The Internet Protocol Journal, Volume 12, No.2

Fragments

RIPE Announces IPv6 Website

The RIPE NCC recently announced the launch of the IPv6 Act Now! website. Available at www.IPv6ActNow.org, the website explains IPv6 in terms that everyone can understand and provides a variety of useful information aimed at promoting the global adoption of IPv6. The site is designed for anyone with an interest in IPv6, including network engineers, company directors, law enforcement agencies, government representatives and civil society. The content is regularly updated and includes:

  • Education, advice and opinions from the experts
  • Latest IPv6-related news stories
  • Videos and articles from Internet community leaders
  • Current IPv4 exhaustion and IPv6 uptake statistics
  • The RIPE community's statement on IPv6 deployment
  • Information on community-developed IPv6 distribution policies
  • Useful links to other sources of information about IPv6
  • A forum for everyone to share experiences, ask questions and find answers

The site also includes contributions from other Regional Internet Registries (RIRs) and industry partners. If you have and comments or suggestions about the website, please contact: ipv6actnow@ripe.net

Four-byte AS numbers from APNIC

From July 1, 2009, the Asia Pacific Network Information Centre (APNIC) will assign four-byte Autonomous System (AS) numbers by default when receiving requests. Two-byte AS numbers will only be assigned if the applicant can demonstrate that a four-byte only AS number is unsuitable. This change marks the next phase of the transition to four-byte AS numbers. The final phase begins in January 2010, when APNIC will cease to make any distinction between two-byte and four-byte AS numbers, and will operate AS number assignments from an undifferentiated four-byte AS number pool. For more information please see: http://icons.apnic.net/asn

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