Configuring Cisco Script Applications

Table of Contents

Configuring Cisco Script Applications
Manage Scripts
Manage Prompts
Install Grammars
Install Customized CRA Languages
Install Java Files
Add a Cisco Script Application
Add an Application Trigger

Configuring Cisco Script Applications


Complete the following tasks before configuring CRA applications:

You must now configure the CRA applications you intend to use. The Cisco CRA system uses applications to interact with contacts and perform a wide variety of functions, such as prompting callers for information, transferring calls, and providing information to callers.

This chapter introduces Cisco CRA script applications, which are applications based on scripts created in the CRA Editor. (For more information on using the CRA Editor to create scripts, refer to the Cisco Customer Response Applications Developer Guide.)

You can use the CRA Editor to create scripts that direct the CRA system to automatically answer calls and other types of contacts, prompt callers for information, accept caller input, queue calls, distribute calls to available agents, place outbound calls, respond to HTTP requests, and send e-mail messages.

(For information on configuring other types of Cisco CRA applications, see "Configuring Additional CRA Applications.")


Note   The Cisco CRA package includes a number of sample scripts. For a description of these sample scripts, and for more information on creating scripts with the CRA Editor, refer to the Cisco Customer Response Applications Developer Guide.

Cisco script applications can make use of many components, such as scripts, pre-recorded prompts, grammars, and custom Java classes. You must first make these components available to the CRA Engine before you can configure a Cisco script application that uses them.

Depending on your particular CRA implementation, you may need to perform most or all of the following tasks to configure a Cisco script application:

1. Manage scripts. Cisco script applications are based on scripts that you must upload to the repository and make available to the CRA system.

2. Manage prompts. Many applications make use of pre-recorded prompts, stored as .wav files, which are played back to callers in order to provide information and elicit caller response. You must upload these .wav files to the repository and make them available to the CRA system.

3. Install grammars. The CRA system uses specific grammars to recognize and respond to caller response to prompts. You must store these grammars in a directory to make them available to the CRA system.

4. Install customized CRA languages. Language packs, such as American English, Canadian French, and so on, are installed with Cisco CRA. You install language packs in a directory accessible by the CRA system.

5. Install Java files. In addition to the Java files automatically installed as part of the Cisco CRA installation process, you can install your own custom classes and Java Archive (JAR) files in order to customize the performance of your CRA system.

6. Add a Cisco script application. Scripts created in the CRA Editor are used as the basis for Cisco script applications.

7. Add an application trigger. Triggers are specified signals that invoke application scripts in response to incoming contacts. After adding a new Cisco script application, you need to add a trigger so that this application can respond to telephone calls and/or HTTP requests.

You must be logged into the CRA Administration web interface to perform most of these tasks.

This chapter includes the following procedures:

Manage Scripts

Scripts are created with the CRA Editor, and can perform a wide variety of functions. For example, scripts can prompt callers for extension numbers in order to transfer calls, place callers in a queue and route calls to available agents, and place outbound calls.

You can add, modify, and delete a script by choosing Script menu options from the menu bar of the Cisco CRA Administration web interface. (For more information on Script menu options, see "The Scripts Menu.")

This section contains the following procedures (which can be performed in any order):

Adding a Script

To make a script available for use as a CRA application, you must first upload the script to the repository.

To upload a script to the repository, complete the following steps.

Procedure

Step 1   From the CRA Administration menu bar, choose Scripts > Manage Scripts.

The Manage Scripts web page opens.

Step 2   Click the Add a Script hyperlink.

The Uploading Scripts window opens.

Step 3   In the Source Script Name field, click Browse.

A Choose File window opens.

Step 4   Navigate to the directory in which scripts are located, select a script, and then click Open.

The Choose File window closes, and the script path appears in the Source Script Name field.

Step 5   Click the Description Script Name field to automatically enter the script name.

Step 6   Click Upload to Repository to upload the script to the repository.

A window opens, informing you that the script was successfully uploaded.

Step 7   Perform one of the following tasks:

  • If the script is already being used by a CRA application, click the Do You Want to Refresh the Script? hyperlink, and then click Yes when the system prompts you to confirm the operation.

When you refresh a script, you copy it from the repository to the CRA server, in order to make it available to the Cisco script application. (If the script does not already exist on the server, you do not need to refresh it.)

  • If the script does not already exist on the CRA server, click the Return to Script Management hyperlink

The Successful Script Upload window closes.

You are now ready to manage any existing scripts shown in the Script Management web page (if necessary) or add prompts that may be useful to your applications. (See Manage Prompts.)





Viewing or Downloading a Script File

You can view or download any script file that appears in the list on the Manage Scripts web page.

To view or download a script file, complete the following steps.

Procedure

Step 1   From the CRA Administration menu bar, choose Scripts > Manage Scripts.

The Manage Scripts web page opens.

Step 2   In the row that contains the script file to view or download, click any information in the Name, Last Modified, or Created fields.

The File Download dialog box opens.

Step 3   Perform one of the following tasks:

  • To view the script file, click Open.

The script file opens in the CRA Editor.

  • To download the script file, click Save, and then follow the prompts to choose a directory and file name for the script file.

The file is saved to the specified directory.





Refreshing a Script

When you make changes to a script, you must refresh the script in order to direct all the applications and subsystems that use this script to reload the new version.

To refresh a script, complete the following steps.

Procedure

Step 1   From the CRA Administration menu bar, choose Scripts > Manage Scripts.

The Manage Scripts web page opens.

Step 2   In the row that contains the script to refresh, click the Refresh icon.

The Refresh Script area opens, giving you the option of refreshing the script and the applications that reference it, or just refreshing the script.

Step 3   Perform one of the following actions:

  • If you want all applications and subsystems that reference the script to use the new version, click Yes.
  • If you do not want all applications and subsystems to use the new script, click No to refresh the script only.

The Manage Script web page opens, and the script appears in the list of scripts.





To refresh all scripts with one command, complete the following steps.

Procedure

Step 1   From the CRA Administration main menu, choose Scripts > Refresh Scripts.

An Engine web page opens, with a dialog box asking whether you would like to reload all applications as well as all scripts.

Step 2   Click OK to reload all applications as well as scripts, or click Cancel to reload scripts only.

A message appears in the Engine web page, informing you that the server has reloaded all scripts. (If you clicked OK, you are also informed that the server has reloaded all applications.)





Restoring a Script

When you restore a script, you replace the version currently in the repository with the previous version of the script.

Restoring a script is similar to using an Undo command. You can, for example, use the restore function when you make changes to a script, and then decide to use the previous version of the script instead.

To restore a script, complete the following steps.

Procedure

Step 1   From the CRA Administration menu bar, choose Scripts > Manage Scripts.

The Manage Scripts web page opens.

Step 2   In the row that contains the script to restore, click the Restore icon.

A web page opens, indicating that the script was restored successfully.

Step 3   Perform one of the following tasks:

  • If you want to continue configuring scripts without refreshing the script that you just restored, click the Return to Script Management hyperlink.
  • If you want to refresh the script you just restored, follow these steps:
    • Click the Do You Want to Refresh the Script? hyperlink.

An area opens, giving you the option of refreshing the script and the applications that reference it, or just refreshing the script.

  • Click Yes to refresh the script and all applications that reference it, or click No to refresh the script only.

The Script Management web page opens.





Uploading a Script

Use the Upload command to copy the latest version of a script to the repository.

To upload a script, complete the following steps.

Procedure

Step 1   From the CRA Administration menu bar, choose Scripts > Manage Scripts.

The Manage Scripts web page opens.

Step 2   In the row that contains the script to upload, click the Upload icon.

The Upload Script window opens.

Step 3   In the Source Script Name field, click Browse.

A Choose File window opens.

Step 4   Navigate to a source file on your system, select the source file, and then click Open.

The script path appears in the Source Script Name field.

Step 5   Click Upload to Repository.

If you entered a file name in the Source Script Name field that differs from the name in the Destination Script Name field, the system prompts you for permission to continue. Click OK to continue, or click Cancel to enter a different name in the Source Script Name field.

A window opens, indicating that the script was uploaded successfully.

Step 6   Perform one of the following tasks:

  • If you want to continue managing scripts without refreshing the script that you just restored, click the Return to Script Management hyperlink.
  • If you want to refresh the script you just restored, follow these steps:
    • Click the Do You Want to Refresh the Script? hyperlink.

An area opens, giving you the option of refreshing the script and the applications that reference it, or just refreshing the script.

  • Click Yes to refresh the script and all applications that reference it, or click No to refresh the script only.

The Script Management web page opens.





Deleting a Script

When you delete a script, you remove it permanently from the repository.

To delete a script, complete the following steps.

Procedure

Step 1   From the CRA Administration menu bar, choose Scripts > Manage Scripts.

The Manage Scripts web page opens.

Step 2   In the row that contains the script to delete, click the Delete icon.

A dialog box opens asking you to confirm that you want to delete the script.

Step 3   Click OK to delete the script.

The dialog box closes and the Manage Scripts web page refreshes, now minus the deleted script.





Manage Prompts

Prompts are messages that the CRA system plays back to callers. Cisco script applications often use prompts to elicit caller response so that the Cisco CRA system can transfer calls, receive account information, and perform other functions.

To use prompts in your Cisco script applications, you must first create a folder to store them. You can then record and upload new user prompts, delete prompts, and modify existing prompts.

You store pre-recorded prompts as .wav files. The CRA system also allows users to record spoken names, which you can upload to be used in the playback of prompts.

Managing prompts involves the following tasks:

1. Create a folder to store prompts. You must create a folder to store the .wav files that the CRA system uses as prompts.

2. Record a prompt. You can record your own prompts to be used in applications.

3. Add a prompt. You must add prompts to the prompt subdirectory to make them available to Cisco script applications.

4. Upload a prompt. You can replace any of the stored prompts used by Cisco script applications with a different .wav file by uploading the new .wav file.

5. Add spoken name prompts. Some Cisco script applications play back the pre-recorded names of the people that callers are trying to reach, in order to allow the caller to confirm the transfer of the call.

6. Add multiple prompts. In addition to adding .wav files individually, you can add multiple .wav files at one time.

This section contains the following topics:

Creating a Folder to Store Prompts

You must create a folder to store the .wav files that the CRA system uses as prompts.

To create a new folder to store your prompts, complete the following steps.

Procedure

Step 1   From the CRA Administration menu bar, choose Tools > Prompt Management.

The Prompt Management web page opens.

Step 2   From the Language Directory drop-down menu, choose a directory in which to create the folder.

Step 3   Click Create Folder.

The Create a New Folder window opens.

Step 4   In the Folder Name field, enter a folder name.

Step 5   Click Create.

The Prompt Management web page opens, displaying the new folder in the Language Directory drop-down menu.

You are now ready to record new prompts, if necessary, and add them to the new folder.





Recording a Prompt  

You can record your own prompts to be used in applications.

The following procedure describes recording prompts with Microsoft Sound Recorder, using a microphone plugged into your computer.

The choices that you make when saving the prompt recording depend on whether you chose the G.711 or G.729 codec during CRA server installation.


Note   If you are not using Microsoft Sound Recorder, refer to the documentation provided with your audio application.

To record a prompt, complete the following steps.

Procedure

Step 1   From your Windows Start menu, choose Start > Programs Accessories > Entertainment Sound Recorder.

The Sound Recorder dialog box opens.

Step 2   Click the Record button and speak your greeting into the microphone.

Step 3   Click the Stop button when you finish recording.

Step 4   To check your greeting, click the Rewind button or drag the slider back to the beginning of the recording. Then click the Play button.

Step 5   When you are satisfied with your greeting, choose File > Save As.

The Save As window opens.

Step 6   Click Change to set the recording options.

You can also set recording properties by choosing Properties from the Sound Recorder File menu.

The Sound Selection dialog box opens.

Step 7   From the Format drop-down menu, choose:

  • CCITT u-Law if you have the G711 codec
  • Option with "G729" or "G729a" in its title if you have the G729 codec

Step 8   From the Attributes drop-down menu, choose 8.000 kHz, 8 Bit, Mono 7 kb/sec.

Step 9   Click Save As.

The Save As dialog box opens.

Step 10   Enter a name for this format, and then click OK.

The Save As Dialog Box closes.

Step 11   In the Sound Selection dialog box, click OK.

The Sound Selection dialog box closes.

Step 12   In the Save As window, navigate to the directory of your choice, preferably a directory that you have set aside for prompts.

Step 13   Select the file name, and click Save.

The Save As dialog box closes.

You are now ready to add this prompt to the CRA system.





Adding a Prompt

To make prompts available to Cisco script applications, you must add them to the subdirectory in which prompts are stored.


Note   Before you add a new prompt, you must create a folder to contain the .wav source files. (See Creating a Folder to Store Prompts.)

To add a prompt, complete the following steps.

Procedure

Step 1   From the CRA Administration menu bar, choose Tools > Prompt Management.

The Prompt Management web page opens.

Step 2   From the Language Directory drop-down menu, choose the specific language and directory to which the prompt should be uploaded.

Step 3   To add a new prompt, click the Add a new prompt hyperlink.

The Prompt Upload window opens.

Step 4   In the Source File Name field, click Browse.

The Choose File dialog box opens.

Step 5   Navigate to the source .wav file folder, and then double-click the .wav file.

The name of the file appears in the Source File Name field.

Step 6   Click in the Destination File Name field to confirm your selection.

Step 7   Click Upload to upload the .wav file.

The Upload Success window opens.

Step 8   Click the Return to Prompt Management hyperlink.

The Prompt Management web page refreshes and the new prompt file is displayed.





Uploading a Prompt

You can replace any of the stored prompts used by Cisco script applications with a different .wav file by uploading the new .wav file. This operation replaces the previous prompt but keeps the same name for the new prompt.

To replace a prompt with a new .wav file, complete the following steps.

Procedure

Step 1   From the CRA Administration menu bar, choose Tools > Prompt Management.

The Prompt Management web page opens.

Step 2   Click the Upload arrow for the prompt you want to upload.

The Prompt Upload window opens.

Step 3   In the Source File Name field, click Browse.

The Choose File dialog box opens.

Step 4   Navigate to the source .wav file folder, and then double-click the .wav file with which you want to replace the previous .wav file.

The name of the file appears in the Source File Name field.

Step 5   Click in the Destination File Name field to confirm your selection.

Step 6   Click Upload to upload the .wav file.

The Upload Success window opens.

Step 7   Click the Return to Prompt Management hyperlink.

The Prompt Management web page opens.





Adding Spoken Name Prompts

Some Cisco script applications play back the pre-recorded names of the people that callers are trying to reach, in order to allow the caller to confirm the transfer of the call.

To upload .wav files of the spoken names of users, complete the following steps.

Procedure

Step 1   From the CRA Administration menu bar, choose Tools > Spoken Name Upload.

The Spoken Name Prompt Upload web page opens.

Step 2   In the User Id field, enter an ID number that will identify the user.

Step 3   In the Spoken Name (.wav) field, click Browse to navigate to the directory that contains the Spoken Name .wav file.

Step 4   Click Upload to upload the file.

Step 5   Repeat this process as needed to upload all spoken name .wav files.





Adding Multiple Prompts

In addition to adding .wav files individually, you can add multiple .wav files at one time.

To add multiple .wav files at one time, complete the following steps.

Procedure

Step 1   From the CRA Administration menu bar, choose System > System Parameters.

The System Parameters Configuration web page opens.

Step 2   Note the file path listed in the User Prompt Directory field.

Step 3   Open Windows Explorer and locate the directory that contains the .wav files for your language.

Step 4   Copy all .wav files into the directory that contains the .wav files for your language.

All your .wav files are now located in the User Prompt directory.





Install Grammars

A grammar is a specific set of all possible spoken phrases and/or Dual Tone Multi-Frequency (DTMF) digits to be recognized by CRA applications and acted upon during run time.

The CRA system uses specific grammars to recognize and respond to caller response to prompts.

The CRA system installs a set of grammars during its initial installation. You can also install your own, customized grammars.

To install your own, customized grammars, complete the following steps.

Procedure

Step 1   From the CRA Administration menu bar, choose System > System Parameters.

The System Parameters Configuration web page opens.

Step 2   Locate your user grammar directory contained in the User Grammar Directory field.

Step 3   Open Windows Explorer and locate the directory that contains the grammar files for your language.

Step 4   Add your customized grammar files to the directory that contains the grammar files for your language.

This grammar directory now contains all your grammar files.

You are now ready to install any customized CRA languages or to install Java files.





Install Customized CRA Languages

You can add languages to the existing set of languages that are installed with Cisco CRA.

To install customized languages, complete the following steps.

Procedure

Step 1   Open Windows Explorer and locate the CRA installation directory.

The default directory is C:\Program Files\wfavvid.

Step 2   Open the local.properties file.

The local.properties opens as a text file.

Step 3   Add additional languages to the languages.supported= line.

For example, languages.supported=en_US,en, ja_JP supports both US English and Japanese.

Do not remove existing languages that the CRA Language Installer automatically adds to the list. New languages added should be the result of adding variations to existing languages. Any totally new languages you add will lack support for internal features in the system, such as prompt generations, TTS (Text-To-Speech), and Speech Recognition.

Step 4   Save the file.

The language appears in the System Parameters page under the Default Language drop-down menu.





Install Java Files

In addition to the Java files automatically installed as part of the Cisco CRA installation process, you can install your own custom classes and Java Archive (JAR) files in order to customize the performance of your CRA system.

This section contains the following topics:

Installing Custom Classes

To install custom Java classes, complete the following steps.

Procedure

Step 1   Open Windows Explorer and locate the CRA Installation directory.

The default directory is C:\Program Files\wfavvid.

Step 2   Copy your custom Java classes into this directory.

After the CRA system loads classes and uses them once, the CRA system will not reflect changes to the classes until you restart the CRA Engine.

Your custom Java classes are now available to the CRA system.

You are now ready to install JAR files, if necessary.





Installing JAR Files

To install additional JAR files, complete the following steps.

Procedure

Step 1   Open Windows Explorer and locate the CRA Installation directory.

The default directory is C:\Program Files\wfavvid.

Step 2   Copy the JAR files into this directory.

Step 3   Locate the customengine.xml file and open the file.

Step 4   Locate the "Classpaths" tag and add the name of the file to the "Classpaths" tag.

Your JAR files are now available to the CRA system.





Add a Cisco Script Application

Now that you have completed the pre-application tasks by uploading your scripts, prompts, grammars, languages, and custom classes, you need to create a new application.

To add a new Cisco script application, complete the following steps.

Procedure

Step 1   From the CRA Administration menu bar, choose Applications > Configure Applications.

The Application Configuration web page opens. )

Step 2   Click the Add a New Application hyperlink.

The Add a New Application web page opens.

Step 3   In the Application Type drop-down menu, choose Cisco Script Application, and then click Next.

The Cisco Script Application web page opens.

Step 4   In the Name field, enter the name of the script.

Step 5   Press the Tab key to automatically populate the Description field.

Step 6   In the ID field, accept the automatically generated ID, or enter a unique ID.

The Historical Reporting feature uses this ID to identify this application.

Step 7   In the Maximum Number of Sessions field, enter the maximum number of simultaneous sessions that the application can handle.

Step 8   From the Script drop-down menu, choose the script to run the application.

If the script contains parameters, the parameters display below the Script drop-down menu. Each parameter has a check box, which enables you to override the default value for that parameter. If you want to override the value, check the check box for that parameter.

Step 9   From the Default Script drop-down menu, accept System Default.

The default script is executed when an error occurs with the configured application script.

Step 10   Click Add.

The following message appears:

The operation has been executed successfully.

The Cisco Script Application web page is refreshed, and the information you entered appears.

Depending on your script selection, the web page may provide additional fields and drop-down menu options when refreshed.

You are now ready to configure a trigger for this application.





After you add an application, you can modify the application by clicking any of the application's name or other information in the Application Configuration page. The page for that application opens, enabling you to modify the application's settings.

Add an Application Trigger

Triggers are specified signals that invoke application scripts in response to incoming contacts. The CRA system uses JTAPI triggers to trigger responses to telephone calls and HTTP triggers to respond to HTTP requests.

After adding a new Cisco script application, you need to add one or more triggers so that the application can respond to JTAPI calls and/or HTTP requests.


Note   Before you add application triggers, you must configure route points in Cisco CallManager. For more information, see the "Add CTI Route Points" section).

You can use either of two methods to add a trigger to an application: Add the trigger from the Cisco Script Application web page or add the trigger from the JTAPI or HTTP subsystem.

This section contains the following procedures:

Adding a JTAPI Trigger

You must add JTAPI triggers to invoke Cisco script applications in response to incoming contacts.

A JTAPI trigger responds to calls that arrive on a specific route point by selecting telephony and media resources to serve the call and invoking an application script to handle the call.

This section contains the following procedures:

Add a JTAPI Trigger from the Cisco Script Application Web Page

To add a JTAPI trigger directly from the Cisco Script Application web page, complete the following steps.

Procedure

Step 1   From the CRA Administration menu bar, choose Applications > Configure Applications.

The Applications Configuration web page opens.

Step 2   In the display list, click the Cisco script application for which you want to add the JTAPI trigger.

The Cisco Script Application web page opens.

Step 3   On the Cisco Script Application navigation bar, click the Add New Trigger hyperlink.

The Add a New Trigger window opens.

Step 4   From the Trigger Type drop-down menu, choose JTAPI.

Step 5   Click Next.

The JTAPI Trigger Configuration window opens.

Step 6   From the CTI Route Point Directory Number drop-down menu, choose the CTI (Computer Telephony Interface) route point number that you configured in Cisco CallManager.

For information on how to create a Cisco CTI route point, see the "Add CTI Route Points" section.

Step 7   From the Language drop-down menu, choose the appropriate default language, or accept the system default language.

Step 8   In the Maximum Number of Sessions field, enter the maximum number of simultaneous sessions that the application can handle.

Step 9   In the Idle Time-out (in ms) field, enter a maximum value (in milliseconds).

This value is the maximum amount of time that the system will wait for all the required resources to process a call and to invoke the application before rejecting a call.

Step 10   From the Call Control Group drop-down menu, choose the appropriate call control group.

Step 11   From the Primary Dialog Group drop-down menu, choose the appropriate primary dialog group.

You can choose No Group if the application being triggered by this trigger does not require a media resource.

Step 12   From the Secondary Dialog Group drop-down menu, choose the appropriate secondary dialog group, or none.

Step 13   Click Add.

The Application Configuration web page opens, and the JTAPI route point appears on the Application Configuration navigation bar.





Add a JTAPI Trigger from the JTAPI Subsystem

To add a JTAPI trigger to an application from the JTAPI subsystem, complete the following steps.

Procedure

Step 1   From the CRA Administration menu bar, choose Subsystems> JTAPI.

The JTAPI Configuration web page opens.

Step 2   On the JTAPI Configuration navigation bar, click the JTAPI Triggers hyperlink.

The first JTAPI Trigger Configuration web page opens.

Step 3   Click the Add a New JTAPI Trigger hyperlink.

The second JTAPI Trigger Configuration web page opens.

Step 4   From the CTI Route Point Directory Number drop-down menu, choose the CTI route point number that you configured in Cisco CallManager.

For information on how to create a Cisco CTI route point, see "Add CTI Route Points" section.

Step 5   From the Language drop-down menu, choose the appropriate default language, or accept the system default language.

Step 6   From the Application Name drop-down menu, choose the appropriate application to associate with this trigger.

Step 7   In the Maximum Number of Sessions field, enter the maximum number of sessions.

This value is the maximum number of simultaneously running applications that can be triggered by this particular trigger.

Step 8   In the Idle Time-out (in ms) field, enter a maximum value (in milliseconds).

This value is the maximum amount of time that the system will wait for all the required resources to process that call and for the right to invoke the application before rejecting a call.

Step 9   From the Call Control Group drop-down menu, choose the appropriate call control group.

Step 10   From the Primary Dialog Group drop-down menu, choose the appropriate primary dialog group or none.

You can choose No Group if the application being triggered by this trigger does not require media resources.

Step 11   From the Secondary Dialog Group drop-down menu, choose the appropriate secondary dialog group, or none.

Step 12   Click Add.

The first JTAPI Trigger Configuration web page opens, showing the new JTAPI trigger.





Adding an HTTP Trigger

A Cisco script application can be used to handle HTTP requests when the CRA system is provisioned with an HTTP trigger.

An HTTP trigger is the relative URL a user enters into the client browser to start the application. You can upload either eXtensible Style Language Transformation (XSLT) templates or Java Server Pages (JSP) templates to serve as your HTTP trigger.

The following path is an example of an HTTP-triggered request (using the HTTP trigger name "/hello"):

In this example, the URL starts the application with the HTTP trigger "/hello" on a web server running on port 8080 with the host name www.appserver.acme.com.

You can add the HTTP trigger from the Cisco Script Application web page or add the trigger from the HTTP subsystem.

This section contains the following procedures:

Add an HTTP Trigger from the Cisco Script Application Web Page

To add an HTTP trigger directly from the Cisco Script Application web page, complete the following steps.

Procedure

Step 1   From the CRA Administration menu bar, choose Applications > Configure Applications.

The Applications Configuration web page opens.

Step 2   In the display list of the Application Configuration web page, click the Cisco script application for which you want to add the HTTP trigger.

The Cisco Script Application web page opens.

Step 3   On the Cisco Script Application navigation bar, click the Add New Trigger hyperlink.

The Add a New Trigger web page opens.

Step 4   From the Trigger Type drop-down menu, choose HTTP, and then click Next.

The HTTP Trigger Configuration window opens.

Step 5   In the URL field, enter the relative URL.

For example:

Step 6   From the Language drop-down menu, choose a default language, or choose Keep Browser Settings to use the browser default language.

Step 7   In the Maximum Number of Sessions field, enter the maximum number of sessions that can be served by the HTTP subsystem for this trigger.

Step 8   In the Idle Timeout (in ms) field, enter a maximum value (in milliseconds).

This value is the maximum amount of time the system will wait to invoke the application before rejecting a contact.

Step 9   In the Enabled field, click the Yes radio button to activate the trigger, or click the No radio button if, for example, you want to disable the trigger for system repair.

If you disable the trigger, the user receives an error message when browsing to the defined trigger URL.

Step 10   Click Add.

The Cisco Script Application web page opens, and the URL of the HTTP trigger appears on the Cisco Script Application navigation bar.

Step 11   To test the trigger, enter the URL you just configured in the address bar of your browser.

For example,

The browser should display "hello".





Add an HTTP Trigger from the HTTP Subsystem

To configure a HTTP trigger from the HTTP subsystem, complete the following steps.

Procedure

Step 1   From the CRA Administration menu bar, choose Subsystems > HTTP.

The first HTTP Trigger Configuration window opens.

Step 2   Click the Add a New HTTP Triggers hyperlink.

The second HTTP Trigger Configuration window opens.

Step 3   In the URL field, enter the relative URL.

For example:

Step 4   From the Language drop-down menu, choose a default language, or choose Keep Browser Settings to use the browser default language.

Step 5   In the Maximum Number of Sessions field, enter the maximum number of sessions that can be served by the HTTP subsystem for this trigger.

Step 6   In the Idle Timeout (in ms) field, enter a maximum value (in milliseconds).

This value is the maximum amount of time the system will wait to invoke the application before rejecting a contact.

Step 7   In the Enabled field, click the Yes radio button to activate the trigger, or click the No radio button if, for example, you want to disable the trigger for system repair.

If you disable the trigger, the user receives an error message when browsing to the defined trigger URL.

Step 8   Click Add.

The Cisco Script Application appears, and the URL of the HTTP trigger appears on the Cisco Script Application navigation bar.

Step 9   To test the trigger, enter the URL you just configured in the address bar of your browser.

For example,

The browser should display "hello".

You are now ready to configure additional CRA applications. (See "Configuring Additional CRA Applications."