Cisco ACNS Software Alarms and Error Messages Guide, Release 5.5.x
Chapter 1: Alarm and System Message Overview
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Alarm and System Message Overview

Table Of Contents

Alarm and System Message Overview

System Message Structure

System Message Example

Searching for System Messages

Alarm Structure

Sample Alarm


Alarm and System Message Overview


The Cisco ACNS Alarms and Error Messages Guide lists and describes the error messages for the Application and Content Networking System (ACNS). The system software sends these error messages to the console (and, optionally, to a logging server on another system) during operation. Not all error messages indicate problems with your system. Some messages are purely informational, while others may help diagnose problems with communications lines, internal hardware, or the system software.

This chapter contains the following sections:

System Message Structure

System Message Example

Searching for System Messages

Alarm Structure

Sample Alarm

System Message Structure

System error messages are structured as follows:

FACILITY-SEVERITY-MNEMONIC: Message-text

FACILITY code

The facility code consists of two or more uppercase letters that indicate the facility to which the message refers. A facility can be a hardware device, a protocol, or a module of the system software.

In the ACNS context, the facility code is CE and refers to Content Engine.

ACNS error messages also indicate where the system condition occurred. These messages are structured as follows:

FACILITY-SOURCE-SEVERITY-MNEMONIC: Message-text

Source indicates the location of the condition. Examples of source are ACQ, which indicates that the condition occurred in the Acquisition component, or SYSMON, which indicates that the condition occurred in the System Monitor component. Table 1-1 lists the source codes in ACNS.

Table 1-1 List of Source Codes in ACNS 

Code
Component Description

ACL

Access control list

ACQ

Acquisition

AUTH

Authentication

AUTHCACHE

Authentication cache

AUTHMOD

Authentication mode

AUTOREG

Auto Registration

BANDWD

Bandwidth

BMRNG

Boomerang module

BUFMGR

Buffer Manager

BYPS

Bypass

CACHE

Cache

CDNFS

Content Delivery Network file system

CIFSSVR

Common Internet File System Server

CLEAN

Cleanup

CLI

CLI commands

CMS

Content Management Service

COMMONEDM

Common EDM

CR

Content routing

CSE

Cisco streaming engine

DDBG

Debug

DHCP

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol

DISK

Disk

DIST

Distribution

DNS

Domain name server

DS

Data server

FFS

Firewall feature set

FTP

File Transfer Protocol

FTP_EXPORT

File Transfer Protocol Export

FTP_PROXY

File Transfer Protocol Proxy

HTTP

Hypertext Transfer Protocol

ICAP

Interactive Communicating Application Protocol daemon

ICP

Internet Cache Protocol

INETD

Internet daemon

IPTVPM

IP/TV Program Manager

LIBCMN

Common library

LOGGING

Logging

LSR

Label switch routing

MINGETTY

Minimal getty

MODUTILS

Module utilities

NAS

Network attached storage

NODEMGR

Node manager

NTP

Network Time Protocol

PAM

Port to application mapping

PARSER

Parser

PFS

PAC file server

PM

Preferences module

POSTGRE

Postgres server

PRELD

Preload

RBCP

Router Blade Configuration Protocol

REALPXY

RealProxy

REALSRV

RealSubscriber

RPC

Remote proxy caching

RSH

Remote Shell Protocol

RSM

RealServer Manager

RTSP

Real-Time Streaming Protocol

RTSPG

Real-Time Streaming Protocol Gateway

RULES

URL filtering rules

SCHED

Scheduler

SMARTD

SMARTD

SNMP

Simple Network Management Protocol

SSHD

Secure Shell

SSRV

Streaming server

STATS

Statistics Provider application

STDBY

Standby

STREAMCACHE

Stream cache

SYS

Kernel

SYSMON

System Monitor

SYSUTL

System utility

SYSVINIT

System V initialization

TELNET

Telnet

TFTP

Trivial File Transfer Protocol

TRNSLG

Translog

TVOUT

TV Out

UNILOG

Unilog

UPG

Upgrade

URLFLT

URL filter

UTILLIN

Linux utilities

VCRON

Vixie cron

WCCP

Web Cache Communication Protocol

WEBSENSESERVER

Websense server

WI

WebServer

WMT

Windows Media Technologies


Severity Level

The severity level is a single-digit code from 0 to 7 that reflects the severity of the condition. The lower the number, the more serious the situation. Table 1-2 lists the message severity levels.

Table 1-2 Message Severity Level

Severity Level
Description

0 - emergency

System is unusable

1 - alert

Immediate action is required

2 - critical

Critical condition

3 - error

Error condition

4 - warning

Warning condition

5 - notification

Normal but significant condition

6 - informational

Informational message only

7 - debugging

Message that appears during debugging only


Mnemonic code

The mnemonic code uniquely identifies the error message.

Message-text

Message-text is a text string that describes the condition. The text string sometimes contains detailed information about the event, including terminal port numbers, network addresses, or addresses that correspond to locations in the system memory address space. Because variable fields change from message to message, they are represented here by short strings enclosed in square brackets ([ ]). The variables give you more information about the system condition. A decimal number, for example, is represented as [dec]. Table 1-3 lists a sample of the variable fields that you will find in this publication.

Table 1-3 Representation of Variable Fields in Messages

Representation
Type of Information

[chars] or [char]

Character string

[dec]

Decimal

[failure description]

Explains the type and nature of system failure

[x] or [y]

Characters

[error]

Error code

[module]

Name of the module

[procedure]

Name of the procedure

[additional information]

Additional information about the error message

[cli]

Command entered at the command line interface

[err]

Error description


System Message Example

The following is an example of a system error message:

CE-ACQ-2-100009: Failed to read Channel=[chars], Channel table may have been dropped accidentally. Restarting acquirer to wait for its creation.

CE is the facility code.

ACQ is the source code.

2 is the severity level.

100009 is the mnemonic code.

Failed to read Channel=[chars], Channel table may have been dropped accidentally. Restarting acquirer to wait for its creation is the message text.

Searching for System Messages

If you search for the explanation and recommended action of a message that contains a SOURCE, remove the SOURCE from the text first, and then search for the message in the documentation.

For example, instead of searching the documentation for the message CE-ACQ-2-100009, remove the source identifier and search for the message CE-2-100009.

When searching for a message in the Error Message Decoder (EMD) also, you must remove the source identifier.

The EMD is located here:

http://www.cisco.com/cgi-bin/Support/Errordecoder/index.cgi

Alarm Structure

Cisco ACNS alarms are structured as follows:

MESSAGE_TYPE-SEVERITY-SOURCE-MNEMONIC: Alarm-text

MESSAGE_TYPE

A three letter code indicating the message is an alarm.

SEVERITY

An alarm can have the severity levels critical, major, or minor.

A critical alarm indicates that a critical problem exists somewhere in the network. Critical alarms cause failover. Critical alarms should be cleared immediately.

A major alarm indicates that a serious problem exists that is disrupting service. Major alarms differ from critical alarms in that they do not cause failovers. Major alarms should also be cleared immediately.

Minor alarms should be noted and cleared as soon as possible.

SOURCE

The component from where the alarm originated.

MNEMONIC

A unique code for identifying the alarm.

ALARM TEXT

A brief description of the alarm.

Sample Alarm

Given here is an example of an alarm:

/alm/min/acquirer/zerobandwidth: specified content acquisition bandwidth is 0

alm is the message type.

min is the severity level.

acquirer is the source code.

zerobandwidth is the mnemonic.

specified content acquisition bandwidth is 0 is the alarm text.