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Frequently Asked Questions

A:  If you are a U.S. person (U.S. citizen or green card holder), you are eligible for ITAR access. However, you must be working on an ITAR project or be able to show a need for access. A list of people who have been granted access to ITAR controlled material is available through the Grouper tool. If you need to request access to ITAR, fill out the form for controlled technology access.

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A:  Generally, no. Cisco commercial business units don't have segregated systems to keep ITAR-controlled information from foreign person access. Only U.S. persons are allowed to work on ITAR projects unless Cisco has obtained the proper export license authorization for a foreign person to work on the project. Business units other than the Cisco Global Government Solutions Group should work closely with Global Export Trade to establish guidelines under which ITAR-controlled programs or projects can be accomplished. The Global Government Solutions Group has separate systems enabling engineering document control, a separate e-mail system, and other applications that are separate from the corporate network. For more information, contact Global Export Trade.

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A:  No. Only U.S. citizens and green card holders are considered U.S. persons. The H-1B visa allows the foreign person to work in the United States for the period of time authorized on the visa, but does not affect export control status. For an H-1B visa holder to work with ITAR technology, a license is required. For more information, contact Global Export Trade.

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A:  Yes. All satellites, even commercial ones, are controlled under the ITAR. Anytime Cisco is dealing with satellites, there is a potential ITAR issue. For more information, contact Global Export Trade.

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A:  The ITAR controls more than just hardware. Cisco supports many types of customers, including military customers that deal with command and control, military radios, and military-grade encryption systems that use Cisco products and technology. Cisco's biggest concern is defense services that are controlled under the ITAR. For more information on what constitutes a defense service, view the VoD on defense services.

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A:  High-level, basic marketing information; general system descriptions; and anything that has been released in the public domain is not ITAR-controlled, even if it relates to an ITAR-controlled program or project. For more information, visit U.S. Export Controls and the ITAR or contact Global Export Trade.

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A:  Contact Global Export Trade. There are potential ITAR issues with integrating commercial products into defense items; license or approvals may be required.

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A:  Yes, if you are only discussing Cisco commercial products. You should not discuss specific military scenarios, deployment strategies, detailed designs, or modification/optimization of military end systems. You can receive information from foreign entities without a Technical Assistance Agreement (TAA) in place so that you can understand your customers' needs. Any further discussions should be coordinated with Global Export Trade.

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A:  Yes. You need to follow the marking and handling procedure and to make sure that the person you are communicating with or sending the information to a U.S. person. Even though the company is within the United States, it is Cisco's responsibility to inform the customer of the type of information they are receiving so there is no unauthorized re-transfer of information.

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A:  Cisco is registered with the U.S. Department of State and compliant with the ITAR. However, because Cisco is a commercial company, special policies and procedures need to be followed when handling ITAR information. Contact Global Export Trade for more information.

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