Cisco AS5300 Module Installation Guide
MICA Modem Cards

Table of Contents

MICA Modem Cards
MICA Cards
Cisco IOS Software Requirements
Removing and Installing Cards and Modules
Upgrading Modem Code
Configuring Modem Modules
Monitoring, Polling, and Troubleshooting Modems

MICA Modem Cards


This chapter describes the 6- and 12-port MICA modem modules and cards used in the Cisco AS5300 universal access servers. Cisco's MICA DSP modem cards provide a high performing, highly flexible, and standards-compliant access platform. This chapter includes the following sections:


Note      Actual speeds vary depending on line conditions. Due to FCC limitations, speeds in the U.S. are less than 56 kbps.


MICA Cards

You can install up to two MICA cards in any unpopulated slot of the access server chassis.


Figure 3-1   MICA Card


Each MICA card includes 10 slots in which you can install 6- or 12-port modem modules.

6-Port Module Cards

Each 6-port module includes 6 modems. Therefore, in a fully populated MICA card, you can have up to 60 modems. Or, in a fully populated access server chassis, you can have up to 120 modems. Ten of these modem modules can be configured on each of two cards for a total of 60 ports per card or a total of 120 ports per chassis.

The 6-port modules cannot be used as standalone cards and they cannot be installed in Microcom cards.


Figure 3-2   MICA Card with 6-Port Modem Modules


12-Port Module Cards

Each 12-port module includes 12 modems. Therefore, in a fully populated MICA card, you can have up to 120 ports. Or, in a fully populated access server chassis, you can have up to 240 modems. Ten of these modem modules can be configured on each of two cards for a total of 120 ports per card or a total of 240 ports per chassis.

The 12-port modules cannot be used as standalone cards and they cannot be installed in Microcom cards.


Figure 3-3   MICA Card with 12-Port Modem Modules


Identifying Modem Modules

Modem modules are plugged into SIMM modules on the carrier card. Use Table 3-1 or Table 3-2 and Figure 3-4 to identify a specific modem module.

.

Table 3-1   Modem Location Table for 6-Port Modem Modules

SIMM Location Modem Numbers SIMM Location Modem Numbers

SIMM 1

0 - 5

SIMM 6

30 - 35

SIMM 2

6 -11

SIMM 7

36 - 41

SIMM 3

12 - 17

SIMM 8

42 - 47

SIMM 4

18 - 23

SIMM 9

48 - 53

SIMM 5

24 - 29

SIMM 10

54 - 59

.

Table 3-2   Modem Location Table for 12-Port Modem Modules

SIMM Location Modem Numbers SIMM Location Modem Numbers

SIMM 1

0 - 11

SIMM 6

60 - 71

SIMM 2

12 -23

SIMM 7

72 - 83

SIMM 3

24 - 35

SIMM 8

84 - 95

SIMM 4

36 - 47

SIMM 9

96 - 107

SIMM 5

48 - 59

SIMM 10

108 - 119


Figure 3-4   SIMM Module Numbering


Cisco IOS Software Requirements

The modem modules require the following Cisco IOS software:

  • To support the modules:
    • Release 11.3(2)T, or higher

or

    • Release 11.2(9)XA, 11.2(10)P, or higher
  • To support the modem code version 2.2.3.0 or later:
    • Release 11.2(11)P

Removing and Installing Cards and Modules


If you skipped the chapter, "Safety Warnings, Recommendations, and Tools Required," (in the beginning of this guide), go back to that chapter and read it now. This chapter provides important safety information and a list of tools you need to successfully remove and install cards without damaging your access server.

Removing a MICA Card

To remove the MICA card:


Step 1   Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap.


Do not work on the system or connect or disconnect cables during periods of lightning activity.


The cards are not hot-swappable (that is, you cannot remove or install them when the power to the access server is ON). Be sure to turn OFF the power to the access server before installing or removing cards. Failure to do so can damage the access server.

Step 2   Power OFF the access server. If using a DC-powered unit, refer to Figure 3-5 and complete steps a to d.


Before performing any of the following procedures, ensure that power is removed from the DC circuit. To ensure that all power is OFF, locate the circuit breaker on the panel board that services the DC circuit, switch the circuit breaker to the OFF position, and tape the switch handle of the circuit breaker in the OFF position.

Figure 3-5   DC Power Supply Connections


    (a). Loosen the three locking screws for the negative, positive, and ground connectors on the DC power supply terminal block

    (b). Remove the -48 VDC wire from the terminal block negative connector (-) .

    (c). Remove the +48 VDC wire from the terminal block positive connector (+) .

    (d). Remove the safety ground (green wire) from the terminal block ground connector.

Step 3   On the rear panel of the access server, locate the MICA card.

Step 4   Loosen the two captive screws that secure the card to the chassis until each screw is free of the chassis.

Step 5   Insert the feature card removal tool so that the slots in each arm of the tool are behind the shoulder of each captive screw, as shown in Figure 3-6, and carefully pull the removal tool toward you until the feature card slides free of the chassis.


The EMI protective devices on the feature cards are designed to make the cards fit tightly. When removing the cards, they can release suddenly. Exercise caution when removing the feature cards with the removal tool.

Figure 3-6   Using the Feature Card Removal Tool


Step 6   Set the removed feature card aside on an ESD-preventive mat.

Step 7   Continue with one of the following sections:

Removing Modem Modules

To remove a modem module, follow these steps:


Note      To identify a specific modem, refer to the "Identifying Modem Modules" section on.



Step 1   Remove the card from the chassis. See the previous section, "Removing a MICA Card" for details.

Step 2   Orient the card so that the modem module socket faces away from you (see Figure 3-7).

Step 3   On the card, locate the 6- or 12-port modem module to be removed.


Figure 3-7   MICA Card with 6-Port Modules


Step 4   Gently push the two clips away from the edges of the modem modules, as shown in Figure 3-8.


Figure 3-8   Prying the Modem Module from the Clips (12-Port Module Displayed)


Step 5   Push the two socket latches away from the modem module, as shown in Figure 3-9.


Figure 3-9   Releasing the Modem Module from the Socket Latch (12-Port Module Displayed)


Step 6   Remove the modem module from its socket, as shown in Figure 3-10.


Figure 3-10   Removing the Modem Module (12-Port Module Displayed)


Step 7   Place the module on an ESD mat.

Step 8   Continue with the next section, "Installing Modem Modules" for procedures on installing a new modem module.

Installing Modem Modules

To install a 6- or 12-port modem module, follow these steps:


Step 1   Insert the modem module into the socket at a 45\xb0 angle.

Step 2   Seat the modem module in the socket and press its edges onto the standoffs, as shown in Figure 3-11.


Figure 3-11   Installing the Modem Module (12-Port Module Displayed)


Step 3   Gently push down the outer edges of the modem module until the two clips lock into place, as shown in Figure 3-12.


Figure 3-12   Seating the Modem Module (12-Port Module Displayed)


Step 4   Continue with the following section, "Installing a MICA Card," to replace the card in the chassis.

Installing a MICA Card

To install a MICA card:


Step 1   Remove the card from the ESD-preventive mat.

Step 2   Slide the card into the slot until it touches the backplane connector.

Step 3   Align the captive screws with their holes, and then seat the card completely.

Step 4   Tighten the two captive screws (Figure 3-13) to secure the card to the chassis.


Figure 3-13    Card Installation


Step 5   If the access server is configured with fewer than three cards, make sure that a blank slot cover is installed over each open slot to ensure proper airflow inside the chassis.

Step 6   Reconnect the AC power cord. Or, if using DC power, refer to Figure 3-14, and then complete steps a to d.


The illustration shows the DC power supply terminal block. Wire the DC power supply using the appropriate wire terminations at the wiring end, as illustrated. The proper wiring sequence is ground to ground, positive to positive, and negative to negative. Note that the ground wire should always be connected first and disconnected last.

Figure 3-14   DC Power Supply Connections



Do not overtorque the terminal block contact screws. The recommended torque is 8.2 ± 0.4 inch-lb.

    (a). Insert the safety ground (green wire) into the terminal block ground connector and tighten the locking screw. Ensure that no bare wire is exposed.

    (b). Insert the +48 VDC wire into the terminal block positive connector (+) and tighten the locking screw. Ensure that no bare wire is exposed.

    (c). Insert the -48 VDC wire into the terminal block negative connector (-) and tighten the locking screw. Ensure that no bare wire is exposed.

    (d). Make sure the power supply cord is secured to the cable strain-relief clamps on the DC power supply with cable ties.


After wiring the DC power supply, remove the tape from the circuit breaker switch handle and reinstate power by moving the handle of the circuit breaker to the ON position.

Step 7   Power ON the access server.

The internal power supply fan should power on.

Step 8   Continue with the following section, "Upgrading Modem Code."

Upgrading Modem Code

Modem code is a generic term applied to a modem code file, which is also called modem code for MICA modems.

With new systems, Cisco loads a Cisco IOS software-compatible version of modem code and copies the version to the installed modem modules. A map of the version(s) of modem code copied to the modem RAM for each modem module is stored in nonvolatile random access memory (NVRAM) so that it is retained over power cycles.


Note      You do not have to take any action to use the pre-installed version of modem code with new systems.


You can acquire new modem code in several ways:

  • Cisco periodically releases new modem code versions (with bug fixes or new modem features) that improve your system's overall modem performance.
  • Cisco also might ship modem code on diskette with spare boards or offer modem code for purchase with spare boards.
  • Modem code is also available on the Cisco Software Center for owners of maintenance contracts.

This section describes how to upgrade modem code on your access server modems by:

1. Understanding the modem code scenarios possible for your access server.

2. Choosing an upgrade strategy.

3. Finding out the modem code version installed on your access server.

4. Upgrading the modem code.


Cisco ships the access server with the latest version of modem code installed in the system Flash memory and mapped to the modems. If you choose to use the modem code bundled with your installed Cisco IOS software, you could be reverting to a previous version of modem code. Also note that once you map the bundled modem code to your modems, each time you upgrade the Cisco IOS software, the new bundled modem code is automatically mapped to your modems. See "Displaying Modem Code Versions," later in this chapter, for details on displaying mode code versions mapped to mode ms, installed in system Flash memory, and bundled with the Cisco IOS software on your access server.

How to Obtain Modem Code

You can obtain modem code in one of two ways:


Note      You must be a registered Cisco user to log into Cisco Connection Online (CCO).


Important Modem Upgrade Commands

There are several commands you use to upgrade modem code. For examples on using the commands, see "Upgrading Modem Code from the Cisco CCO TFTP Server," "Upgrading Modem Code from Diskettes," and "Using Modem Code Bundled with Cisco IOS Software," later in this chapter for details.

  • Use the copy tftp flash filename command to copy any version of modem code (no matter how it is obtained) into system Flash memory. You can store several versions of the modem code in system Flash memory under different filenames.
  • Use the copy flash modem command to transfer a specified version (filename) of modem code from system Flash memory to the modem RAM and map that version to the modem modules (slots/ports) specified in response to the modem range query.
  • Use the copy system:/ucode/mica_port_firmware modem command or the copy system:/ucode/mica_board_firmware modem command to transfer the version of modem code bundled with the Cisco IOS software release to the modem RAM and map that version to the modem modules (slots/ports) specified in response to the modem range query.

Choosing an Update Strategy

Because of multiple versions of modem code and the way Cisco IOS software processes these versions, Cisco suggests that you choose one of the following two strategies:

  • Always allow Cisco IOS software to select the version of modem code.
  • Always control the version of modem code used by the modules, independent of Cisco IOS software selections.

Cisco ships the access server with the latest version of modem code installed in the system Flash memory and mapped to the modems. If you choose to use the modem code bundled with your installed Cisco IOS software, you could be reverting to a previous version of modem code. Also note that after you map the bundled modem code to your modems, each time you upgrade the Cisco IOS software, the new bundled modem code is automatically mapped to your modems. See "Displaying Modem Code Versions," later in this section, for details on displaying mode code versions mapped to modems, installed in system Flash memory, and bundled with the Cisco IOS software on your access server.

To help with the decision, Figure 3-15 shows a hypothetical release process. Using the modem code bundled with Cisco IOS software is the easier strategy and enables you to take advantage of new modem code whenever you upgrade your Cisco IOS software. You can control the modem code by using the copy command as discussed later.


Figure 3-15   Release Timeline for Cisco IOS Software and Modem Code

Modem Code Scenarios

Table 3-3 provides scenarios that can occur when you upgrade Cisco IOS software or modem code.

Table 3-3   Modem Code Scenarios—Cisco IOS Software or Modem Code Upgrades

No. Scenario Update Process
1

You receive a new access server from the Cisco factory.

  • No action needed. The factory loads and maps a compatible version of modem code.1
2

You update Cisco IOS software, and you decide to use the version of modem code selected by Cisco IOS software.

  • Update Cisco IOS software.
  • No further action needed—Cisco IOS software automatically downloads either its bundled version or a mapped version from system Flash memory.2
3

You update Cisco IOS software, and you decide not to use the modem code selected by Cisco IOS software.

  • Update Cisco IOS software.
  • Copy the desired version of modem code file to system Flash memory, then copy that file to the integrated modems on the module. See "Copy the Modem Code from Your PC to the Modems," later in this section, for details.
4

The modems are running a version of modem code from system Flash memory that is different than the version bundled with Cisco IOS software. You decide to revert to the bundled version.

  • Use the Cisco IOS command copy system:/ucode/mica_port_firmware modem or copy system:/ucode/mica_board_firmware modem. Note that after you map the bundled modem code to your modems, each time you upgrade the Cisco IOS software, the new bundled modem code is automatically mapped to your modems. See "Using Modem Code Bundled with Cisco IOS Software," later in this section, for details.
5

Cisco releases new modem code, which is a later version than the version currently running on the modems. You decide to use Cisco's newest modem code.3

1To find out the version of modem in your system, use the show modem mapping command. This command displays the versions bundled with Cisco IOS software (copied into Flash memory) and running on the modems.

2In part, Cisco IOS software bases this decision on the last copy command issued. For more details about mapping, see Table 3-5.

3Cisco might ship this modem code on a diskette packed with the spare card.

Figure 3-16 shows a location on the release timeline where updates might take place, and Table 3-4 explains the resulting versions of Cisco IOS software and modem code.


Figure 3-16   Release Timeline for Cisco IOS Software and Modem Code

Table 3-4   Resulting Versions of Cisco IOS Software and Modem Code

Update
Event
Time
Update Event Resulting Version of
Cisco IOS Software
and Modem Code
1

You upgrade Cisco IOS software to Release B.

  • If there is no previous copy command (Cisco IOS software uses the bundled version).
  • If invalid mapping (Cisco IOS software uses the bundled version).
  • If last copy command was to use the bundled version.
  • If last copy command was copy flash modem and Modem Code Version 1 was specified.

 

  • Cisco IOS Release B
    Modem Code Version 2
  • Cisco IOS Release B
    Modem Code Version 2
  • Cisco IOS Release B
    Modem Code Version 2
  • Cisco IOS Release B
    Modem Code Version 1
2

You upgrade Cisco IOS software to Release C. (Cisco IOS software uses mapping from last copy command at Time 1).1

Cisco IOS Release C
Modem Code Version 1

You enter the copy system:/ucode/mica_port_firmware modem or the copy system:/ucode/mica_board_firmware modem command.

Cisco IOS Release C
Modem Code Version 3

3

New Modem Code Version 4 is released, you copy the file to system Flash memory, enter copy flash modem and specify Modem Code Version 4.

Cisco IOS Release C
Modem Code Version 4

4

You upgrade Cisco IOS software to Release D.

Cisco IOS Release D
Modem Code Version 4

You enter the copy system:/ucode/mica_port_firmware modem or the copy system:/ucode/mica_board_firmware modem command.

Cisco IOS Release D
Modem Code Version 3

1This example assumes the last copy command was copy flash modem, and Modem Code Version 1 was specified.

Table 3-5 provides a list of terms and commands and a description of how they are used in the modem code update process.

Table 3-5   Modem Code Terminology

Terms Description

Modem Code

Modem code on the MICA modems resides in and runs out of modem RAM. Cisco IOS software transfers a version of modem code to modem RAM on each reboot and reload.

System Flash memory can contain several versions of modem code: a version bundled with Cisco IOS software and multiple versions that resulted from previous copy tftp flash commands.

copy system:/ucode/mica_port_firmware modem command

or

copy system:/ucode/mica_board_firmware modem command

These commands transfer the version of modem code bundled with Cisco IOS software to the modem RAM and map that version to the modem modules specified by the modem.

These commands do not affect any existing versions of modem code that reside in system Flash memory.

After one of these commands, future Cisco IOS upgrades will potentially result in the downloading of new Cisco IOS bundled firmware to the modems. (If the new Cisco IOS image contains the same modem code as the old one, no new code will be downloaded to the modems.)

copy tftp flash filename command

Places a copy of the modem code in system Flash memory.

copy flash modem command

This command transfers the version of modem code in system Flash memory to the modem RAM and maps that version to the modem modules specified by the modem range.

Mapping commands

The copy commands map a specific version of modem code to a group of modem slots/ports. The bundled commands map the slots/ports to the bundled version, and the copy flash modem command maps the slots/ports to the system Flash version.

Cisco IOS software uses the mapping to determine which version of modem code should be downloaded to the modems. If Cisco IOS software finds no mapping or invalid mapping, it downloads the bundled version.

Although modem ranges are specified as slot/port, the modem code is downloaded on a per module basis.

The show modem mapping command lists all versions of modem code running on the modem modules, residing in system Flash memory, and bundled with Cisco IOS software. This will help you decide if you need to update your modem code files.1

1This command is supported in Cisco IOS Releases 11.2(11)P and 11.3(2)T.

Displaying Modem Code Versions

Use the show modem mapping command to list the versions of modem code running on the modem modules, residing in system Flash, and bundled with Cisco IOS software. This will help you decide if you need to change the version running on the modems.

5300# show modem mapping
Slot 1 has Mica Carrier card.
Modem Firmware Firmware
Module Numbers Rev Filename
0 1/0 - 1/5 2.2.3.0 flash:mica-modem-portware.2.2.3.0.bin
1 1/6 - 1/11 2.2.3.0 mica-modem-portware.2.2.3.0.bin
2 1/12 - 1/17 2.2.3.0 mica-modem-portware.2.2.3.0.bin
3 1/18 - 1/23 2.2.3.0 mica-modem-portware.2.2.3.0.bin
4 1/24 - 1/29 2.2.3.0 mica-modem-portware.2.2.3.0.bin
Slot 2 has Mica Carrier card.
Modem Firmware Firmware
Module Numbers Rev Filename
0 2/0 - 2/5 2.2.3.0 flash:1:mica-modem-portware.2.2.3.0.bin
1 2/6 - 2/11 2.2.3.0 mica-modem-portware.2.2.3.0.bin
2 2/12 - 2/17 2.2.3.0 mica-modem-portware.2.2.3.0.bin
4 2/24 - 2/29 2.2.3.0 mica-modem-portware.2.2.3.0.bin
IOS Bundled Firmware Information:
Mica Boardware Version : 1.0.0.0
Mica Portware Version : 2.0.1.7
Firmware files on System Flash:
Firmware-file Version Firmware-Type
============= ======= =============
flash:1:mica-modem-portware.2.2.3.0.bin 2.3.0 Mica Portware

Upgrading Modem Code from the Cisco CCO TFTP Server

Upgrading modem code from the Cisco CCO TFTP server is a two-step process:

  • Downloading the modem code from Cisco CCO TFTP server to a local TFTP server
  • Copying the modem code file to the access server and modems

Note      Cisco IOS software contains bundled modem code, which might differ from the version of modem code you download. For more information about how Cisco IOS software processes multiple modem code versions, refer to the earlier sections "Choosing an Update Strategy" and "Modem Code Scenarios" for details.


Download Modem Code from the Cisco CCO TFTP Server to a Local TFTP Server


Note      You must be a registered Cisco user to log in to Cisco's Software Center.


You can download software from the Cisco Systems CCO TFTP server using an Internet browser or using an FTP application. Both procedures are described below.


Note      To download modem code from CCO to a PC and then upgrade the modem code to an access server connected to your PC via an Ethernet hub, you need to set up a TFTP application on your PC, establish a HyperTerminal session, and make sure your PC and access server are correctly connected and talking before downloading the modem code from CCO. All these procedures are described in "Upgrading Modem Code from Diskettes," later in this chapter.


Using an Internet Browser

Step 1   Launch an Internet browser.

Step 2   Bring up Cisco's Software Center home page at following URL (this is subject to change without notice):

http://www.cisco.com/public/sw-center/

Step 3   Click Access Products (under Cisco Software Products) to open the Access Products window.

Step 4   Click Cisco AS5300 Series Software.

Step 5   Click the modem code you want and download it to your workstation or PC. For example, to download modem code for MICA modems, click Download Modem Portware Images.

Step 6   Click the modem code file you want to download, and then follow the remaining download instructions. If you are downloading the modem code file to a PC, make sure you download it to the c:\tftpboot directory; otherwise, the download process will not work.

Step 7   When the modem code is downloaded to your workstation, transfer the file to a TFTP server in your LAN using a terminal emulation software application.

Step 8   When the modem code is downloaded to your workstation, transfer the file to a TFTP server somewhere in your LAN using a terminal emulation software application.

Using an FTP Application

Note      The directory path leading to the modem code files on cco.cisco.com is subject to change without notice. If you cannot access the files using an FTP application, try the Cisco Systems URL http://www.cisco.com/public/sw-center/.



Step 1   Log in to the Cisco CCO FTP server, called cco.cisco.com:

terminal> ftp cco.cisco.com
Connected to cio-sys.cisco.com.
220-
220- Cisco Connection Online | | Cisco Systems, Inc.
220- Email: cco-team@cisco.com ||| ||| 170 West Tasman Drive
220- Phone: +1.800.553.2447 .:|||||:..:|||||:. San Jose, CA 95134
220-
220- NOTE: As of February 1,1997 ftp.cisco.com will now point to this
220- service. Please be advised. To use the former ftp.cisco.com after
220- February 1, connect to ftpeng.cisco.com
220-
220- You may login with:
220- + Your CCO username and password, or
220- + A special access code followed by your e-mail address, or
220- + "anonymous" followed by your e-mail address for guest access.
220-
220 cio-sys FTP server (CIOESD #103 Sun Dec 15 14:43:43 PST 1996) ready.

Step 2   Enter your CCO registered username and password (for example, harry and letmein):

Name (cco.cisco.com:harry): harry
331 Password required for harry.
Password: letmein
230-#############################################################
230- # Welcome to the Cisco Systems CCO FTP server.
230- # This server has a number of restrictions. If you are not familiar
230- # with these, please first get and read the /README or /README.TXT file.
230-# http://www.cisco.com/acs/info/cioesd.html for more info.
230-#############################################################
230-
230- ***** NOTE: As of February 1, 1997, "cco.cisco.com", *****
230- ***** "www.cisco.com" and "ftp.cisco.com" are now all *****
230- ***** logical names for the same machine. *****
230- ***** *****
230- ***** The old "ftp.cisco.com" is an entirely *****
230- ***** different machine, which is now known as *****
230- ***** "ftpeng.cisco.com" or "ftp-eng.cisco.com". *****
230- ***** *****
230- ***** In general, "ftpeng.cisco.com" is used only for ****
230- ***** distribution of Cisco Engineering-controlled *****
230- ***** projects, such as beta programs, early field *****
230- ***** trials, developing standards documents, etc. *****
230- ***** *****
230- ***** Be sure to confirm you have connected to *****
230- ***** the machine you need to interact with. *****
230-
230- If you have any odd problems, try logging in with a minus sign (-) as
230- the first character of your password. This will turn off a feature
230- that may be confusing your ftp client program.
230- Please send any questions, comments, or problem reports about this
230- server to cco-team@cisco.com.
230-
230- NOTE:
230- o To download files from CCO, you must be running a *passive-mode*
230- capable FTP client.
230- o To drop files on this system, you must cd to the /drop directory.
230- o Mirrors of this server can be found at
230-
230- + ftp://www-europe.cisco.com European (Amsterdam)
230- + ftp://www-fr.cisco.com France (Paris)
230- + ftp://www-au.cisco.com Australia (Sydney)
230- + ftp://www-jp.cisco.com Japan (Tokyo)
230- + ftp://www-kr.cisco.com Korea (Seoul)
230-Please read the file README
230- it was last modified on Sat Feb 1 12:49:31 1997 - 163 days ago
230 User harry logged in. Access restrictions apply.
Remote system type is UNIX.
Using binary mode to transfer files.

Step 3   Specify the directory path that holds the modem firmware you want to download. For example, the directory path for the Cisco AS5300 modem code is /cisco/access/5300:

ftp> cd /cisco/access/5300
250-Please read the file README
250- it was last modified on Tue May 27 10:07:38 1997 - 48 days ago
250-Please read the file README.txt
250- it was last modified on Tue May 27 10:07:38 1997 - 48 days ago
250 CWD command successful.

Step 4   View the contents of the directory with the ls command:

ftp> ls
227 Entering Passive Mode (192,31,7,130,218,128)
150 Opening ASCII mode data connection for /bin/ls.
total 2688
drwxr-s--T 2 ftpadmin ftpcio 512 Jun 30 18:11 .
drwxr-sr-t 19 ftpadmin ftpcio 512 Jun 23 10:26 ..
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root 3 10 Aug 6 1996 README ->README.txt
-rw-rw-r-- 1 root ftpcio 2304 May 27 10:07 README.txt
-r--r--r-- 1 ftpadmin ftpint 377112 Jul 10 18:08 mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.bin
-r--r--r-- 1 ftpadmin ftpint 635 Jul 10 18:08 mica-modem-portware.3.1.30.readme
226 Transfer complete.

Step 5   Specify a binary image transfer:

ftp> binary
200 Type set to I.

Step 6   Copy the modem firmware files from the access server to your local environment with the get command.

The following example downloads a MICA modem code file:

ftp> get mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.bin
PORT command successful.
Opening BINARY mode data connection for mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.bin (280208 bytes).
Transfer complete.
local: mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.bin
remote: mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.bin
385503 bytes received in 3.6 seconds (1e+02 Kbytes/s)

Step 7   Quit your terminal session:

ftp> quit
Goodbye.

Step 8   Verify you successfully transferred the files to your local directory:

server% ls -al
total 596
-r--r--r-- 1 280208 Jul 10 18:08 mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.bin
server% pwd
/auto/tftpboot

Step 9   Transfer these files to a local TFTP or RCP server that your access server or router can access.

Copy the Modem Code File from Local TFTP Server to Modems

The procedure for copying the modem code file from your local TFTP server to the modems is a two-step process. First, transfer the modem code to the access server's Flash memory. Then, transfer the modem code to the modems.

These two steps are performed only once. After you copy the modem code file into Flash memory for the first time, you should not have to perform these steps again. Because the modem code runs from the modems themselves, the Cisco IOS software automatically copies the modem code to each modem each time the access server power cycles.


Step 1   Establish an xterm session to the access server if using a UNIX workstation, or a HyperTerminal session to the access server if using a PC. For details on establishing a HyperTerminal session, see "Upgrading Modem Code from Diskettes," later in this chapter for details.

Step 2   Enter the access server enable mode (the prompt is displayed as 5300#):

5300> enable
Password: <password>
5300#

Step 3   Check the files in the access server system Flash memory:

5300# show flash
System flash directory:
File Length Name/status
1 4530624 c5300-js-mx
[498776 bytes used, 16278440 available, 16777216 total]
16384K bytes of processor board System flash (Read/Write)

Step 4   Download the modem code file from TFTP server into the access server Flash memory using the copy tftp flash command. After you enter the command, you are prompted for the download destination and the remote host name as requested by the system software.

5300# copy tftp flash
System flash directory:
File Length Name/status
1 4530624 c5300-js-mx
[498776 bytes used, 16278440 available, 16777216 total]
Address or name of remote host [255.255.255.255]?
Source file name? mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.x.bin
Destination file name [mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.x.bin]?
Accessing file 'mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.x.bin' on 255.255.255.255...
Loading mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.x.bin from 2.2.0.1 (via Ethernet0): ! [OK]
Erase flash device before writing? [confirm] no
Copy 'mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.x.bin' from server
as 'mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.x.bin' into Flash WITHOUT erase? [yes/no]y
Loading mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.x.bin from 2.2.0.1 (via Ethernet0):
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
[OK - 249108/16278440 bytes]
Verifying checksum... OK (0xE009)
Flash device copy took 00:00:02 [hh:mm:ss]

Step 5   Verify the file has been copied into the access server system Flash memory:

5300# show flash
System flash directory:
File Length Name/status
1 4530624 c5300-js-mz
2 210104 mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.x.bin
[747948 bytes used, 16029268 available, 16777216 total]
16384K bytes of processor board System flash (Read/Write)

Step 6   Copy the modem code file from the access server system Flash memory to the modems by entering the copy flash modem command:

5300# copy flash modem
Modem Numbers (slot/port | group number | all)? all
System flash directory:
File Length Name/status
1 4530624 c5300-js-mz
2 210104 mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.x.bin
[747948 bytes used, 16029268 available, 16777216 total]
Name of file to copy? mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.x.bin
Type of service [busyout/reboot] busyout
Copy 'flash:mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.x.bin' from Flash to modems? [yes/no] yes
*Nov 30 21:17:43.574: %MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/0) started portware download
*Nov 30 21:17:43.578: %MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/1) started portware download
*Nov 30 21:17:43.578: %MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/2) started portware download
*Nov 30 21:17:43.578: %MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/3) started portware download
.
.
.
*Nov 30 21:17:53.170: %MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/11) completed portware download:
*Nov 30 21:17:53.598: %MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/12) completed portware download:
*Nov 30 21:17:53.598: %MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/13) completed portware download:
*Nov 30 21:17:53.598: %MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/14) completed portware download:

Note      The modem code is downloaded to the module, not the individual slots/ports as implied by the screen display.


Upgrading Modem Code from Diskettes

This section describes how to copy modem code from diskettes to your hard disk in a PC environment, and then upload the modem code to the modems. The steps are similar if you are using a Macintosh or UNIX workstation.


Note      If you loaded Cisco IOS software from a feature pack CD-ROM using Router Software Loader (RSL), note that the CD contains a TFTP server program for PCs using Microsoft Windows 95. Run the TFTP server program from the directory where you installed the RSL program. Remember to set the root directory to the directory where the Cisco AS5300 modem code is located. The RSL application is available on CCO in the software library in the Access Products section and the TFTP application is available under the Other Services section.


Copy the Modem Code to Your PC Hard Disk

This section describes how to copy the modem code file to your hard disk in a PC environment. The steps are similar if you are using a Macintosh or a UNIX workstation.


Step 1   Insert the modem code diskette into the diskette drive.

Step 2   Use Microsoft Windows 95 Explorer to create a folder named tftpboot at your hard disk root c:.

Step 3   Use the Microsoft Windows 95 Explorer to copy the modem code file into the c:/tftpboot folder.

Copy the Modem Code from Your PC to the Modems

If you are using a PC running Microsoft Windows 95, upgrading modem code from a hard drive onto a Cisco AS5300 involves installing a TFTP application on your PC, connecting your PC and the access server, establishing a HyperTerminal session on your PC, pinging the PC and access server to make sure they are talking to each other, and finally, copying the modem code from the PC to the access server. See the following sections for details.


Note      The steps are similar if you are using a Macintosh or a UNIX workstation.


Set Up a TFTP Application on the PC

Step 1   Install the TFTP application on the PC.


Note You can use any TFTP or rcp application available from independent software vendors. A number of TFTP programs are also available as shareware from public sources on the World Wide Web. If you are using Microsoft Windows 95, you can also download a TFTP application (as zipped files) from the Cisco Systems Software Center web site at:
http://www.cisco.com/public/sw-center/


Step 2   Launch the TFTP application. You commonly do this by double-clicking the application icon or its filename.

Step 3   Set your TFTP server root directory:

  • Choose Server Root Directory from the Options menu.
  • Choose c:\tftpboot from the Drives and [...] list boxes.
  • Click OK.

If you do not select the c:\tftpboot directory as your TFTP server directory, you will not be able to perform the copy procedure. This also applies if you are using RCP on your system.
Connect your PC and the Access Server

Step 1   Use straight-through cables to connect the PC and access server via a 10BaseT hub, as shown in Figure 3-17. Also note that both Ethernet ports must have the same baseband.


Figure 3-17   Connecting a PC and an Access Server



Note You can also connect your PC Ethernet port to the Cisco AS5300 Ethernet port using the 10BaseT crossover cable provided.


Step 2   Connect your PC COM port to the Cisco AS5300 console port, as shown in Figure 3-17.

Step 3   Make sure your PC and access server are powered on.

Establish a HyperTerminal Session

Use the steps in this section to establish a HyperTerminal session from your local PC to the Cisco AS5300. You will use the HyperTerminal session to talk to the access server.


Step 1   In Microsoft Windows 95 on your PC, choose Start/Programs/Accessories/HyperTerminal.

Step 2   Double-click Hypertrm.exe to display the Connection Description dialog box.

Step 3   Enter a name for your connection, for example, Console and then click OK. HyperTerminal displays the Phone number dialog box.

Step 4   Choose the COM port connecting the PC and the access server in the Connect Using list box. You have options to connect directly to one of four COM ports.

Step 5   Click OK. HyperTerminal displays the COM Properties dialog box.

Step 6   Choose these options in the COM Properties dialog box:

  • Bits per second: 9600
  • Data bits: 8
  • Parity: None
  • Stop bits: 1
  • Flow control: None

Step 7   Click OK. The HyperTerminal dialog box appears.

Step 8   Press Enter to display the 5300# prompt.


Note      If the access server prompt does not appear, you might have selected the wrong COM port, the cable connections could be incorrect or bad, or the access server might not be powered on.


Ping the PC and Access Server

Ping the access server and the PC to make sure they are talking to each other and there are no configuration problems on your access server.


Step 1   Choose the correct Ethernet adapter connecting to the access server and note the PC's IP address:

    (a). Choose Start/Run to display the Run dialog.

    (b). Enter winipcfg and click OK to display the IP Configuration dialog box.

    (c). Choose the PC Ethernet adapter connector used for the connection to the access server if you have more than one Ethernet adapter connector installed on your PC.

    (d). Make a note of the PC IP address, and then click OK.


Note Enter the show running config command at the 5300# prompt to verify the access server has an IP address assigned. If the access server does not have an IP address, assign an IP address before continuing.


Step 2   In the HyperTerminal dialog box (see the previous section "Establish a HyperTerminal Session," for details), enter the access server enable mode (the prompt is displayed as 5300#):

5300> enable
Password: <password>
5300#

Step 3   Enter the ping command with your PC's IP address.

5300# ping 172.16.1.1

The access server displays five exclamation points (!) if everything is working and it displays five dots (.) if there is a problem. In the latter case, check the cabling between the router and the PC and check the access server configuration.

Upload Modem Code to the Access Server

The procedure for copying the modem code file from your PC set up as a local TFTP server to the access server system Flash memory is a two-step process:

  • Transfer the modem code to the access server.
  • Transfer the modem code to the modems.

Perform these two steps only once. After you copy the modem code file into system Flash memory for the first time, you should not have to perform these steps again. Because the code runs from modem RAM, the Cisco IOS software must automatically copy the modem code to each modem each time the access server power cycles.

The following code examples show a download to MICA modems.


Step 1   Check the image in the access server Flash memory:

5300# show flash
System flash directory:
File Length Name/status
1 4530624 c5300-js-mx
[498776 bytes used, 16278440 available, 16777216 total]
16384K bytes of processor board System flash (Read/Write)

Step 2   Enter the copy tftp flash command to download the code file from the TFTP server into the access server Flash memory. You are prompted for the download destination and the remote host name.

5300# copy tftp flash
System flash directory:
File Length Name/status
1 4530624 images/c5300-js-mx
[498776 bytes used, 16278440 available, 16777216 total]
Address or name of remote host [255.255.255.255]? jurai
Source file name? mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.x.bin
Destination file name [mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.x.bin]?
Accessing file 'mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.x.bin' on 255.255.255.255...
Loading mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.x.bin from 2.2.0.1 (via Ethernet0): ! [OK]
Erase flash device before writing? [confirm] no
Copy 'mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.x.bin' from server
as 'mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.x.bin' into Flash WITHOUT erase? [yes/no] yes
Loading images/mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.x.bin from 2.2.0.1 (via Ethernet0):
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
[OK - 249108/16278440 bytes]
Verifying checksum... OK (0xE009)
Flash device copy took 00:00:02 [hh:mm:ss]

Step 3   Verify the file has been copied into the access server Flash memory:

5300# show flash
System flash directory:
File Length Name/status
1 4530624 c5300-js-mz
2 210104 mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.x.bin
[747948 bytes used, 16029268 available, 16777216 total]
16384K bytes of processor board System flash (Read/Write)

Step 4   Copy the modem code file from the access server Flash memory to the modems by entering the copy flash modem command:

5300# copy flash modem
Modem Numbers (slot/port | group number | all)? all
System flash directory:
File Length Name/status
1 4530624 c5300-js-mz
2 210104 mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.x.bin
[747948 bytes used, 16029268 available, 16777216 total]
Name of file to copy? mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.x.bin
Type of service [busyout/reboot] busyout
Copy 'flash:mica-modem-portware.x.x.x.x.bin' from Flash to modems? [yes/no] yes
*Feb 28 21:17:43.574: %MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/0) started portware download
.
.
.
*Feb 28 21:17:43.598: %MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/13) started portware download
*Feb 28 21:17:53.598: %MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/14) completed portware download:

Note      The code is downloaded to the module, not the individual slots as shown.


Using Modem Code Bundled with Cisco IOS Software

Use this procedure to update modem code on the modems in your access server if you decide to use the version of modem code bundled with Cisco IOS software instead of the version already mapped to your modems.


Cisco ships the access server with the latest version of modem code installed in the system Flash memory and mapped to the modems. If you choose to use the modem code bundled with your installed Cisco IOS software, you could be reverting to a previous version of modem code. Also note that once you map the bundled modem code to your modems, each time you upgrade the Cisco IOS software, the new bundled modem code is automatically mapped to your modems. See "Displaying Modem Code Versions," earlier in this section, for details on displaying mode code versions mapped to modems, installed in system Flash memory, and bundled with the Cisco IOS software on your access server.

To set the modem code mapping to the modem code version bundled with Cisco IOS software, enter the following command:


Step 1   Enter the access server enable mode (the prompt is displayed as 5300#):

5300> enable
Password: <password>
5300#

Step 2   Enter the copy system:/ucode/mica_port_firmware modem or the copy system:/ucode/mica_port_firmware modem command:

This is an example of the copy system:/ucode/mica_port_firmware modem command:

5300# copy system:/ucode/mica_port_firmware modem
Modem Numbers (<slot>/<port> | group <number> | all)? all
Type of service [busyout/reboot] reboot
Allow copy of "system:/ucode/mica_port_firmware" to modems? [yes/no]y
Mica Portware download will take effect after reboot

This is an example of the copy system:/ucode/mica_port_firmware modem command:

5300# copy system:/ucode/mica_board_firmware modem
Modem Numbers (<slot>/<port> | group <number> | all)? all
Type of service [busyout/reboot] reboot
Allow copy of "system:/ucode/mica_board_firmware" to modems? [yes/no]y
Mica Portware download will take effect after reboot
*Dec 1 00:12:02.835: %MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (1/6) started portware download
*Dec 1 00:12:02.839: %MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (1/7) started portware download
*Dec 1 00:12:02.839: %MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (1/8) started portware download
*Dec 1 00:12:02.843: %MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (1/9) started portware download
*Dec 1 00:12:02.843: %MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (1/10) started portware download
*Dec 1 00:12:02.847: %MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (1/11) started portware download
*Dec 1 00:12:13.643: %MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (1/6) completed portware download:
*Dec 1 00:12:13.647: %MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (1/7) completed portware download:
*Dec 1 00:12:13.651: %MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (1/8) completed portware download:
*Dec 1 00:12:13.651: %MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (1/9) completed portware download:
*Dec 1 00:12:13.655: %MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (1/10) completed portware download:
*Dec 1 00:12:13.659: %MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (1/11) completed portware download:

This command does not affect any existing modem code that resides in system Flash memory in case you later want to revert to it. If you decide to delete the code from system Flash memory, remember that all files in system Flash memory will be deleted, therefore save and restore any important files (for example, the Cisco IOS software image).

If the new Cisco IOS image contains the same modem code as the old one, no new code will be downloaded to the modems.

Download Failure Reasons and Recommended Actions

During the modem code download process, you may receive an error message if the download fails.

Table 3-6   Download Failure Reasons and Recommended Actions

Error Message Description Recommended Action

%%ERROR: Modem slot/port, Modem portware file is not valid for modem type.

The specified modem portware is not compatible with the target modem. For example, V.34 modems cannot be upgraded with 56K portware. If you have a bank of non-56K modems in the access server and specify the all option in the copy tftp modem command, this error message will appear and not download 56K portware where appropriate.

Verify that you are copying 56K modem portware to 56K modems. Also use the show modem command to verify that you specified the correct slot/port or range.

%%ERROR: Modem slot/port currently being downloaded.

The modem code is currently downloading to the 56K modems.

The first download will continue without interruption, and the second download is aborted.

%%ERROR: Modem slot/port, download functions not initialized.

The modem code cannot be downloaded to the specified modem.

Use the show modem command to verify that you are downloading to a supported 56K modem.

%%ERROR: Modem slot/port is held in reset.

The specified modem is held in reset mode. The portware will not download to this modem.

Take the modem out of reset mode, then copy the portware again.

%%ERROR: NVRAM write for portware download filename entry failed.

There is an NVRAM table problem.

Reissue the copy tftp flash command and copy the portware file again.

Configuring Modem Modules

This section lists the procedures you need to complete the following configuration tasks to configure the modem modules:

1. Configure the asynchronous group interface.

2. Configure the controller.

3. Configure the modems.

4. Configure modem pooling.

5. Configuring R2 signaling.

See the Cisco AS5300 Universal Access Server Software Configuration Guide for details. You can find the most up-to-date version of this manual online from either CCO or the CD-ROM.

  • For access to the CCO version of this manual, go to:

Products & Ordering: Documentation: Cisco Documentation: Cisco Product Documentation: Access Servers and Access Routers: Access Servers: Cisco AS5300: Cisco AS5300 Universal Access Server Software Configuration Guide

  • For access to the CD-ROM version of this manual, go to:

Cisco Product Documentation: Access Servers and Access Routers: Access Servers: Cisco AS5300: Cisco AS5300 Universal Access Server Software Configuration Guide

Monitoring, Polling, and Troubleshooting Modems

See the Cisco AS5300 Universal Access Server Software Configuration Guide publication for details.