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IP Application Services

Moving Files and Images Between a CatOS Switch and TFTP Server via SNMP

Document ID: 13504

Updated: Feb 27, 2007

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Introduction

This document describes how to move configuration files and system software images between a switch with the Catalyst Operating Systems (CatOS) and a Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server on UNIX with the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP).

Prerequisites

Requirements

Verify that you can ping the IP address of the TFTP server from the Catalyst switch:

Cat6509> (enable) ping 171.68.191.135
!!!!! 

----171.68.191.135 PING Statistics---- 
5 packets transmitted, 5 packets received, 0% packet loss 
round-trip (ms)  min/avg/max = 2/2/2

These procedures are:

  • Not applicable for Catalyst switches based on Cisco IOS® software, such as the Catalyst 2900/3500XL series.

  • Not applicable for Catalyst 6000 series MSFC and MSFC2 modules with Cisco IOS software.

  • Not applicable if SNMP Read-Write community string is not configured or known on the switch. Refer to How to Configure SNMP Community Strings for the detailed procedure on how to configure the SNMP community strings.

  • Based on command line syntax of NET-SNMP leavingcisco.com (previously known as UCD-SNMP) Utilities. If you have some other SNMP applications, such as HP Open View or NetView, the syntax might be different from these examples.

  • Based on CISCO-STACK-MIB, which is supported by the Catalyst OS since the initial supervisor module software version. Refer to the MIBs Supported by Product page on Cisco.com to verify that your switch supports CISCO-STACK-MIB. These MIB objects from this MIB are used:

MIB Object Name OID
tftpHost .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.1
tftpFile .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.2
tftpModule .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.3
tftpAction .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.4
tftpResult .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.5

See Appendix A for more information on these MIB objects with definitions.

Components Used

The information in this document is based on the switches that run only Catalyst OS software.

The information in this document was created from the devices in a specific lab environment. All of the devices used in this document started with a cleared (default) configuration. If your network is live, make sure that you understand the potential impact of any command.

Conventions

In all the examples, these values are used for illustration:

  • Catalyst 6509 Switch with CatOS

  • 172.16.99.66 = IP address of the Catalyst 6509 Switch

  • private = SNMP read-write community string. Use the read-write string configured on your switch. Verify this with the show snmp command on the switch CLI.

  • public = SNMP read-only community string. Use the read-only string configured on your switch. Verify this with the show snmp command on the switch CLI.

  • 171.68.191.135 = IP address of the TFTP server

This is the syntax for the snmpset and snmpwalk commands in these examples:

snmpset [options...] <hostname> {<community>} [<objectID> <type> <value> ...] 
snmpwalk [options...] <hostname> {<community>} [<objectID>] 

Refer to Cisco Technical Tips Conventions for more information on document conventions.

Copy a Configuration from the TFTP Server to the Catalyst Switch Running CatOS

These steps guide you through the process to copy a configuration file.

Step-by-Step Instructions

Complete these steps:

  1. Create a new file, switch-config, in the TFTP server /tftpboot directory. On UNIX, use this syntax: touch <filename>.

    touch switch-config
    
  2. Change the permissions of the file to 777. Use this syntax: chmod <permissions> <filename> .

    chmod 777 switch-config
    
  3. Define the IP address of the TFTP server with the tftpHost MIB object:

    % snmpset 172.16.99.66 private .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.1.0 s 171.68.191.135
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.1.0 = "171.68.191.135"
  4. Define the TFTP file name that you will use to copy the configuration, with the tftpFile MIB object:

    % snmpset 172.16.99.66 private .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.2.0 s switch-config
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.2.0 = switch-config
  5. Select the module on the Catalyst switch where the configuration will be delivered, with the tftpModule MIB object. Select the Supervisor module and not MSFC or MSFC2 module, otherwise it fails. Verify the correct module number for the snmpset command with a show module command on the switch CLI. A typical output is:

    Mod Slot  Ports  Module-Type                 Model               Sub  Status
    --- ----  -----  -------------------------  -------------------  ---  --------
    2   2     2      1000BaseX Supervisor       WS-X6K-SUP1A-2GE     yes  ok
    16  2     1      Multilayer Switch Feature  WS-F6K-MSFC          no   OK
    ....
    --<snip>--

    In the sample output, the Supervisor module number is 2 and is in slot number 2. Use 2 in order to define the tftpModule MIB object:

    % snmpset 172.16.99.66 private .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.3.0 i 2
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.3.0 = 2
  6. Use the tftpAction MIB object in order to define the switch configuration file that is to be transferred from the TFTP server to the switch with the MIB object value of 2 = downloadConfig. See the MIB object details in Appendix A:

    % snmpset 172.16.99.66 private .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.4.0 i 2
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.4.0 = 2

Verify the Results

In order to verify the results of these operations, perform one of these steps:

  1. Poll the tftpGrp (.1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5) MIB object and compare the results with Appendix A:

    % snmpwalk 172.16.99.66 public .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.1.0 = "171.68.191.135"   
    
    !--- IP address of the TFTP server
    
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.2.0 = "switch-config"   
    
    !--- name of the switch configuration file
    
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.3.0 = 2      
    
    !--- Module number. In this case, Supervisor module
    
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.4.0 = 2      
    
    !--- TFTP action. 2 = Download configuration from TFTP server to the switch
    
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.5.0 = 2      
    
    !--- Result of the TFTP action, 2 = Success
    
    
  2. Poll the tftpResult MIB object and compare the output with the MIB object details in Appendix A:

    % snmpwalk 172.16.99.66 public .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.5
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.5.0 = 2      
    
    !--- Result of the TFTP action, 2 = Success
    
    

Troubleshoot the Process

If download is successful, the MIB object output is equal to 2 (or success). If you receive some other output, compare it with Appendix A for the tftpResult object and take appropriate steps.

Copy a Configuration from the Catalyst Switch Running CatOS to the TFTP Server

These steps guide you through the process to copy a configuration file.

Step-by-Step Instructions

Complete these steps:

  1. Create a new file, switch-config, in the TFTP server /tftpboot directory. On UNIX, use this syntax: touch <filename>.

    touch switch-config
    
  2. Change the permissions of the file to 777 with this syntax: chmod <permissions> <filename> .

    chmod 777 switch-config
    
  3. Define the IP address of the TFTP server with the tftpHost MIB object. The syntax is:

    % snmpset 172.16.99.66 private .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.1.0 s 171.68.191.135
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.1.0 = "171.68.191.135"
  4. Define the TFTP file name that you will use to copy the configuration, with the tftpFile MIB object:

    % snmpset 172.16.99.66 private .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.2.0 s switch-config
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.2.0 = switch-config
  5. Select the module on the Catalyst switch where the configuration will be delivered, with the tftpModule MIB object. Select the Supervisor module and not MSFC or MSFC2 module, otherwise it fails. Verify the correct module number for the snmpset command with a show module command on the switch CLI. A typical output is:

    Mod Slot  Ports  Module-Type                 Model               Sub  Status
    --- ----  -----  -------------------------  -------------------  ---  --------
    2   2     2      1000BaseX Supervisor       WS-X6K-SUP1A-2GE     yes  ok
    16  2     1      Multilayer Switch Feature  WS-F6K-MSFC          no   OK
    ....
    --<snip>--

    In the sample output, the Supervisor module number is 2 and is in slot number 2. Use 2 in order to define the tftpModule MIB object:

    % snmpset 172.16.99.66 private .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.3.0 i 2
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.3.0 = 2
  6. Use the tftpAction MIB object in order to define that the switch configuration file is to be transferred from the TFTP server to the switch with the MIB object value of 3 = uploadConfig. See the MIB object details in Appendix A:

    % snmpset 172.16.99.66 private .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.4.0 i 3
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.4.0 = 3

Verify the Process

In order to verify the results of these operations, perform one of these steps:

  1. Poll the tftpGrp (.1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5) MIB object and compare the results with Appendix A:

    % snmpwalk 172.16.99.66 public .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.1.0 = "171.68.191.135"    
    
    !--- IP address of the TFTP server
    
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.2.0 = "switch-config"    
    
    !--- name of the switch configuration file
    
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.3.0 = 2    
    
    !--- Module number. In this case, Supervisor module
    
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.4.0 = 1    
    
    !--- TFTP action
    
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.5.0 = 2   
    
    !--- Result of the TFTP action, 2 = Succes
    
    
  2. Poll the tftpResult MIB object and compare the output with the MIB object details in Appendix A:

    % snmpwalk 172.16.99.66 public .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.5
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.5.0= 2   
    
    !--- Result of the TFTP action, 2 = Success
    
    

Troubleshoot the Process

If download is successful, the MIB object output is equal to 2 (or success). If you receive some other output, compare it with Appendix A for the tftpResult object and take appropriate steps.

Note:  This procedure transfers both default and non-default configurations from the switch, as seen in the output of the show config all command on the switch CLI in enable mode. The show config command on the switch shows only the non-default configurations.

Copy a System Software Image from the TFTP Server to the Catalyst Switch Running CatOS

These steps guide you through the process to copy a software image.

Step-by-Step Instructions

Complete these steps:

  1. Download and place the correct Supervisor image file in the /tftpboot directory on the TFTP server. In this example, cat6000-sup.5-4-2a.bin is used for illustration.

  2. Change the permissions of the file to 777 with this syntax: chmod <permissions> <filename>.

    chmod 777 cat6000-sup.5-4-2a.bin
    
    
  3. Define the IP address of the TFTP server that uses the tftpHost MIB object:

    % snmpset 172.16.99.66 private .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.1.0 s 171.68.191.135 
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.1.0 = "171.68.191.135"
  4. Define the TFTP file name that you will use to copy the image file:

    % snmpset 172.16.99.66 private .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.2.0 s cat6000-sup.5-4-2a.bin 
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.2.0 = "cat6000-sup.5-4-2a.bin"
  5. In this example, the Supervisor module number is 2 and is in slot number 2 as seen in the show module command output. Use 2 in order to define the tftpModule MIB object:

    % snmpset 172.16.99.66 private .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.3.0 i 2 
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.3.0 = 2

    This means that the CatOS image present in the /tftpboot directory on the TFTP server is transferred to the Supervisor module flash as seen in the output of the show flash command.

  6. Use the tftpAction MIB object in order to define that the image file is transferred from the TFTP server to the switch with the MIB object value of 4 = downloadSw. See the MIB object details in Appendix A:

    % snmpset 172.16.99.66 private .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.4.0 i 4
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.4.0 = 4 

Verify the Process

In order to verify the results of this operations, perform one of these steps:

  1. Poll the tftpGrp (.1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5) MIB object and compare the results with Appendix A:

    % snmpwalk 172.16.99.66 public .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5 
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.1.0 = "171.68.191.135"    
    
    !--- IP address of the TFTP server
     
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.2.0 = "cat6000-sup.5-4-2a.bin"  
    
    !--- name of the switch image file
    
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.3.0 = 0 
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.4.0 = 4    
    
    !--- TFTP action, 4 = downloadSw 
    
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.5.0 = 1    
    
    !--- Result of the TFTP action, 1 = In Process
    
    

    Note: The last entry shows that the image transfer is in process. Wait a few minutes, then poll the tftpResult MIB object again in order to verify that it has transferred successfully. This step can take a few minutes to complete, which depends on the image file size (bytes). While the image transfer process is underway, if you issue a show flash command on the switch, you will see:

    Cat6509> (enable) show flash 
    TFTP session in progress. Try again later.
  2. Poll the tftpResult MIB object and compare the output with the MIB object details in Appendix A:

    % snmpwalk 172.16.99.66 public .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.5 
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.5.0 = 2 
    
    !--- Result of the TFTP action, 2 = Success
    
    

Troubleshoot the Process

If download is successful, the MIB object output is equal to 2 (or success). If you receive other output, compare it with Appendix A for the tftpResult object and take appropriate steps.

Once the image transfer completes successfully, verify that the image file size (bytes) matches that shown in the show flash command output to the file in the TFTP server (cat6000-sup.5-4-2a.bin, in this example).

Copy a System Software Image from the Catalyst Switch Running CatOS to the TFTP Server

These steps guide you through the process to copy a software image.

Step-by-Step Instructions

Complete these steps:

  1. Create a new file image.bin in the /tftpboot directory of the TFTP server. On UNIX, use this syntax: touch <filename>. Use .bin as the file extension.

    touch image.bin 
    
  2. Change the permissions of the file to 777 with the syntax: chmod <permissions> <filename>.

    chmod 777 image.bin 
    
  3. Define the IP address of the TFTP server using the tftpHost MIB object :

    % snmpset 172.16.99.66 private .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.1.0 s 171.68.191.135 
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.1.0 = "171.68.191.135"
  4. Define the TFTP file name you will use to copy the image file with the tftpFile MIB object :

    % snmpset 172.16.99.66 private .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.2.0 s image.bin 
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.2.0 = "image.bin"
  5. In this example, the Supervisor module number is 2 and is in slot number 2 as seen in the show module command output. Use 2 in order to define the tftpModule MIB object:

    % snmpset 172.16.99.66 private .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.3.0 i 2
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.3.0 = 2

    This means that the CatOS image that runs on the Supervisor module in Flash is transferred to the TFTP server as seen in the output of the show flash command.

  6. Use the tftpAction MIB object in order to define that the image file is transferred from the TFTP server to the switch with the MIB object value of 5 = uploadSw. See the MIB object details in Appendix A:

    % snmpset 172.16.99.66 private .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.4.0 i 5 
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.4.0 = 5

Verify the Process

In order to verify the results of these operations, perform one of these steps:

  1. Poll the tftpGrp (.1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5) MIB object and compare the results with Appendix A:

    % snmpwalk 172.16.99.66 public .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5 
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.1.0 = "171.68.191.135"    
    
    !--- IP address of the TFTP server
    
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.2.0 = "image.bin"    
    
    !--- name of the switch image file 
    
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.3.0 = 2    
    
    !--- Module number. In this case, Supervisor module 
    
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.4.0 = 5    
    
    !--- TFTP action, 5 = uploadSw 
    
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.5.0 = 1    
    
    !--- Result of the TFTP action, 1 = In Process 
    
    

    Note: The last entry shows that the image transfer is in process. Wait for a few minutes and then poll the tftpResult MIB object again in order to verify that it has transferred successfully. This step can take a few minutes to complete, which depends on the image file size (bytes).

  2. Poll the tftpResult MIB object and compare the output with the MIB object details in Appendix A:

    % snmpwalk 172.16.99.66 public .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.5 
    enterprises.9.5.1.5.5.0 = 2 --> Result of the TFTP action, 2 = Success

Troubleshoot the Process

If download is successful, the MIB object output is equal to 2 (or success). If you receive other output, compare it with Appendix A for the tftpResult object and take appropriate steps.

Once the image transfer completes successfully, verify the image file size (bytes) matches that are shown in the show flash command output to the file in the TFTP server (image.bin, in this example).

Note: If you have multiple images in the flash (show flash), only the image from which the Supervisor module has been booted up, is transferred to the TFTP server with this procedure. Use the show boot command to see the BOOT variable =, which shows what image from the flash is used by the Supervisor module to boot up. Refer to Upgrading Software Images and Working with Configuration Files on Catalyst Switches for more information.

UNIX Script Example

Note: These scripts are provided as examples only and are not supported in any way by Cisco Systems.

Script to Automate Configuration File and Cisco IOS Migration on Switches

#!/bin/sh
# Script to automate config file & IOS migration of switches
# supporting STACK-MIB including 5000, 5500, 1400, 2900, 1200
if [ ! -f SW ] ;
then
echo
echo "File SW does not exist!!!"
echo
echo "Syntax is 'switch.sh'"
echo "where each line in file SW lists:"
echo "Switchname Filename Serverip Module# Moduleaction Community"
echo
echo "Switchname must resolve"
echo "Filename must exist in server tftpboot directory 777"
echo "Serverip is the ip of the server for the file"
echo "Module# is usually '1'"
echo "Module action is as per STACK-MIB: "
echo "- 2 - config file - server > switch"
echo "- 3 - config file - switch > server"
echo "- 4 - software image - server > switch"
echo "- 5 - software image - switch > server"
echo "Community is *write* community"
echo
exit
fi
cat SW | 
while read SW
do
  SWNAME=\Qecho $SW | cut -d' ' -f 1\Q 
  FILE=\Qecho $SW | cut -d' ' -f 2\Q
  SERVER=\Qecho $SW | cut -d' ' -f 3\Q
  MODULE=\Qecho $SW | cut -d' ' -f 4\Q
  ACTION=\Qecho $SW | cut -d' ' -f 5\Q
  CMTY=\Qecho $SW | cut -d' ' -f 6\Q
  echo
  echo $SWNAME
  echo $FILE
  echo $SERVER
  echo $MODULE
  echo $ACTION
  echo $CMTY
  echo
  # '-t #' can be modified to adjust timeout
  snmpset -t 100 -c $CMTY $SWNAME .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.1.0 octetstring $SERVER
  sleep 5
  snmpset -t 100 -c $CMTY $SWNAME .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.2.0 octetstring $FILE
  sleep 5
  snmpset -t 100 -c $CMTY $SWNAME .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.3.0 integer $MODULE
  sleep 5
  snmpset -t 100 -c $CMTY $SWNAME .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.4.0 integer $ACTION
sleep 60
echo
echo Check Progress...
echo
echo
echo "Switch $SWNAME: \\c"; snmpget -t 100 -c $CMTY $SWNAME .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.5.0 | cut 
-d":" -f 3
done

Switch Expect Script to Execute a Particular Command on the Switch

#!/usr/nms/bin/expect
# Above line points to your expect interpreter
# Add '-d' option to expect line above to enable debugging
# Tested on Cat5000 with regular login; no error-checking 
# except for number arguments, but will timeout on failure.
# Tacacs+ lines left in for future releases
set argc [llength $argv]
if { $argc < 4} {
        puts "Syntax is:"
        puts "(For system with no Tac+)"
        puts "switch.exp destination \"command\" vtypassword enapassword"
        exit 0 }
set destination [lindex $argv 0]
puts -nonewline "Where we're going:  "
puts $destination
set command [lindex $argv 1]
puts -nonewline "What we're doing:  "
puts $command
set vtypassword [lindex $argv 2]
puts -nonewline "What our password is (vty):  "
puts $vtypassword
set enapassword [lindex $argv 3]
puts -nonewline "What our password is (enable):  "
puts $enapassword
# username only for Tac+
set username [lindex $argv 4]
puts -nonewline "What our username is if Tac+:  "
puts $username
#
set timeout 10
spawn telnet $destination
expect {
        "Enter password:" {
        send "$vtypassword\r" }
        "Username:" {
        send "$username\r"  
        exec sleep 1
        expect "Password:" 
        send "$vtypassword\r"
        }
        }
# Look for non-enable router 'prompt>'
expect  -re "(^.*)(\r\n\[^ \]+> \$)" 
# Get into enable mode
send "en\r"
expect { 
        "password: " {
        send "$enapassword\r" }
        "Username:" {
        send "$username\r"
        exec sleep 1
        expect "Password:"
        send "$enapassword\r" }
        }
# Look for enable router 'prompt#'
expect -re "(^.*)(\r\n\[^ \]+(enable) \$)"
# Send the command
send "$command\r"
expect {
        -re "(^.*)(\r\n\[^ \]+ (enable) \$)" {
                append buffer $expect_out(1,string)
                }
        -re "(^.*)(\r\n\ --More-- \$)" {
                append buffer $expect_out(1,string)
        send " "
        }
        -re "(^.*)(\r\n\ --More-- \$)" {
                append buffer $expect_out(1,string)
        send " "
        }
        }
# Done with command - disable prior to exit
send "disable\r"
expect -re "(^.*)(\r\n\[^ \]+> \$)"
exec sleep 1
send "logout"

Perl Script to Show via SNMP the Same Output as "show cam dynamic"

#!/usr/local/bin/perl
open(TABLE, "bridge-table.csv") || die "Cant' open file: $!\n"; 
while (<TABLE>) {
	($vlan, $unicast_mac, $mod_ports) = split (/,/, $_);
	write;
}
exit;
 
format STDOUT =
set cam permanent @<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< @<<< @<
$unicast_mac, $mod_ports, $vlan

Appendix A—MIB Object Details

Object tftpHost
OID .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.1
Type DisplayString
Permission read-write
Syntax OCTET STRING (0..64)
Status Current
MIB CISCO-STACK-MIB
Description Name of source/destination host for the TFTP transfer or storage device transfer. If the name is for the TFTP transfer, it can be the IP address or the host name. If the name for the storage device transfer, it is in the format of deviceName: (e.g. slot0:, slot1:)
OID in Tree ::= { iso(1) org(3) dod(6) internet(1) private(4) enterprises(1) cisco(9) workgroup(5) ciscoStackMIB(1) tftpGrp(5) 1 }

Object tftpFile
OID .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.2
Type DisplayString
Permission read-write
Syntax OCTET STRING (0..64)
Status Current
MIB CISCO-STACK-MIB
Description Name of file for the TFTP transfer or for storage device transfer.
OID in Tree ::= { iso(1) org(3) dod(6) internet(1) private(4) enterprises(1) cisco(9) workgroup(5) ciscoStackMIB(1) tftpGrp(5) 2 }

Object tftpModule
OID .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.3
Type Integer
Permission read-write
Status Current
Range 0 - 16
MIB CISC O-STACK-MIB
Description Which code/configuration of the module is transferred.
OID in Tree ::= { ISO(1) org(3) DOD(6) Internet(1) private(4) enterprises(1) cisco(9) workgroup(5) ciscoStackMIB(1) tftpGrp(5) 3 }

Object tftpAction
OID .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.4
Type Integer
Permission read-write
Status Current
Values
  1. other
  2. downloadConfig
  3. uploadConfig
  4. downloadSw
  5. uploadSw
  6. downloadFw
  7. uploadFw
MIB CISCO-STACK-MIB
Description If you set this object to one of the acceptable values, it initiates the requested action with the information given in tftpHost, tftpFile, tftpModule. downloadConfig(2): receive configuration from host/file uploadConfig(3): send configuration to host/file downloadSw(4): receive software image from host/file uploadSw(5): send software image to host/file downloadFw(6): receive firmware image from host/file uploadFw(7): send firmware image to host/file If you set this object to any other value, you get an error.
OID in Tree ::= { ISO(1) org(3) DOD(6) Internet(1) private(4) enterprises(1) cisco(9) workgroup(5) ciscoStackMIB(1) tftpGrp(5) 4 }

Object tftpResult
OID .1.3.6.1.4.1.9.5.1.5.5
Type Integer
Permission read-only
Status Current
Values
  1. inProgress
  2. success
  3. noResponse
  4. tooManyRetries
  5. noBuffers
  6. noProcesses
  7. badChecksum
  8. badLength
  9. badFlash
  10. serverError
  11. userCanceled
  12. wrongCode
  13. fileNotFound
  14. invalidTftpHost
  15. invalidTftpModule
  16. accessViolation
  17. unknownStatus
  18. invalidStorageDevice
  19. insufficientSpaceOnStorageDevice
  20. insufficientDramSize
  21. incompatibleImage
MIB CISCO-STACK-MIB
Description Contains result of the last TFTP action request
OID in Tree ::= { ISO(1) org(3) DOD(6) Internet(1) private(4) enterprises(1) cisco(9) workgroup(5) ciscoStackMIB(1) tftpGrp(5) 5 }

Related Information

Updated: Feb 27, 2007
Document ID: 13504