Quick Start Guide vA3(2.2), Cisco ACE 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance
Configuring a Load-Balancing Predictor
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Configuring a Load-Balancing Predictor

Table Of Contents

Configuring a Load-Balancing Predictor

Overview

Configuring a Hash Header Predictor Using the Device Manager GUI

Configuring a Hash Header Predictor Using the CLI


Configuring a Load-Balancing Predictor


This chapter describes how to configure a load-balancing predictor on the Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine (ACE) appliance. This chapter contains the following sections:

Overview

Configuring a Hash Header Predictor Using the Device Manager GUI

Configuring a Hash Header Predictor Using the CLI

Overview

After reading this chapter, you should have a basic understanding of how the ACE appliance selects a real server for a client request using a predictor and how to configure a hash header predictor as an example.

When there is a client request for web services, the ACE selects a server that can successfully fulfill the client request in the shortest amount of time without overloading either the individual server or the server farm.

The ACE makes load-balancing choices using a predictor. When you configure a predictor, you define the series of checks and calculations that the ACE will perform to determine which real server can best service a client request.

For each server farm, you can configure one of several predictor types to allow the ACE to select an appropriate server. Two common predictor types include the following:

Round-robin—Selects a server from the list of real servers based on weighted server capacity. A weight can be assigned to each real server based on its connection capacity in relation to the other servers in a server farm. Servers with higher weight values receive a proportionally higher number of connections than servers with lower weight values. For example, a server with a weight of 5 would receive five connections for every one connection received by a server with a weight of 1. Also known as weighted round-robin, this is the default predictor.

Hash header—Selects a server using a hash value based on the HTTP header name.

For a complete list of predictor types that the ACE supports and how to configure them, see the Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance Administration Guide.

You can configure a server load-balancing predictor by following these steps:


Step 1 Choose a server farm.

Step 2 Choose a predictor type and its parameters.

Step 3 Deploy the configuration.


This chapter describes how to configure a hash header predictor for the server farm that was created in Chapter 6, "Configuring Server Load Balancing," as illustrated in Figure 6-1. You can use either the ACE Device Manager GUI or the CLI.

Configuring a Hash Header Predictor Using the Device Manager GUI

You can configure a hash header predictor using the ACE Device Manager GUI by following these steps:


Step 1 Choose Config > Virtual Contexts. Choose context VC_web.

Step 2 Choose Load Balancing > Server Farms. The Server Farms pane appears (Figure 7-1).

Figure 7-1 Configuring a Predictor

Step 3 Choose SF_web.

Step 4 Choose the Predictor tab.

Step 5 Choose Hash_Header for the predictor Type.

Step 6 Choose Accept for the Header Name.

Step 7 Assign the hash header predictor to server farm SF_web by clicking Deploy Now.


Configuring a Hash Header Predictor Using the CLI

You can configure a hash header predictor using the CLI by following these steps:


Step 1 Verify that you are operating in the desired context by checking the CLI prompt. If necessary, change to the correct context.

host1/Admin# changeto VC_web
host1/VC_web#

Step 2 Enter configuration mode for SF_web.

host1/VC_web# config
host1/VC_web(config)# serverfarm SF_web
host1/VC_web(config-sfarm-host)#

Step 3 Configure a hash header predictor.

host1/VC_web(config-sfarm-host)# predictor hash header Accept

Step 4 Display the predictor configuration information.

host1/VC_web(config-sfarm-host)# exit 
host1/VC_web(config)# exit
host1/VC_web# show running-config serverfarm 


In this chapter, you have configured a hash header predictor for your server load balancing. Next, you will configure server persistence by using the stickiness feature.