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Cisco IOS Software Releases 12.2 T

Content Engine Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery

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Content Engine Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery

Table Of Contents

Content Engine Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery

Contents

Prerequisites for the Content Engine Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery

Restrictions for the Content Engine Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery

Information About the Content Engine Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery

Cisco Content Delivery Networks

Cisco Content Engines

CE Network Module Hardware

CE Network Module Operating Topologies

CE Network Module Interfaces

How to Configure and Manage the Content Engine Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery

Configuring IP Addresses on the CE Network Module Interfaces

Opening a Console Access Session to Configure the CE Network Module

Managing the CE Network Module

Installing Cisco ACNS Software on a CE Network Module with a SCSI Expansion Module

Installing Cisco ACNS Software from a CD-ROM or from Cisco.com

Installing Cisco ACNS Software from Compact Flash

Recovering a Corrupted ACNS Software Image

Installing a Hot-Swappable CE Network Module (Cisco 3660 and Cisco 3745 Only)

Troubleshooting Tips

Configuration Examples for the Content Engine Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery

Unnumbered IP Address Example

Three IP Address Example

Additional References

Related Documents

Standards

MIBs

RFCs

Technical Assistance

Command Reference

interface

service-module content-engine reload

service-module content-engine reset

service-module content-engine session

service-module content-engine session clear

service-module content-engine shutdown

service-module content-engine status

service-module external ip address

service-module ip address

service-module ip default-gateway

show controllers content-engine

show interfaces content-engine

Glossary


Content Engine Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery


The Content Engine Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery feature integrates content engine (CE) functionality into branch office routers for enterprise and service provider sites. Content engine functionality provides the following benefits:

Reduced bottlenecks and increased available bandwidth

Offloading of a significant amount of traffic and number of TCP connections from origin servers

Transferring content engine capabilities from a router-attached appliance to an integrated network module provides the following benefits:

Increased manageability

Reduced complexity

Decreased price

Optimized performance

Feature Specifications for the Content Engine Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery

Feature History
 
Release
Modification

12.2(11)YT

This feature was introduced.

12.2(13)T

This feature was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(13)T.

Supported Platforms

Cisco 2600 series, Cisco 2600XM series, Cisco 2691, Cisco 3640, Cisco 3640A, Cisco 3660, Cisco 3725, and Cisco 3745.


Determining Platform Support Through Cisco Feature Navigator

Cisco IOS software is packaged in feature sets that are supported on specific platforms. To get updated information regarding platform support for this feature, access Cisco Feature Navigator. Cisco Feature Navigator dynamically updates the list of supported platforms as new platform support is added for the feature.

Cisco Feature Navigator is a web-based tool that enables you to determine which Cisco IOS software images support a specific set of features and which features are supported in a specific Cisco IOS image. You can search by feature or release. Under the release section, you can compare releases side by side to display both the features unique to each software release and the features in common.

To access Cisco  Feature Navigator, you must have an account on Cisco.com. If you have forgotten or lost your account information, send a blank e-mail to cco-locksmith@cisco.com. An automatic check will verify that your e-mail address is registered with Cisco.com. If the check is successful, account details with a new random password will be e-mailed to you. Qualified users can establish an account on Cisco.com by following the directions found at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/register

Cisco Feature Navigator is updated regularly when major Cisco IOS software releases and technology releases occur. For the most current information, go to the Cisco Feature Navigator home page at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/fn

Availability of Cisco IOS Software Images

Platform support for particular Cisco IOS software releases is dependent on the availability of the software images for those platforms. Software images for some platforms may be deferred, delayed, or changed without prior notice. For updated information about platform support and availability of software images for each Cisco IOS software release, refer to the online release notes or, if supported, Cisco Feature Navigator.

Contents

Prerequisites for the Content Engine Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery

Restrictions for the Content Engine Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery

Information About the Content Engine Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery

How to Configure and Manage the Content Engine Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery

Configuration Examples for the Content Engine Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery

Additional References

Command Reference

Glossary

Prerequisites for the Content Engine Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery

Install Cisco IOS Release 12.2(11)YT, Cisco IOS Release 12.2(13)T, or a later release.

Install Cisco ACNS Version 4.2.3 or a later release if it is not already installed. If you have a CE network module with an installed SCSI controller expansion module, refer to the "Installing Cisco ACNS Software on a CE Network Module with a SCSI Expansion Module" section. For other types of CE network modules, refer to software installation and upgrade instructions in the documentation for the appropriate ACNS software version at the following URL: http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/webscale/uce/

Install the CE network module. Be sure that it is properly seated and that the EN (enable) and PWR (power) LEDs are lit. For information about installing CE network modules, refer to Connecting CE Network Modules for Caching and Content Delivery.

For Cisco 2691, Cisco 3725, and Cisco 3745 routers only, ensure that the ROM monitor (ROMMON) version is 12.2(8r)T2 or a later version. This ROMMON version contains a fix that prevents the router from resetting all the network modules when it is reloaded.

Restrictions for the Content Engine Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery

Cisco IOS Release 12.2(11)YT, Cisco IOS Release 12.2(13)T, or a later release is required.

Cisco ACNS software Version 4.2.3 or a later release is required.

The only ACNS software features supported by the CE network module are the ACNS software content engine features.

Online insertion and removal (OIR) is supported only on Cisco 3660 and Cisco 3745 platforms.

Transmission speed over the internal CE link is automatically negotiated between the CE interface and the Cisco IOS interface on the router side. On Cisco 2600 series and Cisco 2600XM series platforms except for the Cisco 2691, a speed of 10 Mbps is negotiated. On all other platforms, the speed of 100 Mbps is automatically negotiated.

The maximum number of CE network modules that can be installed in a router is limited by the amount and type of power that is provided to the network module slots. Table 1 lists the maximum number of CE network modules that can be installed on different router types.

Table 1 Maximum Number of CE Network Modules per Router Type

Router Type
Number of Network Modules

Cisco 2600 series

1

Cisco 2600XM series

1

Cisco 2691

1

Cisco 3640 and Cisco 3640A

3

Cisco 3660

6

Cisco 3725

2

Cisco 3745

4


Information About the Content Engine Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery

The CE network module is specialized to run an integrated enterprise content delivery network (E-CDN) application on a Cisco Application and Content Networking System (ACNS) software platform that includes content-caching and content-delivery software.

The following concepts are helpful in understanding the CE network module:

Cisco Content Delivery Networks

Cisco Content Engines

CE Network Module Hardware

Cisco Content Delivery Networks

When a Cisco E-CDN application is enabled, a combination of content engines, content routers, content services switches, and content distribution managers can be deployed to create a complete content delivery network system that includes content routing, content switching, content distribution and management, and content services, as well as content delivery. The CE network module is one element of that network. Figure 1 shows a typical E-CDN topology.

Cisco ACNS software unifies caching software and Cisco E-CDN software into a single software platform that is supported on content engines, content distribution managers, and content routers. ACNS software accelerates content delivery and optimizes bandwidth usage by caching frequently accessed content and fulfilling content requests locally rather than traversing the Internet or intranet to a distant server each time a request is made. The ACNS software cache application works in tandem with Cisco IOS routing software to handle web traffic, including user requests to view pages and graphics (objects) on World Wide Web servers—whether the traffic is internal or external to your network.

In addition to relieving WAN bottlenecks with localized caching, Cisco CEs can become the content delivery elements of a Cisco content delivery network (CDN) solution. CDN solutions enable the proactive distribution of rich media files to content engines at the network edge for local access. Primary CDN applications include e-learning, corporate communications, and software distribution. Designed for affordability and ease of installation, a CDN solution enables you to quickly deploy high-impact, high-bandwidth rich media, such as high-quality streaming video—with minimal administration.

The CE network module is completely interoperable with other CE appliances and components of an E-CDN. CE network module hardware is based on Cisco CE-507 and CE-560 architecture, uses an Intel Mobile Pentium III microprocessor, and runs under a Linux operating system.

For more information, refer to the following:

Cisco ACNS software

E-CDN application software within a content delivery network—Cisco Enterprise CDN Software User Guide

Cisco Content Networking Technology Solution

White paper—The Cisco Content Delivery Network Solution for the Enterprise

Technical documentation—Content Delivery Networking Products

Figure 1 Cisco Enterprise Content Delivery Network Topology

Cisco Content Engines

Cisco CEs, including CE network modules, accelerate content delivery and optimize bandwidth usage in the following two ways:

By transparently caching frequently accessed content through the Web Cache Communication Protocol (WCCP) V.2.

By fulfilling content requests locally rather than by traversing the Internet or corporate intranet to a distant server farm each time that a request is made.

The CE leverages interception mechanisms based on Cisco IOS software to handle requests for web traffic—whether internal or external to your network. In addition, Cisco CEs can be deployed in reverse proxy mode in front of web servers to dramatically increase performance. By transparently caching inbound requests for content, CEs can offload a significant amount of traffic and number of TCP connections from origin servers. CEs dynamically distribute web content to eliminate bottlenecks and to speed access to content using this type of scenario:

1. A user (client) requests a web page from a browser.

2. A router enabled with WCCP analyzes the request and, on the basis of TCP port number, determines if it should transparently redirect the request to a CE. If so, the request is redirected to the CE.

3. If the CE has a copy of the requested object in storage, the CE sends the object to the user. Otherwise, the CE simultaneously obtains the requested object from the web server, stores a copy of the object (caches it) locally, and forwards the object to the user.

4. Subsequent requests for the same content are transparently fulfilled by the CE from its local storage.

By caching web objects in this manner, the CE can speed the satisfaction of user requests when more than one user wants to access the same object. Caching in this manner also reduces the amount of traffic between your network and the Internet, potentially improving your overall network performance and optimizing your bandwidth usage, typically resulting in WAN bandwidth savings of 25 to 60 percent.

CE Network Module Hardware

The CE network module occupies a single router slot and has the properties that are summarized in Table 2.

Table 2 CE Network Module Properties

Property
Description

Part Number

NM-CE-BP-20G-K9 (20 GB internal storage)

NM-CE-BP-40G-K9 (40 GB internal storage)

NM-CE-BP-SCSI-K9 (SCSI connection for external storage)

Router Slot Usage

One network module slot.

Processor

Intel Mobile Pentium III, 500 MHz.

Memory

256 MB DRAM, upgradable to 512 MB.

External Compact Flash Memory

(Optional) 256 MB, Cisco part number MEM-256CF-x.x-K9=, where x.x is the version of Cisco ACNS software.

Internal Storage

(Optional) One of the following 2.5-in. IDE drives (laptop) on an expansion module:

20 GB, 4200 RPM

40 GB, 5400 RPM

External Storage Connectivity

(Optional) SCSI expansion module with SCSI controller and 64-pin SCSI connector to provide connectivity to the types of external storage arrays supported by Cisco CE-507 and Cisco CE-560 content engines.

Platforms

Cisco 2600 series, Cisco 2600XM series, Cisco 2691, Cisco 3640, Cisco 3640A, Cisco 3660, Cisco 3725, and Cisco 3745.

Power Consumption

16 watts (including IDE disk).

Expansion Modules

EM-CE-20G
EM-CE-40G
EM-CE-SCSI


External hardware interfaces include the following:

An external 10/100 (Fast Ethernet) interface port that provides direct LAN connectivity. This interface has an RJ-45 connector.

An optional SCSI expansion module that has a 64-pin SCSI connector to provide external storage array connectivity.

An external compact Flash slot that is available to house an optional Flash memory for image recovery.

CE Network Module Operating Topologies

The CE network module can be deployed by branch office customers in one of the following topologies:

The CE network module is directly connected to a LAN by an Ethernet switch or hub through the network module's external Fast Ethernet (FE) interface.

Similar to situations in which a PC is connected to a LAN, the Ethernet interface on the CE network module is given an IP address from the branch office's LAN IP subnet space, which is typically configured statically using the Cisco IOS command-line interface (CLI) on the console port. One advantage of this topology is that the Fast Ethernet port on the CE network module can operate at line speed. The only communication between the router and the CE network module is in the form of keepalives or heartbeats that are processed through the internal FE ports. All caching and streaming traffic goes through the external FE port.

The CE network module is directly connected to an Ethernet interface on the router using the internal FE interface on the CE network module.

In this topology, the Ethernet interface is given an address from an IP subnet separate from the branch office LAN subnet. All caching and streaming traffic flows through the router. The CE's performance is limited by the router's switching performance. In this scenario, streaming and caching traffic, as well as keepalive traffic, goes through internal FE ports. Caching and streaming traffic uses router resources such as CPU, SDRAM bandwidth, and backplane PCI bandwidth.

CE Network Module Interfaces

The CE network module uses three interfaces for communication, as shown in Figure 2. Two of the interfaces enable internal administrative and management traffic between the router (Cisco IOS) and the CE (Cisco ACNS software) over an internal Ethernet segment. The third interface is the external link that supports CE functionality.

Note that the interfaces within the "Router" box in Figure 2 are managed by Cisco IOS, while the interfaces within the "CE Network Module" box are managed by the CE CLI (Cisco ACNS software).

Figure 2 CE Network Module Interfaces

The router-side interface for the internal Ethernet segment is known as interface Content-Engine in the Cisco IOS software. This interface is the only interface associated with the CE that is visible in the output of the show interfaces command. It provides access through the Cisco IOS software to configure the CE interfaces with IP addresses and a default gateway. The router-side internal interface is connected to the router PCI backplane and is managed by Cisco IOS CLI.

The CE side of the internal Ethernet segment is called interface FastEthernet 0/1 in the CE CLI (Cisco ACNS software). When packets are sent from the router to the CE, they are sent out from the router on interface Content-Engine and received at the CE on interface FastEthernet 0/1. When packets are sent from the CE to the router, they are sent out from the CE on interface FastEthernet 0/1 and received at the router on interface Content-Engine. The internal CE-side interface is connected to the PCI bus on the CE side, and it is managed by the CE software. Only the IP address is configured from Cisco IOS CLI. All other configurations are performed from the CE CLI or from the CE graphical user interface (GUI). Bandwidth, autosense, and duplex settings are not allowed on this interface.

The external CE interface is known as interface FastEthernet 0/0 in the CE CLI (Cisco ACNS software). This is the Ethernet port on the network module, and it supports data requests and transfers from outside sources. This link provides direct Fast Ethernet connectivity to the LAN through an RJ-45 connector. Only the IP address is configured from Cisco IOS CLI; all other configurations are performed from the CE CLI or from the CE GUI.

How to Configure and Manage the Content Engine Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery

The first configuration task for the CE network module is to define IP addresses and subnet masks for the CE network module interfaces. Because the CE network module does not have direct console access, this is a necessary first step to allow access so that you can configure ACNS software on the CE itself.

After defining IP addresses, ensure that ACNS software Version 4.2.3 or a later release is loaded on the CE network module. The type of storage memory that your CE network module employs determines how the ACNS software is installed, as follows:

CE network modules with optional IDE expansion modules for internal storage arrive with ACNS software already installed.

CE network modules with optional SCSI expansion modules for connecting external storage arrays arrive without ACNS software installed. You must install ACNS software by following one of the procedures in the "Installing Cisco ACNS Software on a CE Network Module with a SCSI Expansion Module" section.

Refer to the following sections for configuration, installation, and troubleshooting tasks for the CE network module. Each task in the list is identified as either required or optional.

Configuring IP Addresses on the CE Network Module Interfaces (required)

Opening a Console Access Session to Configure the CE Network Module (required)

Managing the CE Network Module (optional)

Installing Cisco ACNS Software on a CE Network Module with a SCSI Expansion Module (optional)

Recovering a Corrupted ACNS Software Image (optional)

Installing a Hot-Swappable CE Network Module (Cisco 3660 and Cisco 3745 Only) (optional)

Troubleshooting Tips (optional)

Configuring IP Addresses on the CE Network Module Interfaces

In this procedure, IP addresses are configured on the three CE network module interfaces shown in Figure 2:

Router-side interface to the internal link

CE interface to the internal link

CE external interface

SUMMARY STEPS

1. interface content-engine slot/unit

2. ip address router-side-ipaddr subnet-mask

3. service-module ip address ce-side-ipaddr subnet-mask

4. service-module external ip address external-ipaddr subnet-mask

5. service-module ip default-gateway gw-ipaddr

6. exit

7. exit

8. show running-config

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

interface content-engine slot/unit

Example:

Router(config)# interface content-engine 4/0

Enters content-engine interface configuration mode for the specified interface. The arguments are as follows:

slot—Number of the router chassis slot for the network module.

unit—Number of the daughter card on the network module. For CE network modules, always use 0.

Step 2 

ip address router-side-ipaddr subnet-mask

Example:
Router(config-if)# ip address 172.18.12.1 
255.255.255.0

Configures an IP address and subnet mask on the router-side interface to the internal link. The arguments are as follows:

router-side-ipaddr—IP address for the internal router-side CE interface.

subnet-mask—Subnet mask to use with the IP address.

Step 3 

service-module ip address ce-side-ipaddr subnet-mask

Example:

Router(config-if)# service-module ip address 172.18.12.2 255.255.255.0

Configures an IP address and subnet mask on the CE interface to the internal link. The arguments are as follows:

ce-side-ipaddr—IP address for the internal CE-side interface.

subnet-mask—Subnet mask to use with the IP address.

Step 4 

service-module external ip address external-ipaddr subnet-mask

Example:

Router(config-if)# service-module external ip address 10.3.208.190 255.255.0.0

Configures an IP address and subnet mask on the Fast Ethernet external interface of the CE network module. The arguments are as follows:

external-ipaddr—IP address for the external CE interface.

subnet-mask—Subnet mask to use with the IP address.

Step 5 

service-module ip default-gateway gw-ipaddr

Example:

Router(config-if)# service-module ip default-gateway 10.3.0.1

Configures an IP address for the default gateway for the CE network module. The argument is as follows:

gw-ipaddr—IP address for the default gateway.

Step 6 

exit

Example:

Router(config-if)# exit

Exits content-engine interface configuration mode.

Step 7 

exit

Example:

Router(config)# exit

Exits global configuration mode.

Step 8 

show running-config

Example:

Router# show running-config

.
.
.
!
interface Content-engine4/0
 ip address 172.18.12.1 255.255.255.0
 service-module external ip address 
10.3.208.190 255.255.0.0
 service-module ip address 172.18.12.2 
255.255.255.0
 service-module ip default-gateway 
10.3.0.1
!
.
.
.

Verifies that the address configuration is correct.

Opening a Console Access Session to Configure the CE Network Module

The CE network module is a standalone content engine with its own startup and run-time configurations that are independent of the Cisco IOS configuration on the router. Although IP addresses are defined on the CE network module interfaces through the router's Cisco IOS CLI, as explained in the "Configuring IP Addresses on the CE Network Module Interfaces" section, the CE itself is configured in the same way that standalone CE appliances are configured, with a combination of CE CLI and web-based GUI. The software to configure CEs is known as Cisco Application and Content Networking System (ACNS) software.

The CE network module differs from a standalone CE appliance because it does not have an external console port. Console access to the CE network module is enabled when you issue the service-module content-engine session command on the router, as explained in this section, or when you initiate a Telnet connection. The lack of an external console port means that the initial boot-up configuration is possible only through the router.

When you issue the service-module content-engine session command, you create a console session with the CE, in which you can issue any of the CE configuration commands. After completing work in the session and exiting the CE software, you are returned to Cisco IOS CLI, where you must clear the session using the service-module content-engine session clear command.


Timesaver Configure IP addresses on the CE network module interfaces before opening a console access session.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. service-module content-engine slot/unit session

2. Enter ACNS configuration commands at the CE-netmodule prompt.

3. Press Control-Shift-6, and then press x to return to router configuration.

4. service-module content-engine slot/unit session clear

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

service-module content-engine slot/unit session

Example:

Router# service-module content-engine 4/0 session


Trying 10.10.10.1, 2129 ... Open


CE-netmodule con now available


Press RETURN to get started!


CE-netmodule> enable

CE-netmodule#

Provides console access to the CE network module from the router CLI by initiating a reverse Telnet connection. This command places you in CE CLI configuration mode. After using the enable command, you are in CE CLI privileged EXEC mode.

The reverse Telnet connection is made using the IP address of the CE interface and the terminal (TTY) line associated with the CE network module. The TTY line number is calculated using the following formula (n*32)+1, where n is the number of the chassis slot that contains the CE network module. In the example output provided in this step, the CE interface IP address is 10.10.10.1, and the TTY line number is 129. The number 2000 has been added to the TTY line number for the reverse Telnet session.

The arguments are as follows:

slot—Number of the router chassis slot for the network module.

unit—Number of the daughter card on the network module. For CE network modules, always use 0.

The CE interface must be up before you can use the service-module content-engine session command.

Once a session is started, you can perform any CE configuration task. You first access the CE console in a user-level shell. The enable command takes you to the privileged EXEC command shell, where most commands are available.

Step 2 

Enter ACNS configuration commands at the CE-netmodule prompt.


CE configuration tasks are described in documentation for the appropriate version of Cisco ACNS software at the following URL: http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/webscale/uce/

Step 3 

Press Control-Shift-6, and then press x to return to router configuration.

The CE session stays up until you use the service-module content-engine session clear command as described in Step 4. While the CE session remains up, you can use Enter to return to the CE session from router configuration.

Step 4 

service-module content-engine slot/unit session clear

Example:

Router# service-module content-engine 4/0 session clear

Clears the existing CE network module configuration session. Use this command after exiting the CE module as described in Step 2. The arguments are as follows:

slot—Number of the router chassis slot for the network module.

unit—Number of the daughter card on the network module. For CE network modules, always use 0.

Press Enter when you are asked to confirm this command.

Managing the CE Network Module

The commands in this section are used for the graceful shutdown, reset, and reload of a CE network module after it has been installed. For information on installation, refer to the following documents:

CE network module—Connecting CE Network Modules for Caching and Content Delivery

CE network module daughter card—Installing Expansion Modules on the Cisco CE Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery

Network modules—Cisco Network Modules Hardware Installation Guide

SUMMARY STEPS

Use the following commands as necessary:

service-module content-engine slot/unit shutdown

service-module content-engine slot/unit reset

service-module content-engine slot/unit reload

DETAILED STEPS

Command or Action
Purpose

service-module content-engine slot/unit shutdown

Example:

Router# service-module content-engine 1/0 shutdown


Shutdown is used for Online removal of Service Module.

Do you want to proceed with shutdown?[confirm]

Use service module reset command to recover from shutdown.

Performs a graceful halt of the CE network module operating system so that the CE disks are not corrupted. Used when removing or replacing a hot-swappable CE network module during online insertion and removal (OIR). The arguments are as follows:

slot—Number of the router chassis slot for the network module.

unit—Number of the daughter card on the network module. For CE network modules, always use 0.

At the confirmation prompt, press Enter to confirm the action or n to cancel.

service-module content-engine slot/unit reset

Example:

Router# service-module content-engine 1/0 reset


Use reset only to recover from shutdown or failed state

Warning: May lose data on the hard disc!

Do you want to reset?[confirm]

Performs a hardware reset of the CE network module. The arguments are as follows:

slot—Number of the router chassis slot for the network module.

unit—Number of the daughter card on the network module. For CE network modules, always use 0.

At the confirmation prompt, press Enter to confirm the action or n to cancel.

service-module content-engine slot/unit reload

Example:

Router# service-module content-engine 1/0 reload


Do you want to proceed with reload?[confirm]

Performs a graceful halt and reload of the CE network module operating system. The arguments are as follows:

slot—Number of the router chassis slot for the network module.

unit—Number of the daughter card on the network module. For CE network modules, always use 0.

At the confirmation prompt, press Enter to confirm the action or n to cancel.


Installing Cisco ACNS Software on a CE Network Module with a SCSI Expansion Module

A Cisco CE network module with an installed SCSI controller expansion module does not ship with installed ACNS software. If you have this type of CE network module, you also require an external storage array to hold the ACNS software.

Before using the CE network module, you need to install an external storage array and the Cisco ACNS software. ACNS software is installed by one of the following methods:

From a CD-ROM—Download the software from the CD-ROM to a local FTP server. The local FTP server must be accessible to the router with the CE network module. Follow the instructions in the "Installing Cisco ACNS Software from a CD-ROM or from Cisco.com" section.

From Cisco.com—Download the ACNS software from the Cisco Software Center at http://www.cisco.com/kobayashi/sw-center/sw-content.shtml to a local FTP server. The local FTP server must be accessible to the router with the CE network module. Follow the instructions in the "Installing Cisco ACNS Software from a CD-ROM or from Cisco.com" section.

From a compact Flash card—Follow the instructions in the "Installing Cisco ACNS Software from Compact Flash" section.

Installing Cisco ACNS Software from a CD-ROM or from Cisco.com

To perform the Cisco ACNS software installation from a CD-ROM or from Cisco.com, you need a local FTP server that can be reached from the router that contains the CE network module. The local FTP server should be configured with a valid username and password.

The external storage array is also installed during this procedure.


Note In addition to the ACNS x.x.x image, the CD-ROM contains special upgrade and downgrade images, meta files, manifest samples, and so forth. These are not required for installation, but may be useful if you are using certain features of ACNS.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. Download to a local FTP server the Cisco ACNS software image.

2. show disks or show disks details

3. Attach the external storage array to the Cisco content engine network module.

4. reload or service-module content-engine reload

5. Configure the CE network module for IP address and default gateway.

6. show disks or show disks details

7. disk recover

8. copy ftp install {hostname | ip-address} remotefiledir remotefilename

9. reload or service-module content-engine reload

10. Configure the Cisco ACNS software as required.

DETAILED STEPS


Step 1 Download to a local FTP server the Cisco ACNS software image. You can use the image from either of these locations:

The CD-ROM that accompanied the CE network module—Copy the ACNS-x.x.x-K9.bin software file, which is located in the root directory. ACNS-x.x.x-K9.bin is the generic form for the Cisco ACNS file name. For example, Cisco ACNS software version 4.2.3 has the software file name ACNS-4.2.3-K9.bin.

The Cisco Software Center at http://www.cisco.com/kobayashi/sw-center/sw-content.shtml — Select the appropriate version of Cisco ACNS software and follow the prompts to download the ACNS software image.

Step 2 Initiate a CE network module console access session using the service-module content-engine slot/unit session command from the router's CLI privileged EXEC mode. Login using the default username admin and the default password default to enter the CLI privileged EXEC mode on the CE Network module.

Step 3 Use the show disks command or the show disks details command in CE CLI privileged EXEC mode to establish a baseline value for CE disk usage. The output of these commands establish a baseline value for the amount of disk usage or the number of disks detected, respectively. This step must be completed before you attach the external storage array. Later, in Step 7 of this procedure, you verify that the software detects the external storage array by comparing this output to the output from the same command after you have attached the external storage array.


Note Before performing this step, make sure that you have used the ip address command under the content-engine interface to define an IP address for the router-side interface to the internal link and that the content-engine interface is in an up state. The ip address command is explained in Step 2 of the "Configuring IP Addresses on the CE Network Module Interfaces" section.


The following example shows how to enter CE CLI privileged EXEC mode for the CE network module in slot 4 and then shows the two commands that you can use to establish baseline disk usage. An example of the output from the two commands is shown in Step 7.

Router# service-module content-engine 4/0 session

Trying 10.10.10.1, 2129 ... Open
CE-netmodule con now available
Press RETURN to get started!

CE-netmodule> enable

Password:


CE-netmodule# show disks

CE-netmodule# show disks details

Step 4 Attach the external storage array to the Cisco content engine network module. For information on attaching an external storage array, see the Cisco Storage Array 6 Installation and Configuration Guide and the hardware documents in the "Additional References" section.

Step 5 Restart the network module using either of the following commands:

reload—Use this command from CE CLI privileged EXEC mode.

CE-netmodule# reload

service-module content-engine reload—Use this command from router CLI privileged EXEC mode.

Router# service-module content-engine 4/0 reload
Do you want to proceed with reload?[confirm]

Step 6 Configure the network module for IP address and default gateway, using Cisco IOS CE interface configuration mode on the router, as explained in the "Configuring IP Addresses on the CE Network Module Interfaces" section.

Step 7 Confirm that the external storage array is detected by the network module by using either the show disks command or the show disks details command, as explained here:

Enter the show disks command in CE CLI privileged EXEC mode. The command output displays the file systems that are found on the network module. These file systems can exist on a single disk or can span multiple disks. You confirm the detection of the external storage array by noting whether the total disk space on all file systems has increased from the baseline that you noted in Step 3. The following example shows output from the show disks command:

CE-netmodule# show disks

SYSFS    0.0GB      0.0%
CFS      0.0GB      0.0%
MEDIAFS  0.0GB      0.0%
ECDNFS   0.0GB      0.0%
FREE   113.7GB    100.0%

Enter the show disks details command in CE CLI privileged EXEC mode. The command output provides an entry for each disk detected. If the external storage array is detected, the number of entries in the show disks details command output increases from the number in the output that you saw when you used the commands in Step 3. The following example shows output from the show disks details command:

CE-netmodule# show disks details

disk00:Normal          (h00 c00 i08 l00)    17364MB( 17.0GB)
        System use:              3317MB(  3.2GB)
        FREE:                   14046MB( 13.7GB)
disk01:Normal          (h00 c00 i09 l00)    17366MB( 17.0GB)
        disk01/00:SYSFS         17365MB( 17.0GB) mounted at /local1
        FREE:                       0MB(  0.0GB)
disk02:Normal          (h00 c00 i10 l00)    17366MB( 17.0GB)
        disk02/00:SYSFS         17365MB( 17.0GB) mounted at /local2
        FREE:                       0MB(  0.0GB)
disk03:Normal          (h00 c00 i11 l00)    17366MB( 17.0GB)
        disk03/00:SYSFS         17365MB( 17.0GB) mounted at /local3
        FREE:                       0MB(  0.0GB)
disk04:Normal          (h00 c00 i11 l00)    17366MB( 17.0GB)
        disk03/00:SYSFS         17365MB( 17.0GB) mounted at /local4
        FREE:                       0MB(  0.0GB)
disk05:Normal          (h00 c00 i13 l00)    17366MB( 17.0GB)
        disk05/00:SYSFS         17365MB( 17.0GB) mounted at /local5
        FREE:                       0MB(  0.0GB)

If the external storage array is not detected by the network module, verify that the SCSI cables are connected and that the external storage array is operational. For more information on troubleshooting the external storage array, refer to the Cisco Storage Array 6 Installation and Configuration Guide.

Step 8 In CE CLI privileged EXEC mode, enter the disk recover command to create disk partitions on the external storage array for use by the network module.

CE-netmodule# disk recover

Step 9 In CE CLI privileged EXEC mode, enter the copy ftp install {hostname | ip-address} remotefiledir remotefilename command to download the Cisco ACNS software image from the FTP server to the external storage array and to the onboard Strata Flash memory on the network module. In the following example, the FTP server is server4, the directory is /images, and the image name is acns_file:

CE-netmodule# copy ftp install server4 /images acns_file

Step 10 Restart the network module as described in Step 5 of this procedure.

Step 11 Configure the Cisco ACNS software as required. For more information, refer to documentation for the appropriate version of Cisco ACNS software at the following URL: http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/webscale/uce/


Installing Cisco ACNS Software from Compact Flash

If you do not have an FTP server available in the network or if the CE network module does not have network connectivity, you can install the ACNS software image from an external compact Flash card, Cisco part number MEM-256CF-x.x-K9=, where x.x is the Cisco ACNS software version.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. Insert the compact Flash card in the compact Flash slot on the front of the network module.

2. reload or service-module content-engine reload

3. After the CE network module has booted up, enter CE CLI privileged EXEC mode and list the files in compact Flash memory.

a. service-module content-engine slot/unit session

b. enable

c. cd flash

d. dir

4. copy compactflash install image-name

5. reload or service-module content-engine reload

6. Configure the CE with the Cisco ACNS software.

DETAILED STEPS


Step 1 Insert the compact Flash card in the compact Flash slot on the front of the network module.

Step 2 Restart the CE network module using either of the following commands:

Use the reload command from CE CLI privileged EXEC mode.

CE-netmodule# reload

Use the service-module content-engine reload command from router CLI privileged EXEC mode.

Router# service-module content-engine 4/0 reload

Do you want to proceed with reload?[confirm]

Step 3 Initiate a CE network module console access session using the service-module content-engine slot/unit session command from the router's CLI privileged EXEC mode. Login using the default username admin and the default password default to enter the CLI privileged EXEC mode on the CE Network module.

Step 4 In CE CLI privileged EXEC mode, list the files in compact Flash memory, using the following commands:

a. service-module content-engine slot/unit session

b. enable

c. cd flash

d. dir

Router# service-module content-engine 4/0 session

Trying 10.10.10.1, 2129 ... Open
CE-netmodule con now available
Press RETURN to get started!

CE-netmodule> enable

Password:

CE-netmodule# cd flash1
CE-netmodule# dir

The dir command displays the list of files in the compact Flash memory. The following example shows the output from a dir command.

CE-netmodule# dir
      size          time of last change             name
--------------  -------------------------          -----------
      12290784  Mon Jan  7 03:22:38 1980           sys422.img
     105990784  Mon Jan  7 03:22:38 1980           acns422.img

Step 5 Copy the Cisco ACNS software image to the CE network module by using the following command from CE CLI privileged EXEC mode. Substitute the actual image name from your dir command output for the file name "acns4xx.img" in the following example.

CE-netmodule# copy compactflash install acns4xx.img

Step 6 Restart the network module as described in Step 2 of this procedure.

Step 7 Configure the CE with the Cisco ACNS software. For more information, refer to the appropriate version of Cisco ACNS software at the following URL: http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/webscale/uce/.


Recovering a Corrupted ACNS Software Image

An ACNS software image can become corrupted if there is a power failure or other interruption during an operation in which the image is being written to the CE network module's onboard StrataFlash memory, such as during an ACNS software installation or upgrade.

If the ACNS software image on the CE network module's onboard StrataFlash memory is corrupted, the network module boots up using a special rescue image that is also located on the onboard StrataFlash memory. The rescue image serves a limited purpose, which is simply to download a fresh Flash component of the ACNS software image and write it to the onboard StrataFlash memory. The rescue image can download this Flash component either from an FTP server on the network or from an external compact Flash card that is installed locally.

If you are going to download the Flash component from an FTP server on the network, the Flash component must first be downloaded to an FTP server from a CD-ROM or from Cisco.com over the network. This procedure and the procedure to download the image from the FTP server to the onboard Flash memory are the same as those described in the "Installing Cisco ACNS Software from a CD-ROM or from Cisco.com" section.

If you do not have an FTP server available in the network or if the network module does not have network connectivity, you can recover the ACNS software image from a special external compact Flash card, Cisco part number MEM-256CF-x.x-K9=, where x.x is the Cisco ACNS software version number.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. Insert the compact Flash card in the compact Flash slot on the front of the network module.

2. Type 4 to reboot the system.

3. Type 2 to read the image from the compact Flash and write it to the onboard StrataFlash memory.

4. Enter the directory name for the image file on the external compact Flash card.

5. Enter the filename for the image file on the external compact Flash card.

6. Type yes to write the image.

7. Type yes to reload.

8. Configure ACNS software on the network module.

DETAILED STEPS


Step 1 When a failure occurs in the ACNS software image, the CE network module automatically enters rescue mode during its bootup procedure and the following messages are displayed.

Insert the compact Flash card in the compact Flash slot on the front of the network module.

Freeing initrd memory:208k freed
VFS:Mounted root (ext2 filesystem).
Freeing unused kernel memory:448k freed

This is the rescue image.  The purpose of this software is to let
you install a new system image onto your system's boot flash
device.  This software has been invoked either manually
(if you entered `***' to the bootloader prompt) or has
been invoked by the bootloader if it discovered that your system image
in flash had been corrupted.

You now have the following options.

  1.  Download an image from the network and install it to flash

  2.  Insert a DOS formatted compact flash with a good system
      image on it, and install this image to flash. (The
      system must be rebooted to detect the compact flash).

  3.  Display diagnostic information about this system

  4.  Reboot the system

enter choice:

Step 2 Type 4 to reboot the system so that the system detects the compact Flash card you installed in Step 1.

Step 3 After the system reboots, the rescue mode messages are displayed again. At the "enter choice" prompt, type 2 to read the image from the compact Flash and write it to the onboard StrataFlash memory.

Step 4 At the next prompt, enter the directory name for the image file on the external compact Flash card. In the example below, the image file is found in the root directory (/) on the compact Flash.

Please enter the directory containing the image file on the compact flash:
[Enter directory on compact flash (e.g. /)]: /

Step 5 At the next prompt, enter the filename for the image file on the external compact Flash card. The filename has the format ACNS-x.x.x-K9.sysimg, where x.x.x is the ACNS version number. In the following example, the version is ACNS 5.0.3 and the image is named ACNS-5.0.3-K9.sysimg:

Please enter the file name of the system image file on the compact flash:
[Enter filename on compact flash]: ACNS-5.0.3-K9.sysimg

Step 6 The system provides feedback as it reads the file and then asks you to write the image to the onboard Flash memory. Type yes to write the image.

Trying to access the file //ACNS-5.0.3-K9.sysimg...
Read 12290784 byte image file
A new system image has been read from compact flash.
You should write it to system flash at this time.
Please enter 'yes' below to indicate that this is what you want to do:
yes

Step 7 After the ACNS software has been written to the CE network module's onboard Flash memory, the system will ask if you want to reload the network module. Type yes to reload.

Step 8 After the reload is complete, you can continue to configure ACNS software on the network module. Previous ACNS software configurations are saved.


Installing a Hot-Swappable CE Network Module (Cisco 3660 and Cisco 3745 Only)

Some Cisco modular access routers allow you to replace network modules without switching off the router or affecting the operation of other interfaces. This feature is often called hot-swapping or online insertion and removal (OIR). Hot-swapping of network modules provides uninterrupted operation to network users, maintains routing information, and ensures session preservation.


Note OIR is supported only on Cisco 3660 and Cisco 3745 platforms.



Caution Unlike other network modules, CE network modules use hard disks. Online removal of disks without proper shutdown can result in file system corruption and might render the disk unusable. The operating system on the CE network module must be shut down in an orderly fashion before the network module is removed.


Caution Cisco routers support hot-swapping with similar modules only. If you remove a network module, install another module exactly like it in its place.

For a description of informational messages and error messages that may appear on the console during this procedure, refer to the hardware installation guide for your type of router.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. service-module content-engine session

2. copy running-config tftp tftp-server-address filename

3. Control-Shift-6, followed by x

4. service-module content-engine slot/unit session clear

5. service-module content-engine slot/unit shutdown

6. Shut down the CE interface.

a. interface content-engine slot/unit

b. shutdown

c. exit

7. Unplug all network interface cables from the CE network module.

8. Loosen the two captive screws holding the CE network module in the chassis slot.

9. Slide the CE network module out of the slot.

10. Align the replacement CE network module with the guides in the chassis slot, and slide it gently into the slot.

11. Push the module into place until you feel its edge connector mate securely with the connector on the backplane.

12. Reconnect the network interface cables previously removed in Step 7.

13. Check that the network module LEDs are lit and that the Power and Enable LEDs on the front panel are also lit.

14. service-module content-engine slot/unit session

15. copy tftp running-config tftp-server-address filename

16. Control-Shift-6, followed by x

17. service-module content-engine slot/unit session clear

DETAILED STEPS


Step 1 Initiate a CE network module console access session using the service-module content-engine slot/unit session command from the router's CLI privileged EXEC mode. Login using the default username admin and the default password default to enter the CLI privileged EXEC mode on the CE Network module. The following example shows the starting of a session for the CE network module in slot 4.

Router# service-module content-engine 4/0 session

Trying 10.10.10.1, 2129 ... Open

CE-netmodule con now available

Press RETURN to get started!

CE-netmodule> enable
Password:

CE-netmodule#

Step 2 Save the CE running configuration using the following command from CE CLI privileged EXEC mode.

CE-netmodule# copy running-config tftp //server12/configs/rtr11-confg

Step 3 Exit the CE network module console access session by pressing Control-Shift-6, followed by x.

Step 4 On the router, clear the CE console access session using the following command.

Router# service-module content-engine 4/0 session clear


Step 5 Perform a graceful halt of the CE network module disk drive using the following command.

Router# service-module content-engine 4/0 shutdown 

Step 6 Shut down the CE interface.

Router(config)# interface content-engine 4/0
Router(config-if)# shutdown
Router(config-if)# exit

Step 7 Unplug all network interface cables from the CE network module.

Step 8 Loosen the two captive screws holding the CE network module in the chassis slot.

Step 9 Slide the CE network module out of the slot.

Step 10 Align the replacement CE network module with the guides in the chassis slot, and slide it gently into the slot.


Note If the router is not fully configured with network modules, make sure that blank panels fill the unoccupied chassis slots to provide proper airflow.


Step 11 Push the module into place until you feel its edge connector mate securely with the connector on the backplane.

Step 12 Reconnect the network interface cables previously removed in Step 7.

Step 13 Check that the network module LEDs are lit and that the Power and Enable LEDs on the front panel are also lit. This inspection ensures that connections are secure and that the new unit is operational.

Step 14 Initiate a CE network module console access session using the service-module content-engine slot/unit session command from the router's CLI privileged EXEC mode. Login using the default username admin and the default password default to enter the CLI privileged EXEC mode on the CE Network module. The following example shows the starting of a session for the CE network module in slot 4.

Router# service-module content-engine 4/0 session

Trying 10.10.10.1, 2129 ... Open

CE-netmodule con now available
Press RETURN to get started!

CE-netmodule> enable 
Password: 

CE-netmodule#

Step 15 Restore the CE running configuration by using the following command from CE CLI privileged EXEC mode.

CE-netmodule# copy tftp running-config //server12/configs/rtr11-confg

Step 16 Exit the CE network module console access session by pressing Control-Shift-6, followed by x.

Step 17 On the router, clear the CE console access session using the following command.

Router# service-module content-engine 1/0 session clear



Troubleshooting Tips

To diagnose problems with CE network module operation, use the commands and actions in this section.

Display configured commands using the show running-config command. Make sure that a new interface called Content-Engine is displayed and that the IP addresses listed for the CE are correct. The Content-Engine interface is the router-side interface for the internal Ethernet segment between the router and the CE, and it is the only CE interface that is displayed in the output of the show running-config command. The other two CE interfaces appear as "service-modules" under the Content-Engine interface. For more information on CE interfaces, refer to the "CE Network Module Interfaces" section.

Display software version information using the show version command. The following output example shows a CE network module and its terminal line listed in the interface information section:

Router# show version

Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software 
IOS (tm) C2600 Software (C2600-IS-M), Version 12.2(11)YT, RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc1)
TAC Support: http://www.cisco.com/tac
Copyright (c) 1986-2002 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Thu 12-Sep-02 21:34 by axpo
Image text-base: 0x80008098, data-base: 0x818AF44C

ROM: System Bootstrap, Version 12.1(3r)T2, RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc1)

router-2621 uptime is 10 minutes
System returned to ROM by power-on
System image file is "flash:c2600-is-mz"

cisco 2621 (MPC860) processor (revision 0x200) with 60416K/5120K bytes of memory.
Processor board ID JAD051516TV (4151953086)
M860 processor: part number 0, mask 49
Bridging software.
X.25 software, Version 3.0.0.
2 FastEthernet/IEEE 802.3 interface(s)
1 terminal line(s)
1 cisco content engine(s)
32K bytes of non-volatile configuration memory.
16384K bytes of processor board System flash (Read/Write)

Configuration register is 0x0

Display the basic interface configuration and the number of packets transmitted, output rate, and related information using the show interfaces content-engine command.

Display information for controllers that are associated with the CE network module using the show controllers content-engine command.

Display the status of the content engine, as well as the hardware configuration, software version, and related information, using the service-module content-engine status command.

Display hardware installed on the router using the show diag command. The following output example shows a CE network module in router slot 1:

Router# show diag 1

Slot 1:
        Content Engine Port adapter, 1 port
        Port adapter is analyzed 
        Port adapter insertion time unknown
        EEPROM contents at hardware discovery:
        Hardware Revision        : 1.0
        Top Assy. Part Number    : 800-20382-01
        Board Revision           : A0
        Deviation Number         : 0-0
        Fab Version              : 02
        PCB Serial Number        : JAB060605C4
        RMA Test History         : 00
        RMA Number               : 0-0-0-0
        RMA History              : 00
        EEPROM format version 4
        EEPROM contents (hex):
          0x00: 04 FF 40 03 81 41 01 00 C0 46 03 20 00 4F 9E 01
          0x10: 42 41 30 80 00 00 00 00 02 02 C1 8B 4A 41 42 30
          0x20: 36 30 36 30 35 43 34 03 00 81 00 00 00 00 04 00
          0x30: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
          0x40: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
          0x50: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
          0x60: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
          0x70: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF

        20GB IDE Disc Daughter Card
        Hardware Revision        : 1.0
        Top Assy. Part Number    : 800-20520-01
        Board Revision           : A0
        Deviation Number         : 0-0
        Fab Version              : 02
        PCB Serial Number        : JAB060605A5
        RMA Test History         : 00
        RMA Number               : 0-0-0-0
        RMA History              : 00

        EEPROM format version 4
        EEPROM contents (hex):
          0x00: 04 FF 40 03 83 41 01 00 C0 46 03 20 00 50 28 01
          0x10: 42 41 30 80 00 00 00 00 02 02 C1 8B 4A 41 42 30
          0x20: 36 30 36 30 35 41 35 03 00 81 00 00 00 00 04 00
          0x30: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
          0x40: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
          0x50: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
          0x60: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
          0x70: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF

After exiting a CE console access session, remember to use the service-module content-engine session clear command to terminate the session.

Check LEDs that are associated with the CE network module. The link activity LED should light up whenever packets are being transmitted through the port.

If Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) is enabled in the CE network module, use the debug cdp packet command to see the CDP packets going across the interfaces every 60 seconds, which is the default. Use the show cdp neighbor command to see all the Cisco devices that have CDP enabled and that are in the same segment.

Enable the debug scp all command to check the communication between the Cisco IOS software and the CE:

Router# debug scp all

*Mar  1 00:28:34.371: scp-tx: SA:0F/01 DA:01/01 Op:0012 Sq:0024 Ln:0004 I:00
*Mar  1 00:28:34.371: 000: 02 5A 00 00                                     .Z..            
*Mar  1 00:28:34.371: scp-rx: SA:01/01 DA:0F/01 Op:0012 Sq:0024 Ln:0004 I:01
*Mar  1 00:28:34.371: 000: 02 5A 00 00                                     .Z.. 

Configuration Examples for the Content Engine Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery

This section provides the following configuration examples:

Unnumbered IP Address Example

Three IP Address Example


Note IP addresses and host names used in examples are fictitious.


Unnumbered IP Address Example

Figure 3 shows how the CE interfaces are configured using the unnumbered IP address method. In this example, the router interface to the internal router-CE link is configured using the ip unnumbered command to save IP address space. No new subnet needs to be defined for the internal network between the router and the CE. This configuration makes the CE interface that is pointing toward the Cisco IOS software an extension of the Fast Ethernet interface 0/0 of the router, which has an IP address of 10.10.10.2. When this method is used, a static IP route must be defined.

Figure 3 Unnumbered IP Address Example

.
.
.
!
interface Content-Engine 1/0
 ip unnumbered FastEthernet 0/0
 service-module ip address 10.10.10.10 255.255.255.0
 service-module external ip address 172.18.12.20 255.255.255.0
 service-module ip default-gateway 10.10.10.2
!
ip route 10.10.10.10 255.255.255.255 Content-Engine 1/0
!
.
.
.

Three IP Address Example

Figure 4 shows the configuration for the three IP address method. In this example, both the CE interface to the internal router-CE link and the router interface to the same link are on the 172.18.12.0/24 subnet. The external port of the CE network module is in the 10.3.0.0/16 subnet. Notice that there is no connection between the internal router interface to the CE and the external router interface in this configuration.

Figure 4 Three IP Address Example

.
.
.
!
interface Content-Engine 4/0
 ip address 172.18.12.1 255.255.255.0
 service-module ip address 172.18.12.2 255.255.255.0
 service-module external ip address 10.3.208.190 255.255.0.0
 service-module ip default-gateway 10.3.0.1
!
.
.

Additional References

For additional information related to the Content Engine Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery, refer to the following references:

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

Related content delivery products

Content Delivery Networking Products

Cisco ACNS software

Refer to documentation for the appropriate version of Cisco ACNS software at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/webscale/uce/

E-CDN application software within a content delivery network

Cisco CDN Software Enterprise User Guide

Cisco Content Delivery Networks (white paper)

The Cisco Content Delivery Network Solution for the Enterprise

Cisco Content Networking technologies (web site)

Cisco Content Networking Technology Solution

Overview and installation of Content Delivery Networking products

Cisco Content Delivery Networking Products Getting Started Guide

Installing CE network modules

Connecting CE Network Modules for Caching and Content Delivery

Installing CE network module expansion modules

Installing Expansion Modules on the Cisco CE Network Module for Caching and Content Delivery

Installing CE network module memory modules

Installing SODIMM Memory Modules in Cisco Network Modules for Caching and Content Delivery

Installing network modules

Cisco Network Modules Hardware Installation Guide

Installing storage arrays

Cisco Storage Array 6 Installation and Configuration Guide

Cisco 2600 series

Cisco 2600 series product documentation

Cisco 3600 series

Cisco 3600 series product documentation

Cisco 3700 series

Cisco 3700 series product documentation


Standards

Standards 1
Title

No new or modified standards are supported by this feature, and support for existing standards has not been modified by this feature.

1 Not all supported standards are listed.


MIBs

MIBs 1
MIBs Link

CISCO-CONTENT-ENGINE-MIB

CISCO-ENTITY-ASSET-MIB

ENTITY-MIB

MIB-2

CDP-MIB

To obtain lists of supported MIBs by platform and Cisco IOS release, and to download MIB modules, go to the Cisco MIB website on Cisco.com at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/public/sw-center/netmgmt/cmtk/mibs.shtml

1 Not all supported MIBs are listed.


To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://tools.cisco.com/ITDIT/MIBS/servlet/index

If Cisco  MIB Locator does not support the MIB information that you need, you can also obtain a list of supported MIBs and download MIBs from the Cisco  MIBs page at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/public/sw-center/netmgmt/cmtk/mibs.shtml

To access Cisco MIB Locator, you must have an account on Cisco.com. If you have forgotten or lost your account information, send a blank e-mail to cco-locksmith@cisco.com. An automatic check will verify that your e-mail address is registered with Cisco.com. If the check is successful, account details with a new random password will be e-mailed to you. Qualified users can establish an account on Cisco.com by following the directions found at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/register

RFCs

RFCs 1
Title

No new or modified RFCs are supported by this feature, and support for existing RFCs has not been modified by this feature.

1 Not all supported RFCs are listed.


Technical Assistance

Description
Link

Technical Assistance Center (TAC) home page, containing 30,000 pages of searchable technical content, including links to products, technologies, solutions, technical tips, tools, and lots more. Registered Cisco.com users can log in from this page to access even more content.

http://www.cisco.com/public/support/tac/home.shtml


Command Reference

This section documents new and modified commands. All other commands used with this feature are documented in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2 T command reference publications.

New Commands

service-module content-engine reload

service-module content-engine reset

service-module content-engine session

service-module content-engine session clear

service-module content-engine shutdown

service-module content-engine status

service-module external ip address

service-module ip address

service-module ip default-gateway

show controllers content-engine

show interfaces content-engine

Modified Command

interface

interface

To configure an interface type and to enter interface configuration mode, use the interface command in global configuration mode.

interface type number [name-tag]

Cisco 7200 Series and Cisco 7500 Series with a Packet over SONET Interface Processor

interface type slot/port

Cisco 7500 Series with a Channelized T1 or E1

interface serial slot/port:channel-group

Cisco 7500 Series with Ports on VIP Cards

interface type slot/port-adapter/port [ethernet | serial]

Cisco MC3810

interface serial number:channel-group

Content Engine Network Module Interface

interface content-engine slot/unit

To configure a subinterface, use this form of the interface global configuration command:

Cisco 7200 Series Subinterfaces

interface type slot/port.subinterface-number [multipoint | point-to-point]

Cisco 7500 Series Subinterfaces

interface type slot/port-adapter.subinterface-number [multipoint | point-to-point]

Cisco 7500 Series Subinterfaces with Ports on VIP Cards

interface type slot/port-adapter/port.subinterface-number [multipoint | point-to-point]

Syntax Description

type

Type of interface to be configured. See Table 3 for a list of valid interface type keywords.

number

Port, connector, or interface card number.

name-tag

(Optional) Specifies the logic name to identify the server configuration so that multiple entries of server configuration can be entered.

This optional argument is for use with the RLM feature.

slot

Number of the slot being configured. Refer to the appropriate hardware manual for slot and port information.

port

Number of the port being configured. Refer to the appropriate hardware manual for slot and port information.

port-adapter

Number of the port adapter being configured. Refer to the appropriate hardware manual for information about port adapter compatibility.

unit

Number of the network module daughter card. For content engine (CE) network modules, always use 0.

ethernet

(Optional) Ethernet IEEE 802.3 interface.

serial

(Optional) Serial interface.

:channel-group

(Cisco MC3810) T1/E1 channel group number that was defined with the channel-group controller configuration command. Range is from 0 to 23.

content-engine

Content engine network module interface.

.subinterface-number

Subinterface number in the range 1 to 4294967293. The number that precedes the period (.) must match the number to which this subinterface belongs.

multipoint

(Optional) Multipoint subinterface. There is no default.

point-to-point

(Optional) Point-to-point subinterface. There is no default.


Defaults

No interface types are configured.

Command Modes

Global configuration


Note To use this command with the RLM feature, you must be in interface configuration mode.


Command History

Release
Modification

10.0

This command was introduced on the Cisco 7000 series routers.

12.0(3)T

The optional name-tag argument was added for the RLM feature.

12.2(11)YT

The content-engine keyword and interface type were added.

12.2(13)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(13)T.


Usage Guidelines

This command does not have a no form.

Subinterfaces can be configured to support partially meshed Frame Relay networks. Refer to the "Configuring Serial Interfaces" chapter in the Cisco IOS Interface Configuration Guide.

There is no correlation between the number of the physical serial interface and the number of the logical LAN Extender interface. These interfaces can have the same or different numbers.

Table 3 provides definitions for interface type keywords.

Table 3 Interface Type Keywords 

Keyword
Interface Type

async

Port line used as an asynchronous interface.

atm

ATM interface.

bri

ISDN BRI. This interface configuration is propagated to each of the B channels. B channels cannot be configured individually. The interface must be configured with dial-on-demand commands in order for calls to be placed on that interface.

content-engine

Content engine network module interface. This type of interface cannot be configured for subinterfaces or for speed, duplex mode, and similar parameters. See command-line interface (CLI) help for a list of valid parameters.

dialer

Dialer interface.

ethernet

Ethernet IEEE 802.3 interface.

fastethernet

100-Mbps Ethernet interface on the Cisco 7200 and Cisco 7500 series routers.

fddi

FDDI.

group-async

Master asynchronous interface.

hssi

High-Speed Serial Interface (HSSI).

lex

LAN Extender (LEX) interface.

loopback

Software-only loopback interface that emulates an interface that is always up. It is a virtual interface supported on all platforms. The number argument is the number of the loopback interface that you want to create or configure. There is no limit on the number of loopback interfaces that you can create.

null

Null interface.

port-channel

Port channel interface.

pos

Packet OC-3 interface on the Packet over SONET Interface Processor.

serial

Serial interface.

switch

Switch interface.

tokenring

Token Ring interface.

tunnel

Tunnel interface; a virtual interface. The number argument is the number of the tunnel interface that you want to create or configure. There is no limit on the number of tunnel interfaces that you can create.

vg-anylan

100VG-AnyLAN port adapter.


Examples

The following example configures serial interface 0 with PPP encapsulation:

Router(config)# interface serial 0
Router(config-if)# encapsulation ppp

The following example enables loopback mode and assigns an IP network address and network mask to the interface. The loopback interface established here will always appear to be up.

Router(config)# interface loopback 0
Router(config-if)# ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0

The following example for a Cisco 7500 series router shows the interface command for Ethernet port 4 on the Ethernet Interface Processor (EIP) that is installed in (or recently removed from) slot 2:

Router(config)# interface ethernet 2/4

The following example begins configuration on the Token Ring interface processor in slot 1 on port 0 of a Cisco 7500 series router:

Router(config)# interface tokenring 1/0

The following example shows how a partially meshed Frame Relay network can be configured. In this example, serial subinterface 0.1 is configured as a multipoint subinterface with three Frame Relay permanent virtual connections (PVCs) associated, and serial subinterface 0.2 is configured as a point-to-point subinterface.

Router(config)# interface serial 0
Router(config-if)# encapsulation frame-relay
Router(config-if)# exit
Router(config)# interface serial 0.1 multipoint
Router(config-if)# ip address 192.168.10.1 255.255.255.0
Router(config-if)# frame-relay interface-dlci 42 broadcast
Router(config-if)# frame-relay interface-dlci 53 broadcast
Router(config-if)# exit
Router(config)# interface serial 0.2 point-to-point
Router(config-if)# ip address 192.168.11.1 255.255.0
Router(config-if)# frame-relay interface-dlci 59 broadcast

The following example configures circuit 0 of a T1 link for PPP encapsulation:

Router(config)# controller t1 4/1
Router(config-controller)# circuit 0 1
Router(config-controller)# exit
Router(config)# interface serial 4/1:0
Router(config-if)# ip address 192.168.13.1 255.255.255.0
Router(config-if)# encapsulation ppp

The following example configures LAN Extender interface 0:

Router(config)# interface lex 0

The following example configures an interface for a content engine network module in slot 1:

Router(config)# interface content-engine 1/0

Related Commands

Command
Description

channel-group

Defines the time slots of each T1 or E1 circuit.

clear interface

Resets the hardware logic on an interface.

controller

Configures a T1 or E1 controller and enters controller configuration mode.

mac-address

Sets the MAC layer address of the Cisco Token Ring.

ppp

Starts an asynchronous connection using PPP.

show interfaces

Displays the statistical information specific to a serial interface.

shutdown (RLM)

Shuts down all of the links under the RLM group.

slip

Starts a serial connection to a remote host using SLIP.


service-module content-engine reload

To perform a graceful halt and reboot of a content engine (CE) network module operating system, use the service-module content-engine reload command in privileged EXEC mode.

service-module content-engine slot/unit reload

Syntax Description

slot

Number of the router chassis slot for the network module.

unit

Number of the daughter card on the network module. For CE network modules, always use 0.


Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(11)YT

This command was introduced.

12.2(13)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(13)T.


Usage Guidelines

At the confirmation prompt, press Enter to confirm the action or n to cancel.

Examples

The following example gracefully halts and reboots the CE network module in slot 1:

Router# service-module content-engine 1/0 reload

Do you want to proceed with reload?[confirm]

Related Commands

Command
Description

service-module content-engine reset

Resets the hardware on a CE network module.

service-module content-engine shutdown

Gracefully halts a CE network module.


service-module content-engine reset

To reset the hardware on a content engine (CE) network module, use the service-module content-engine reset command in privileged EXEC mode.

service-module content-engine slot/unit reset

Syntax Description

slot

Number of the router chassis slot for the network module.

unit

Number of the daughter card on the network module. For CE network modules, always use 0.


Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(11)YT

This command was introduced.

12.2(13)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(13)T.


Usage Guidelines

At the confirmation prompt, press Enter to confirm the action or n to cancel.

Examples

The following example resets the hardware on the CE network module in slot 1:

Router# service-module content-engine 1/0 reset

Use reset only to recover from shutdown or failed state

Warning: May lose data on the hard disc!

Do you want to reset?[confirm]

Related Commands

Command
Description

service-module content-engine reload

Performs a graceful halt and reboot of a CE network module operating system.

service-module content-engine shutdown

Gracefully halts a CE network module.


service-module content-engine session

To access a content engine (CE) network module console and begin a configuration session, use the service-module content-engine session command in privileged EXEC mode.

service-module content-engine slot/unit session

Syntax Description

slot

Number of the router chassis slot for the network module.

unit

Number of the daughter card on the network module. For CE network modules, always use 0.


Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(11)YT

This command was introduced.

12.2(13)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(13)T.


Usage Guidelines

Only one session at a time is allowed into the content engine from the internal CE network-module-side interface. This interface provides console access to the CE network module from the router command-line interface (CLI) by initiating a reverse Telnet connection that uses the IP address of the CE interface and the terminal (TTY) line associated with the CE network module. The TTY line number is calculated using the following formula: (n*32)+1, where n is the number of the chassis slot that contains the CE network module.

The CE interface must be up before you can use this command.

Once a session is started, you can perform any CE configuration task. You first access the CE console in a user-level shell. To access the privileged EXEC command shell, where most commands are available, use the enable command. Note that this is a Cisco Application and Content Networking System (ACNS) software command, not a Cisco IOS software command.

CE configuration tasks are described in the documentation for the appropriate version of Cisco ACNS software at the following URL: http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/webscale/uce/

After you finish CE configuration and exit the CE console session, use the service-module content-engine session clear command to clear the session.

Examples

The following example shows a CE session being opened for a CE network module in slot 2:

Router# service-module content-engine 2/0 session


Trying 10.10.10.1, 2129 ... Open

CE-netmodule con now available

Press RETURN to get started!

CE-netmodule> enable
CE-netmodule#

Related Commands

Command
Description

service-module content-engine session clear

Clears an existing CE configuration session on a CE network module.


service-module content-engine session clear

To clear an existing content engine (CE) configuration session on a CE network module, use the service-module content-engine session clear command in privileged EXEC mode.

service-module content-engine slot/unit session clear

Syntax Description

slot

Number of the router chassis slot for the network module.

unit

Number of the daughter card on the network module. For CE network modules, always use 0.


Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(11)YT

This command was introduced.

12.2(13)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(13)T.


Usage Guidelines

Press Enter when asked to confirm this command or n to cancel.

Examples

The following example clears the session that had been used to configure the CE in the network module in slot 1:

Router# service-module content-engine 1/0 session clear

[confirm]
 [OK]

Related Commands

Command
Description

service-module content-engine session

Accesses a CE network module console and begins a configuration session.


service-module content-engine shutdown

To gracefully halt a content engine (CE) network module, use the service-module content-engine shutdown command in privileged EXEC mode.

service-module content-engine slot/unit shutdown

Syntax Description

slot

Number of the router chassis slot for the network module.

unit

Number of the daughter card on the network module. For CE network modules, always use 0.


Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(11)YT

This command was introduced.

12.2(13)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(13)T.


Usage Guidelines

At the confirmation prompt, press Enter to confirm the action or n to cancel.

The service-module content-engine shutdown command brings down the operating system of the specified content engine network module in an orderly fashion to protect the network module's hard drive. When the system has been shut down, the network module can be removed from the router.

Examples

The following example gracefully halts the CE network module in slot 1:

Router# service-module content-engine 1/0 shutdown

Shutdown is used for Online removal of Service Module.
Do you want to proceed with shutdown?[confirm]
Use service module reset command to recover from shutdown.

Related Commands

Command
Description

service-module content-engine reload

Performs a graceful halt and reboot of a CE network module operating system.

service-module content-engine reset

Resets the hardware on a CE network module.


service-module content-engine status

To display configuration information related to the hardware and software on the content engine (CE) side of a CE network module, use the service-module content-engine status command in privileged EXEC mode.

service-module content-engine slot/unit status

Syntax Description

slot

Number of the router chassis slot for the network module.

unit

Number of the daughter card on the network module. For CE network modules, always use 0.


Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(11)YT

This command was introduced.

12.2(13)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(13)T.


Examples

The following example displays information for a CE network module in router slot 1:

Router# service-module content-engine 1/0 status

Service Module is Cisco Content-Engine1/0
Service Module supports session via TTY line 33
Service Module is in Steady state
Getting status from the Service Module, please wait..
Application and Content Networking Software (ACNS)
Copyright (c) 1999-2002 by Cisco Systems, Inc.
Application and Content Networking Software Release 4.2.2 (build b3 May  6 2002)
Version: ce2636-sw-<unknown-version>
Compiled 18:03:40 May  6 2002 by smith
Compile Time Options: PP

System was restarted on Mon Jan  7 20:30:37 1980.
The system has been up for 8 minutes, 30 seconds.

Core CPU is GenuineIntel Pentium III (Coppermine) (rev 8) running at 498MHz.
246 Mbytes of Physical memory.
2 FastEthernet interfaces
1 Console interface

List of disk drives:
disk00: Normal          (h00 c00 i00 l00)    19075MB( 18.6GB)

service-module external ip address

To define the IP address for the external LAN interface on a content engine (CE) network module, use the service-module external ip address command in content-engine interface configuration mode. To delete the IP address associated with this interface, use the no form of this command.

service-module external ip address external-ipaddr subnet-mask

no service-module external ip address

Syntax Description

external-ipaddr

IP address of the external LAN interface on a CE network module.

subnet-mask

Subnet mask to append to the IP address.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

Content-engine interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(11)YT

This command was introduced.

12.2(13)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(13)T.


Examples

The following example defines an IP address for the external LAN interface on the CE network module in slot 1:

Router(config)# interface content-engine 1/0
Router(config-if)# service-module external ip address 172.18.12.28 255.255.255.0
Router(config-if)# exit

service-module ip address

To define the IP address for the internal network-module-side interface on a content engine (CE) network module, use the service-module ip address command in content-engine interface configuration mode. To delete the IP address associated with this interface, use the no form of this command.

service-module ip address ce-side-ipaddr subnet-mask

no service-module ip address

Syntax Description

ce-side-ipaddr

IP address of the internal CE network-module-side interface on a CE network module.

subnet-mask

Subnet mask to append to the IP address.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

Content-engine interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(11)YT

This command was introduced.

12.2(13)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(13)T.


Examples

The following example defines an IP address for the internal CE network-module-side interface on the CE network module in slot 1:

Router(config)# interface content-engine 1/0
Router(config-if)# service-module ip address 172.18.12.26 255.255.255.0
Router(config-if)# exit

service-module ip default-gateway

To define a default gateway (router) for a content engine (CE) network module, use the service-module ip default-gateway command in content-engine interface configuration mode. To remove the default gateway from the CE configuration, use the no form of this command.

service-module ip default-gateway gw-ipaddr

no service-module ip default-gateway

Syntax Description

gw-ipaddr

IP address of the default gateway.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

Content-engine interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(11)YT

This command was introduced.

12.2(13)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(13)T.


Examples

The following example configures a default gateway for the CE network module in slot 1:

Router(config)# interface content-engine 1/0
Router(config-if)# service-module ip default-gateway 172.18.12.1
Router(config-if)# exit

show controllers content-engine

To display controller information for content engine (CE) network modules, use the show controllers content-engine command in privileged EXEC mode.

show controllers content-engine slot/unit

Syntax Description

slot

Number of the router chassis slot for the network module.

unit

Number of the daughter card on the network module. For CE network modules, always use 0.


Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(11)YT

This command was introduced.

12.2(13)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(13)T.


Examples

The following example displays controller information for the CE network module in router slot 1:

Router# show controllers content-engine 1/0

Interface Content-Engine1/0
Hardware is Intel 82559 FastEthernet
IDB: 82A92DC4, FASTSEND: 8021B488, MCI_INDEX: 0

INSTANCE=0x82A94534
  Rx Ring entries = 64
  Rx Shadow = 0x82A947A0
  Rx Ring = 0x 3CB5160
  Rx Ring Head = 14
  Rx Ring Last = 13
  Rx Buffer Descr = 0x 3CB55A0
  Rx Buffer Descr Head = 14
  Rx Buffer Descr Last = 13
  Rx Shadow (malloc) = 0x82A947A0
  Rx Ring (malloc) = 0x 3CB5160
  Rx Buffer Descr (malloc) = 0x 3CB55A0
  Tx Ring entries = 128
  Tx Shadow = 0x82A948D0
  Tx Shadow Head = 79
  Tx Shadow Tail = 79
  Tx Shadow Free = 128
  Tx Ring = 0x 3CB59E0
  Tx Head = 81
  Tx Last = 80
  Tx Tail = 81
  Tx Count = 0
  Tx Buffer Descr = 0x 3CB6A20
  Tx Buffer Descr Head = 0
  Tx Buffer Descr Tail = 0
  Tx Shadow (malloc) = 0x82A948D0
  Tx Ring (malloc) = 0x 3CB59E0
  Tx Buffer Descr (malloc) = 0x 3CB6A20

CONTROL AND STATUS REGISTERS (CSR)=0x40800000
  SCB Intr  Mask   = 00
  SCB CU/RU Cmd    = 00
  SCB Intr  Status = 00
  SCB CU/RU Status = 50
  SCB General Ptr  = 00000000
  PORT             = 00000000
  EEPROM           = 0008
  FLASH            = 0002
  MDI              = 1821782D
  Rx Byte Count    = 00000608
  PMDR             = 80
  FC Cmd           = 00
  FC Threshold     = 03
  Early Rx         = 00
  General Status   = 05
  General Control  = 00

PHY REGISTERS
  Register 0x00:   1000  782D  02A8  0154  0441  45E1  0001  0000
  Register 0x08:   0000  0000  0000  0000  0000  0000  0000  0000
  Register 0x10:   0401  0000  0001  0000  0000  0000  0000  0000
  Register 0x18:   0000  0000  8000  0000  0000  0000  0000  0000

HARDWARE STATISTICS
  Rx good frames:         14
  Rx CRC:                 0
  Rx alignment:           0
  Rx resource:            0
  Rx overrun:             0
  Rx collision detects:   0
  Rx short:               0
  Tx good frames:         79
  Tx maximum collisions:  0
  Tx late collisions:     0
  Tx underruns:           0
  Tx lost carrier sense:  0
  Tx deferred:            0
  Tx single collisions:   0
  Tx multiple collisions: 0
  Tx total collisions:    0
  FC Tx pause:            0
  FC Rx pause:            0
  FC Rx unsupported:      0

  Receive All Multicasts = enabled
  Receive Promiscuous = disabled
  Loopback Mode = disabled

Table 4 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 4 show controllers content-engine Field Descriptions  

Field
Description

Hardware

Description of the chip being used.

IDB, FASTSEND

Address in router memory of the Interface Descriptor Block (IDB) and the fastsend routine.

INSTANCE

Device-specific data stored in router memory that lists the memory locations and current indices of receive (Rx) and transmit (Tx) rings in router I/O memory.

CONTROL AND STATUS REGISTERS (CSR)

Control and status registers that are physically located on the chip itself and that are accessed by the CPU over the PCI bus.

PHY REGISTERS

Contents of the PHY registers. PHY is a device that interfaces the physical Ethernet line and that is located between the chip and the physical line.

HARDWARE STATISTICS

Receive (Rx) and transmit (Tx) traffic statistics collected by the chip.


show interfaces content-engine

To display basic interface configuration information for a content engine (CE) network module, use the show interfaces content-engine command in privileged EXEC mode.

show interfaces content-engine slot/unit

Syntax Description

slot

Number of the router chassis slot for the network module.

unit

Number of the daughter card on the network module. For CE network modules, always use 0.


Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(11)YT

This command was introduced.

12.2(13)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(13)T.


Usage Guidelines

The output for this command contains the basic configuration for the interface, as well as the number of packets transmitted, output rate, and so forth.

Examples

The following example displays interface status and data for the CE network module in slot 1 for all Cisco 2600 series routers except the Cisco 2691. Note that the bandwidth is 10 Mbps.

Router# show interfaces content-engine 1/0

Content-Engine1/0 is up, line protocol is up 
  Hardware is I82559FE, address is 0006.280e.10b0 (bia 0006.280e.10b0)
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 10000 Kbit, DLY 1000 usec, 
     reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
  Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set
  Keepalive set (10 sec)
  ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
  Last input 00:00:50, output 00:00:04, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
  Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
  Queueing strategy: fifo
  Output queue :0/40 (size/max)
  5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
     13 packets input, 5835 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 13 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored
     0 input packets with dribble condition detected
     71 packets output, 6285 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets
     0 babbles, 0 late collision, 0 deferred
     0 lost carrier, 0 no carrier
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out

The following example displays interface status and data for a CE network module in slot 3 of a Cisco 2691. This example shows the 100 Mbps bandwidth of the Cisco 2691 and all the other supported routers except the remainder of the Cisco 2600 series.

Router# show interfaces content-engine 3/0

Content-Engine3/0 is up, line protocol is up 
  Hardware is I82559FE, address is 0004.9a0b.4b30 (bia 0004.9a0b.4b30)
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 100000 Kbit, DLY 100 usec, 
     reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
  Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set
  Keepalive set (10 sec)
  ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
  Last input 00:00:41, output 00:00:04, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
  Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
  Queueing strategy: fifo
  Output queue :0/40 (size/max)
  5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
     14 packets input, 6176 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 14 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored
     0 input packets with dribble condition detected
     109 packets output, 16881 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 collisions, 1 interface resets
     0 babbles, 0 late collision, 0 deferred
     0 lost carrier, 0 no carrier
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out

Table 5 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 5 show interfaces content-engine Field Descriptions  

Field
Description

Content-Engine

Indicates whether the CE interface hardware is currently active. If the CE interface hardware is operational, the output states that "Content-Engine 1/0 is up." If it has been taken down by an administrator, the output states that "Content-Engine1/0 is administratively down."

line protocol

Indicates whether the software processes that handle the line protocol consider the line usable or whether the line has been taken down by an administrator.

Hardware...address

Hardware type and address.

MTU

Maximum transmission unit (MTU) of the content engine interface.

BW

Bandwidth of the interface, in kilobits per second.

DLY

Delay of the interface, in microseconds.

reliability

Reliability of the interface as a fraction of 255 (255/255 is 100 percent reliability), calculated as an exponential average over 5 minutes.

txload

Transmit load on the interface as a fraction of 255 (255/255 is completely saturated), calculated as an exponential average over 5 minutes.

rxload

Receive load on the interface as a fraction of 255 (255/255 is completely saturated), calculated as an exponential average over 5 minutes.

Encapsulation

Encapsulation method assigned to the interface.

loopback

Indicates whether loopback is set or not.

Keepalive

Indicates whether keepalives are set or not and the interval between keepalives if they have been set.

ARP type...Timeout

Type of Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) assigned and length of timeout.

Last input

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds since the last packet was successfully received by the interface and processed locally on the router. This field is useful for detecting when a dead interface failed.

Note This field is not updated by fast-switched traffic.

output

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds since the last packet was successfully transmitted by the interface. This field is useful for detecting when a dead interface failed.

output hang

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds (or never) since the interface was last reset because a transmission took too long. When the number of hours in any of the "last" fields exceeds 24 hours, the number of days and hours is printed. If that field overflows, asterisks are printed.

Last clearing

Time at which the counters that measure cumulative statistics (such as number of bytes transmitted and received) shown in this report were last reset to zero. Note that variables that might affect routing (for example, load and reliability) are not cleared when the counters are cleared.

Asterisks (***) indicate that the elapsed time is too large to be displayed.

A time of all zeroes (0:00:00) indicates that the counters were cleared more than 231 ms (and less than 232 ms) ago.

Input queue

Number of packets in the input queue. Each number is followed by a slash, the maximum size of the queue, and the number of packets dropped because of a full queue.

Total output drops

Number of packets in the output queue that have been dropped because of a full queue.

Queueing strategy

Queueing strategy applied to the interface, which is configurable under the interface. The default is FIFO (first-in, first-out).

Output queue

Number of packets in the output queue. Each number is followed by a slash, the maximum size of the queue, and the number of packets dropped due to a full queue.

5 minute input rate, 5 minute output rate

Average number of bits and packets transmitted per second in the last 5 minutes. If the interface is not in promiscuous mode, it senses network traffic that it sends and receives (rather than all network traffic).

The 5-minute input and output rates should be used only as an approximation of traffic per second during a given 5-minute period. These rates are exponentially weighted averages with a time constant of 5 minutes. A period of four time constants must pass before the average will be within 2 percent of the instantaneous rate of a uniform stream of traffic over that period.

Note The 5-minute period referenced in this output is a load interval that is configurable under the interface. The default value is 5 minutes.

packets input

Total number of error-free packets received by the system.

bytes

Total number of bytes, including data and MAC encapsulation, in the error-free packets received by the system.

no buffer

Number of received packets discarded because there was no buffer space in the main system. Compare with ignored count. Broadcast storms on Ethernets and bursts of noise on serial lines are often responsible for no input buffer events.

Received...broadcasts

Number of broadcasts received.

runts

Number of packets that are discarded because they are smaller than the minimum packet size of the medium. For instance, any Ethernet packet that is less than 64 bytes is considered a runt.

giants

Number of packets that are discarded because they exceed the maximum packet size of the medium. For example, any Ethernet packet that is greater than 1518 bytes is considered a giant.

throttles

Number of times that the interface requested another interface within the router to slow down.

input errors

Errors that include runts, giants, no buffer, cyclic redundancy checksum (CRC), frame, overrun, and ignored counts. Other input-related errors can also cause the input errors count to be increased, and some datagrams may have more than one error; therefore, this sum may not balance with the sum of enumerated input error counts.

CRC

Errors created when the CRC generated by the originating LAN station or far-end device does not match the checksum calculated from the data received. On a LAN, this usually indicates noise or transmission problems on the LAN interface or the LAN bus itself. A high number of CRCs is usually the result of collisions or a station that is transmitting bad data.

frame

Number of packets received incorrectly that have a CRC error and a noninteger number of octets. On a LAN, this is usually the result of collisions or a malfunctioning Ethernet device.

overrun

Number of times that the receiver hardware was unable to hand received data to a hardware buffer because the input rate exceeded the receiver's ability to handle the data.

ignored

Number of received packets that were ignored by the interface because the interface hardware ran low on internal buffers. These buffers are different from system buffer space described. Broadcast storms and bursts of noise can cause the ignored count to increase.

input packets with dribble condition detected

Number of packets with dribble condition. Dribble bit error indicates that a frame is slightly too long. This frame error counter is incremented just for informational purposes; the router accepts the frame.

packets output

Total number of messages that have been transmitted by the system.

bytes

Total number of bytes, including data and MAC encapsulation, that have been transmitted by the system.

underruns

Number of times that the transmitter has run faster than the router could handle. This may never be reported on some interfaces.

output errors

Sum of all errors that prevented the final transmission of datagrams out of the content engine that is being examined. Note that this may not balance with the sum of the enumerated output errors, because some datagrams may have more than one error, and others may have errors that do not fall into any of the specifically tabulated categories.

collisions

Number of messages that have been retransmitted because of an Ethernet collision. This is usually the result of an overextended LAN (Ethernet or transceiver cable too long, more than two repeaters between stations, or too many cascaded multiport transceivers). A packet that collides is counted only once in output packets.

interface resets

Number of times an interface has been completely reset. This can happen if packets that were queued for transmission were not sent within several seconds. On a serial line, this can be caused by a malfunctioning modem that is not supplying the transmit clock signal or by a cable problem. If the system notices that the carrier detect line of a serial interface is up, but the line protocol is down, it periodically resets the interface in an effort to restart it. Interface resets can also occur when an interface is looped back or shut down.

babbles

Count of frames greater than 1518 bytes that have been transmitted, indicating that the transmitter has been on the interface longer than the time necessary to transmit the largest frame.

late collision

Number of late collisions. A collision becomes a late collision when it occurs after the preamble has been transmitted.

deferred

Deferred indicates that the chip, while ready to transmit a frame, had to defer because the carrier was asserted.

lost carrier

Number of times that the carrier was lost during transmission.

no carrier

Number of times that the carrier was not present during the transmission.

output buffer failures, output buffers swapped out

Number of failed buffers and number of buffers swapped out.


Glossary

ACNS—Cisco Application and Content Networking System. ACNS is a software platform that unifies the Cisco cache software and Cisco enterprise content delivery network (E-CDN) software into a single software platform. ACNS software allows you to access caching application features and E-CDN application features from a single software base. ACNS software is supported on content engines, content distribution managers, and content routers.

CDM—Cisco Content Distribution Manager. Management program that provides a browser-based user interface to configure and monitor content engines and content routers and to control and manage content switching, content distribution and delivery, and content services.

CDN—content delivery network. Content delivery networks help accelerate the delivery of advanced content by deploying five key components: content switching, content routing, content edge nodes, content distribution and management, and intelligent network services. Content edge nodes are content engines that are typically placed in the branch office, like the CE network module.

CE—content engine. Edge appliance for delivering live or on-demand streaming media and other rich file formats to the desktop.

E-CDN—enterprise content delivery network. Enterprise CDNs (also known as intranet CDNs) apply caching and multicasting technology in a corporate LAN/WAN environment to distribute video and other content-rich files in ways that help minimize WAN bottlenecks, while taking advantage of the relatively abundant bandwidth of the LANs close to users.

WCCP—Web Cache Communication Protocol. Developed by Cisco Systems, WCCP specifies interactions between one or more routers (or Layer 3 switches) and one or more web caches. The purpose of the interaction is to establish and maintain the transparent redirection of selected types of traffic flowing through a group of routers. The selected traffic is redirected to a group of web caches with the aim of optimizing resource usage and lowering response times.