The Internet Protocol Journal - Volume 3, No. 3

From The Editor

From The Editor

In our last issue, Geoff Huston described the basic design and operation of the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP). He outlined how numerous enhancements to TCP implementations have been developed over time to improve its performance, particularly in the face of congested networks. The Internet is a rapidly changing environment in which both the applications and the underlying transmission systems are undergoing an evolution, if not a revolution. Some of these changes, such as the introduction of wireless devices, affect the way TCP works, because the protocol makes many implicit assumptions about the network over which it operates. In this issue, Geoff looks at the future for TCP and describes techniques for adopting TCP to today's Internet.

Security continues to be a major concern for everyone involved in the design and operation of networks. Widely publicized "hacker attacks," "denial-of-service attacks," and outright online fraud has brought the topic into sharp focus in the last few years. Because security was not part of the original design of the Internet, numerous solutions at every level of the protocol stack have been proposed and implemented over the last three decades. Today's network manager is, therefore, faced with a system of security components that must be carefully configured and monitored in order to provide sufficient cient security without preventing users from getting their work done. In our second article, Chris Lonvick explores a model for evaluating and securing a network.

The online subscription system for this journal is now up and running at www.cisco.com/ipj In addition to offering a subscription form, the system allows you to select delivery options, update your mailing and e-mail address, and much more. Please visit our Web site and give it a try. If you encounter any difficulties, please send your comments to ipj@cisco.com .

- Ole J. Jacobsen, Editor and Publisher ole@cisco.com .