE

(config) policy-engine application map other optimize full

(config) policy-engine application map other pass-through

(config) policy-engine application name

(config) policy-engine config

show print-services

To display administrative users who have access to configuration privileges, print services, or print service processes on a WAAS device, use the show print-services EXEC command.

show print-services {drivers user username | process}

Syntax Description

process

Displays information about the print server and print spooler.

drivers

Displays printer drivers on this print server.

user username

Specifies a username that belongs to the print admin group.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

Table 3-56 describes the fields shown in the show print-services process display.

Table 3-56 Field Descriptions for the show print-services process Command 

Field
Description

Print server is running.

Operation status of the print server.

Print spooler is running.

Operation status of the print spooler.

Print Server Status

Samba version 3.0.20

Samba version being used.

PID

Process ID. Process identification number of the Samba process on the WAE Linux appliance.

Username

UNIX user that has started the Samba process.

Group

UNIX group to which the user belongs.

Machine

Machine name and IP address. The machine name is the same as the NetBIOS name.

Service

Remote procedure call (RPC) port that is used by clients to connect to the print server. Value is always IPC$.

pid

Process ID. Process identification number of the Samba process on the WAE Linux appliance.

machine

Machine name.

Connected at

Date and time of connection to the print server.

No locked files

Comment line.

Print Spooler Status

scheduler is running

Operation status of the print spooler scheduler.

system default destination

Default print destination for WAAS (VistaPrinterOnWAAS).

device for (VistaPrinterOnWAAS)

Socket address for the system default print destination.

(VistaPrinterOnWAAS) accepting requests

Availability status of the system default print destination.

printer (VistaPrinterOnWAAS) is idle. enabled

Operation status of the system default printer.


Related Commands

(config) authentication

(config) print-services

show authentication

windows-domain

(config) windows-domain

show processes

To display CPU or memory processes for a WAAS device, use the show processes EXEC command.

show processes [cpu | debug pid | memory | system [delay 1-60 | count 1-100]]

Syntax Description

cpu

(Optional) Displays CPU utilization.

debug

(Optional) Prints the system call and signal traces for a specified process identifier to display system progress.

pid

Process identifier.

memory

(Optional) Displays memory allocation processes.

system

(Optional) Displays system load information in terms of updates.

delay

(Optional) Specifies the delay between updates, in seconds (1-60).

count

(Optional) Specifies the number of updates that are displayed (1-100).


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use the EXEC commands shown in this section to track and analyze system CPU utilization.

The show processes debug command displays extensive internal system call information and a detailed account of each system call (along with arguments) made by each process and the signals it has received.

Use the show processes system command to display system load information in terms of updates. The delay option specifies the delay between updates, in seconds. The count option specifies the number of updates that are displayed. This command displays these items:

A list of all processes in wide format.

Two tables listing the processes that utilize CPU resources. The first table displays the list of processes in descending order of utilization of CPU resources based on a snapshot taken after the processes system (ps) output is displayed. The second table displays the same processes based on a snapshot taken 5 seconds after the first snapshot.

Virtual memory used by the corresponding processes in a series of five snapshots, each separated by 1 second.


Note CPU utilization and system performance are severely affected when you use these commands. We therefore recommend that you avoid using these commands, especially the show processes debug command, unless it is absolutely necessary.


Examples

Table 3-57 describes the fields shown in the show processes display.

Table 3-57 Field Descriptions for the show processes Command 

Field
Description

CPU Usage

CPU utilization as a percentage for user, system overhead, and idle.

PID

Process identifier.

STATE

Current state of corresponding processes.

R = running
S = sleeping in an interruptible wait
D = sleeping in an uninterruptible wait or swapping
Z = zombie
T = traced or stopped on a signal

PRI

Priority of processes.

User T

User time utilization in seconds.

Sys T

System time utilization in seconds.

COMMAND

Process command.

Total

Total available memory in bytes.

Used

Memory currently used in bytes.

Free

Free memory available in bytes.

Shared

Shared memory currently used in bytes.

Buffers

Buffer memory currently used in bytes.

Cached

Cache memory currently used in bytes.

SwapTotal

Total available memory in bytes for swap purposes.


show radius-server

To display RADIUS configuration information for a WAAS device, use the show radius-server EXEC command.

show radius-server

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

Table 3-58 describes the fields shown in the show radius-server display.

Table 3-58 Field Descriptions for the show radius-server Command 

Field
Description

Login Authentication for Console/Telnet Session

Indicates whether a RADIUS server is enabled for login authentication.

Configuration Authentication for Console/Telnet Session

Indicates whether a RADIUS server is enabled for authorization or configuration authentication.

Authentication scheme fail-over reason

Indicates whether the WAAS devices fail over to the secondary method of administrative login authentication whenever the primary administrative login authentication method.

RADIUS Configuration

RADIUS authentication settings.

Key

Key used to encrypt and authenticate all communication between the RADIUS client (the WAAS device) and the RADIUS server.

Timeout

Number of seconds that the WAAS device waits for a response from the specified RADIUS authentication server before declaring a timeout.

Servers

RADIUS servers that the WAAS device is to use for RADIUS authentication.

IP

Hostname or IP address of the RADIUS server.

Port

Port number on which the RADIUS server is listening.


Related Commands

(config) radius-server

show running-config

To display a WAAS device's current running configuration information on the terminal, use the show running-config EXEC command. This command replaces the write terminal command.

show running-config

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use this EXEC command in conjunction with the show startup-config command to compare the information in running memory to the startup configuration used during bootup.

Examples

The following example displays the currently running configuration of a WAAS device:

WAE# show running-config
! WAAS version 4.0.0
!
device mode central-manager
!
!
hostname waas-cm
!
!
!
!
!
exec-timeout 60
!
!
primary-interface GigabitEthernet 1/0
!
!
...

Related Commands

configure

copy running-config

copy startup-config

show services

To display services-related information for a WAAS device, use the show services EXEC command.

show services {ports [port-num] | summary}

Syntax Description

ports

Displays services by port number.

port-num

(Optional) Up to 8 port numbers (1-65535).

summary

Displays the services summary.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

The following example displays a summary of the services:

WAE# show services summary

Service        Ports
-----------------------------------------------------
                 CMS          1100  5256
                 NLM          4045
                WAFS          1099
                emdb          5432
               MOUNT          3058
           MgmtAgent          5252
         WAFS_tunnel          4050
       CMS_db_vacuum          5257

show smb-conf

To view a WAAS device's current values of the Samba configuration file, smb.conf, use the show smb-conf EXEC command.

show smb-conf

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

This command displays the global, print$, and printers parameters values of the smb.conf file for troubleshooting purposes. For a description of these parameters and their values, see "(config) smb-conf" command.

Examples

The following example displays all of the parameter values for the current configuration:

WAE# show smb-conf

Current smb-conf configurations -->

smb-conf section "global" name "ldap ssl" value "start_tls"
smb-conf section "printers" name "printer admin" value "root"

Output of current smb.conf file on disk -->


==============================================

# File automatically generated


[global]
idmap uid = 70000-200000
idmap gid = 70000-200000
winbind enum users = no
winbind enum groups = no
winbind cache time = 10
winbind use default domain = yes
printcap name = cups
load printers = yes
printing = cups
cups options = "raw"
force printername = yes
lpq cache time = 0
log file = /local/local1/errorlog/samba.log
max log size = 50
socket options = TCP_NODELAY SO_RCVBUF=8192 SO_SNDBUF=8192
smb ports = 50139
local master = no
domain master = no
preferred master = no
dns proxy = no
template homedir = /local/local1/
template shell = /admin-shell
ldap ssl = start_tls
comment = Comment:
netbios name = MYFILEENGINE
realm = ABC
wins server = 10.10.10.1
password server = 10.10.10.10
security = domain

[print$]
path = /state/samba/printers
guest ok = yes
browseable = yes
read only = yes
write list = root


[printers]
path = /local/local1/spool/samba
browseable = no
guest ok = yes
writable = no
printable = yes
printer admin = root

==============================================

Related Commands

(config) smb-conf

windows-domain

(config) windows-domain

show snmp

To check the status of SNMP communications for a WAAS device, use the show snmp EXEC command.

show snmp {alarm-history | engine ID | event | group | stats | user}

Syntax Description

alarm-history

Displays SNMP alarm history information.

engineID

Displays local SNMP engine identifier.

event

Displays events configured through the Event MIB.

group

Displays SNMP groups.

stats

Displays SNMP statistics.

user

Displays SNMP users.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

This EXEC command provides information on various SNMP variables and statistics on SNMP operations.

Examples

Table 3-59 describes the fields shown in the show snmp alarm-history display.

Table 3-59 Field Descriptions for the show snmp alarm-history Command

Field
Description

Index

Displays serial number of the listed alarms.

Type

Indicates whether the alarm has been Raised (R) or Cleared (C).

Sev

Levels of alarm severity: Critical (Cr), Major (Ma), or Minor (Mi)

Alarm ID

Traps sent by a WAE contain numeric alarm IDs.

ModuleID

Traps sent by a WAE contain numeric module IDs. (See the table below to map module names to module IDs.)

Category

Traps sent by a WAE contain numeric category IDs. (See the table below to map category names to category IDs.)

Descr

Provides description of the WAAS software alarm and the application that generated the alarm.


Table 3-60 summarizes the mapping of module names to module IDs.

Table 3-60 Summary of Module Names to ID Numbers

Module Name
Module ID

AD_DATABASE

8000

NHM

1

NHM/NHM

2500

nodemgr

2000

standby

4000

sysmon

1000

UNICAST_DATA_RECEIVER

5000

UNICAST_DATA_SENDER

6000


Table 3-61 summarizes the mapping of category names to category IDs.

Table 3-61 Summary of Category Names to ID Numbers

Category Name
Category ID

Communications

1

Service Quality

2

Processing Error

3

Equipment

4

Environment

5

Content

6


Table 3-62 describes the fields shown in the show snmp engineID display.

Table 3-62 Field Descriptions for the show snmp engineID

Field
Description

Local SNMP Engine ID

String that identifies the copy of SNMP on the local device.


Table 3-63 describes the fields shown in the show snmp event display. The show snmp event command displays information about the SNMP events that were set using the "snmp trigger" command:

Table 3-63 Field Descriptions for the show snmp event Command 

Field
Description

Mgmt Triggers

Output for management triggers, which are numbered 1, 2, 3, and so on in the output.

(1): Owner:

Name of the person who configured the trigger. "CLI" is the default owner; the system has a default trigger configured.

(1):

Name for the trigger. This name is locally-unique and administratively assigned. For example, this field might contain the "isValid" trigger name. Numbering indicates that this is the first management trigger listed in the show output.

Comment:

Description of the trigger's function and use. For example: WAFS license file is not valid.

Sample:

Basis on which the test sample is being evaluated. For example: Abs (Absolute) or Delta.

Freq:

Frequency. Number of seconds to wait between trigger samplings. To encourage consistency in sampling, the interval is measured from the beginning of one check to the beginning of the next and the timer is restarted immediately when it expires, not when the check completes.

Test:

Type of trigger test to perform based on the SNMP trigger configured. The Test field may contain the following types of tests:

Absent—Absent existence of a test

Boolean—Boolean value test

Equal—Equality threshold test

Falling—Falling threshold test

Greater-than—Greater-than threshold test

Less-than—Less-than threshold test

On-change—Changed existence test

Present—Present present test

Rising—Rising threshold test

ObjectOwner:

Name of the object owner who created the trigger using the snmp trigger create global configuration command or by using an SNMP interface. "CLI" is the default owner.

Object:

String identifying the object.

Boolean Entry:

Value:

Object identifier of the MIB object to sample to see whether the trigger should fire.

Cmp:

Comparison. Type of boolean comparison to perform. The numbers 1-6 correspond to these Boolean comparisons:

unequal (1)

equal (2)

less (3)

lessOrEqual (4)

greater (5)

greaterOrEqual (6)

Start:

Starting value for which this instance will be triggered.

ObjOwn:

Object owner.

Obj:

Object.

EveOwn:

Event owner.

Eve:

Event. Type of SNMP event. For example: CLI_EVENT.

Delta Value Table:

Table containing trigger information for delta sampling.

(0):

Thresh:

Threshold value to check against if the trigger type is threshold.

Exis:

Type of existence test to perform. Values are 1 or 0.

Read:

Indicates whether the MIB instance has been queried or not.

OID:

Object ID (Same as MIB instance).

val:

Value ID.

(2):

MIB instance on which the trigger is configured. This is the second management trigger listed in the show output. The fields are repeated for each instance listed in this show command.


Table 3-64 describes the fields shown in the show snmp group display.

Table 3-64 Field Descriptions for the show snmp group Command

Field
Description

groupname

Name of the SNMP group, or collection of users who have a common access policy.

security_model

Security model used by the group (either v1, v2c, or v3).

readview

String identifying the read view of the group.

writeview

String identifying the write view of the group.

notifyview

string identifying the notify view of the group.


Table 3-65 describes the fields shown in the show snmp stats display.

Table 3-65 Field Descriptions for the show snmp stats Command 

Field
Description

SNMP packets input

Total number of SNMP packets input.

Bad SNMP version errors

Number of packets with an invalid SNMP version.

Unknown community name

Number of SNMP packets with an unknown community name.

Illegal operation for community name supplied

Number of packets requesting an operation not allowed for that community.

Encoding errors

Number of SNMP packets that were improperly encoded.

Number of requested variables

Number of variables requested by SNMP managers.

Number of altered variables

Number of variables altered by SNMP managers.

Get-request PDUs

Number of GET requests received.

Get-next PDUs

Number of GET-NEXT requests received.

Set-request PDUs

Number of SET requests received.

SNMP packets output

Total number of SNMP packets sent by the router.

Too big errors

Number of SNMP packets that were larger than the maximum packet size.

Maximum packet size

Maximum size of SNMP packets.

No such name errors

Number of SNMP requests that specified a MIB object that does not exist.

Bad values errors

Number of SNMP SET requests that specified an invalid value for a MIB object.

General errors

Number of SNMP SET requests that failed because of some other error. (It was not a No such name error, Bad values error, or any of the other specific errors.)

Response PDUs

Number of responses sent in reply to requests.

Trap PDUs

Number of SNMP traps sent.


Table 3-66 describes the fields shown in the show snmp user display.

Table 3-66 Field Descriptions for the show snmp user Command

Field
Description

User name

String identifying the name of the SNMP user.

Engine ID

String identifying the name of the copy of SNMP on the device.

Group Name

Name of the SNMP group, or collection of users who have a common access policy.


Related Commands

(config) snmp-server community

(config) snmp-server contact

(config) snmp-server enable traps

(config) snmp-server group

(config) snmp-server host

(config) snmp-server location

(config) snmp-server mib

(config) snmp-server notify inform

(config) snmp-server user

(config) snmp-server view

snmp trigger

show ssh

To display the status and configuration information of the Secure Shell (SSH) service for a WAAS device, use the show ssh EXEC command.

show ssh

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

Table 3-67 describes the fields shown in the show ssh display.

Table 3-67 Field Descriptions for the show ssh Command

Field
Description

SSH server supports SSH2 protocol (SSH1 compatible).

Protocol support statement.

SSH service is not enabled.

Status of whether the SSH service is enabled or not enabled.

Currently there are no active SSH sessions.

Number of active SSH sessions.

Number of successful SSH sessions since last reboot:

Number of successful SSH sessions since last reboot.

Number of failed SSH sessions since last reboot:

Number of failed SSH sessions since last reboot.

SSH key has not been generated or previous key has been removed.

Status of the SSH key.

SSH login grace time value is 300 seconds.

Time allowed for login.

Allow 3 password guess(es).

Number of password guesses allowed.


Related Commands

(config) ssh-key-generate

(config) sshd

show standby

To display information about a standby interface on a WAAS device, use the show standby EXEC command.

show standby

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

To display information about a specific standby group configuration, enter the show interface standby standby group_num EXEC command.

Examples

Table 3-68 describes the fields shown in the show standby display.

Table 3-68 Field Descriptions for the show standby Command 

Field
Description

Standby Group

Number that identifies the standby group.

Description

Description of the device, as configured by using the description option of the interface global configuration command.

IP address

IP address of the standby group.

netmask

Netmask of the standby group.

Member interfaces

Member interfaces of the standby group. Shows which physical interfaces are part of the standby group. Shows the interface definition, such as GigabitEthernet 1/0.

priority

Priority status of each interface.

Active interface

Interfaces that are currently active in the standby group.

Maximum errors allowed on the active interface

Maximum number of errors allowed on the active interface.


Related Commands

show interface

show running-config

show startup-config

(config-if) standby

show startup-config

To display the startup configuration for a WAAS device, use the show startup-config EXEC command.

show startup-config

Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use this EXEC command to display the configuration used during an initial bootup, stored in NVRAM. Note the difference between the output of this command versus the show running-config command.

Examples

The following example displays the configuration saved for use on startup of the WAAS device:

WAE# show startup-config
! WAAS version 4.0.0
!
device mode central-manager
!
!
hostname Edge-WAE1
!
!
!
!
!
exec-timeout 60
!
!
primary-interface GigabitEthernet 1/0
!
!
!
interface GigabitEthernet 1/0
 ip address 10.10.10.33 255.255.255.0
 exit
interface GigabitEthernet 2/0
 shutdown
...

Related Commands

configure

copy running-config

show running-config

show statistics authentication

To display authentication statistics for a WAAS device, use the show statistics authentication EXEC command.

show statistics authentication

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use the show statistics authentication command to display the number of authentication access requests, denials, and allowances recorded.

Examples

The following example displays the statistics related to authentication on the WAAS device:

WAE# show statistics authentication
    Authentication  Statistics            
    --------------------------------------
    Number of access requests:        115
    Number of access deny responses:  12
    Number of access allow responses: 103

Related Commands

(config) authentication

clear

show authentication

show statistics cifs

To display the CIFS statistics information, use the show statistics cifs EXEC command.

show statistics cifs {cache eviction | requests}

Syntax Description

cache

Statistics for CIFS cache.

eviction

Status of CIFS cache eviction.

requests

Statistics for CIFS requests.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

Usage Guidelines

Use the show statistics cifs EXEC command to view the CIFS traffic details itemized by request type. This command is useful when you want to understand how the system is being used. For example, are requests mostly for data transfer, browsing, database activity, or for some other purpose? You might correlate these statistics with performance issues for troubleshooting purposes, or you may use them to determine what specific performance optimizations to configure.

Examples

Table 3-69 describes the fields in the show statistics cifs requests display.

Table 3-69 Field Descriptions for the show statistics cifs requests Command 

Field
Description

Statistics gathering period

Number of hours, minutes, seconds, and milliseconds of the statistics gathering period.

Total

Total number of CIFS requests.

Remote

Number of CIFS requests that were not handled from the local cache.

ALL_COMMANDS

Alias for all of the CIFS commands shown.

total

Total number of requests for all commands.

remote

Number of remote requests for all commands.

async

Number of async requests for all commands.

avg local

Average local request time in milliseconds for all commands.

avg remote

Average remote request time in milliseconds for all commands.

CONNECT

Connection check command.

total

Total number of requests for this command.

remote

Number of remote requests for this command.

async

Number of async requests for this command.

avg local

Average local request time in milliseconds for this command.

avg remote

Average remote request time in milliseconds for this command.

NB_SESSION_REQ

NetBIOS session request command.

VFN_LIVELINESS

Liveliness check command.


Related Commands

cifs

show cifs

show statistics content-distribution-network

To display the status of a WAE or device group that is registered with a WAAS Central Manager, use the show statistics content-distribution-network EXEC command. This command is available on only WAAS Central Managers.

show statistics content-distribution-network device status device_id

Syntax Description

device status

Displays the status of a WAE or device group that is registered with the WAAS Central Manager.

device_id

Name or ID of the device or device group.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use the show statistics content-distribution-network EXEC command to display the identification details about a WAE or WAEs in a device group, and verify if a WAE is online.

Examples

The following example displays the identification details of a WAE that is registered with the WAAS Central Manager:

WAE# show statistics content-distribution-network device status edge-wae-11
Device id="CdmConfig_142" name="edge-wae-11" status="Online";

show statistics dre

To display Data Redundancy Elimination (DRE) general statistics for a WAE, use the show statistics dre EXEC command.

show statistics dre

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

Examples

Table 3-70 describes the fields shown in the show statistics dre display. This command shows the aggregated statistics for all connections.

Table 3-70 Field Descriptions for the show statistics dre Command 

Field
Description

Cache

Aggregated DRE cache data statistics.

Status

Current DRE status. Status values include: Initializing, Usable, Temporarily Fail, and Fail.

Oldest Data (age)

Time that the DRE data has been in the cache in days (d), hours (h), minutes (m), and seconds (s).

For example, "1d1h" means 1 day, 1 hour.

Total usable disk size

Total disk space allocated to the DRE cache.

Used (%)

Percentage of the total DRE cache disk space being used.

Hash table RAM size

Amount of memory allocated for the DRE hash table.

Used (%)

Percentage of allocated memory being used for the DRE hash table.

Completed Connections

Total (cumulative):

Number of cumulative connections that have been processed.

Active:

Number of connections that are still open.

Encode

Statistics for compressed messages.

Overall: [msg | in | out | ratio]

Aggregated statistics for compressed messages.

msg = Total number of messages.

in = Number of bytes before compression.

out = Number of bytes after compression.

ratio = Percentage of the total number of bytes that were compressed.

DRE: [msg | in | out | ratio]

Number of DRE messages.

DRE bypass

Number of DRE messages that were bypassed for compression.

LZ: [msg | in | out | ratio]

Number of LZ messages.

Note LZ compression is applied after DRE compression is applied. (DRE compression is always applied first.)

LZ Bypass: [msg | in | out | ratio]

Number of LZ messages that were bypassed for compression.

Average Latency

Average time to compress one message for both DRE and LZ in milliseconds (ms).

Message size distribution

Percentage of messages that fall into each size grouping. (The message size field is divided into 6 size groups.)

Decode

Statistics for decompressed messages.

Overall: [msg | in | out | ratio]

Aggregated statistics for decompressed messages.

msg = Total number of messages.

in = Number of bytes before decompression.

out = Number of bytes after decompression.

ratio = Percentage of the total number of bytes that were decompressed.

DRE: [msg | in | out | ratio]

Number of DRE messages.

DRE Bypass [msg | in]

Number of DRE messages that were bypassed for decompression.

LZ: [msg | in | out | ratio]

Number of LZ messages.

LZ Bypass: [msg | in]

Number of LZ messages that were bypassed for decompression.

Latency (Last 3 sec): [max | avg]

Maximum time to decompress one message for both DRE and LZ in milliseconds (ms).

Average time to decompress one message for both DRE and LZ in milliseconds (ms).

Message size distribution

Percentage of messages that fall into each size grouping. (The message size field is divided into 6 size groups.)


Related Commands

debug

show statistics dre connection

show statistics dre peer

show statistics dre connection

To display Data Redundancy Elimination (DRE) connection statistics for a WAE, use the show statistics dre connection EXEC command.

show statistics dre connection [active [client-ip {ip_address | hostname} | client-port port |
id connection_id | last | peer-no peer_id | server-ip {ip_address | hostname} | server-port port] | client-ip {ip_address | hostname} | client-port port | id connection_id | last | peer-no peer_id | server-ip {ip_address | hostname} | server-port port]

Syntax Description

active

(Optional) Displays all active connection statistics.

client-ip

(Optional) Displays the connection statistics for the client with the specified IP address or hostname.

ip_address

IP address of a client or server.

hostname

Hostname of a client or server.

client-port

(Optional) Displays the connection statistics for the client with the specified port number.

port

Port number of a client or server (1-65535).

id

(Optional) Displays the connection statistics for the connection with the specified identifier.

connection_id

Number from 0 to 4294967295 identifying a connection.

last

(Optional) Displays the last connection statistics.

peer-no

(Optional) Displays the connection statistics for the peer with the specified identifier.

peer_id

Number from 0 to 4294967295 identifying a peer.

server-ip

(Optional) Displays the connection statistics for the server with the specified IP address or hostname.

server-port

(Optional) Displays the connection statistics for the server with the specified port number.


Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

Usage Guidelines

This command displays the statistics for individual TCP connections on which DRE compression is being applied. This information is updated in real time.

Using this command without any options displays a one-line summary of all the TCP connections on the WAE for which DRE is applied. To obtain detailed statistics for a connection, use the command options to filter the connection. While most filters show detail statistics, some filters (such as, peer no.) show summary information and not details.

Examples

Table 3-71 describes the fields shown in the show statistics dre connection display.

Table 3-71 Field Descriptions for the show statistics dre connection Command 

Field
Description

Conn-ID

Connection ID assigned by the device for each connection.

Peer No.

Number assigned to the peer compression device.

Client-ip:port

IP address and port of the client device that initialized the TCP connection, such as the user's PC or laptop.

Server-ip:port

IP address and port of the server.

Encode-in

Number of bytes in for compression.

Decode-in

Number of bytes in for decompression.

PID

Peer ID. MAC address of the peer device.

Status

State of the connection and the duration of that state. Possible values are Active or Closed.

A = active

C = closed

For example, C(22h) shows that the connection has been closed for 22 hours.


Related Commands

debug

show statistics dre connection

show statistics dre peer

To display Data Redundancy Elimination (DRE) peer statistics for a WAE, use the show statistics dre peer EXEC command.

show statistics dre peer {context context-value [ip ip-address | peer-id peer-id |
peer-no peer-no] | ip ip-address [context context-value | ip ip-address | peer-id peer-id | peer-no peer-no] | peer-id peer-id [context context-value | ip ip-address | peer-no peer-no] |
peer-no peer-no [context context-value | ip ip-address | peer-id peer-id]}

Syntax Description

context

Displays peer statistics for the specified context.

context-value

Context value (0-4294967295).

ip

(Optional) Specifies the IP address of the peer.

ip_address

IP address of the peer.

peer-id

(Optional) Specifies the MAC address of the peer.

peer-id

Peer ID (0-4294967295).

peer-no

(Optional) Specifies the peer number.

peer-no

Peer number.


Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

Examples

Table 3-72 describes the fields shown in the show statistics dre peer display. This command shows the DRE peer device connection information.

Table 3-72 Field Descriptions for the show statistics dre peer Command 

Field
Description

Peer-No

Number assigned to the peer compression device.

Context

Context ID for the DRE debugging trace.

Peer-ID

MAC address of the peer device.

Hostname

Hostname of the peer device.

Cache

DRE cache data statistics as shown by the peer.

Used disk:

Number of megabytes (MB) used on the disk for the DRE cache.

Age:

Time that the DRE data has been in the cache in days (d), hours (h), minutes (m), and seconds (s).

Connections:

Total (cumulative):

Number of cumulative connections that have been processed.

Active:

Number of connections that are still open.

Concurrent connections (Last 2 min):

max

Maximum number of concurrent connections in the last two minutes.

avg

Average number of concurrent connections in the last two minutes.

Encode

Statistics for compressed messages.

Overall: [msg | in | out | ratio]

Aggregated statistics for compressed messages.

msg = Total number of messages.

in = Number of bytes before decompression.

out = Number of bytes after decompression.

ratio = Percentage of the total number of bytes that were compressed.

DRE: [msg | in | out | ratio]

Number of DRE messages.

DRE Bypass: [msg | in]

Number of DRE messages that were bypassed for compression.

LZ: [msg | in | out | ratio]

Number of LZ messages.

LZ Bypass: [msg | in]

Number of LZ messages that were bypassed for compression.

Message size distribution

Percentage of messages that fall into each size grouping. (The message size field is divided into 6 size groups.)

Decode

Statistics for decompressed messages.

Overall: [msg | in | out | ratio]

Aggregated statistics for decompressed messages.

msg = Total number of messages.

in = Number of bytes before decompression.

out = Number of bytes after decompression.

ratio = Percentage of the total number of bytes that were decompressed.

DRE: [msg | in | out | ratio]

Number of DRE messages.

DRE Bypass: [msg | in]

Number of DRE messages that were bypassed for decompression.

LZ: [msg | in | out | ratio]

Number of LZ messages.

LZ Bypass: [msg | in]

Number of LZ messages that were bypassed for decompression.

Latency (Last 3 sec): [max | avg]

Maximum time to decompress one message for both DRE and LZ in milliseconds (ms).

Average time to decompress one message for both DRE and LZ in milliseconds (ms).

Message size distribution

Percentage of messages that fall into each size grouping. (The message size field is divided into 6 size groups.)


Related Commands

debug

show statistics dre connection

show statistics epm

To display EndPoint Mapper (EPM) statistics for a WAE, use the show statistics epm EXEC command.

show statistics epm

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

Usage Guidelines

This command displays the number of total requests and responses recorded.

Examples

Table 3-73 describes the fields shown in the show statistics epm display.

Table 3-73 Field Descriptions for the show statistics epm Command

Field
Description

Total requests

Number of requests processed by the EPM adaptor (incremented once for each connection).

success

Number of EPM requests which were successfully parsed by the EPM adaptor.

fault

Number of connections which were not successfully handled because of a bad client request (or a valid request that does not require processing by the EPM adaptor).

Total responses

Number of responses processed by the EPM adaptor (incremented once for each connection).

policy match

Number of connections which were successfully handled by the EPM adaptor, such as "dynamic match created," for example.

UUID not configured

Number of times that a client requested a service that is not configured in the policy engine.

service unavailable

Number of times that a client requested a service, which the server reported to be unavailable.

fault

Number of connections which were not successfully handled because of a bad client response or because of an internal error which occurred while processing the client response.


Related Commands

(config) policy-engine application map adaptor EPM

show statistics flow

To display flow statistics for a WAAS device, use the show statistics flow EXEC command.

show statistics flow {filters | monitor tcpstat-v1}

Syntax Description

filters

Displays flow filter statistics.

monitor

Displays flow performance statistics.

tcpstat-v1

Displays tcpstat-v1 collector statistics.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

Examples

Table 3-76 describes the fields shown in the show statistics flow filters display.

Table 3-74 Field Descriptions for the show statistics flow filters Command 

Field
Description

Number of Filters

Number of filters.

Status

Status of whether the filters are enabled or disabled.

Capture Mode

Operation of the filter. Values include FILTER or PROMISCUOUS. The promiscuous operation is not available in WAAS.

Server

IP address list of the servers for which flows are being monitored.

Flow Hits

Number of flow hits for each server.

Flags

Flags identifying the flows.

CSN: Client-Side Non-Optimized (Edge)

SSO: Server-Side Optimized (Edge)

CSO: Client-Side Optimized (Core)

SSN: Server-Side Non-Optimized (Core)

PT: Pass Through (Edge/Core/Intermediate)

IC: Internal Client


Table 3-75 describes the fields shown in the show statistics flow monitor display.

Table 3-75 Field Descriptions for the show statistics flow monitor Command 

Field
Description

Host Connection

Configured host address

IP address of the tcpstat-v1 console for the connection.

Connection State

State of the connection.

Connection Attempts

Number of connection attempts.

Connection Failures

Number of connection failures.

Last connection failure

Date and time of the last connection failure.

Last configuration check sent

Date and time that the last configuration check was sent.

Last registration occurred

Date and time that the last registration occurred.

Host Version

Version number of the tcpstat-v1 console for the connection.

Collector Connection

Collector host address:port

IP address and port number of the tcpstat-v1 aggregator identified through the host connection.

Connection State

State of the connection.

Connection Attempts

Number of connection attempts.

Connection Failures

Number of connection failures.

Last connection failure

Date and time of the last connection failure.

Last configuration check sent

Date and time that the last configuration check was sent.

Last update sent

Date and time that the last update was sent.

Updates sent

Number of updates sent.

Summaries discarded

Number of summaries that were discarded because disk space allocated for storage has reached its limit.

The numbers in this field indicate when summaries are being collected faster than they are able to be transferred to the collector.

Counters in this field generate a data_update alarm.

Last registration occurred

Date and time that the last registration occurred.

Host Version

Version number of the tcpstat-v1 aggregator for the connection.

Collection Statistics

Collection State

State of the summary collection operation.

Summaries collected

Number of summaries collected. Summaries are packet digests of the traffic that is being monitored.

Summaries dropped

Total number of summaries dropped. This is the sum of the following subcategories.

Dropped by TFO

Number of packets that were dropped by TFO because of an error, such as not being able to allocate memory.

Dropped due to backlog

Number of packets that were dropped because the queue limit has been reached.

This counter indicates whether the flow monitor application can keep up with the number of summaries being received.

Summary backlog

Number of packets that are waiting in the queue to be read by the collector module on the WAE,

Last drop occurred

Date and time that the last packet drop occurred.


Related Commands

clear

show statistics icmp

To display ICMP statistics for a WAAS device, use the show statistics icmp EXEC command.

show statistics icmp

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

Table 3-76 describes the fields shown in the show statistics icmp display.

Table 3-76 Field Descriptions for the show statistics icmp Command 

Field
Description

ICMP messages received

Total number of Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) messages which the entity received, including all those counted as ICMP input errors.

ICMP messages receive failed

Number of ICMP messages which the entity received but determined as having ICMP-specific errors, such as bad ICMP checksums, bad length, and so forth.

Destination unreachable

Number of ICMP messages of this type received.

Timeout in transit

Number of ICMP messages of this type received.

Wrong parameters

Number of ICMP messages of this type received.

Source quenches

Number of ICMP messages of this type received.

Redirects

Number of ICMP messages of this type received.

Echo requests

Number of ICMP messages of this type received.

Echo replies

Number of ICMP messages of this type received.

Timestamp requests

Number of ICMP messages of this type received.

Timestamp replies

Number of ICMP messages of this type received.

Address mask requests

Number of ICMP messages of this type received.

Address mask replies

Number of ICMP messages of this type received.

ICMP messages sent

Total total number of ICMP messages which this entity attempted to send. This counter includes all those counted as ICMP output errors.

ICMP messages send failed

Number of number of ICMP messages which this entity did not send because of problems discovered within ICMP, such as a lack of buffers.

Destination unreachable

Number of ICMP messages of this type sent out.

Time exceeded

Number of ICMP messages of this type sent out.

Wrong parameters

Number of ICMP messages of this type sent out.

Source quenches

Number of ICMP messages of this type sent out.

Redirects

Number of ICMP messages of this type sent out.

Echo requests

Number of ICMP messages of this type sent out.

Echo replies

Number of ICMP messages of this type sent out.

Timestamp requests

Number of ICMP messages of this type sent out.

Timestamp replies

Number of ICMP messages of this type sent out.

Address mask requests

Number of ICMP messages of this type sent out.

Address mask replies

Number of ICMP messages of this type sent out.


Related Commands

clear

show statistics ip

To display IP statistics for a WAAS device, use the show statistics ip EXEC command.

show statistics ip

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

Table 3-77 describes the fields shown in the show statistics ip display.

Table 3-77 Field Descriptions for the show statistics ip Command 

Field
Description

IP statistics

Total packets in

Total number of input datagrams received from interfaces, including all those counted as input errors.

with invalid address

Number of input datagrams discarded because the IP address in their IP header destination field was not a valid address to be received at this entity. This count includes invalid addresses (such as, 0.0.0.0) and addresses of unsupported Classes (such as, Class E). For entities that are not IP gateways and therefore do not forward datagrams, this counter includes datagrams discarded because the destination address was not a local address.

with invalid header

Number of input datagrams discarded because of errors in their IP headers, including bad checksums, version number mismatches other format errors, time-to-live exceeded errors, and errors discovered in processing their IP options.

forwarded

Number of input datagrams for which this entity was not their final IP destination, and as a result, an attempt was made to find a route to forward them to that final destination. In entities which do not act as IP gateways, this counter includes only those packets which were source-routed by way of this entity, and the source-route option processing was successful.

unknown protocol

Number of locally-addressed datagrams received successfully but discarded because of an unknown or unsupported protocol.

discarded

Number of input IP datagrams for which no problems were encountered to prevent their continued processing, but which were discarded (such as, for lack of buffer space). This counter does not include any datagrams discarded while awaiting reassembly.

delivered

Total number of input datagrams successfully delivered to IP user protocols (including ICMP).

Total packets out

Total number of IP datagrams which local IP user protocols (including ICMP) supplied to IP in requests for transmission. This counter does not include any datagrams counted in the forwarded field.

dropped

Number of output IP datagrams for which no problem was encountered to prevent their transmission to their destination, but which were discarded (such as, for lack of buffer space). This counter includes datagrams counted in the forwarded field if any such packets meet this (discretionary) discard criterion.

dropped (no route)

Number of IP datagrams discarded because no route could be found to transmit them to their destination. This counter includes any packets counted in the forwarded field which meet this no-route criterion, including any datagrams that a host cannot route because all of its default gateways are down.

Fragments dropped after timeout

Maximum number of seconds that received fragments are held while they are awaiting reassembly at this entity.

Reassemblies required

Number of IP fragments received which needed to be reassembled at this entity.

Packets reassembled

Number of IP datagrams successfully reassembled.

Packets reassemble failed

Number of number of failures detected by the IP reassembly algorithm (for whatever reason: timed out, errors, and so forth). This count is not necessarily a count of discarded IP fragments because some algorithms (notably the algorithm in RFC 815) can lose track of the number of fragments by combining them as they are received.

Fragments received

Total number of IP datagrams that have been successfully fragmented at this entity.

Fragments failed

Number of IP datagrams that have been discarded because they needed to be fragmented at this entity but could not be fragmented because their Don't Fragment flag was set.

Fragments created

Number of IP datagram fragments that have been generated as a result of fragmentation at this entity.


Related Commands

clear

(config) ip

(config-if) ip

show ip routes

show statistics key-manager

To display key manager information for each WAAS device, use the show statistics key-manager EXEC command.

show statistics key-manager

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

central-manager

Examples

Table 3-78 describes the fields shown in the show statistics key-manager display.

Table 3-78 Field Descriptions for the show statistics key-manager Command

Field
Description

Count of Retrieve key

Number of encryption keys retrieved.

Count of Create new key

Number of new keys created.


Related Commands

show statistics key-manager

show statistics netstat

To display Internet socket connection statistics for a WAAS device, use the show statistics netstat EXEC command.

show statistics netstat

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

Table 3-79 describes the fields shown in the show statistics netstat display.

Table 3-79 Field Descriptions for the show statistics netstat Command 

Field
Description

Active Internet connections (w/o servers)

The following output prints the list of all open Internet connections to and from this WAE.

Proto

Layer 4 protocol used on the Internet connection, such as, TCP, UDP, and so forth.

Recv-Q

Amount of data buffered by the Layer 4 protocol stack in the receive direction on a connection.

Send-Q

Amount of data buffered by the Layer 4 precool stack in the send direction on a connection.

Local Address

IP address and Layer 4 port used at the WAE end point of a connection.

Foreign Address

IP address and Layer 4 port used at the remote end point of a connection.

State

Layer 4 state of a connection. TCP states include the following: ESTABLISHED, TIME-WAIT, LAST-ACK, CLOSED, CLOSED-WAIT, SYN-SENT, SYN-RCVD, SYN-SENT, SYN-ACK-SENT, and LISTEN.


show statistics radius

To display RADIUS authentication statistics for a WAAS device, use the show statistics radius EXEC command.

show statistics radius

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

Table 3-80 describes the fields shown in the show statistics radius display.

Table 3-80 Field Descriptions for the show statistics radius Command 

Field
Description

RADIUS Statistics

Authentication

Number of access requests

Number of access requests.

Number of access deny responses

Number of access deny responses.

Number of access allow responses

Number of access allow responses.

Authorization

Number of authorization requests

Number of authorization requests.

Number of authorization failure responses

Number of authorization failure responses.

Number of authorization success responses

Number of authorization success responses.

Accounting

Number of accounting requests

Number of accounting requests.

Number of accounting failure responses

Number of accounting failure responses.

Number of accounting success responses

Number of accounting success responses.


Related Commands

clear

(config) radius-server

show radius-server

show statistics services

To display services statistics for a WAAS device, use the show statistics services EXEC command.

show statistics services

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

Table 3-81 describes the fields shown in the show statistics services display.

Table 3-81 Field Descriptions for the show statistics services Command

Field
Description

Port Statistics

Service-related statistics for each port on the WAAS device.

Port

Port number.

Total Connections

Number of total connections.


Related Commands

show services

show statistics snmp

To display SNMP statistics for a WAAS device, use the show statistics snmp EXEC command.

show statistics snmp

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

Table 3-82 describes the fields shown in the show statistics snmp display.

Table 3-82 Field Descriptions for the show statistics snmp Command 

Field
Description

SNMP packets input

Total number of SNMP packets input.

Bad SNMP version errors

Number of packets with an invalid SNMP version.

Unknown community name

Number of SNMP packets with an unknown community name.

Illegal operation for community name supplied

Number of packets requesting an operation not allowed for that community.

Encoding errors

Number of SNMP packets that were improperly encoded.

Number of requested variables

Number of variables requested by SNMP managers.

Number of altered variables

Number of variables altered by SNMP managers.

Get-request PDUs

Number of GET requests received.

Get-next PDUs

Number of GET-NEXT requests received.

Set-request PDUs

Number of SET requests received.

SNMP packets output

Total number of SNMP packets sent by the router.

Too big errors

Number of SNMP packets that were larger than the maximum packet size.

Maximum packet size

Maximum size of SNMP packets.

No such name errors

Number of SNMP requests that specified a MIB object that does not exist.

Bad values errors

Number of SNMP SET requests that specified an invalid value for a MIB object.

General errors

Number of SNMP SET requests that failed because of some other error. (It was not a No such name error, Bad values error, or any of the other specific errors.)

Response PDUs

Number of responses sent in reply to requests.

Trap PDUs

Number of SNMP traps sent.


Related Commands

show snmp

(config) snmp-server user

(config) snmp-server view

show statistics tacacs

To display TACACS+ authentication and authorization statistics for a WAAS device, use the show statistics tacacs EXEC command.

show statistics tacacs

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

Table 3-83 describes the fields shown in the show statistics tacacs display.

Table 3-83 Field Descriptions for the show statistics tacacs Command 

Field
Description

TACACS+ Statistics

Authentication

Number of access requests

Number of access requests.

Number of access deny responses

Number of access deny responses.

Number of access allow responses

Number of access allow responses.

Authorization

Number of authorization requests

Number of authorization requests.

Number of authorization failure responses

Number of authorization failure responses.

Number of authorization success responses

Number of authorization success responses.

Accounting

Number of accounting requests

Number of accounting requests.

Number of accounting failure responses

Number of accounting failure responses.

Number of accounting success responses

Number of accounting success responses.


Related Commands

clear

(config) tacacs

show tacacs

show statistics tcp

To display TCP statistics for a WAAS device, use the show statistics tcp EXEC command.

show statistics tcp

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

Table 3-84 describes the fields shown in the show statistics tcp display.

Table 3-84 Field Descriptions for the show statistics tcp Command 

Field
Description

TCP statistics

Server connection openings

Number of times that TCP connections have made a direct transition to the SYN-SENT state from the CLOSED state.

Client connection openings

Number of times that TCP connections have made a direct transition to the SYN-RCVD state from the LISTEN state.

Failed connection attempts

Number of times TCP connections have made a direct transition to the CLOSED state from either the SYN-SENT state or the SYN-RCVD state, plus the number of times TCP connections have made a direct transition to the LISTEN state from the SYN-RCVD state.

Connections established

Number of TCP connections for which the current state is either ESTABLISHED or CLOSE-WAIT.

Connections resets received

Number of times TCP connections have made a direct transition to the CLOSED state from either the ESTABLISHED state or the CLOSE-WAIT state.

Connection resets sent

Number of TCP segments sent containing the RST flag.

Segments received

Total number of segments received, including those received in error. This count includes segments received on currently established connections.

Segments sent

Total number of segments sent, including those on current connections but excluding those containing only retransmitted octets.

Bad segments received

Number of bad segments received.

Segments retransmitted

Total number of segments retransmitted, that is, the number of TCP segments transmitted containing one or more previously transmitted octets.

Retransmit timer expirations

Number of TCP packets retransmitted due to retransmit timer expiry.

Server segments received

Number of TCP packets received from the server.

Server segments sent

Number of TCP packets sent to the server.

Server segments retransmitted

Number of TCP packets retransmitted to the server.

Client segments received

Number of TCP packets received from the client.

Client segments sent

Number of TCP packets sent to the client.

Client segments retransmitted

Number of TCP packets retransmitted to the client.

TCP extended statistics

Sync cookies sent

Number of SYN-ACK packets sent with SYN cookies in response to SYN packets.

Sync cookies received

Number of ACK packets received with the correct SYN cookie that was sent in the SYN-ACK packet by the device.

Sync cookies failed

Number of ACK packets received with the incorrect SYN cookie that was sent in the SYN-ACK packet by the device.

Embryonic connection resets

Number of times TCP connections have made a direct transition to the CLOSED state from either the SYN-RCVD state, the SYN-SENT state, or the SYN-ACK-SENT state.

Prune message called

Number of times that the device exceeded the memory pool allocated for the connection.

Packets pruned from receive queue

Number of packets dropped from the receive queue of the connection because of a memory overrun.

Out-of-order-queue pruned

Number of times that the out-of-order queue was pruned because of a memory overrun.

Out-of-window Icmp messages

Number of ICMP packets received on a TCP connection that were out of the received window.

Lock dropped Icmp messages

Number of ICMP packets dropped because the socket is busy.

Arp filter

Number of ICMP responses dropped because of the ARP filter.

Time-wait sockets

Number of times that the TCP connection made a transition to the CLOSED state from the TIME-WAIT state.

Time-wait sockets recycled

Number of times that the TCP connection made a transition to the CLOSED state from the TIME-WAIT state.

Time-wait sockets killed

Number of times that the TCP connection made a transition to the CLOSED state from TIME-WAIT state.

PAWS passive

Number of incoming SYN packets dropped because of a PAWS check failure.

PAWS active

Number of incoming SYN-ACK packets dropped because of a PAWS check failure.

PAWS established

Number of packets dropped in ESTABLISHED state because of a PAWS check failure.

Delayed acks sent

Number of delayed ACKs sent.

Delayed acks blocked by socket lock

Number of delayed ACKs postponed because the socket is busy.

Delayed acks lost

Number of delayed ACKs lost.

Listen queue overflows

Number of incoming TCP connections dropped because of a listening server queue overflow.

Connections dropped by listen queue

Number of incoming TCP connections dropped because of an internal error.

TCP packets queued to prequeue

Number of incoming TCP packets prequeued to a process.

TCP packets directly copied from backlog

Number of incoming TCP packets copied from the backlog queue directly to a process.

TCP packets directly copied from prequeue

Number of incoming TCP packets copied from the prequeue directly to a process.

TCP prequeue dropped packets

Number of packets removed from the TCP prequeue.

TCP header predicted packets

Number of TCP header-predicted packets.

Packets header predicted and queued to user

Number of TCP packets header-predicted and queued to the user.

TCP pure ack packets

Number of ACK packets received with no data.

TCP header predicted acks

Number of header-predicted TCP ACK packets.

TCP Reno recoveries

Number of TCP Reno recoveries.

TCP SACK recoveries

Number of TCP SACK recoveries.

TCP SACK reneging

Number of TCP SACK reneging.

TCP FACK reorders

Number of TCP FACK reorders.

TCP SACK reorders

Number of TCP SACK reorders.

TCP Reno reorders

Number of TCP Reno reorders.

TCP TimeStamp reorders

Number of TCP TimeStamp reorders.

TCP full undos

Number of TCP full undos.

TCP partial undos

Number of TCP partial undos.

TCP DSACK undos

Number of TCP DSACK undos.

TCP loss undos

Number of TCP loss undos.

TCP losses

Number of TCP losses.

TCP lost retransmit

Number of TCP lost retransmit.

TCP Reno failures

Number of TCP Reno failures.

TCP SACK failures

Number of TCP SACK failures.

TCP loss failures

Number of TCP loss failures.

TCP fast retransmissions

Number of TCP fast retransmissions.

TCP forward retransmissions

Number of TCP forward retransmissions.

TCP slowstart retransmissions

Number of TCP slow start retransmissions.

TCP Timeouts

Number of TCP timeouts.

TCP Reno recovery fail

Number of TCP Reno recovery fail.

TCP Sack recovery fail

Number of TCP Sack recovery failures.

TCP scheduler failed

Number of TCP scheduler failures.

TCP receiver collapsed

Number of TCP receiver collapsed failures.

TCP DSACK old packets sent

Number of TCP DSACK old packets sent.

TCP DSACK out-of-order packets sent

Number of TCP DSACK out-of-order packets sent.

TCP DSACK packets received

Number of TCP DSACK packets received.

TCP DSACK out-of-order packets received

Number of TCP DSACK out-of-order packets received.

TCP connections abort on sync

Number of TCP connections aborted on sync.

TCP connections abort on data

Number of TCP connections aborted on data.

TCP connections abort on close

Number of TCP connections aborted on close.

TCP connections abort on memory

Number of TCP connections aborted on memory.

TCP connections abort on timeout

Number of TCP connections aborted on timeout.

TCP connections abort on linger

Number of TCP connections aborted on linger.

TCP connections abort failed

Number of TCP connections abort failed.

TCP memory pressures

Number of times the device approaches the allocated memory pool for the TCP stack.


Related Commands

clear

show tcp

(config) tcp

show statistics tfo

To display Traffic Flow Optimization (TFO) statistics for a WAE, use the show statistics tfo EXEC command.

show statistics tfo [application app-name | pass-through | peer | saving app-name]

Syntax Description

application

(Optional) Displays statistics per application.

app-name

Application name.

pass-through

(Optional) Displays the pass-through statistics.

peer

(Optional) Displays peer information.

saving

(Optional) Displays savings for all applications.


Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

Examples

Table 3-85 describes the fields shown in the show statistics tfo command.

Table 3-85 Field Descriptions for the show statistics tfo Command 

Field
Description

Total number of optimized connections

Total number of TCP connections that were optimized since the last TFO statistics reset.

No. of active connections

Total number of TCP optimized connections.

No. of pending (to be accepted) connections

Number of TCP connections that will be optimized but are currently in the setup stage.

No. of connections closed normally

Number of optimized connections closed without any issues using TCP FIN.

No. of connections closed with error

Number of optimized connection closed with some issues or using TCP RST.

Total number of peers

Number of active peer WAEs. (Every connection is optimized between two WAEs: this one and a peer WAE.)

No. of entries into overload mode

Number of times the WAE entered into an overload state. (In the overload state, new connections are set to pass-through. This state occurs for various reasons, such as reaching the maximum number of concurrent connections.

No. of connections reset due to

Details for number of connections closed with error.

Socket write failure

Failed to write on a socket (either on the LAN or WAN side).

Socket read failure

Failed to read from a socket (either LAN or WAN side).

Opt socket close while waiting to write

The socket between two WAEs (WAN socket) closed before completing writing into it.

Unopt socket close while waiting to write

The socket between the WAE and the client/server (LAN socket) closed before completing writing into it.

Opt socket error close while waiting to read

The socket between two WAEs (WAN socket) closed before completing reading from it.

Unopt socket error close while waiting to read

The socket between the WAE and the client/server (LAN socket) closed before completing reading from it.

DRE decode failure

DRE internal error while decoding data. (Should not happen.)

DRE encode failure

DRE internal error while encoding data. (Should not happen.)

Connection init failure

Failed to setup the connection although auto-discovery finished successfully.

Opt socket unexpected close while waiting to read

The socket between two WAEs (WAN socket) closed before completing reading from it.

Exceeded maximum number of supported connections

Connection closed ungracefully because the WAE reached its scalability limit.

Buffer allocation or manipulation failed

Internal memory allocation failure. (Should not happen.)

Peer received reset from end host

TCP RST sent by the server or client. (Can be normal behavior and does not necessarily indicate a problem.)

DRE connection state out of sync

DRE internal error. (Should not happen.)

Memory allocation failed for buffer heads

Internal memory allocation failure. (Should not happen.)


Related Commands

show tfo accelerators

show tfo bufpool

show tfo connection

show tfo status

show statistics udp

To display User Datagram Protocol (UDP) statistics for a WAAS device, use the show statistics udp EXEC command.

show statistics udp

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

Table 3-86 describes the fields shown in the show statistics udp display.

Table 3-86 Field Descriptions for the show statistics udp Command

Field
Description

UDP statistics

Packets received

Total number of UDP datagrams delivered to UDP users.

Packets to unknown port received

Total number of received UDP datagrams for which there was no application at the destination port.

Packet receive error

Number of received UDP datagrams that could not be delivered for reasons other than the lack of an application at the destination port.

Packet sent

Total number of UDP datagrams sent from this entity.


show statistics wccp

To display WCCP statistics for a WAE, use the show statistics wccp EXEC command.

show statistics wccp gre

Syntax Description

gre

Displays WCCP generic routing encapsulation packet-related statistics.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

Usage Guidelines

GRE is a Layer 3 technique that allows datagrams to be encapsulated into IP packets at the WCCP-enabled router and then redirected to a WAE (the transparent proxy server). At this intermediate destination, the datagrams are decapsulated and then routed to an origin server to satisfy the request if a cache miss occurs. In doing so, the trip to the origin server appears to the inner datagrams as one hop. Usually, the redirected traffic using GRE is referred to as GRE tunnel traffic. With GRE, all redirection is handled by the router software.

With WCCP redirection, a Cisco router does not forward the TCP SYN packet to the destination because the router has WCCP enabled on the destination port of the connection. Instead, the WCCP-enabled router encapsulates the packet using GRE tunneling and sends it to the WAE that has been configured to accept redirected packets from this WCCP-enabled router.

After receiving the redirected packet, the WAE does the following:

1. Strips the GRE layer from the packet.

2. Decides whether it should accept this redirected packet and process the request for the content as follows:

a. If the WAE accepts the request, it sends a TCP SYN ACK packet to the client. In this response packet, the WAE uses the IP address of the original destination (origin server) that was specified as the source address so that the WAE can be invisible (transparent) to the client; it acts as if it is the destination that the client's TCP SYN packet was trying to reach.

b. If the WAE does not accept the request, it reencapsulates the TCP SYN packet in GRE and sends it back to the WCCP-enabled router. The router identifies that the WAE is not interested in this connection and forwards the packet to its original destination (the origin server).

For example, a WAE would not accept the request because it is configured to bypass requests that originate from a certain set of clients or that are destined to a particular set of servers.

Examples

Table 3-87 describes the fields shown in the show statistics wccp gre display.

Table 3-87 Field Descriptions for the show statistics wccp gre Command 

Field
Description

Transparent GRE packets received

Total number of GRE packets received by the WAE, regardless of whether or not they have been intercepted by WCCP. GRE is a Layer 3 technique that allows packets to reach the WAE, even if there are any number of routers in the path to the WAE.

Transparent non-GRE packets received

Number of non-GRE packets received by the WAE, either using the traffic interception and redirection functions of WCCP in the router hardware at Layer 2 or Layer 4 switching (a Content Switching Module [CSM]) that redirects requests transparently to the WAE.

Transparent non-GRE packets passed through

Number of non-GRE packets transparently intercepted by a Layer 4 switch and redirected to the WAE.

Total packets accepted

Total number of packets that are transparently intercepted and redirected to the WAE to serve client requests for content.

Invalid packets received

Number of packets that are dropped either because the redirected packet is a GRE packet and the WCCP GRE header has invalid data or the IP header of the redirected packet is invalid.

Packets received with invalid service

Number of WCCP version 2 GRE redirected packets that contain an invalid WCCP service number.

Packets received on a disabled service

Number of WCCP version 2 GRE redirected packets that specify the WCCP service number for a service that is not enabled on the WAE. For example, an HTTPS request redirected to the WAE when the HTTPS-caching service (service 70) is not enabled.

Packets received too small

Number of GRE packets redirected to the WAE that do not contain the minimum amount of data required for a WCCP GRE header.

Packets dropped due to zero TTL

Number of GRE packets that are dropped by the WAE because the redirected packet's IP header has a zero TTL.

Packets dropped due to bad buckets

Number of packets that are dropped by the WAE because the WCCP flow redirection could not be performed due to a bad mask or hash bucket determination.

Note A bucket is defined as a certain subsection of the allotted hash assigned to each WAE in a WAE cluster. If only one WAE exists in this environment, it has 256 buckets assigned to it.

Packets dropped due to no redirect address

Number of packets that are dropped because the flow redirection destination IP address could not be determined.

Packets dropped due to loopback redirect

Number of packets that are dropped by the WAE when the destination IP address is the same as the loopback address.

Pass-through pkts dropped on assignment update

Number of packets that were targeted for TFO pass-through, but were dropped instead because the bucket was not owned by the device.

Connections bypassed due to load

Number of connection flows that are bypassed when the WAE is overloaded. When the overload bypass option is enabled, the WAE bypasses a bucket and reroutes the overload traffic. If the load remains too high, another bucket is bypassed, and so on, until the WAE can handle the load.

Packets sent back to router

Number of requests that are passed back by the WAE to the WCCP-enabled router from which the request was received. The router then sends the flow toward the origin web server directly from the web browser, which bypasses the WAE.

Packets sent to another WAE

Number of packets that are redirected to another WAE in the WCCP service group. Service groups consist of up to 32 WAEs and 32 WCCP-enabled routers. In both packet-forwarding methods, the hash parameters specify how redirected traffic should be load balanced among the WAEs in the various WCCP service groups.

GRE fragments redirected

Number of GRE packets received by the WAE that are fragmented. These packets are redirected back to the router.

GRE encapsulated fragments received

Number of GRE encapsulated fragments received by the WAE. The tcp-promiscuous service does not inspect port information and therefore the router or switch may GRE encapsulate IP fragments and redirect them to the WAE. These fragments are then reassembled into packets before being processed.

Packets failed encapsulated reassembly

Number of reassembled GRE encapsulated packets that were dropped because they failed the reassembly sanity check. Reassembled GRE encapsulated packets are composed of two or more GRE encapsulated fragments. This field is related to the previous statistic.

Packets failed GRE encapsulation

Number of GRE packets that are dropped by the WAE because they could not be redirected due to problems while encapsulating the packet with a GRE header.

Packets dropped due to invalid fwd method

Number of GRE packets that are dropped by the WAE because it was redirected using GRE but the WCCP service was configured for Layer 2 redirection.

Packets dropped due to insufficient memory

Number of GRE packets that are dropped by the WAE due to the failure to allocate additional memory resources required to handle the GRE packet.

Packets bypassed, no conn at all

Number of packets that failed to be associated with an existing flow because no TCP port was listening. WCCP can also handle asymmetric packet flows and always maintains a consistent mapping of web servers to caches regardless of the number of switches or routers used in a WCCP service group (up to 32 routers or switches communicating with up to 32 WAEs in a cluster).

Packets bypassed, no pending connection

Number of packets that failed to be associated with a pending connection because the initial handshake was not completed.

Packets due to clean wccp shutdown

Number of connection flows that are bypassed due to a clean WCCP shutdown. During a proper shutdown of WCCP, the WAE continues to service the flows it is handling but starts to bypass new flows. When the number of flows goes down to zero, the WAE takes itself out of the cluster by having its buckets reassigned to other WAEs by the lead WAE.

Packets bypassed due to bypass-list lookup

Number of connection flows that are bypassed due to a bypass list entry. When the WAE receives an error response from an origin server, it adds an entry for the server to its bypass list. When it receives subsequent requests for the content residing on the bypassed server, it redirects packets to the bypass gateway. If no bypass gateway is configured, then the packets are returned to the redirecting Layer 4 switch.

Packets received with client IP addresses

Number of packets that are associated to a connection flow that is being spoofed. By spoofing a client's IP address, the WAE can receive packets with the client IP (which is different from the WAE's own IP address) and send the packet to the correct application that is waiting for the packet.

Conditionally Accepted connections

Number of connection flows that are accepted by the WAE due to the conditional accept feature.

Conditionally Bypassed connections

Number of connection flows that are bypassed by the WAE due to the conditional accept feature.

Packets dropped due to received on loopback

Number of packets that were dropped by the WCCP L2 intercept layer because they were received on the loopback interface but were not destined to a local address of the device. There is no valid or usable route for the packet.

Packets w/WCCP GRE received too small

Number of packets transparently intercepted by the WCCP-enabled router at Layer 2 and sent to the WAE that need to be fragmented for the packets to be redirected using GRE. The WAE drops the packets since it cannot encapsulate the IP header.

Packets dropped due to IP access-list deny

Number of packets that are dropped by the WAE when an IP access list that the WAE applies to WCCP GRE encapsulated packets denies access to WCCP applications (the wccp access-list command).

Packets fragmented for bypass

Number of GRE packets that do not contain enough data to hold an IP header.

Packet pullups needed

Number of times a packet had to be consolidated as part of its processing. Consolidation is required when a packet is received as fragments and the first fragment does not contain all the information needed to process it.

Packets dropped due to no route found

Number of packets that are dropped by the WAE because it cannot find the route.


Related Commands

(config) wccp access-list

(config) wccp flow-redirect

(config) wccp router-list

(config) wccp shutdown

(config) wccp tcp-promiscuous

(config) wccp tcp-promiscuous

show statistics windows-domain

To display Windows domain server information for a WAAS device, use the show statistics windows-domain EXEC command.

show statistics windows-domain

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use the show statistics windows-domain EXEC command to view the Windows domain server statistics, then clear the counters for these statistics by entering the clear statistics windows-domain EXEC command.

Examples

Table 3-88 describes the fields shown in the show statistics windows-domain display.

Table 3-88 Field Descriptions for the show statistics windows-domain Command 

Field
Description

Windows Domain Statistics

Authentication

Number of access requests

Number of access requests.

Number of access deny responses

Number of access deny responses.

Number of access allow responses

Number of access allow responses.

Authorization

Number of authorization requests

Number of authorization requests.

Number of authorization failure responses

Number of authorization failure responses.

Number of authorization success responses

Number of authorization success responses.

Accounting

Number of accounting requests

Number of accounting requests.

Number of accounting failure responses

Number of accounting failure responses.

Number of accounting success responses

Number of accounting success responses.


Related Commands

windows-domain

(config) windows-domain

show sysfs

To display system file system (sysfs) information for a WAAS device, use the show sysfs EXEC command.

show sysfs volumes

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

The system file system (sysfs) stores log files, including transaction logs, syslogs, and internal debugging logs. It also stores system image files and operating system files.

Examples

Table 3-89 describes the fields shown in the show sysfs volumes display.

Table 3-89 Field Descriptions for the show sysfs volumes Command

Field
Description

sysfs 00-04

System file system and disk number.

/local/local1-5

Mount point of the volume.

nnnnnnKB

Size of the volume in kilobytes.

nn% free

Percentage of free space in the SYSFS partition.


Related CommandsRelated Commands

disk

(config) disk error-handling

show tacacs

To display TACACS+ authentication protocol configuration information for a WAAS device, use the show tacacs EXEC command.

show tacacs

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

Table 3-90 describes the fields shown in the show tacacs display.

Table 3-90 Field Descriptions for the show tacacs Command 

Field
Description

Login Authentication for Console/Telnet Session

Indicates whether TACACS+ server is enabled for login authentication.

Configuration Authentication for Console/Telnet Session

Indicates whether TACACS+ server is enabled for authorization or configuration authentication.

TACACS+ Configuration

TACACS+ server parameters.

TACACS+ Authentication

Indicates whether TACACS+ authentication is enabled on the the WAAS device.

Key

Secret key that the WAE uses to communicate with the TACACS+ server. The maximum number of characters in the TACACS+ key should not exceed 99 printable ASCII characters (except tabs).

Timeout

Number of seconds that the WAAS device waits for a response from the specified TACACS+ authentication server before declaring a timeout.

Retransmit

Number of times that the WAAS device is to retransmit its connection to the TACACS+ if the TACACS+ timeout interval is exceeded.

Password type

Mechanism for password authentication. By default, the Password Authentication Protocol (PAP) is the mechanism for password authentication.

Server

Hostname or IP address of the TACACS+ server.

Status

Indicates whether server is the primary or secondary host.


Related Commands

clear

show statistics tacacs

show tacacs

(config) tacacs

show tcp

To display TCP configuration information for a WAAS device, use the show tcp EXEC command.

show tcp

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

Table 3-91 describes the fields shown in the show tcp display. This command displays the settings configured with the tcp global configuration command.

Table 3-91 Field Descriptions for the show tcp Command 

Field
Description

TCP Configuration

TCP keepalive timeout XX sec

Length of time that the WAAS device is set to keep a connection open before disconnecting.

TCP keepalive probe count X

Number of times the WAAS device will retry a connection before the connection is considered unsuccessful.

TCP keepalive probe interval XX sec

Length of time (in seconds) that the WAAS device is set to keep an idle connection open.

TCP explicit congestion notification disabled

Configuration status of the TCP explicit congestion notification feature. Values are enabled or disabled.

TCP cwnd base value X

Value (in segments) of the send congestion window.

TCP initial slowstart threshold value X

Threshold (in segments) for slow start.

TCP increase (multiply) retransmit timer by X

Number of times set to increase the length of the retransmit timer base value.

TCP memory_limit

Low water mark

Lower limit (in MB) of memory pressure mode, below which TCP enters into normal memory allocation mode.

High water mark (pressure)

Upper limit (in MB) of normal memory allocation mode, beyond which TCP enters into memory pressure mode.

High water mark (absolute)

Absolute limit (in MB) on TCP memory usage.


Related Commands

clear

show statistics tcp

(config) tcp

show tech-support

To view information necessary for Cisco's TAC to assist you, use the show tech-support EXEC command.

show tech-support [page]

Syntax Description

page

(Optional) Displays output page by page.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Usage Guidelines

Use this command to view system information necessary for TAC to assist you with a WAAS device. We recommend that you log the output to a disk file. (See the "(config) logging" command.)

Examples

The following example displays technical support information:


Note Because the show tech-support command output can be long, excerpts are shown in the this example.


WAE# show tech-support
------------------ version and hardware --------------------

Cisco Wide Area Application Services Software (WAAS)
Copyright (c) 1999-2006 by Cisco Systems, Inc.
...
Version: ce510-4.0.0.180

Compiled 18:08:17 Feb 16 2006 by cnbuild

System was restarted on Fri Feb 17 23:09:53 2006.
The system has been up for 5 weeks, 3 days, 2 hours, 9 minutes, 49 seconds.

CPU 0 is GenuineIntel Intel(R) Celeron(R) CPU 2.40GHz (rev 2) running at 2401MHz
.
Total 1 CPU.
512 Mbytes of Physical memory.
...
BIOS Information:
Vendor                             : IBM
Version                            : -[PLEC52AUS-C.52]-
Rel. Date                          : 05/19/03
...
List of all disk drives:
Physical disk information:

  disk00: Normal                (IDE disk)                 76324MB( 74.5GB)
  disk01: Normal                (IDE disk)                 76324MB( 74.5GB)


Mounted filesystems:

  MOUNT POINT       TYPE       DEVICE           SIZE    INUSE     FREE USE%
  /                 root       /dev/root        31MB     26MB      5MB  83%
  /sw               internal   /dev/md0        991MB    430MB    561MB  43%
  /swstore          internal   /dev/md1        991MB    287MB    704MB  28%
  /state            internal   /dev/md2       3967MB     61MB   3906MB   1%
  /disk00-04        CONTENT    /dev/md4      62539MB     32MB  62507MB   0%
  /local/local1     SYSFS      /dev/md5       3967MB    197MB   3770MB   4%
  .../local1/spool  PRINTSPOOL /dev/md6        991MB     16MB    975MB   1%


Software RAID devices:

  DEVICE NAME  TYPE     STATUS                PHYSICAL DEVICES AND STATUS
  /dev/md0     RAID-1   NORMAL OPERATION      disk00/00[GOOD]  disk01/00[GOOD]
  /dev/md1     RAID-1   NORMAL OPERATION      disk00/01[GOOD]  disk01/01[GOOD]
/dev/md0     RAID-1   NORMAL OPERATION      disk00/00[GOOD]  disk01/00[GOOD]
  /dev/md1     RAID-1   NORMAL OPERATION      disk00/01[GOOD]  disk01/01[GOOD]
  /dev/md2     RAID-1   NORMAL OPERATION      disk00/02[GOOD]  disk01/02[GOOD]
...
Currently content-filesystems RAID level is not configured to change.


------------------ running configuration -------------------

! WAAS version 4.0.0
!
!
...
------------------ processes --------------------

CPU average usage since last reboot:
   cpu: 0.00% User,  1.79% System,  3.21% User(nice),  95.00% Idle
--------------------------------------------------------------------
 PID  STATE PRI User T  SYS T        COMMAND
----- ----- --- ------ ------ --------------------
    1    S   0  20138  21906 (init)
    2    S   0      0      0 (migration/0)
    3    S  19      0      0 (ksoftirqd/0)
    4    S -10      0      0 (events/0)
    5    S -10      0      0 (khelper)
   17    S -10      0      0 (kacpid)
   93    S -10      0      0 (kblockd/0)
...

Related Commands

show version

show hardware

show disks details

show running-config

show processes

show processes memory

show memory

show interface

show cdp entry

show cdp neighbors

show statistics wccp

show alarms all

show statistics tfo

show statistics tfo application

show statistics tfo saving

show statistics tfo pass-through

show statistics tfo peer

show tfo auto-discovery

show tfo status

show tfo accelerators

show tfo bufpool accounting

show policy-engine status

show policy-engine application

show statistics dre

show statistics dre peer

show statistics tcp

show statistics ip

show statistics icmp

show standby

show statistics netstat

show disks SMART-info

show disks SMART-info details

show disks failed-sectors

show telnet

To display Telnet services configuration for a WAAS device, use the show telnet EXEC command.

show telnet

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

Enabled

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

central-manager

Examples

The following example displays whether or not Telnet is enabled on the WAAS device:

WAE# show telnet
telnet service is enabled

Related Commands

telnet

(config) telnet enable

(config) exec-timeout

show tfo accelerators

To display Traffic Flow Optimization (TFO) accelerators information for a WAE, use the show tfo accelerators EXEC command.

show tfo accelerators

Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

Examples

The following example displays TFO accelerator information for the WAE:

WAE# show tfo accelerators
Name: TFO                    State: Registered,  Handling Level: 100%
  Keepalive timeout: 3.0 seconds,  Session timeouts: 0,  Total timeouts: 0
  Last keepalive received 00.5 Secs ago
  Last registration occurred 11:21:43:38.4 Days:Hours:Mins:Secs ago
Name: EPM                    State: Registered,  Handling Level: 100%
  Keepalive timeout: 5.0 seconds,  Session timeouts: 0,  Total timeouts: 0
  Last keepalive received 00.2 Secs ago
  Last registration occurred 11:21:43:36.7 Days:Hours:Mins:Secs ago
Name: CIFS                   State: Not Registered,  Handling Level: 0%
  Keepalive timeout: 0.0 seconds,  Session timeouts: 0,  Total timeouts: 0
  Last keepalive received -Never-
  Last Registration occurred -Never-

Related Commands

show tfo auto-discovery

show tfo bufpool

show tfo connection

show tfo filtering

show tfo status

show tfo auto-discovery

To display Traffic Flow Optimization (TFO) auto-discovery statistics for a WAE, use the show tfo auto-discovery EXEC command.

show tfo auto-discovery [blacklist {entries [netmask netmask] [|] | statistics [|]}] [list] [| {begin regex [regex] | exclude regex [regex] | include regex [regex]}]

Syntax Description

blacklist

(Optional) Displays the blacklist servers table.

entries

Displays all of the entries in the auto-discovery blacklist server table.

netmask

Displays the network mask to filter the table output.

netmask

Network mask (A.B.C.D/) for which you want to display the matching addresses.

statistics

Displays the auto-discovery blacklist server table management statistics.

list

(Optional) Lists TCP flows that the WAE is currently optimizing or passing through.

|

(Optional) Output modifier.

begin

Begins with the line that matches the regular expression.

regex

Regular expression to match. You can enter multiple expressions.

exclude

Excludes lines that match the regular expression.

include

Includes lines that match the regular expression.


Command Modes

EXEC

Device Modes

application-accelerator

Examples

The following example displays TFO auto-discovery statistics for the WAE:

WAE# show tfo auto-discovery
Auto discovery structure:
       Allocation Failure:                            0
       Allocation Success:                            6615
       Deallocations:                                 6615
       Timed Out:                                     0
Auto discovery table:
       Bucket Overflows:                              0
       Table Overflows:                               0
       Entry Adds:                                    6615
       Entry Drops:                                   6615
       Entry Count:                                   0
       Lookups:                                       6624
Bind hash add failures:                               0
Route Lookup:
       Failures:                                      0
       Success:                                       0
Socket:
       Allocation failures:                           0
       Accept pair allocation failures:               0
       Unix allocation failures:                      0
       Connect lookup failures:                       0
Packets:
       Memory allocation failures:                    0
       Total Sent:                                    6624
       Total Received:                                13228
       Incorrect length or checksum received:         0
       Invalid filtering tuple received:              0
       Received for dead connection:                  0
       Ack dropped in synack received state:          0
       Non Syn dropped in nostate state:              0
Auto discovery failure:
       No peer or asymmetric route:                   6604
       Insufficient option space:                     0
       Invalid connection state:                      0
       Missing Ack conf:                              0
Auto discovery success TO:
       Internal server:                               0
       External server:                               0
Auto discovery success FOR:
       Internal client:                               0
       External client:                               0
Auto discovery success SYN retransmission:
       Zero retransmit:                               0
       One retransmit:                                0
       Two+ retransmit:                               0
Auto discovery Miscellaneous:
       Intermediate device:                           0
       RST received:                                  0
       SYNs found with our device id:                 0
       SYN retransmit count resets:                   0

Related Commands

show statistics tfo

show tfo accelerators

show tfo bufpool

show tfo connection

show tfo filtering

show tfo status

show tfo bufpool

To display Traffic Flow Optimization (TFO) buffer pool information for a WAE, use the show tfo bufpool EXEC command.

show tfo bufpool {accounting | from-index index | owner-connection conn-id |
owner-module {RElib | tcpproxy} [from-index index | owner-connection conn-id |
state {free | in-use} [from-index index | owner-connection conn-id | to-index index] |
to-index index] | state {free | in-use} [from-index index | owner-connectionconn-id |
to-index index] | to-index index}

Syntax Description

accounting

Displays the buffer pool overall usage.

from-index

Displays the starting index of the buffer units to be displayed.

index

Index of a buffer unit (0-4294967295).

owner-connection

Displays the owner connection of the buffer units.

conn-id

Connection ID (0-4294967295).

owner-module