What’s Hot in the Content Program

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Big Data and Analytics

Enormous amounts of data are generated every day as a result of mobile devices, social networking, interconnected systems, cloud computing and the "Internet of Things". Data generation, consumption and analytics have provided competitive business advantages for information-centric businesses that offer services to customers and services differentiation through correlation of adjacent data. With the rise of business intelligence data mining and analytics spanning market research, behavioural modelling, and inference-based decision, data can be used to provide a competitive advantage.

This rapid change has prompted changes in the fundamental models that describe the way that Big Data is stored, analysed, and accessed. The new models are based on a scaled-out, shared-nothing architecture, bringing new challenges to enterprises to decide what technologies to use, where to use them, and how. The traditional model is now being expanded to incorporate new building blocks that address the challenges of big data with new information processing frameworks purpose-built to meet big data's requirements. However, these purpose-built systems also must meet the inherent requirement for integration into current business models, data strategies, and network infrastructures.

For the full agenda, including detailed session descriptions, visit our online interactive Session Library.

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Cloud

Cloud has dramatically changed the landscape of IT. The integration of virtualised computing, networking and storage with easy on-demand capacity allocation in large-scale environments embracing multiple tenants is turning IT into a utility. The concerns of IT managers are moving away from specifying, buying and standing up infrastructure to focus on service levels, security, compliance and performance.

There are many kinds of clouds - private, public, and hybrid. Cloud now blurs the boundaries of the corporation to achieve elasticity, agility and cost efficiency. The cloud service provider may be internal to an enterprise, fully external, or often a combination of both. Cisco offers a portfolio of cloud services and solutions for Enterprises and Service Providers that uniquely bring together the intelligence of the network, the power of the data centre, and the flexibility of applications. Delivering the world of many clouds.

For the full agenda, including detailed session descriptions, visit our online interactive Session Library.

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Internet of Things and Internet of Everything

In the last twenty years, two billion people connected to the Internet. The rate is still accelerating but sometime around 2009, the number of autonomous devices connected to the Internet surpassed the number of people. At that point we began to experience the "Internet of Things".

There will be about 15 billion devices connected by 2015, and around 40 billion by 2020. But despite all these connections, we estimate that more than 99% of all physical objects that may one day join the network are currently still unconnected. We are rapidly beginning to experience what we call the "Internet of Everything" - the intelligent connection of people, process, data, and things on the network.

With each new person, process, piece of data, or thing that comes online, the connection possibilities between all these elements grow exponentially. An important enabler of the Internet of Everything is the network intelligence that fuels the manageability, controllability and scalability required to support this incredible growth in connections. The proliferation of mobile networking, the evolution of the cloud and the development of IPv6 also play critical roles. The rise of Big Data allows tremendous value to be extracted from information in motion. However there are very real risks and challenges, for example maintaining security and protecting privacy in a hyper-connected world.

As people and context-aware machines gain access to more actionable information, the result will be new capabilities, richer experiences, and unprecedented value for individuals, businesses, communities and countries everywhere.

For the full agenda, including detailed session descriptions, visit our online interactive Session Library.

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IPv6

Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is becoming critical for business continuity and continued growth. We are seeing an exponential growth of people, devices and "things" connected to the Internet and IP version 4 (IPv4) addresses have effectively run out. Enterprises and Service Providers that have not planned for a transition to IPv6 are already late and may miss out on business growth opportunities.

At this year's Cisco Live event, there will be a number of IPv6 sessions for both Enterprise and Service Provider customers across the different technology streams to help with understanding and transitioning to IPv6. The objective of the sessions is to help understand the benefits and impacts of IPv6 on topics like Security, Network Infrastructure and the Data Centre. Topics to assist with planning and migration to IPv6 are also included.

For the full agenda, including detailed session descriptions, visit our online interactive Session Library.

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Large Scale and Multi-Tenant

From a technology perspective, there is a shrinking distinction between the requirements of the Enterprise and Service Provider markets. Enterprises are often deploying infrastructure capable of delivering multi-tenant services to multiple departments, organisations or business units with large scale, utilisation monitoring, prioritisation and chargeback capabilities. Conversely, to take advantage of changing consumption models, Service Providers are rapidly moving into Cloud, Unified Communications and managed infrastructure as services.

In addition to the dedicated Service Provider track, Large Scale and Multi-Tenant content is incorporated throughout the Technical Education program and within relevant Breakout Sessions. Content is included across Data Centre, Collaboration, Security and Mobility tracks.

For the full agenda, including detailed session descriptions, visit our online interactive Session Library.

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Orchestration and Management

The ability to efficiently manage and operate IT infrastructure assets is critical to effective service delivery. Relying on people to remember the intricacies of procedures, stay alert 24/7 and react appropriately in real time to adverse events is expensive and prone to errors. Sound orchestration and management processes and the use of products such as the Cisco Prime suite help IT organisations simplify asset management, improve operations efficiency and deliver predictable services.

Orchestration and Management content is incorporated throughout the Technical Education program and within relevant Breakout Sessions. The content is included to help you more effectively manage your networks and the services they deliver. Technical areas covered are Data Centre Orchestration, Unified Communications management, Wireless LAN management and optimisation, network performance measurement including Netflow and NBAR, device instrumentation such as Embedded Event Manager and Cisco Prime LMS.

For the full agenda, including detailed session descriptions, visit our online interactive Session Library.

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Personal and Bring Your Own Device (BYOD)

It's not so long ago that the IT assets used at work were relatively powerful and expensive, and those used at home were cheap and cheerful. With the advent of smart phones, tablets, laptops and mobile broadband, that trend has reversed. Workers are finding that they often carry technology in their pockets and handbags, that is more powerful, flexible, useful and user-friendly than the computers on their desks. In times of increasing mobility, these devices support the modern paradigm that work is an activity, not a place.

The days of IT departments specifying, owning and "locking down" the assets that their users have access to are slipping away. There is growing pressure from information-oriented workers to do their work on their own devices from wherever they are. Dubbed Bring Your Own Device (BYOD), this trend by employees, contractors, visitors and customers to work from several mobile devices, often simultaneously, has multiplied the challenges of connectivity, security, compliance, compatibility and productivity that IT managers were already grappling with.

For the full agenda, including detailed session descriptions, visit our online interactive Session Library.

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Software Defined Networking (SDN) and Cisco Open Network Environment (Cisco ONE)

Software Defined Networking (SDN) is a new approach to networking, complementing traditional network architectures. SDN aims to give the network operator granular programmatic control over network hardware in order to rapidly react to changes in policy, environment, costs, network conditions and other parameters. Instead of using set-and-forget configuration files and CLI access, SDN offers the vision of real-time control of the behavior of the parts or all of network by centralised software.

There are a number of approaches to SDN which aim for the normalisation of network configuration and control through open programmatic interfaces to individual network devices as well as to the whole network. SDN incorporates concepts for network and network topology virtualisation, and enables customised control planes through Controllers and Agents, and Application Programming Interfaces (APIs).

Cisco Open Network Environment (Cisco ONE) is a comprehensive solution to help networks become more open, programmable, and application-aware. Cisco ONE creates a dynamic feedback loop that gathers network intelligence and programs individual network layers to optimise user experiences.

For the full agenda, including detailed session descriptions, visit our online interactive Session Library.

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Video

According to the 2013 Cisco Visual Networking Index (VNI), within the next 3 years, over half of the Internet's traffic will be real-time video. Whether it is IPTV, TelePresence, mobile video, desktop conferencing or streaming video-on-demand, over two years of video content will transverse the world's networks every second. Video is inevitably growing exponentially in corporate and public networks, and network managers need to prepare.

Video is particularly demanding on network performance. Bandwidth, jitter, latency and other parameters affect the user experience and need careful consideration by network designers. Conversely, video origination and distribution equipment vendors and codec designers are innovating with adaptive technologies that better handle adverse conditions. Learn about some of the technologies, techniques and tricks to ensuring that your user experience is optimal while avoiding performance issues for other users or runaway costs in your network. Learn how video systems work and plan for your own move into video-enabled collaboration, communication and entertainment.

For the full agenda, including detailed session descriptions, visit our online interactive Session Library.

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