Guest

Cisco Subscriber Registration Center Device Provisioning Registrar

Cisco Subscriber Registration Center

 

Table Of Contents

Data Sheet

Overview

Product Features

Customizable, Automated Protocol Servers

Intelligent Device Management

Business Process Integration

Voice Support

DVB/DAVIC Support

Key Benefits

Security

Reliability

Scalability and Performance

Ease of Integration

Standards support

System Requirements

Cisco Service and Support


Data Sheet


Cisco Subscriber Registration
Center Device Provisioning
Registrar 2.0

Overview

The Cisco Subscriber Registration Center (SRC) Device Provisioning Registrar (DPR) 2.0 makes it easier than ever for service providers to deploy high-speed data and voice-over-IP (VoIP) services over Data-over-Cable Service Interface Specification (DOCSIS) cable modems, Digital Video Broadcasting/Digital Audio and Visual Council (DVB/DAVIC) digital set-top-boxes (DSTBs), and fixed wireless devices. Cisco SRC DPR builds intelligence on top of the Cisco Network RegistrarTM protocol servers to allow service providers to automate the subscriber- provisioning process. Performance, scalability, and reliability were the design requirements behind this second-generation Cisco SRC product. In addition, Cisco SRC DPR includes a Java-based provisioning application programming interface (API), ensuring quick and seamless integration with customers' existing and next-generation operations support systems (OSSs).

Cisco SRC DPR is the first lightweight version of Cisco SRC designed for the streamlined provisioning of subscribers supporting both self-provisioning and preprovisioning workflows. Building on Cisco Network Registrar to customize and automate the provisioning of cable modems, Cisco SRC DPR provides genuinely intelligent device management. This can greatly reduce or even eliminate costly truck-rolls—and set the stage for a retail-driven market for customer-configured broadband services. Cisco SRC DPR can scale to support the burgeoning number of subscribers who require support from even the largest of cable operators and service providers. There is no need to modify Cisco SRC as new services are introduced. It supports provisioning and intelligent device management for high-speed data, residential voice over IP (VoIP), DOCSIS cable modems, DVB/DAVIC DSTBs, and fixed wireless devices alike—automatically.

Product Features

Customizable, Automated Protocol Servers

Cisco SRC DPR provides customizable automated protocol servers, including Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), Domain Name System (DNS), and Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP). These form the basis of this DOCSIS provisioning system by providing full-featured and scalable naming and addressing services for service provider networks.

Intelligent Device Management

Cisco SRC DPR provisions, configures, and manages end-user devices and supports administration and reporting tasks as well as automating the provisioning of subscriber services. Cisco SRC DPR also assigns the type and appropriate quality of service (QoS) to each user—such as high-speed data, VoIP, or specific features based on devices and the services the operator makes available to its subscriber base.

Business Process Integration

The Cisco SRC DPR Java provisioning API is used to draw upon information on subscriber devices, registration, and class-of-service (CoS) information for use in OSS and business support systems, from straightforward billing applications to extensive, sophisticated workflow applications.

Voice Support

If a cable modem contains analog voice (RJ-11) ports, Cisco SRC DPR can support residential VoIP services using basic Simple Gateway Control Protocol and Media Gateway Control Protocol (xGCP) standards and DHCP Option 14. Cisco SRC DPR can support an xGCP call agent to handle call feature processing and connection to the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) by associating a telephone number with the cable modem's frequently qualified domain name (FQDN). Cisco SRC DPR will provision the FQDN of the call agent on the modem so the modem can locate a call agent for outgoing calls. It will also provision the telephone number and FQDN of the cable modem on the call agent so that the call agent can locate the appropriate modem for incoming calls.

DVB/DAVIC Support

The typical set-top box might contain three components —a DOCSIS modem, a DVB/DAVIC modem or component, and middleware. Each component has its own media-access-control (MAC) address and must be provisioned separately. Cisco SRC DPR can provision both the DOCSIS modem as well as the DVB/DAVIC device for data services via the Cisco Digital Line Card (Cisco DLC 24) at the cable headend.

Key Benefits

Security

Cisco SRC DPR allows service providers to implement the security features of the DOCSIS standard, which encrypts traffic flows between the cable modem and the cable modem termination system (CMTS) in the cable headend.

DOCSIS 1.0 provides the baseline privacy interface (BPI) standard for encryption. Rather than use authentication methods such as passwords or digital signatures, BPI checks the MAC address of the cable modem to see whether it is qualified to receive a key for the appropriate services. BPI, however, cannot protect against a hacker who masquerades as a cable modem with an authorized MAC address. BPI+, implemented in DOCSIS 1.1, remedies this shortcoming.

In addition, Cisco SRC DPR, the Cisco Network Registrar DHCP server, and the Cisco Universal Broadband Router (uBR) Series of CMTSs support the new DHCP LEASEQUERY message. By sending the LEASEQUERY message to Cisco Network Registrar DHCP, the uBR CMTS can verify the source IP address of all upstream datagrams and can transmit downstream datagrams without relying on any broadcast ARP packets, even after a uBR reboot. With this message, the uBR CMTS can prevent the theft of subscriber IP addresses in the cable network.

Reliability

Cisco SRC DPR provides high availability of DHCP through the Cisco Network Registrar/DHCP module industry-leading implementation of DHCP failover. The comprehensive Cisco Network Registrar support of DHCP helps to achieve this highly effective failover capability. If one DHCP server goes down, a backup is able to provide DHCP services without service interruption. The result is greater fault tolerance—if a power outage takes down a DHCP server in one location, a second server in another location immediately takes over the function of DHCP leasing.

Scalability and Performance

Cisco SRC DPR supports the service provider's urgent need for scalability. A four-server configuration can support several hundred thousand devices, depending on such factors as the number of CPUs in the server and their speed, the amount of memory in the system, the redundant array of inexpensive disks (RAID) configuration, the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) implementation used, and the lease renewal rate. By spreading out DHCP servers, Cisco SRC DPR also provides for highly scalable failover as well.

Ease of Integration

One of the major innovations in Cisco SRC DPR is its provisioning API. This Java-based API allows each service to be tied to the appropriate order entry, customer service, or billing system, allowing the full integration of OSS and business process software to enable true end-to-end flow-through provisioning.

Standards support

The DNS implementation in Cisco Network Registrar supports dynamic updates and is multithreaded to ensure high performance. It includes a lightweight, embedded high-performance data repository to further improve both performance and scalability. It was one of the first DNS servers to fully support the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) NOTIFY and IXFR standards, which lets primary servers notify secondary servers that something has changed and transfer only the changed information. This scenario sharply reduces network traffic that zone transfers would otherwise require.

The same open, comprehensive approach can be seen with the Cisco Network Registrar implementation of DHCP, which includes:

DHCP RFC 2131, 2132 (automatic allocation of reusable network addresses and additional configuration options)

BOOTP RFC 951, 1497 (Bootstrap Protocol, for automatic request and transfer of IP address)

RFC 2136 (dynamic update of DNS)

Cisco Network Registrar also offers multithreaded, high-performance TFTP. Most TFTP implementations are process based, and thereby limit performance. In Cisco Network Registrar, by contrast, TFTP can handle multiple, simultaneous requests for configuration file downloads. What's more, the superior TFTP performance in Cisco Network Registrar means that it consumes fewer system resources. For example, it runs on a less-powerful server than would be required to achieve similar performance with another TFTP implementation.

The Cisco Network Registrar component of Cisco SRC interoperates with the Berkeley Internet Name Domain (BIND) implementation of DNS by importing BIND configuration files and allowing zone transfers between BIND and CNR. Together, these DNS capabilities allow the primary DNS to automatically update the secondary DNS with any changes in resource records. As a result, it is standards based and fully interoperable.

System Requirements

Cisco SRC DPR 2.0 is supported on Sun SPARC Solaris 2.6, 7, and 8, as well as Windows NT 4 (on Intel).

LDAP—Cisco SRC DPR is designed to work with any Version 3-compliant LDAP directory. It has been specifically tested with Netscape Directory Server 4.x and Open LDAP (Version 2.7).

Cisco Service and Support

Service and support for Cisco SRC DPR is available through the Cisco Software Application Services (SAS) Program. These services provide 24-hour technical assistance, full access to the information and support resources on the Cisco.com Web site, and Software Application Support Plus Upgrades (SASU), including proactive shipment of all minor (update) and major (upgrade) product releases.