The Internet Protocol Journal, Volume 13, No.4

Fragments

Bjoern A. Zeeb Receives Second Itojun Service Award

The second Itojun Service Award was presented at the 79th meeting of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) in Beijing, China. Bjoern A. Zeeb received the award for his dedicated work to make significant improvements in open source implementations of IPv6.

Photo: Matsuzaki Yoshinobu

First awarded last year, the Itojun Service Award honours the memory of Dr. Jun-ichiro "Itojun" Hagino, who passed away in 2007, aged just 37. The award, established by the friends of Itojun and administered by the Internet Society (ISOC), recognises and commemorates the extraordinary dedication exercised by itojun over the course of IPv6 development.

"For many years, Bjoern has been a committed champion of, and contributor to, implementing IPv6 in open source operating systems used in servers, desktops, and embedded computer platforms, including those used by some of the busiest websites in the world," said Jun Murai of the Itojun Service Award Committee and Founder of the WIDE Project. "On behalf of the Itojun Service Award Committee, I am extremely pleased to present this award to Bjoern for his outstanding work in support of IPv6 development and deployment."

The Itojun Service Award is focused on pragmatic contributions to developing and deploying IPv6 in the spirit of serving the Internet. The award, expected to be presented annually, includes a presentation crystal, a US$3,000 honorarium, and a travel grant.

"This is a great honour, and I would like to thank the people who recommended me for the award and the committee for believing my work was valuable. I never met Itojun but he was one of the people helping me, and I have the highest respect for his massive foundational work," said Bjoern A. Zeeb. "As the Internet community works to roll out IPv6 to more and more people all around the globe, we also need to help others—developers, businesses, and users—understand and use the new Internet protocols so that the vision Itojun was working so hard for comes true."

Each Internet-connected device uses an IP address and, with the number of Internet-connected devices growing rapidly, the supply of unallocated IPv4 addresses is expected to be exhausted within the next year. To help ensure the continued rapid growth of the Internet, IPv6 provides a huge increase in the number of available addresses. And, while the technical foundations of IPv6 are well established, significant work remains to expand the deployment and use of IPv6.

For more information about the Itojun Service Award see: http://www.isoc.org/itojun/

Remaining IPv4 Address Space Drops Below 5 percent

The Number Resource Organization (NRO) recently announced that less than five percent of the world's IPv4 addresses remain unallocated. APNIC, the Regional Internet Registry for the Asia Pacific region, has been assigned two blocks of IPv4 addresses by the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA). This latest allocation means that the IPv4 free pool dipped below 10% in January 2010. Since then, over 200 million IPv4 addresses have been allocated from IANA to the Regional Internet Registries (RIRs).

"This is a major milestone in the life of the Internet, and means that allocation of the last blocks of IPv4 to the RIRs is imminent," stated Axel Pawlik, Chairman of the NRO, the official representative of the five RIRs. "It is critical that all Internet stakeholders take definitive action now to ensure the timely adoption of IPv6."

IPv6 is the "next generation" of the Internet Protocol, providing a hugely expanded address space, which will allow the Internet to grow into the future. In 2010, the five RIRs are expected to allocate over 2,000 IPv6 address blocks, representing an increase of over 70% on the number of IPv6 allocations in 2009. In contrast, the number of IPv4 allocations is expected to grow by only 8% in 2010. These statistics indicate an absence of any last minute "rush" on IPv4 addresses, and a strong momentum behind the adoption of IPv6.

"The allocation of Internet number resources by the five RIRs enables every region in the world to benefit from fair and equitable distribution of IPv4 and IPv6 addresses. We are also actively collaborating with stakeholders at the local, regional, and global level to offer training and advice to public and private sector organisations on IPv6 adoption to ensure that everyone is prepared for IPv4 depletion and IPv6 deployment," added Pawlik.

The IANA assigns IPv4 addresses to the RIRs in blocks that equate to 1/256th of the entire IPv4 address space (each block is referred to as a "/8" or "slash-8"). The most recent assignment means that there are now only 12 of these blocks available, which is less than five percent of the entire IPv4 address pool.

The final five blocks of IPv4 addresses will be distributed simultaneously to the five RIRs, leaving only seven blocks to be handed out under the normal distribution method.

According to current depletion rates, the last five IPv4 address blocks will be allocated to the RIRs in early 2011. The pressure to adopt IPv6 is mounting. Many worry that without adequate preparation and action, there will be a chaotic scramble for IPv6, which could increase Internet costs and threaten the stability and security of the global network.

The NRO exists to protect the pool of unallocated Internet numbers (IP addresses and AS numbers) and serves as a coordinating mech-anism for the five RIRs to act collectively on matters relating to the interests of RIRs. For further information, visit http://www.nro.net

The RIRs are independent, not-for-profit membership organizations that support the infrastructure of the Internet through technical coordination. There are five RIRs in the world today. Currently, the IANA allocates blocks of IP addresses and ASNs, known collectively as Internet Number Resources, to the RIRs, who then distribute them to their members within their own specific service regions. RIR members include Internet Service Providers (ISPs), telecommunications organizations, large corporations, governments, academic institutions, and industry stakeholders, including end users.

The RIR model of open, transparent participation has proven successful at responding to the rapidly changing Internet environment. Each RIR holds one to two open meetings per year, as well as facilitating online discussion by the community, to allow the open exchange of ideas from the technical community, the business sector, civil society, and government regulators. Each RIR performs a range of critical functions including: The reliable and stable allocation of Internet number resources (IPv4, IPv6 and Autonymous System Number resources); The responsible storage and maintenance of this registration data; The provision of an open, publicly accessible database where this data can be accessed. RIRs also provide a range of technical and coordination services for the Internet community. The five RIRs are:

AfriNIC: http://www.afrinic.net
APNIC: http://www.apnic.net
ARIN: http://www.arin.net
LACNIC: http://www.lacnic.net
RIPE NCC: http://www.ripe.net

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