Cisco ONS 15454 User Documentation, Release 2.2.x
Chapter 9, CTC Alarms

Table Of Contents

CTC Alarms

9.1 Overview

9.2 AIS-L

9.2.1 OCN

9.2.2 EC-1 (AIS-L)

9.3 AIS-P

9.3.1 I/O

9.4 AISV

9.4.1 DS1, DS3XM-6

9.5 APSB

9.5.1 OCN

9.6 APSCIMP

9.6.1 OC-12 and OC-48 in BLSR

9.7 APSCM

9.7.1 OCN in linear mode

9.8 APSMM

9.8.1 OCN in linear mode

9.9 AUTORESET

9.9.1 Any Card

9.10 BKUPMEMP

9.10.1 TCC+

9.11 BLSROOSYNC

9.12 CARLOSS

9.12.1 E100T-12, E1000-2

9.13 CONCAT

9.13.1 OCN

9.14 CONNLOS

9.14.1 OC-12 and OC-48 in BLSR

9.15 CONTBUS-A-X

9.15.1 Any Card

9.16 CONTBUS-A-18

9.16.1 TCC, TCC+

9.17 CONTBUS-B-X

9.17.1 Any Card

9.18 CONTBUS-B-18

9.18.1 TCC/TCC+

9.19 CTNEQPT-PBXPROT

9.19.1 I/O, XC/XCVT

9.20 CTNEQPT-PBXWORK

9.20.1 I/O, XC/XCVT

9.21 DATAFLT

9.21.1 TCC/TCC+

9.22 DFLTK

9.22.1 OCN

9.23 DISCONNECTED

9.24 EOC

9.24.1 OCN

9.25 EQPT

9.25.1 Any Card

9.26 EXTERNAL

9.26.1 AIC

9.27 FAILTOSW-PATH

9.27.1 UPSR

9.28 FAN

9.29 FE-AIS

9.29.1 DS3XM-6

9.30 FE-DS1-MULTLOS

9.30.1 DS3XM-6

9.31 FE-DS1-SNGLLOS

9.31.1 DS3XM-6

9.32 FE-EQPT-FAIL-SA

9.32.1 DS3XM-6

9.33 FE-EQPT-NSA

9.33.1 DS3XM-6

9.34 FE-IDLE

9.34.1 DS3XM-6

9.35 FE-LOF

9.35.1 DS3XM-6

9.36 FE-LOS

9.36.1 DS3XM-6

9.37 FORCED-REQ

9.37.1 OCN in linear mode

9.38 FRNGSYNC

9.39 HITEMP

9.40 HLDOVERSYNC

9.41 IMPROPRMVL

9.41.1 Any Card

9.42 INCOMPATIBLE-SW

9.43 INCON

9.43.1 OC-12 and OC-48 in BLSR

9.44 LANOVERFLOW

9.44.1 TCC/TCC+

9.45 LBKFACILITY

9.45.1 OCN

9.46 LPBKTERMINAL

9.46.1 OCN

9.47 LOCKOUTOFPR-RING

9.47.1 OC-12 and OC-48 in BLSR

9.48 LOF

9.48.1 DS3XM-6

9.48.2 TCC/TCC+ (LOF)

9.48.3 DS1 (LOF)

9.48.4 OCN (LOF)

9.48.5 EC-1 (LOF)

9.49 LOP

9.49.1 I/O

9.50 LOP-V

9.50.1 DS3XM-6, DS1

9.51 LOS

9.51.1 DS3, DS3XM-6, DS1

9.51.2 OCN (LOS)

9.51.3 EC-1 (LOS)

9.52 LPBKDS1FEAC

9.52.1 DS3XM-6

9.53 LPBKDS3FEAC

9.53.1 DS3XM-6

9.54 LPBKFACILITY

9.54.1 DS3, DS3XM-6

9.54.2 DS1 (LPBKFACILITY)

9.55 LPBKTERMINAL

9.55.1 DS3, DS3XM-6

9.55.2 DS1 (LPBKTERMINAL)

9.56 MANRESET

9.56.1 Any Card

9.57 MANUAL-REQ

9.57.1 OCN (Not OC3)

9.57.2 XC/XCVT (MANUAL-REQ)

9.58 MEA

9.58.1 XC, I/O

9.59 MEM-GONE

9.59.1 TCC/TCC+

9.60 MEM-LOW

9.60.1 TCC/TCC+

9.61 NODEMIS

9.61.1 OC-12 and OC-48 in BLSR

9.62 NOT-AUTHENTICATED

9.63 PDI-P

9.63.1 DS3, DS3XM-6, DS1

9.64 PLM-P

9.64.1 DS3, DS3XM-6, DS1

9.65 PLM-V

9.65.1 DS1, DS3XM-6

9.66 PWRRESTART

9.67 RAI

9.67.1 DS3XM-6

9.68 RCVRMISS

9.68.1 DS1

9.69 RFI-L

9.69.1 OCN, EC-1

9.70 RFI-P

9.70.1 DS3, DS3XM-6, DS1, E100-T12, E1000-2

9.71 RFI-V

9.71.1 DS3XM-6, DS1

9.72 SDBER

9.72.1 OCN

9.73 SFBER

9.73.1 OCN

9.74 SQUELCH

9.75 STU

9.76 SWTOPRI

9.77 SWTOSEC

9.78 SWTOTHIRD

9.79 SWTRANSFER

9.79.1 TCC/TCC+

9.80 SYNCPRI

9.80.1 TCC/TCC+

9.81 SYNCSEC

9.81.1 TCC/TCC+

9.82 SYNCTHIRD

9.82.1 TCC/TCC+

9.83 SYSBOOT

9.83.1 TCC/TCC+

9.84 TRMTMISS

9.84.1 DS1

9.85 UNEQ-P

9.85.1 I/O

9.86 UNEQ-V

9.86.1 DS1, DS3XM-6


9

CTC Alarms


9.1 Overview

This chapter gives an alphabetical list of Cisco Transport Controller (CTC) alarm messages for the Cisco ONS 15454 and provides procedures to correct the alarms. The same procedures apply to the corresponding TL1 alarms. The chapter also includes a matrix showing the alarms as facility alarms, equipment alarms and common equipment alarms. A list of threshold crossing events (EVTs) is also provided. Call the Technical Assistance Center (TAC) at 1-877-323-7368 for unresolved problems.


Note   Some minor differences exist between TL1 error messages and CTC error messages for the ONS 15454, for example, a TL1 error message might contain a hyphen and the CTC error message might not. These discrepancies will be resolved in an upcoming release of the ONS 15454. This chapter is based on the error messages as they appear in the CTC. For a description of the CTC, see Chapter 3, "Using the Cisco Transport Controller."



Note   Fan tray Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs) running on Release 2.1 and later display alarm counts for Critical, Major, and Minor alarms on a slot or port basis. LCDs running on earlier software releases display alarm error messages on a slot or port basis, but do not provide alarm counts.


Table 9-1 Alarm Index

To clear this alarm
Go to page

AIS-L

9-5

AIS-P

9-6

AISV

9-6

APSB

9-7

APSCIMP

9-7

APSCM

9-8

APSMM

9-9

AUTORESET

9-9

BKUPMEMP

9-10

BLSROOSYNC

9-11

CARLOSS

9-12

CONCAT

9-14

CONNLOS

9-14

CONTBUS-A-X

9-15

CONTBUS-A-18

9-16

CONTBUS-B-X

9-17

CONTBUS-B-18

9-19

CTNEQPT-PBXPROT

9-20

CTNEQPT-PBXWORK

9-21

DATAFLT

9-23

DFLTK

9-24

DISCONNECTED

9-25

EOC

9-26

EQPT

9-27

EXTERNAL

9-27

FAILTOSW-PATH

9-28

FAN

9-29

FE-AIS

9-30

FE-DS1-MULTLOS

9-30

FE-DS1-SNGLLOS

9-31

FE-EQPT-FAIL-SA

9-31

FE-EQPT-NSA

9-32

FE-IDLE

9-33

FE-LOF

9-33

FE-LOS

9-34

FORCED-REQ

9-34

FRNGSYNC

9-35

HITEMP

9-35

HLDOVERSYNC

9-36

IMPROPRMVL

9-36

INCOMPATIBLE-SW

9-38

INCON

9-38

LBKFACILITY

9-39

LPBKTERMINAL

9-40

LOCKOUTOFPR-RING

9-40

LOF

9-41

LOP

9-46

LOP-V

9-47

LOS

9-48

LPBKDS1FEAC

9-51

LPBKDS3FEAC

9-51

LPBKFACILITY

9-52

LPBKTERMINAL

9-53

MANRESET

9-54

MANUAL-REQ

9-55

MEA

9-56

MEM-GONE

9-57

MEM-LOW

9-58

NODEMIS

9-58

PDI-P

9-59

PLM-P

9-62

PLM-V

9-62

PWRRESTART

9-62

RAI

9-63

RCVRMISS

9-63

RFI-L

9-64

RFI-P

9-64

RFI-V

9-65

SDBER

9-66

SFBER

9-67

SQUELCH

9-68

STU

9-68

SWTOPRI

9-69

SWTOSEC

9-69

SWTOTHIRD

9-69

SWTRANSFER

9-70

SYNCPRI

9-70

SYNCSEC

9-71

SYNCTHIRD

9-71

SYSBOOT

9-72

TRMTMISS

9-73

UNEQ-P

9-73

UNEQ-V

9-74


9.2 AIS-L

9.2.1 OCN

The ONS 15454 detects an Alarm Indication Signal (AIS) in the SONET overhead. This alarm is secondary to another alarm occurring simultaneously in an upstream node. The AIS can be caused by an incomplete circuit path, for example, when the port on the reporting node is in service but a node upstream on the circuit does not have its port inservice. The upstream node often reports a loss of signal (LOS) or has an OCN port out of service. The AIS-L clears when the primary alarm on the upstream node is cleared. However, the upstream node might not report anything to indicate it is at fault.

An AIS-L occurs at the line layer. The line layer refers to the segment between two SONET devices in the circuit and is also known as a maintenance span. The line layer deals with SONET payload transport, and its functions include multiplexing and synchronization.

Active: Critical, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Check upstream nodes and equipment for alarms, especially for LOS and an out-of-service port.

Step 2 Clear the upstream alarms.

Step 3 The AIS-L clears.


9.2.2 EC-1 (AIS-L)

The ONS 15454 detects an Alarm Indication Signal (AIS) in the SONET overhead. This alarm is secondary to another alarm occurring simultaneously in an upstream node. The AIS can be caused by an incomplete circuit path, for example, when the port on the reporting node is in service but a node upstream on the circuit does not have its port in service. The upstream node often reports a LOS or has an OCN port out of service. The AIS-L clears when the primary alarm on the upstream node is cleared. However, the upstream node might not report anything to indicate it is at fault.

An AIS-L occurs at the line layer. The line layer refers to the segment between two SONET devices in the circuit and is also known as a maintenance span. The line layer deals with SONET payload transport, and its functions include multiplexing and synchronization.

Active: Minor, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Check upstream nodes and equipment for alarms, especially LOS or an out-of-service port.

Step 2 Clear the upstream alarms.

The AIS-L clears.


9.3 AIS-P

9.3.1 I/O

The ONS 15454 detects an Alarm Indication Signal (AIS) in the SONET overhead. This alarm is secondary to another alarm occurring simultaneously in an upstream node. The AIS can be caused by an incomplete circuit path, for example, when the port on the reporting node is in service, but a node upstream on the circuit does not have its port in service. The upstream node often reports a LOS or has an OCN port out of service. The AIS-P clears when the primary alarm on the upstream node is cleared. However, the upstream node might not report anything to indicate it is at fault.

AIS-P occurs in the node that terminates a path. The path layer is the segment between the originating equipment and the terminating equipment. This path segment can encompass several consecutive line segments or segments between two SONET devices. The originating equipment puts bits together into a SONET payload and the terminating equipment breaks the bits apart again. SONET multiplexers, such as the ONS 15454, often perform the origination and termination tasks of the SONET payload.

An AIS-P error message on the ONS 15454 indicates that the node reporting the AIS-P is the terminating node on that path segment. If there is a node between the failing node and the terminating node, the middle node reports an AIS-L.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Check upstream nodes and equipment for alarms, especially LOS and out of service port.

Step 2 Clear the upstream alarms.

The AIS-P clears.


9.4 AISV

9.4.1 DS1, DS3XM-6

The ONS 15454 detects an Alarm Indication Signal (AIS) in the SONET overhead. This alarm is secondary to another alarm occurring in an upstream node. The AIS can be caused by an incomplete circuit path, for example, the port on the reporting node is in service but a node upstream on the circuit does not have its port in service. The upstream node is commonly reporting a loss of signal (LOS) or has an OCN port out of service. The AIS-V clears when the primary alarm is cleared. The upstream node with the port out of service might not report anything to indicate it is at fault.

An AIS-V indicates that an upstream failure has occurred at the VT layer. The VT, or electrical layer, occurs when the SONET signal is broken down into an electrical signal, for example when an OC-48 signal comes into an OC-48 optical card contained in the ONS 15454. If this OC-48 signal is demultiplexed by the ONS 15454, and one of the channels separated from the OC-48 is then cross-connected into the DS-1 card in the ONS 15454, the DS-1 card reports an AIS-V alarm.

An AIS-V error message on the electrical card is accompanied by an AIS-P error message on the cross-connected optical card.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Check upstream nodes and equipment for alarms, especially for LOS or an out-of-service port.

Step 2 Correct the upstream alarms.

The AIS-V clears.


9.5 APSB

9.5.1 OCN

Explanation    Line terminating equipment detects protection switching byte failure in the incoming Automatic Protection Switching (APS) signal. A protection switching byte defect occurs when an inconsistent APS byte or invalid code is detected.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   

Verify the APS setting on the upstream equipment.

9.6 APSCIMP

9.6.1 OC-12 and OC-48 in BLSR

Explanation    An Improper SONET Automatic Protect Switch code alarm indicates invalid K bytes. The receiving equipment monitors K bytes or K1 and K2 APS bytes for an indication to switch from the working card to the protect card or vice versa. K1/K2 bytes also contain bits that tell the receiving equipment whether the K byte is valid. APSCIMP occurs when these bits indicate a bad or invalid K byte. The alarm clears when the node receives valid K bytes.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 To determine the validity of the K byte signal, examine the received signal. Use an optical test set capable of viewing SONET overhead.

Step 2 If the K byte is invalid, the problem lies in upstream equipment and not in the reporting ONS 15454. Troubleshoot the appropriate upstream equipment.

Step 3 If the K byte is valid, verify that each node has a ring ID that matches the other node ring IDs:

(a) Using CTC, log into a node on the ring.

(b) Click the Provisioning tab and the Ring subtab.

(c) Record the ring ID number.

(d) Repeat Steps a - c for all nodes in the ring.

Step 4 If a node has a ring ID number that does not match the other nodes, change the ring ID number of that node to match the other nodes in the ring.

Step 5 Click Apply.


9.7 APSCM

9.7.1 OCN in linear mode

Explanation    The Automatic Protection Switching channel mismatch alarm occurs when the ONS 15454 expects a working channel but receives a protection channel, or vice versa. In many cases, the working and protection channels are crossed. For example, the protection and working receivers are crossed but the protection and working transmitters are not crossed. APSCM does not occur when both channels switch over, and it only occurs in a linear configuration.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.


Warning   Invisible laser radiation may be emitted from the aperture ports of the single-mode fiber optic modules when no cable is connected. Avoid exposure and do not stare into open apertures.


Recommended Action   


Step 1 Verify that the working-card channel fibers connect directly to the working-card channel fibers of the adjoining node's.

Step 2 Verify that the protection-card channel fibers connect directly to the working-card channel fibers of the adjoining node.


9.8 APSMM

9.8.1 OCN in linear mode

Explanation    An Automatic Protection Switching Mode Mismatch failure occurs when there is a mismatch of the protection switching schemes at the two ends of the span. If one end is provisioned for bidirectional switching, the other end of the span must also be provisioned for bidirectional switching. If one end is provisioned for bidirectional and the other is provisioned for unidirectional, an APSMM alarm results. This alarm occurs in a linear configuration.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 For the reporting ONS 15454, display CTC and click the Provisioning tab and the Protection subtab.

Step 2 Select the 1+1 protection group configured for the OCn cards.

This is the protection group optically connected to the far-end.

Step 3 Record whether the Bidirectional switching box is checked.

Step 4 Log into the far-end node and verify the OCn 1+1 protection group.

This is the protection group optically connected to the near end.

Step 5 Verify that the Bidirectional switching box matches the condition of the box recorded in Step 3. If not, change it to match.

Step 6 Click Apply.


9.9 AUTORESET

9.9.1 Any Card

Explanation    The card is warm rebooting automatically. An AUTORESET can occur when you change an IP address or perform any other operation that causes an automatic card-level reboot.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.


Step 1 Check for additional alarms that might have triggered an automatic reset.

Step 2 If the card automatically resets often with no apparent cause, replace it with a new card.

(a) Open the card ejectors.

(b) Slide the card out of the slot.

(c) Open the ejectors on the replacement card.

(d) Slide the replacement card into the slot along the guide rails.

(e) Close the ejectors.

When replacing a card with an identical type of card, you do not need to change the database.


9.10 BKUPMEMP

9.10.1 TCC+

Explanation    The BKUPMEMP alarm refers to a problem with the TCC+ card's flash memory. The alarm occurs when the TCC card is in use and has one of four problems: the flash manager fails to format a flash partition, the flash manager fails to write a file to a flash partition, there is a problem at the driver level or the code volume fails cylic redundancy checking (CRC), which is a method to check for errors in data transmitted to the TCC+.

The BLKUPMEMP alarm will also raise the alarm EQPT alarm. In this instance of an EQPT alarm, following the Reccomended Action for the BKUPMEM alarm, which will also clear the EQPT alarm.

Active: Critical, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Verify that both TCC+ cards are powered and enabled by confirming a lighted green ACT/STBY LED on the TCC+ card.

Step 2 Reset the Active TCC+ card to make the standby TCC+ card active.

(a) In CTC go to the node view of the node.

(b) Position the cursor over the active TCC+ card slot.

(c) Right click and choose RESET CARD.

Step 3 If the alarm clears, reseat the old TCC+ and allow it to boot up completely.

Step 4 Do a second reset, this time on the newly active TCC+ card to make the recently reseated standby TCC+ card active.

(a) In CTC go to the node view of the node.

(b) Position the cursor over the active TCC+ card slot.

(c) Right click and choose RESET CARD.

Step 5 If the alarm reappears after you perform the switch, replace the TCC+.

(a) Open the card ejectors.

(b) Slide the card out of the slot.

(c) Open the ejectors on the replacement card.

(d) Slide the replacement card into the slot along the guide rails.

(e) Close the ejectors.

When replacing a card with an identical type of card, you do not need to change the CTC database.


9.11 BLSROOSYNC

Explanation    The BLSR Out Of Sync alarm occurs when the mapping table needs updating. To clear the alarm, a new ring map must be created and accepted. Before you create a new ring map, complete Steps 1-4.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Prior to accepting a new mapping table, verify that each node has a unique node ID number:

(a) Log into a node on the ring.

(b) Click the Provisioning tab and the Ring subtab.

(c) Record the Node ID number.

(d) Repeat Steps a - c for all nodes in the ring.

(e) If two nodes have the same node ID number, change one node's ID number.

(f) Click Apply.

Step 2 Verify that each node has a ring ID that matches the other node ring IDs:

(a) Log into a node on the ring.

(b) Click the Provisioning tab and the Ring subtab.

(c) Record the Ring ID number.

(d) Repeat Steps a - b for all nodes in the ring.

(e) If a node has a ring ID number that does not match the other nodes, change one node's ID.

(f) Click Apply.

Step 3 Verify correct configuration of the east port and west port optical fibers:

(a) Click the Provisioning tab and the Ring subtab.

(b) Verify the east port and west port pattern for all network elements.

Clockwise ring fiber should be optically connected starting east to west. Counter-clockwise ring fiber should be optically connected starting west to east.

Step 4 If items have been changed, click Apply.

The BLSR Ring Map Change screen appears.

Step 5 Click Yes to accept the Ring Map.

Step 6 If the alarm does not clear, check the ring map for each ONS 15454 in the network and verify that each node is visible to the other nodes.

(a) Under the node view, click the Provisioning tab and the SONET DCC subtab.

(b) Click Create.

(c) Click the optical card that links to the adjacent network element.

(d) Click OK.

Step 7 If alarms are raised when the Data Communications Channels (DCCs) are turned on, follow the troubleshooting procedure for the EOC alarm on page 9-26.

Step 8 If the alarm still does not clear, call the Technical Assistance Center (TAC) at 1-877-323-7368.

Step 9

9.12 CARLOSS

9.12.1 E100T-12, E1000-2

Explanation    A carrier loss on the LAN is the data equivalent of an optical LOS (loss of signal). The Ethernet card has lost its link and is not receiving any signal, even an invalid one. The most common causes of this alarm are a disconnected cable or an improperly installed Ethernet card.

CARLOSS also occurs after the restoration of a node's database. In this instance, the alarm will clear in approximately 30 seconds after spanning tree protection is reestablished.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Verify that the cable is properly connected and attached to the correct port.


Step 1 Check that the transmitting device is operational. If not, troubleshoot the device.

Step 2 Using a test set, determine that a valid signal is coming into the Ethernet port.

Step 3 If a valid Ethernet signal is not present and the transmitting device is operational, check that the Ethernet wiring is intact and correct.

Step 4 If a valid Ethernet signal is present, physically reseat the Ethernet card.

Step 5 If the alarm does not clear, replace the Ethernet card.

(a) Open the card ejectors.

(b) Slide the card out of the slot.

(c) Open the ejectors on the replacement card.

(d) Slide the replacement card into the slot along the guide rails.

(e) Close the ejectors.

When replacing a card with an identical type of card, you do not need to change the CTC database.

Step 6 If a CARLOSS alarm repeatedly appears and clears, examine the layout of your particular network to determine whether the Ethernet circuit is part of an Ethernet manual cross connect. If the reporting Ethernet circuit is part of an Ethernet manual cross connect, then the reappearing alarm may be a result of mismatched STS circuit sizes in the set up of the manual cross connect. If the Ethernet circuit is not part of a manual cross connect, these steps do not apply.


Note   A Ethernet manual cross connect is used when another vendors' equipment sits between ONS 15454s, and the OSI/TARP-based equipment does not allow tunneling of the ONS 15454 TCP/IP-based DCC. To circumvent a lack of continuous DCC, the Ethernet circuit is manually cross connected to an STS channel riding through the non-ONS network.


(a) Right-click anywhere on the row of the CARLOSS alarm.

(b) Right-click or left-click the Select Affected Circuits dialog that appears.

(c) Record the information in the type and size columns of the highlighted circuit.

(d) From the examination of the layout of your particular network, determine the ONS 15454 and card that host the Ethernet circuit at the other end of the Ethernet manual cross connect.

(e) Log into the ONS 15454 at the other end of the Ethernet manual cross connect.

(f) Double-click the Ethernet card that is part of the Ethernet manual cross connect.

(g) Click the Circuits tab.

(h) Record the information in the type and size columns of the circuit that is part of the Ethernet manual cross connect. This circuit will connect the Ethernet card to an OC-N card on the same node.

(i) Determine whether the two Ethernet circuits on each side of the Ethernet manual cross connect have the same circuit size from the circuit size information you recorded.

(j) If one of the circuit sizes is incorrect, navigate to the incorrectly configured circuit.

(k) Click the incorrectly configured circuit to highlight it and click Delete.

(l) Click Yes at the Delete Circuit dialog box, and OK at the Confirmation dialog box.

(m) Reconfigure the circuit with the correct circuit size. Refer to the Cisco Installation and Operations Guide for procedures to provision Ethernet manual cross connects.


9.13 CONCAT

9.13.1 OCN

Explanation    The STS Concatenation error alarm occurs when the transmitted STSc circuit is smaller than the provisioned STSc and causes a mismatch of the circuit type on the concatenation facility. For example, an STS-3c or STS-1 is sent across a circuit provisioned for STS-12c.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Using the CTC, log into the network element.

Step 2 Check that the circuit is correctly provisioned.

Step 3 Check that the circuit source is correctly provisioned.


9.14 CONNLOS

9.14.1 OC-12 and OC-48 in BLSR

Explanation    An APS channel connection loss is occurring in the BLSR.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Verify that both TCC cards are powered and enabled by confirming a lighted green ACT/STBY LED on the TCC card.

Step 2 Verify that both OCN cards are powered and enabled by confirming a lighted green ACT/STBY LED on the OCN card.

Step 3 Reset the Active TCC card to make the standby TCC card active.

(a) In CTC go to the node view of the node.

(b) Position the cursor over the active TCC card slot.

(c) Right click and choose RESET CARD.

Step 4 If the alarm clears, reseat the old TCC and allow it to boot up completely.

Step 5 Do a second Reset, this time on the newly active TCC card to make the recently reseated standby TCC card active.

(a) In CTC go to the node view of the node.

(b) Position the cursor over the active TCC card slot.

(c) Right click and choose RESET CARD.

Step 6 If the alarm reappears after you perform the switch, replace the TCC.

(a) Open the card ejectors.

(b) Slide the card out of the slot.

(c) Open the ejectors on the replacement card.

(d) Slide the replacement card into the slot along the guide rails.

(e) Close the ejectors.

When replacing a card with an identical type of card, you do not need to change the CTC database.


9.15 CONTBUS-A-X

9.15.1 Any Card

Explanation    The TCC card in Slot 7 has lost communication with the card in Slot X. Cards require frequent communication with the TCC because the TCC performs system initialization, provisioning, alarm reporting, maintenance, diagnostics, IP address detection/resolution, SONET DCC termination, and system fault detection for the ONS 15454. The TCC also ensures that the system maintains Telcordia timing requirements.

This alarm might appear briefly when the ONS 15454 switches to the standby TCC card. In this instance, the alarm clears after the cards establish communication with the new primary TCC card. In cases where the alarm persists, the problem lies in the physical communication path from the TCC card to the reporting card. The physical communication path includes the TCC card, the card in Slot X, and the ONS 15454 backplane.

Active: Major, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Note   If X equals 18, then see CONTBUS-A-18 listed below.



Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Make sure the slot X card is physically present and note the card type.

Step 2 Click the Inventory tab to reveal the provisioned card type.

If the actual card type and the provisioned card type do not match, follow the procedure for the MEA alarm on page 9-56.

Step 3 If this slot is the only one reporting the alarm, perform a software reset of the I/O card.

(a) Go to the node view.

(b) Position the CTC cursor over the slot reporting the alarm (slot X).

(c) Right click and choose RESET CARD.

Step 4 If the software reset does not clear the alarm, physically reseat the reporting card.

Step 5 If all I/O cards report this alarm, perform a software reset of the active TCC.

(a) Go to the node view.

(b) Position the CTC cursor over the active TCC card slot.

(c) Right click to RESET CARD.

Step 6 If the software reset does not clear the alarm, physically reseat the TCC card.

Step 7 If the alarm still does not clear, replace the TCC card.

(a) Open the card ejectors.

(b) Slide the card out of the slot.

(c) Open the ejectors on the replacement card.

(d) Slide the replacement card into the slot along the guide rails.

(e) Close the ejectors.

When replacing a card with an identical type of card, you do not need to change the CTC database.


9.16 CONTBUS-A-18

9.16.1 TCC, TCC+

Explanation    The main processor on the TCC/TCC+ card in Slot 7 has lost communication with the coprocessor on the second TCC card in Slot 11. The problem lies in the physical path of communication from the TCC card to the reporting card. The physical path of communication includes the two TCC cards and the ONS 15454 backplane.

The Timing Communications and Control (TCC) card ensures that the system maintains Telcordia timing requirements.

Active: Major, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Position the CTC cursor over the TCC card in Slot 7.

Step 2 Right click the mouse to reveal a menu.

Step 3 Click RESET CARD from the menu to make the standby TCC in Slot 11 the active TCC and clear the alarm.

Step 4 Wait approximately 2 minutes for the TCC in Slot 7 to reset as the standby TCC.

Step 5 Position the CTC cursor over the TCC card in Slot 7.

Step 6 Right click the mouse to reveal a menu.

Step 7 Click RESET CARD from the menu to make the standby TCC in Slot 7 the active TCC.

Step 8 If the alarm reappears when the TCC in slot 7 reestablishes as the active TCC, the TCC card in Slot 7 is defective and must be replaced.

(a) Open the card ejectors.

(b) Slide the card out of the slot.

(c) Open the ejectors on the replacement card.

(d) Slide the replacement card into the slot along the guide rails.

(e) Close the ejectors.

When replacing a card with an identical type of card, you do not need to change the CTC database.


9.17 CONTBUS-B-X

9.17.1 Any Card

Explanation    The TCC card in Slot 11 has lost communication with the card in Slot X. Cards require frequent communication with the TCC because the TCC performs system initialization, provisioning, alarm reporting, maintenance, diagnostics, IP address detection/resolution, SONET DCC termination, and system fault detection for the ONS 15454. The TCC also ensures that the system maintains Telcordia timing requirements.

This alarm might appear briefly when the ONS 15454 switches over to the second TCC card. In this instance, the alarm clears after the cards establish communication with the new primary TCC card. In cases where the alarm persists, the problem lies in the physical communication path from the TCC card to the reporting card. The physical communication path includes the TCC card. The card in Slot X and the ONS 15454 backplane.

Active: Major, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Note   If X equals 18, then see CONTBUS-B-18 listed below.



Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Make sure the Slot X card is physically present and that it matches the type of card identified in that slot on the CTC.

Step 2 If this is the only slot reporting the alarm, perform a software reset of the I/O card:

(a) Go to the node view.

(b) Position the CTC cursor over the slot reporting the alarm (Slot X).

(c) Right click the mouse and select RESET CARD to do a software reset.

Step 3 If the software reset does not clear the alarm, physically reseat the reporting card.

Step 4 If all cards, with the possible exception of the active TCC, report this alarm, perform a software reset of the active TCC.

(a) Go to the node view.

(b) Position the CTC cursor over the active TCC card slot.

(c) Select RESET CARD.

Step 5 If the software reset does not clear the card, then physically reseat the TCC card.

Step 6 If the alarm still does not clear, then replace the TCC card.

(a) Open the card ejectors.

(b) Slide the card out of the slot.

(c) Open the ejectors on the replacement card.

(d) Slide the replacement card into the slot along the guide rails.

(e) Close the ejectors.

When replacing a card with an identical type of card, you do not need to change the CTC database.


9.18 CONTBUS-B-18

9.18.1 TCC/TCC+

Explanation    The processor on the TCC/TCC+ card in Slot 11 has lost communication with the processor on the TCC card in Slot 7. The problem lies in the physical communication path from the TCC card to the reporting card. The physical communication path includes the two cards and the ONS 15454 backplane.

The Timing Communications and Control (TCC) card also ensures that the system maintains Telcordia timing requirements.

Active: Major, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Position the CTC cursor over the TCC card in Slot 11.

Step 2 Click the right button on the mouse to reveal a menu.

Step 3 Click RESET CARD from the menu to make the TCC in Slot 11 the active TCC and clear the alarm.

Step 4 Wait approximately 2 minutes for the TCC in Slot 7 to reset as the standby TCC.

Step 5 Position the CTC cursor over the TCC card in Slot 7.

Step 6 Select RESET CARD to again make the TCC in Slot 11 the active TCC.

Step 7 If the alarm reappears when the TCC in Slot 11 is reestablished as the active TCC, the TCC card in Slot 11 is defective and must be replaced.

(a) Open the card ejectors.

(b) Slide the card out of the slot.

(c) Open the ejectors on the replacement card.

(d) Slide the replacement card into the slot along the guide rails.

(e) Close the ejectors.

When replacing a card with an identical type of card, you do not need to change the CTC database.

the CTC database.


9.19 CTNEQPT-PBXPROT

9.19.1 I/O, XC/XCVT

Explanation    This alarm indicates a failure of the main payload between the protect XC/XCVT card in Slot 10 and the reporting I/O card in Slot X. The XC/XCVT card and the reporting card are no longer communicating through the backplane. The problem lies in either the XC/XCVT card, the reporting I/O card, or the backplane.


Note   X is equal to the number of the card slot for numbers 1-6. If X is 7 or greater, then add 5 to X to determine the actual card slot. For example, CTNEQPT-PB7PROT signifies Slot 12, not Slot 7.



Note   If all I/O cards show this alarm, physically reseat the standby XC/XCVT card. If this fails to clear the alarm, replace the standby XC/XCVT card. Do not physically reseat an active XC/XCVT card. This might disrupt traffic.


Active: Critical, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Perform a software reset on the standby XC/XCVT card.

(a) Go to the node view.

(b) Position the CTC cursor over the slot reporting the alarm.

(c) Right click to select RESET CARD.

Step 2 If the alarm persists, physically reseat the standby XC/XCVT card.

Step 3 If the reporting I/O card is active:

(a) Do a manual switch to move traffic away from the card.

At the node view, click the Maintenance tab.

Click the Protection tab.

Double-click the protection group that contains the reporting card.

Click the Protect/Standby card of that protection group.

At Operation click the drop-down arrow.

Click FORCE_SWITCH_TO_PROTECT.

Click APPLY.

Click YES at the confirmation dialog.

(b) Perform a software reset on the reporting card.

Go to the node view.

Position the CTC cursor over the slot reporting the alarm.

Right click to select RESET CARD.

(c) If the alarm persists, physically reseat the reporting card.

Step 4 If the reporting I/O card is protect:

(a) Perform a software reset on the reporting card.

Go to the node view.

Position the CTC cursor over the slot reporting the alarm.

Right click to select RESET CARD.

(b) If the alarm persists, physically reseat the reporting card.

Step 5 If the alarm persists, replace the standby XC/XCVT card.

(a) Open the card ejectors.

(b) Slide the card out of the slot.

(c) Open the ejectors on the replacement card.

(d) Slide the replacement card into the slot along the guide rails.

(e) Close the ejectors.

When replacing a card with an identical type of card, you do not need to change the CTC database.

Step 6 If the alarm persists, replace the reporting I/O card.


9.20 CTNEQPT-PBXWORK

9.20.1 I/O, XC/XCVT

Explanation    The main payload bus between the active XC/XCVT card in Slot 8 and the reporting I/O card in Slot X failed. The XC/XCVT card and the reporting card are no longer communicating through the backplane. The problem lies in the XC/XCVT card, the reporting I/O card, or the backplane.


Note   X is equal to the number of the card slot for numbers 1-6. If X is 7 or greater, add 5 to X to determine the actual card slot. For example, CTNEQPT-PB7WORK signifies Slot 12, not Slot 7.



Note   If all I/O cards show this alarm, do a side-switch on the active XC/XCVT card (shown in Step 1) and physically reseat this XC/XCVT card. If this fails to clear the alarm, replace the XC/XCVT card. Do not physically reseat an active XC/XCVT card; this might disrupt traffic.


Active: Critical, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Do a side-switch from the active XC/XCVT card to the protect XC/XCVT card.

(a) From the node view, click the Maintenance tab.

(b) Click the XC Cards subtab.

(c) At Slot Operation for the active card, click the drop-down arrow.

(d) Click FORCE.

(e) Click Apply.

Step 2 Perform a software reset on the reporting card.

(a) Go to the node view.

(b) Position the CTC cursor over the slot reporting the alarm.

(c) Right click to select RESET CARD.

Step 3 If the alarm persists, physically reseat the standby XC/XCVT card to perform a hard reset.

Step 4 If the reporting I/O card is active:

(a) Do a manual switch to move traffic away from the card.

At the node view, click the Maintenance tab.

Click the Protection subtab.

Double-click the protection group that contains the reporting card.

Click the Protect/Standby card of that protection group.

At Operation click the drop-down arrow.

Click FORCE_SWITCH_TO_PROTECT.

Click APPLY.

Click YES at the confirmation dialog.

(b) Perform a software reset on the reporting card.

Go to the node view.

Position the CTC cursor over the slot reporting the alarm.

Right click to select RESET CARD.

(c) If the alarm persists, physically reseat the reporting card.

Step 5 If the reporting I/O card is protect:

(a) Perform a software reset on the reporting card.

Go to the node view.

Position the CTC cursor over the slot reporting the alarm.

Right click to select RESET CARD.

(b) If the alarm persists, physically reseat the reporting card.

Step 6 If the alarm persists, replace the XC/XCVT card. Make sure the card has been side-switched from active to standby (Step 1) before replacement.

(a) Open the card ejectors.

(b) Slide the card out of the slot.

(c) Open the ejectors on the replacement card.

(d) Slide the replacement card into the slot along the guide rails.

(e) Close the ejectors.

When replacing a card with an identical type of card, you do not need to change the CTC database.

Step 7 If the alarm persists, replace the reporting I/O card.

(a) Open the card ejectors.

(b) Slide the card out of the slot.

(c) Open the ejectors on the replacement card.

(d) Slide the replacement card into the slot along the guide rails.

(e) Close the ejectors.

When replacing a card with an identical type of card, you do not need to change the CTC database.


9.21 DATAFLT

9.21.1 TCC/TCC+

Explanation    The database has exceeded the capacity of the flash memory on the TCC/TCC+.

Active: Critical, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   When the system reboots, the last configuration entered is not saved.

Recommended Action   

Call the Technical Assistance Center (TAC) at 1-877-323-7368.


9.22 DFLTK

9.22.1 OCN

Explanation    The Default K Byte Received alarm occurs when a BLSR is not properly configured, for example, when a four-node BLSR has one node configured as UPSR. A node in a UPSR or linear configuration does not send the two valid K1/K2 APS bytes anticipated by a system configured for BLSR. One of the bytes sent is considered invalid by the BLSR configuration. The K1/K2 byte is monitored by receiving equipment for link-recovery information.

The alarm can also be caused when a new node is added but a new ring map has not been accepted. Troubleshooting for DFLTK is often similar to troubleshooting for BLSROOSYNC.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Warning   Invisible laser radiation may be emitted from the aperture ports of the single-mode fiber optic modules when no cable is connected. Avoid exposure and do not stare into open apertures.


Recommended Action   


Step 1 Prior to accepting a new mapping table, verify that each node has a unique node ID number.

(a) Log into a node on the ring.

(b) Click the Provisioning tab and the Ring subtab.

(c) Record the node ID number.

(d) Repeat Steps a - c for all nodes in the ring.

(e) If two nodes have the same node ID number, change one node's ID number so that each node has a unique node ID.

(f) Click Apply.

Step 2 Verify that each node has a ring ID that matches the other node ring IDs.

(a) Log into a node on the ring.

(b) Click the Provisioning tab and the Ring subtab.

(c) Record the Ring ID number.

(d) Repeat Steps a - c for all nodes in the ring.

(e) If a node has a ring ID number that does not match, change the node ID number of that node so that all nodes have the same Ring ID.

(f) Click Apply.

Step 3 Verify correct configuration of east port and west port optical fibers.

(a) Click the Provisioning tab and the Ring subtab.

(b) Verify the east port and west port pattern for all network elements (see Note).


Note   Clockwise ring fiber should be optically connected starting east to west. Counter-clockwise ring fiber should be optically connected starting west to east.


Step 4 If items have changed, click Apply. The BLSR Ring Map Change screen appears.

Step 5 Click Yes to accept the Ring Map.

Step 6 If the alarm does not clear, check the ring map for each ONS 15454 in the network and verify that each node is visible to the other nodes.

(a) At the node view, click the Provisioning tab and the SONET DCC subtab.

(b) Click Create.

(c) Select the optical card that links to the adjacent network element.

(d) Click OK.

Step 7 If alarms are raised when the DCCs are turned on, follow the troubleshooting procedure for the EOC alarm on page 9-26.

Step 8 If the alarm still does not clear, call the Technical Assistance Center (TAC) at 1-877-323-7368.


9.23 DISCONNECTED

Explanation    The ONS 15454 and the CTC do not have a TCP/IP connection. The problem lies in this connection, usually a LAN problem, and not the CTC or the ONS 15454.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Check the LAN connection to your PC.

Step 2 Verify connectivity by performing a Ping to the ONS 15454 reporting the alarm.

(a) If you are using a Microsoft Windows operating system, from the Start Menu select Command Prompt.

(b) If you are using a Sun Solaris operating system, from the Common Desktop Environment (CDE) click the Personal Application tab and select Terminal.

(c) For both the Sun and Microsoft operating systems, at the prompt type ping [ONS 15454 IP address] for example, ping 192.1.0.2.

If the workstation has connectivity to the ONS 15454, it displays a reply from [IP Address] after the ping. If the workstation does not have connectivity, a Request timed out message displays.

Step 3 If the ping is successful, an active TCP/IP connection exists. Restart the CTC.

Step 4 If you are unable to establish connectivity, perform standard network/LAN diagnostics. For example, trace the IP route, check cables, and check any routers between the node and CTC.


9.24 EOC

9.24.1 OCN

Explanation    The ONS 15454 has lost its Data Communications Channel (DCC). The DCC is three bytes, D1 through D3, in the SONET overhead. The bytes convey information about Operation, Administration, Maintenance, and Provisioning (OAM&P.) The ONS 15454 uses the DCC on the SONET section layer (SDCC) to communicate network management information.

Active: Major, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.


Warning   Invisible laser radiation may be emitted from the aperture ports of the single-mode fiber optic modules when no cable is connected. Avoid exposure and do not stare into open apertures.


Recommended Action   


Step 1 If there is also a LOS alarm reported, first resolve the LOS alarm by following the troubleshooting procedure given for that alarm.


Step 1 On the node reporting the alarm, check the physical connections of the optic fibers configured to carry DCC traffic.

Step 2 Verify that both ends of the fiber span have in-service ports.

Step 3 Verify that both ends of the fibers have DCC provisioned.

(a) Under the node view, click the Provisioning tab and the SONET DCC subtab.

(b) If the slot and port are listed under SDCC Terminations, the DCC is provisioned.

(c) If the slot and port are not listed under the SDCC Terminations, click Create.

(d) Click the optical card that links to the adjacent network element.

(e) Click OK.

(f) Repeat Steps a - e at the adjacent nodes.

Step 4 Verify that the OCN port is active and in service.

Step 5 With a test set, check for signal failure on fiber terminations.

Step 6 Measure power levels to verify that the budget loss is within the parameters of the receiver.

Step 7 Make sure fiber connectors are securely fastened and properly terminated.

Step 8 Restart the active TCC.

Step 9 Select the Provisioning tab and the SONET DCC subtab.

Step 10 Delete and recreate the offending SDCC termination.

Step 11 Verify that both ends of the SDCC have been recreated at the optical ports.


9.25 EQPT

9.25.1 Any Card

Explanation    An equipment failure (EQPT) alarm indicates that a hardware failure has occurred on the reporting card.

If the EQPT alarm occurs with a BLKUPMEMP alarm, follow the Reccomended Action for the BKUPMEM alarm on the "BKUPMEMP" section. This procedure will also clear the EQPT alarm.

Active: Critical, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Perform a software reset on the reporting card.

(a) Go to the node view.

(b) Position the CTC cursor over the slot reporting the alarm.

(c) Right click RESET CARD.

Step 2 If the software reset fails to clear the alarm, physically reseat the card.

When replacing a card with an identical type of card, you do not need to change the CTC database.


9.26 EXTERNAL

9.26.1 AIC

Explanation    A facility alarm is detected external to the node because an environmental alarm is present; f or example, a door is open or flooding has occurred.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Open the AIC maintenance screen to gather further information about this alarm.

Step 2 Perform your standard operating procedure for this environmental condition.


9.27 FAILTOSW-PATH

9.27.1 UPSR

Explanation    There is a switch failure between the working path and the protection path on a UPSR. Common causes of this alarm include a missing or defective protection card or a lockout set on one of the UPSR nodes.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Check that a lockout is not set on the UPSR.

(a) Go to the network view.

(b) Right click the span (the line between the nodes).

(c) Click Circuits.

(d) Under Switch State, confirm that Clear appears.

(e) If Clear appears perform Steps a-d at the next span.

(f) If Clear does not appear, click the arrow next to Switch all UPSR-circuits away.

(g) Click Clear.

(h) Click Apply.

(i) Click Yes at the Confirm UPSR Switch Are You Sure? dialog.

(j) Click OK at the next dialog box.

Step 2 Check fiber connections to make sure they are securely fastened and intact.

Step 3 Make sure OCN cards are active and in service.

Step 4 Verify that the Protect OCN card paired with the reporting Active OCN card is the same type and inservice.

Step 5 Do a manual switch to move traffic away from the reporting active card.

(a) At the node view, click the Maintenance tab.

(b) Click the Protection subtab.

(c) Double-click the protection group that contains the reporting card.

(d) Click the Protect/Standby card of that protection group.

(e) At Operation click the drop-down arrow.

(f) Click MANUAL_SWITCH_TO_PROTECT.

(g) Click APPLY.

(h) Click YES at the confirmation dialog.

Step 6 If the traffic does not switch over, try restarting the protect cards through the Maintenance tab.

Step 7 Attempt another manual switch after the protect cards have booted up completely.

Step 8 If you are still unable to perform a switch, try reseating the protect card.

Step 9 Attempt another manual switch.

Step 10 If the alarm persists, replace the protect card.

(a) Open the card ejectors.

(b) Slide the card out of the slot.

(c) Open the ejectors on the replacement card.

(d) Slide the replacement card into the slot along the guide rails.

(e) Close the ejectors.

When replacing a card with an identical type of card, you do not need to change the CTC database.

Step 11 Call the Technical Assistance Center (TAC) at 1-877-323-7368 for unresolved problems.


9.28 FAN

Explanation    The fan alarm indicates a problem with the fan tray assembly. When the fan is not fully functional, the temperature of the ONS 15454 can rise above its normal operating range. The ONS 15454 fan tray contains six fans, and the unit is designed to cool properly with only five of the six fans operating. However, when only five of the six fans are operational, the fan tray still needs replacement. Six operational fans give the ONS 15454 additional protection against overheating.

Active: Critical, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Check the condition of the filter to see if it needs replacement. See the "Air Filter Inspection" section on page 10-1 for instructions on locating and accessing the filter.

Step 2 If the filter is clean, take the fan tray assembly out of the ONS 15454.

Step 3 Reinsert the fan tray making sure the back of the fan tray connects to the rear of the ONS 15454.


Note   The fan should run immediately when correctly inserted.


Step 4 If the fan does not run or the alarm persists, replace the fan tray.

Step 5 If the replacement fan tray does not operate, call the Technical Assistance Center (TAC) at 1-877-323-7368. The Alarm Interface Board (AIP) might have blown a fuse. If the fuse did blow, TAC will determine if the board needs replacement.


9.29 FE-AIS

9.29.1 DS3XM-6

Explanation    The far-end DS-3 node is reporting an Alarm Indication Signal (AIS). The prefix FE in an alarm message means the main alarm is occurring at the far-end node and not at the node reporting the FE alarm. Troubleshoot the FE alarm by troubleshooting the main alarm at its source. Both the alarms clear when the main alarm clears.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 To troubleshoot an FE alarm determine which node and card link directly to the card reporting the FE alarm. For example, an FE-AIS alarm from the DS3XM-6 card in Slot 12 of Node 1 might link to the main AIS alarm from an DS3XM-6 card in Slot 6 of Node 2.

Step 2 Log into the node that links directly to the card reporting the FE alarm.

Step 3 Clear the main alarm.

This clears the FE alarm.


9.30 FE-DS1-MULTLOS

9.30.1 DS3XM-6

Explanation    Multiple inputs detect a loss on the far end. The prefix FE in an alarm message means the main alarm is occurring at the far-end node and not at the node reporting the FE alarm. Troubleshoot the FE alarm by troubleshooting the main alarm at its source. Both alarms clear when the main alarm clears.

Explanation   

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 To troubleshoot an FE alarm, determine which node and card link directly to the card reporting the FE alarm. For example, an FE-AIS alarm from the DS3XM-6 card in Slot 12 of Node 1 might link to the main AIS alarm from an DS3XM-6 card in Slot 6 of Node 2.

Step 2 Log into the node that links directly to the card reporting the FE alarm.

Step 3 Troubleshoot the main alarm.

This clears the FE alarm.


9.31 FE-DS1-SNGLLOS

9.31.1 DS3XM-6

Explanation    One of the DS-1 inputs on the far end detects a LOS. The prefix FE in an alarm message means the main alarm is occurring at the far-end node and not at the node reporting the FE alarm. Troubleshoot the FE alarm by troubleshooting the main alarm at its source. Both alarms clear when the main alarm clears.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 To troubleshoot an FE alarm, determine which node and card link directly to the card reporting the FE alarm. For example, an FE-AIS alarm from the DS3XM-6 card in Slot 12 of node 1 might link to the main AIS alarm from a DS3XM-6 card in Slot 6 of Node 2.

Step 2 Log into the node that links directly to the card reporting the FE alarm.

Step 3 Clear the main alarm.

This clears the FE alarm.


9.32 FE-EQPT-FAIL-SA

9.32.1 DS3XM-6

Explanation    A far-end DS-3 equipment failure is occurring. The prefix FE in an alarm message means the main alarm is occurring at the far-end node and not at the node reporting the FE alarm. Troubleshoot the FE alarm by troubleshooting the main alarm at its source. Both alarms clear when the main alarm clears.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 To troubleshoot an FE alarm, determine which node and card link directly to the card reporting the FE alarm. For example, an FE-AIS alarm from the DS3XM-6 card in Slot 12 of Node 1 might link to the main AIS alarm from a DS3XM-6 card in Slot 6 of Node 2.

Step 2 Log into the node that links directly to the card reporting the FE alarm.

Step 3 Clear the main alarm.

This clears the FE alarm.


9.33 FE-EQPT-NSA

9.33.1 DS3XM-6

Explanation    A non-service affecting equipment failure is detected in the far-end DS-3. The prefix FE in an alarm message means that the main alarm is occurring at the far-end node, not the node reporting the FE alarm. Troubleshoot the FE alarm by troubleshooting the main alarm at its source. Both alarms clear when the main alarm clears.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 To troubleshoot an FE alarm, determine which node and card link directly to the card reporting the FE alarm. For example, an FE-AIS alarm from the DS3XM-6 card in Slot 12 of Node 1 might link to the main AIS alarm from a DS3XM-6 card in Slot 6 of Node 2.

Step 2 Log into the node that links directly to the card reporting the FE alarm.

Step 3 Clear the main alarm.

This clears the FE alarm.


9.34 FE-IDLE

9.34.1 DS3XM-6

Explanation    A far-end node detects an idle DS-3 signal. The prefix FE in an alarm message means that the main alarm is occurring at the far-end node, not the node reporting the FE alarm. Troubleshoot the FE alarm by troubleshooting the main alarm at its source. Both alarms will clear when the main alarm clears.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 To troubleshoot the FE alarm, determine which node and card link directly to the card reporting the FE alarm. For example, an FE-AIS alarm from the DS3XM-6 card in Slot 12 of Node 1 might link to the main AIS alarm from a DS3XM-6 card in Slot 6 of Node 2.

Step 2 Log into the node that links directly to the card reporting the FE alarm.

Step 3 Clear the main alarm.

This clears the FE alarm.


9.35 FE-LOF

9.35.1 DS3XM-6

Explanation    A far-end node reports a DS-3 loss of frame (LOF). The prefix FE in an alarm message means that the main alarm is occurring at the far-end node, not the node reporting the FE alarm. Troubleshoot the FE alarm by troubleshooting the main alarm at its source. Both alarms clear when the main alarm clears.

Explanation   

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 To troubleshoot an FE alarm, determine which node and card link directly to the card reporting the FE alarm. For example, an FE-AIS alarm from the DS3XM-6 card in Slot 12 of Node 1 might link to the main AIS alarm from a DS3XM-6 card in Slot 6 of Node 2.

Step 2 Log into the node that links directly to the card reporting the FE alarm.

Step 3 Clear the main alarm.

This clears the FE alarm.


9.36 FE-LOS

9.36.1 DS3XM-6

Explanation    The far-end node reports a DS-3 loss of signal (LOS). The prefix FE in an alarm message means that the main alarm is occurring at the far-end node, and not at the node reporting the FE alarm. Troubleshoot the FE alarm by troubleshooting the main alarm at its source. Both alarms clear when the main alarm clears.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 To troubleshoot the FE alarm, determine which node and card link directly to the card reporting the FE alarm. For example, an FE-AIS alarm from the DS3XM-6 card in Slot 12 of Node 1 might link to the main AIS alarm from a DS3XM-6 card in Slot 6 of Node 2.

Step 2 Log into the node that links directly to the card reporting the FE alarm.

Step 3 Clear the main alarm.

This clears the FE alarm.


9.37 FORCED-REQ

9.37.1 OCN in linear mode

Explanation    This alarm means that a user entered the force command on a span or card to force traffic from a working card or working span to a protection card or protection span. You do not need to clear this alarm if you want the force switch to remain in place. To clear this alarm, clear the force command.

Active: Minor, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   

To clear the force command:


Step 1 Click the Maintenance tab.

Step 2 Click the Protection tab for a card or span switch. Click the Ring tab to clear a ring switch.

Step 3 Click the drop-down arrow at Operation.

Step 4 Click Clear.

Step 5 Click Apply.


9.38 FRNGSYNC

Explanation    The reporting ONS 15454 is in free run synchronization mode. Either external timing sources have been disabled so the node is using its internal clock, or the ONS 15454 has lost its designated BITS timing source.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 If the ONS 15454 is configured to operate from its own internal clock, disregard this alarm.

Step 2 If the ONS 15454 is configured to operate from an external timing source, verify that the BITS timing source is valid. Common problems with a BITS timing source include reversed wiring and bad timing cards.


9.39 HITEMP

Explanation    The temperature of the ONS 15454 is above 50 degrees Celsius.

Active: Critical, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Check the temperature of the ONS 15454 (shown on the front panel LCD).

Step 2 Check that the temperature of the room is not abnormally high.

Step 3 Make sure that nothing prevents the fan tray assembly from passing air through the ONS 15454.

Step 4 Make sure blank faceplates fill the ONS 15454 empty slots. Blank faceplates aid airflow.

Step 5 Check the condition of the filter to see if it needs replacement.

Step 6 If the filter is clean, take the fan tray assembly out of the ONS 15454.

Step 7 Reinsert the fan tray, making sure the back of the fan tray connects to the rear of the ONS 15454.


Note   The fan should run immediately when correctly inserted.


Step 8 If the fan does not run or the alarm persists, replace the fan tray.


9.40 HLDOVERSYNC

Explanation    The Holdover Synchronization alarm occurs when primary/secondary reference timing is lost. This might occur when line coding on the timing input is different than the configuration on the ONS 15454. It also occurs after the selection of a new node reference clock.This alarm indicates that the ONS 15454 has gone into holdover and is using the ONS 15454 internal reference clock, which is a Stratum 3-level timing device. The alarm clears when primary or secondary timing is reestablished.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Check for additional alarms that relate to timing.

Step 2 Reestablish a primary and secondary timing source according to local site practice.


9.41 IMPROPRMVL

9.41.1 Any Card

Explanation    A card was physically removed from its slot before the card was deleted in the CTC. The card does not have to be in service to cause this alarm, it only has to be recognized by the CTC and the TCC card. This alarm will not appear if you delete the card from the CTC before you physically remove it from the node.


Note   The CTC gives the user approximately 15 seconds to physically remove the card before the CTC begins a card reboot.



Caution   Do not pull a rebooting card. If the CTC begins to reboot a card before you can remove it, allow the card to finish rebooting. After the card reboots, delete the card in the CTC again and physically remove it before the card begins to reboot.

Active: Critical, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 At the node view, right click the card reporting the IMPROPRMVL.

Step 2 Choose Delete.

Step 3 If the card is in service, has a circuit mapped to it, is paired in a working protection scheme, and has DCC communications turned on or is used as a timing reference, the CTC will not allow the card to be deleted.

Step 4 If the card is in service, then take the facility out of service.


Caution   Prior to taking the facility out of service, ensure that there is no live traffic on the facility.

(a) Double click the reporting card to display a card level view.

(b) Click the Provisioning tab.

(c) Click the Status of any in-service ports.

(d) Choose Out of Service to take the ports out of service.

Step 5 If a circuit has been mapped to the card, delete the circuit.


Caution   Prior to deleting the circuit, ensure that there is no live traffic on the circuit.

(a) On the node view, click the Circuits tab.

(b) Select the applicable circuit. (The circuit that connects to the reporting card.)

(c) Click Delete.

Step 6 If the card is paired in a protection scheme, delete the protection group.

(a) Click the Provisioning tab and the Protection subtab.

(b) Select the protection group of the reporting card.

(c) Click Delete.

Step 7 If the card is provisioned for DCC, delete the DCC provisioning.

(a) Click the Provisioning tab and the SONET DCC subtab.

(b) Click the slots and ports listed in SDCC Terminations.

(c) Click Delete.

(d) Click Yes when a dialog appears.

Step 8 If the card is used as a timing reference, change the timing reference.

(a) Click the Provisioning tab and the Timing subtab.

(b) Click the arrow next to the Ref-1 field.

(c) Change the field from the listed OCn card to Internal Clock.

(d) Click Apply.

Step 9 Right click the card reporting the IMPROPRMVL.

Step 10 Choose Delete.


9.42 INCOMPATIBLE-SW

Explanation    The CTC software and the TCC software are incompatible. This can happen when the TCC software is upgraded but the PC has not yet upgraded the compatible CTC.jar file. It can also happen when the CTC logs into a node with compatible software, but encounters another node in the network that has a newer version of TCC software.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Exit the current CTC session and completely close down the browser.

Step 2 Start the browser.

Step 3 Type the ONS 15454 IP address of the node that reported the alarm. This might be the original IP address you logged on with or an IP address other than the original.

Step 4 Log into the CTC. (The browser will download the.jar file from the CTC.)


9.43 INCON

9.43.1 OC-12 and OC-48 in BLSR

Explanation    An inconsistent automatic protection switching (APS) code is present. The SONET overhead contains K1/K2 APS bytes that notify receiving equipment, such as the ONS 15454, to switch the SONET signal from a working to a protect path. An inconsistent APS code occurs when three consecutive frames do not contain identical APS bytes. Inconsistent APS bytes give the receiving equipment conflicting commands about switching.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Look for other alarms, especially LOS, LOF or AIS. Clearing these alarms clears the INCON alarm.

Step 2 If an INCON alarm occurs with no other alarms, call the Technical Assistance Center (TAC) at 1-877-323-7368.


9.44 LANOVERFLOW

9.44.1 TCC/TCC+

Explanation    The LAN overflow alarm indicates that there is a broadcast storm on the network management LAN. The network management LAN connects to the TCC/TCC+ card, and this connection is temporarily disabled to prevent data packets from flooding the port of the TCC/TCC+ card. When the connection is disabled, the ONS periodically checks the LAN to determine when the broadcast storm clears. When the broadcast storm clears, the TCC connection is reinstated.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   

This problem is external to the ONS node. Troubleshoot the TCC/TCC+ connected network management LAN for a broadcast storm.


9.45 LBKFACILITY

9.45.1 OCN

Explanation    A software facility loopback is active for a port on the reporting card.

Loopback is a commonly used troubleshooting technique. A signal is sent out on a link or part of the network and returned to the sending device. A troubleshooter can compare the quality of the sent signal and the returned signal to determine the condition of an isolated circuit. By setting up loopbacks on various parts of the network and excluding other parts, a troubleshooter can logically narrow down the source of the problem.

Two types of loopbacks are available: Facility and Terminal. Facility loopbacks troubleshoot ports only and are generally performed locally or at the near end. Terminal loopbacks test ports and spans and are often used for remote sites or far-end equipment. Users provision loopbacks through the CTC.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 To remove the loopback alarm, open the reporting card by double clicking on the card or right clicking on the card in the CTC and selecting Open from the list of options.

Step 2 Click the Maintenance tab.

Step 3 Select the Loopback Type column and select None from the menu.

Step 4 Click Apply.


9.46 LPBKTERMINAL

9.46.1 OCN

Explanation    A software terminal loopback is active for a port on the reporting card.

Loopback is a commonly used troubleshooting technique. A signal is sent on a link or part of the network and returned to the sending device. A troubleshooter can compare the quality of the sent signal and the returned signal to determine the condition of an isolated circuit. By setting up loopbacks on various parts of the network and excluding other parts, a troubleshooter can logically narrow down the source of the problem.

Two types of loopbacks are available: Facility and Terminal. Facility loopbacks troubleshoot ports only and are generally performed locally or at the near end. Terminal loopbacks test ports and spans and are often used for remote sites or far-end equipment. You can provision loopbacks through the CTC.


Caution   The CTC permits loopbacks on an in-service circuit. This operation is service affecting.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 To remove the loopback alarm, open the reporting card by double clicking on the card in the CTC or right clicking on the card in the CTC and selecting Open from the list of options.

Step 2 Click the Maintenance menu tab.

Step 3 Select the Loopback Type column and select None from the menu.

Step 4 Click Apply.


9.47 LOCKOUTOFPR-RING

9.47.1 OC-12 and OC-48 in BLSR

Explanation    The BLSR will not allow a protection channel switch. One of the BLSR nodes has a LOCKOUT SPAN set. Clearing this LOCKOUT SPAN allows the protection channel switch.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Remove the lockout set on the BLSR.

(a) Log into one of the BLSR nodes.

(b) Click the Maintenance tab.

(c) Click the Ring tab.

(d) Click the arrow next to East Operation.

(e) Click Clear.

(f) Click the arrow next to West Operation.

(g) Click Clear.

(h) Click Apply.

(i) Click Yes at the Confirm BLSR Switch Are You Sure? dialog.

(j) Click OK at the next dialog box.

Step 2 Repeat Step 1 at each node in the BLSR until the alarm clears.


9.48 LOF

9.48.1 DS3XM-6

Explanation    A port on the DS3XM-6 card has a loss of frame (LOF) condition. LOF indicates that the receiving ONS 15454 has lost frame delineation in the data being received.

When a LOF appears on the DS3XM-6 card, the transmitting equipment might have framing set to a format different from the receiving ONS 15454, or there might be no framing contained in the signal.

Explanation   

Active: Critical, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   

Verify that the line framing and line coding match between the DS3XM-6 port reporting the alarm and the signal source:


Step 1 In CTC, note the slot and port reporting the alarm.

Step 2 Find the coding and framing formats of the signal source for the port reporting the alarm. You might need to contact your Network Administrator for this information.

Step 3 Go to the card-level view of the reporting card.

Step 4 Click the Provisioning tab.

Step 5 Verify that the reporting port's Line Type matches the signal source's Line Type.

Step 6 If the signal source line type does not match the reporting port, click the Line Type to reveal a menu.

Step 7 Choose the matching type.

Step 8 Click Apply.

Step 9 Verify that the reporting port's Line Coding matches the signal source's Line Type.

Step 10 Slide the replacement card into the slot along the guide rails.


9.48.2 TCC/TCC+ (LOF)

Explanation    A port on the TCC BITS input detects a loss of frame (LOF) on the incoming BITS timing reference signal. LOF indicates that the receiving ONS 15454 has lost frame delineation in the data being received.


Note   The procedure assumes that the BITS timing reference signal has been functioning properly. It also assumes the alarm is not appearing during system turn-up.



Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Verify that the BITS input and the TCC have matching line framing and line coding.

(a) In the CTC, note the slot and port reporting the alarm.

(b) Find the coding and framing formats of the external BITS timing source. This should be in the user documentation for the external BITS timing source or on the unit itself.

(c) Click the Provisioning tab and the Timing tab to display the General Timing Screen.

(d) Verify that Coding matches the coding of the BITS timing source (either B8ZS or AMI).

(e) If the coding does not match, click Coding to reveal the menu. Choose the appropriate coding.

(f) Verify that Framing matches the framing of the BITS timing source (either ESF or SF[D4]).

(g) If the Framing does not match, click Framing to reveal the menu. Choose the appropriate framing.


Note   The B8ZS coding field is normally paired with ESF in the Framing field, and the AMI coding field is normally paired with SF (D4) in the Framing field.


Step 2 If the alarm does not clear when the coding and framing of the ONS 15454 match the coding and framing of the external BITS timing source, replace the TCC card.

(a) Open the card ejectors.

(b) Slide the card out of the slot.

(c) Open the ejectors on the replacement card.

(d) Slide the replacement card into the slot along the guide rails.

(e) Close the ejectors.

When replacing a card with an identical type of card, you do not need to change the CTC database.


9.48.3 DS1 (LOF)

Explanation    A port on the DS-1 card has a loss of frame (LOF) condition. LOF indicates that the receiving ONS 15454 has lost frame delineation in the data being received.

When a LOF appears on the DS-1 card, the transmitting equipment might have its framing set to a format different from the receiving ONS 15454.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Verify that the line framing and line coding match between the DS-1 card and the signal source.

(a) In the CTC, note the slot and port reporting the alarm.

(b) Find the coding and framing formats of the DS-1 signal source for the card reporting the alarm. You might need to contact your Network Administrator for this information.

(c) Go to the card level view of the reporting card.

(d) Click the Provisioning tab.

(e) Verify that the reporting port's Line Type matches the signal source's Line Type.

(f) If the signal source line type does not match the reporting port, click Line Type to reveal the menu and choose the matching type.

(g) Verify that the reporting port's Line Coding matches the signal source's Line Type.

(h) If the signal source line coding does not match the reporting port, click Port Line Coding to reveal the menu. Choose the matching type.


Note   The B8ZS coding field is normally paired with ESF in the Framing field. AMI coding is normally paired with SF (D4) in the Framing field.


Step 2 If the alarm does not clear when the coding and framing of the ONS 15454 match the coding and framing of the DS-1 source, replace the DS-1 card.

(a) Open the card ejectors.

(b) Slide the card out of the slot.

(c) Open the ejectors on the replacement card.

(d) Slide the replacement card into the slot along the guide rails.

(e) Close the ejectors.

When replacing a card with an identical type of card, you do not need to change the CTC database.


9.48.4 OCN (LOF)

Explanation    A port on the reporting card has a loss of frame (LOF) condition. LOF indicates that the receiving ONS 15454 has lost frame delineation in the data being received. LOF occurs when the SONET overhead loses a valid framing pattern for 3 milliseconds. Receiving two consecutive valid A1/A2 framing patterns clears the alarm.

LOF on an OCN card is sometimes an indication that the OCN card reporting the alarm might be expecting a specific line rate and the input line rate source does not match the input line rate of the optical receiver.

Explanation   

Active: Critical, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Do a manual switch to move traffic away from the card.

(a) At the node view, click the Maintenance tab.

(b) Click the Protection tab.

(c) Click the protection group that contains the reporting card.

(d) Click the Protect/Standby card of that protection group.

(e) At Operation click the drop-down arrow.

(f) Click FORCE_SWITCH_TO_PROTECT.

(g) Click APPLY.

(h) Click YES at the confirmation dialog.

Step 2 If you still receive the LOF alarm, ensure that the source of the input line rate matches the input line rate of the optical receiver.

(a) Verify that the reporting optical card matches the originating optical card, for example, an OC-3 card matches an OC-3 card.

(b) If the optical cards match, use a test set to measure the input line rate to verify that the input line rate of the source matches the input line rate of the optical receiver.

Step 3 Verify physical connections between the optical ports.

Step 4 Verify that the optical connectors are clean.

Step 5 Verify that the receive levels are in the specified range.

Step 6 If the receive levels are not in the specified range, go to the receive side and attenuate the receive input.

Step 7 Verify that the optical port of the upstream node is inservice.


9.48.5 EC-1 (LOF)

Explanation    This alarm occurs when a port on the reporting card has a Loss of Frame (LOF) condition. LOF indicates that the receiving ONS 15454 has lost frame delineation in the data being received. LOF occurs when the SONET overhead loses a valid framing pattern for 3 milliseconds. Receiving two consecutive valid A1/A2 framing patterns clears the alarm.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Do a manual switch to move traffic away from the card.

(a) At the node view, click the Maintenance tab.

(b) Click the Protection tab.

(c) Double-click the protection group that contains the reporting card.

(d) Click the Protect/Standby card of that protection group.

(e) At Operation click the drop-down arrow.

(f) Click FORCE_SWITCH_TO_PROTECT.

(g) Click APPLY.

Step 2 Click YES at the confirmation dialog.


Note   If you do not have a protect card for the reporting card, on the reporting card create a new port and a new circuit to achieve the same effect.


Step 3 If you still receive the LOF alarm, check to make sure the input line rate source matches the input line rate of the optical receiver.

(a) Verify that the reporting optical card line rate matches the originating optical card line rate, for example, an EC-1 line rate matches an EC-1 line rate.

(b) If the optical card line rates are still in question, use an optical test set to measure the input line rate.

(c) If the received dbm levels are not in the specified range, go to the receive side and attenuate the receive input.

Step 4 Verify physical connections for the ports.


9.49 LOP

9.49.1 I/O

Explanation    This alarm indicates a Loss of Pointer (LOP) condition. LOP occurs when valid H1/H2 pointer bytes are missing from the SONET overhead. The H1/H2 pointer bytes are monitored by receiving equipment to locate the SONET payload. The LOP alarm indicates that invalid pointer values came in on eight, nine, or ten frames. The alarm clears when three consecutive valid pointers are received.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Do a manual switch to move traffic away from the card.

(a) At the node view, click the Maintenance tab.

(b) Click the Protection tab.

(c) Double-click the protection group that contains the reporting card.

(d) Click the Protect/Standby card of that protection group.

(e) At Operation click the drop-down arrow.

(f) Click FORCE_SWITCH_TO_PROTECT.

(g) Click APPLY.

Step 2 Click YES at the confirmation dialog.

Step 3 Perform a software reset on the reporting card.

(a) Go to the node view.

(b) Position the CTC cursor over the slot reporting the alarm.

(c) Right click to select RESET CARD.

Step 4 If the alarm persists, the problem is at the far-end node. Verify the cabling and physical connections at the far-end card.

Step 5 Switch from the far-end working card to the far-end protect card:

(a) At the node view, click the Maintenance tab.

(b) Click the Protection tab.

(c) Double-click the protection group that contains the far-end working card.

(d) Click the Protect/Standby card of that protection group.

(e) At Operation click the drop-down arrow.

(f) Click FORCE_SWITCH_TO_PROTECT.

(g) Click APPLY.

Step 6 If the alarm persists, replace the far-end card.

(a) Open the card ejectors.

(b) Slide the card out of the slot.

(c) Open the ejectors on the replacement card.

(d) Slide the card into the slot along the guide rails.

(e) Close the ejectors.

When replacing a card with an identical type of card, you do not need to change the CTC database.

Step 7 Do a soft reset on the far-end card.

Step 8 Verify the cabling and physical connections on the reporting card.


9.50 LOP-V

9.50.1 DS3XM-6, DS1

Explanation    This alarm indicates a loss of pointer (LOP) condition. LOP occurs when valid H1/H2 pointer bytes are missing from the SONET overhead. The H1/H2 pointer bytes are monitored by receiving equipment to locate the SONET payload. The LOP alarm indicates that invalid pointer values came in on eight, nine, or ten frames. The alarm clears when three consecutive valid pointers are received.

LOP-V indicates a loss of pointer at the VT level. The VT layer, or electrical layer, occurs when the SONET signal is broken down into an electrical signal, for example, when an OC-48 signal comes into an OC-48 optical card. This OC-48 signal is demultiplexed by the ONS 15454 and one of the channels separated from the OC-48 is cross connected into the DS3XM-6 card. This DS3XM-6 card reports the LOS-V alarm.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Verify the cabling and physical connections on the reporting card.

Step 2 Do a manual switch to move traffic away from the card.

(a) At the node view, click the Maintenance tab.

(b) Click the Protection tab.

(c) Double-click the protection group that contains the reporting card.

(d) Click the Protect/Standby card of that protection group.

(e) At Operation click the drop-down arrow.

(f) Click FORCE_SWITCH_TO_PROTECT.

(g) Click APPLY.

(h) Click YES at the confirmation dialog.

Step 3 Perform a software reset on the reporting card.

(a) Go to the node view.

(b) Position the CTC cursor over the slot reporting the alarm.

(c) Right click to select RESET CARD.

Step 4 If the alarm persists, the problem is at the far-end node. Verify the cabling and physical connections at the far-end card.

Step 5 Do a soft reset on the far-end card.

Step 6 Switch from the far-end working card to the far-end protect card.


9.51 LOS

9.51.1 DS3, DS3XM-6, DS1

Explanation    This alarm indicates a loss of signal (LOS) for a DS-3, DS-1 or DS3XM-6 card.

Loss of signal occurs when the port on the card is inservice but no signal is being received. The cabling might not be hooked up correctly to the card or a signal might not be present on the line.

Active: Critical, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Verify cabling continuity to the port.

Step 2 Verify that the proper port is inservice.

Step 3 Use a test set to verify that a valid signal is on the line. Test the line as close to the receiving card as possible.

Step 4 Ensure that the transmit and receive outputs from the DSx panel to your equipment are properly connected.

Step 5 Look for another alarm that might identify the source of the problem.

Step 6 Replace the reporting card.

(a) Open the card ejectors.

(b) Slide the card out of the slot.

(c) Open the ejectors on the replacement card.

(d) Slide the replacement card into the slot along the guide rails.

(e) Close the ejectors.

When replacing a card with an identical type of card, you do not need to change the CTC database.

Step 7 If there is a valid signal, replace the connector on the Backplane Interface Connector (BIC).


9.51.2 OCN (LOS)

Explanation    A port on the reporting OCN card has a loss of signal (LOS) condition. A LOS occurs when a SONET receiver detects an all-zero pattern for 10 microseconds or longer. The loss of signal indicates that the upstream transmitter has failed. If an OCN LOS alarm is not accompanied by additional alarms, a fiber break is often the cause of the alarm.The condition clears when two consecutive valid frames are received.

Active: Critical, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.


Warning   Invisible laser radiation may be emitted from the aperture ports of the single-mode fiber optic modules when no cable is connected. Avoid exposure and do not stare into open apertures.


Recommended Action   


Step 1 Verify fiber continuity to the port.

Step 2 Verify that the proper port is in service.

Step 3 Use an optical test set to verify that a valid signal exists on the line.

Test the line as close to the receiving card as possible.

Step 4 Verify that the power level of the optical signal is within the optical card's receiver specifications. Each individual card section in Chapter 2 lists the receiver specifications for that card.

Step 5 Ensure that the optical transmits and receives are connected properly.

Step 6 Replace the OCN card.


9.51.3 EC-1 (LOS)

Explanation    A port on the reporting card has a loss of signal (LOS) condition. A loss of signal occurs when a SONET receiver detects an all-zero pattern for 10 microseconds or longer. The loss of signal indicates that the upstream transmitter has failed. The condition clears when two consecutive valid frames are received.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Verify cabling continuity to the port.

Step 2 Verify that the proper port is in service.

Step 3 Use a test set to verify that there is a valid signal on the line.

Test the line as close to the receiving card as possible.

Step 4 Ensure that the transmit and receive cables from the DSX panel to your equipment are properly connected.

Step 5 If there is a valid signal, replace the connector on the backplane.

Step 6 Try another port on the card.

Step 7 Replace the EC-1 card.


9.52 LPBKDS1FEAC

9.52.1 DS3XM-6

Explanation    A DS-1 loopback signal is received from the far-end node due to a Far-End Alarm and Control (FEAC) command. A FEAC command is often used when troubleshooting with loopbacks.

Loopback is a commonly used troubleshooting technique. A signal is sent out on a link or part of the network and returned to the sending device. A troubleshooter can compare the quality of the sent signal and the returned signal to determine the condition of an isolated circuit. By setting up loopbacks on various parts of the network and excluding other parts, a troubleshooter can logically narrow down the source of the problem.

Two types of loopbacks are available: Facility and Terminal. Facility loopbacks troubleshoot ports only and are generally performed locally or at the near end. Terminal loopbacks test ports and spans and are often used for remote sites or far-end equipment. You can provision loopbacks through the CTC.


Caution   The CTC permits loopbacks on an in-service circuit. This operation is service affecting.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Note   This is an informational alarm.


9.53 LPBKDS3FEAC

9.53.1 DS3XM-6

Explanation    A DS-3 loopback signal is received from the far-end node due to a Far-End Alarm and Control (FEAC) command. A FEAC command is often used when troubleshooting with loopbacks.

Loopback is a commonly used troubleshooting technique. A signal is sent out on a link or part of the network and returned to the sending device. A troubleshooter can compare the quality of the sent signal and the returned signal to determine the condition of this isolated circuit. By setting up loopbacks on various parts of the network and excluding other parts, a troubleshooter can logically narrow down the source of the problem.

Two types of loopbacks are available: Facility and Terminal. Facility loopbacks troubleshoot ports only and are generally performed locally or at the near end. Terminal loopbacks test ports and spans and are often used for remote sites or far-end equipment. You can provision loopbacks through the CTC.


Caution   The CTC permits loopbacks on an in-service circuit. This operation is service affecting.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Note   This is an informational alarm.


9.54 LPBKFACILITY

9.54.1 DS3, DS3XM-6

Explanation    A software facility loopback is active for a DS3/DS3XM-6 port.

Loopback is a commonly-used troubleshooting technique. A signal is sent out on a link or part of the network and returned to the sending device. A troubleshooter can compare the quality of the sent signal and the returned signal to determine the condition of this isolated circuit. By setting up loopbacks on various parts of the network and excluding other parts, a troubleshooter can logically isolate the source of the problem.

Two types of loopbacks are available: Facility and Terminal. Facility loopbacks troubleshoot ports only and are generally performed locally or at the near end. Terminal loopbacks test ports and spans and are often used for remote sites or far-end equipment. You can provision loopbacks through the CTC.


Caution   The CTC permits loopbacks to be performed on an in-service circuit. This operation is service affecting.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 To remove the loopback alarm, double-click the reporting card.

Step 2 Click the Maintenance tab.

Step 3 Select the Loopback Type column.

Step 4 Select None.

Step 5 Click Apply.


9.54.2 DS1 (LPBKFACILITY)

Explanation    A software facility loopback is active for a DS-1 port.

Loopback is a commonly used troubleshooting technique. A signal is sent out on a link or part of the network and returned to the sending device. A troubleshooter can compare the quality of the sent signal and the returned signal to determine the condition of this isolated circuit. By setting up loopbacks on various parts of the network and excluding other parts, a troubleshooter can logically isolate the source of the problem.

Two types of loopbacks are available: Facility and Terminal. Facility loopbacks troubleshoot ports only and are generally performed locally or at the near end. Terminal loopbacks test ports and spans and are often used for remote sites or far-end equipment. You can provision loopbacks through the CTC.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 To remove the loopback alarm, double click the reporting card.

Step 2 Click the Maintenance tab.

Step 3 Select the Loopback Type column.

Step 4 Select None.

Step 5 Click Apply.


9.55 LPBKTERMINAL

9.55.1 DS3, DS3XM-6

Explanation    A terminal loopback is active for a DS3/DS3XM-6 port.

Loopback is a commonly used troubleshooting technique. A signal is sent out on a link or part of the network and returned to the sending device. A troubleshooter can compare the quality of the sent signal and the returned signal to determine the condition of this isolated circuit. By setting up loopbacks on various parts of the network and excluding other parts, a troubleshooter can logically narrow down the source of the problem.

Two types of loopbacks are available: Facility and Terminal. Facility loopbacks troubleshoot ports only and are generally performed locally or at the near end. Terminal loopbacks test ports and spans and are often used for remote sites or far-end equipment. You can provision loopbacks through the CTC.


Caution   The CTC permits loopbacks on an in-service circuit. This operation is service affecting.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 To remove the loopback alarm, double click or right click the card in the CTC and select Open to open the reporting card.

Step 2 Click the Maintenance tab.

Step 3 Select the Loopback Type column.

Step 4 Select None.

Step 5 Click Apply.


9.55.2 DS1 (LPBKTERMINAL)

Explanation    A software terminal loopback is active for a DS-1 port.

Loopback is a commonly used troubleshooting technique. A signal is sent out on a link or part of the network and returned to the sending device. A troubleshooter can compare the quality of the sent signal and the returned signal to determine the condition of this isolated circuit. By setting up loopbacks on various parts of the network and excluding other parts, a troubleshooter can logically isolate the source of the problem.

Two types of loopbacks are available: Facility and Terminal. Facility loopbacks troubleshoot ports only and are generally performed locally or at the near end. Terminal loopbacks test ports and spans and are often used for remote sites or far-end equipment. You can provision loopbacks through the CTC.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 To remove the loopback alarm, double click the reporting card.

The reporting card opens.

Step 2 Click the Maintenance tab.

Step 3 Select the Loopback Type column.

Step 4 Select None from the menu.

Step 5 Click Apply.


9.56 MANRESET

9.56.1 Any Card

Explanation    The user performed a manual system reset. This alarm appears when a user right clicks on a card and chooses Reset. Resets performed during a software upgrade also prompt the alarm.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Note   This is an informational alarm.


9.57 MANUAL-REQ

9.57.1 OCN (Not OC3)

Explanation    The Manual Switch Request on Facility/Equipment alarm occurs when a user initiates a manual switch request on a BLSR. BLSR reverts to the original working path if the manual switch is cleared. Clearing the manual switch also clears the MANUAL-REQ alarm.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Note   This is an informational alarm.


Recommended Action   


Step 1 To clear the manual switch and the MANUAL-REQ alarm on the BLSR:

(a) Log into one of the BLSR nodes.

(b) Click the Maintenance tab.

(c) Click the Ring tab.

(d) Click the arrow next to East Operation.

(e) Click Clear.

(f) Click the arrow next to West Operation.

(g) Click Clear.

(h) Click Apply.

(i) Click Yes at the Confirm BLSR Switch Are You Sure? dialog box.

(j) Click OK at the next dialog box.

Step 2 Repeat Step 1 at each node in the BLSR until the alarm clears.


9.57.2 XC/XCVT (MANUAL-REQ)

Explanation    The Manual Switch Request on Facility/Equipment alarm occurs when a user initiates a manual switch request on an XC/XCVT. Clearing the manual switch will not cause the XC/XCVT card to revert back to the pre-switch card. Clearing the manual switch clears the MANUAL-REQ alarm.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Note   This is an informational alarm.


Recommended Action   

Clear the manual switch and the MANUAL-REQ alarm on the XC/XCVT.


Step 1 Click the Maintenance tab.

Step 2 Click the XC Cards tab.

Step 3 Click the arrow next to Slot 8 Operation.

Step 4 Click Clear.

Step 5 Click the arrow next to Slot 10 Operation.

Step 6 Click Clear.

Step 7 Click Apply.


9.58 MEA

9.58.1 XC, I/O

Explanation    The Mismatch Between Entity/Equipment Type and Provisioned Attributes alarm occurs when the physical card inserted in a slot does not match the card type provisioned for that slot through the CTC. The alarm clears when the provisioned card type and the actual card type match.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Physically verify the type of card that sits in the reported slot.

Step 2 Click the Inventory tab to reveal the provisioned card type.

Step 3 Determine which card the CTC identifies as residing in the reported slot.

Step 4 If the card depicted by the CTC is the card type desired, physically insert the type of card provisioned for that slot.

Step 5 If the card that physically occupies the slot is correct card type, put the cursor over the card in the CTC.

Step 6 Right click and select Delete Card.

The card that physically occupies the slot reboots and CTC automatically provisions the card type into that slot.

Step 7 If the card is in service, has a circuit mapped to it, is paired in a working protection scheme, has DCC communications turned, on or is used as a timing reference, then the CTC will not allow the card to be deleted.

Step 8 If the card is in-service, take the facility out of service.


Caution   Prior to taking the facility out of service, ensure that no live traffic exists on the facility.

(a) Double-click the reporting card to display a card level view.

(b) Click the Provisioning tab.

(c) Click the Status of any in service ports.

(d) Select Out of Service to take the ports out of service.

Step 9 If a circuit has been mapped to the card, delete the circuit.


Caution   Prior to deleting the circuit, ensure that no live traffic exists on the circuit.

(a) On the node view, click the Circuits tab.

(b) Select the applicable circuit. (The one that connects to the reporting card.)

(c) Click Delete.

Step 10 If the card is paired in a protection scheme, delete the protection group.

(a) Click the Provisioning tab and the Protection tab.

(b) Select the protection group of the reporting card.

(c) Click Delete.

Step 11 Right click the card reporting the IMPROPRMVL.

Step 12 Choose Delete.


9.59 MEM-GONE

9.59.1 TCC/TCC+

Explanation    The Memory Gone alarm occurs when software operations exceed the memory capacity of the TCC/TCC+ card. The CTC will not function properly until this alarm clears. The alarm clears when additional memory becomes available.

Active: Critical, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 If the card reporting the alarm is a TCC, replace the TCC with a TCC+, see the "TCC Card to TCC+ Card Upgrade" section on page 10-11.

Step 2 If the card reporting the alarm is a TCC+, call the Technical Assistance Center (TAC) at 1-877-323-7368.


9.60 MEM-LOW

9.60.1 TCC/TCC+

Explanation    The Memory Low alarm occurs when data generated by software operations is close to exceeding the memory capacity of the TCC/TCC+ card. The CTC still functions, but will cease to function if additional CTC operations further tax the memory. The alarm clears when additional memory becomes available.

Active: Major, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 If the card reporting the alarm is a TCC, replace the TCC with a TCC+, see the "TCC Card to TCC+ Card Upgrade" section on page 10-11.

Step 2 If the card reporting the alarm is a TCC+, call the Technical Assistance Center (TAC) at 1-877-323-7368.


9.61 NODEMIS

9.61.1 OC-12 and OC-48 in BLSR

Explanation    The Node Id Mismatch failure alarm indicates two identical node IDs in the same ring. The ONS 15454 requires each node in the ring to have a unique node ID.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Find the nodes with identical node IDs.

(a) Log into a node on the ring.

(b) Click the Provisioning tab and the Ring tab.

(c) Record the Node ID number.

(d) Repeat Steps a - c for all nodes in the ring.

Step 2 If two nodes have the identical node ID number, change the node ID number of one node.

(a) Log into a node that has an identical node ID number.

(b) Click the Provisioning tab and the Ring tab.

(c) Change the number in Node ID to a unique number between 0 and 15.

(d) Click Apply.


9.62 NOT-AUTHENTICATED

Explanation    This alarm indicates that the username and password entered do not match the information stored in the TCC. All ONS 15454s must have the same username and password created in order to access every ONS 15454 in the network. Users can also be locked out of certain ONS 15454s on a network if their username and password is not created on that specific ONS 15454.

Recommended Action    For initial logon to the ONS 15454, type the user name CISCO15 and click Login (no password is required).

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Ensure that you are using a correct username and password.

Step 2 Ensure that an account exists on the TCC.


9.63 PDI-P

9.63.1 DS3, DS3XM-6, DS1

Explanation    A Payload Defect Indication Path alarm means that a signal label mismatch failure is occurring. A signal label mismatch failure (SLMF) is caused when an invalid C2 byte occurs in the SONET path overhead. The C2 byte is the signal label byte. This byte tells the equipment what the SONET payload envelope contains and how it is constructed. It enables a SONET device to transport multiple types of services. For example, ATM cells and fiber distributed data interface (FDDI) data frames can be interwoven and carried together.

The ONS 15454 encounters an SLMF when the payload, such as an ATM, does not match what the signal label is reporting. An AIS alarm often accompanies the PDI-P alarm. If the PDI-P is the only alarm reported with the AIS, clearing the PDI-P alarm clears the AIS alarm. PDI-P might also occur during an upgrade, but usually clears itself and is not a valid alarm.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.


Warning   Invisible laser radiation may be emitted from the aperture ports of the single-mode fiber optic modules when no cable is connected. Avoid exposure and do not stare into open apertures.


Recommended Action   


Step 1 Verify that all circuits terminating in the reporting card are in an active state.

(a) Click the Circuits tab.

(b) Verify that the State column lists the port as ACTIVE.

(c) If the State column lists the port as INCOMPLETE, wait up to 10 minutes for the ONS 15454 to fully initialize.

Step 2 Verify that the signal source to the DSN card is reporting the alarm.

Step 3 If traffic is being affected, delete and recreate the circuit.


Caution   Deleting a circuit might affect traffic.

Step 4 Check the far-end OCN card that provides STS payload to the DSN card.

Step 5 Verify the cross-connect between the OCN card and the DSN card.

Step 6 Clean the far-end OCN fiber.

(a) Clean fiber according to local site practice.

(b) If no local practice exists, use a CLETOP Real-Type or equivalent fiber optic cleaner and follow the instructions accompanying the product.

Step 7 Replace OCN/DSN cards.

(a) Open the card ejectors.

(b) Slide the card out of the slot.

(c) Open the ejectors on the replacement card.

(d) Slide the replacement card into the slot along the guide rails.

(e) Close the ejectors.

When replacing a card with an identical type of card, you do not need to change the CTC database.


9.64 PLM-P

9.64.1 DS3, DS3XM-6, DS1

Explanation    A Payload Label Mismatch Path means that a signal label mismatch failure is occurring. A signal label mismatch failure (SLMF) occurs when an invalid C2 byte occurs in the SONET path overhead. The C2 byte is the signal label byte. This byte tells the equipment what the SONET payload envelope contains and how it is constructed. It enables a SONET device to transport multiple types of services. For example, ATM cells and fiber distributed data interface (FDDI) data frames can be interwoven and carried together.

The ONS 15454 encounters a SLMF when the payload, such as an ATM, does not match what the signal label is reporting. An AIS alarm often accompanies the PLM-P alarm. If the PLM-P is the only alarm reported with the AIS, clearing the PLM-P alarm clears the AIS alarm. PDI-P might also occur during an upgrade, but usually clears itself and is not a valid alarm.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.


Warning   Invisible laser radiation may be emitted from the aperture ports of the single-mode fiber optic modules when no cable is connected. Avoid exposure and do not stare into open apertures.


Recommended Action   


Step 1 Verify that all circuits terminating in the reporting card are active.

(a) Click the Circuits tab.

(b) Verify that the State column lists the port as ACTIVE.

(c) If the State column lists the port as INCOMPLETE, wait up to 10 minutes for the ONS 15454 to fully initialize.

Step 2 Verify that the signal source to the DSN card is reporting the alarm.

Step 3 If traffic is being affected, delete and recreate the circuit.


Caution   Deleting a circuit might affect traffic.

Step 4 Check the far-end OCN card that provides STS payload to the DSN card.

Step 5 Verify the cross-connect between the OCN card and the DSN card.

Step 6 Clean the far-end OCN fiber.

(a) Clean the fiber according to local site practice.

(b) If no local practice exists, use a CLETOP Real-Type or equivalent fiber optic cleaner and follow the instructions accompanying the product.

Step 7 Replace OCN/DSN cards.

(a) Open the card ejectors.

(b) Slide the card out of the slot.

(c) Open the ejectors on the replacement card.

(d) Slide the replacement card into the slot along the guide rails.

(e) Close the ejectors.

When replacing a card with an identical type of card, you do not need to change the CTC database.


9.65 PLM-V

9.65.1 DS1, DS3XM-6

Explanation    A VT Payload Label Mismatch indicates that the content of the V5 byte in the SONET overhead is inconsistent or invalid.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Verify that your signal source matches the signal allowed by the I/O card, for example, the I/O card does not allow VT6 or VT9 mapping.

Step 2 Verify that the SONET VT path originator, which can be found through circuit provisioning, is sending the correct VT label value.


9.66 PWRRESTART

Explanation    A power fail restart is a cold boot of the reporting card. This alarm might occur when you hard reset (physically remove and insert) a card, power up an ONS 15454, or replace a card.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Note   This is an informational alarm.



Step 1 If the alarm does not clear after the card reboots, physically reseat the card.

Step 2 If the alarm still fails to clear, replace the card.

(a) Open the card ejectors.

(b) Slide the card out of the slot.

(c) Open the ejectors on the replacement card.

(d) Slide the replacement card into the slot along the guide rails.

(e) Close the ejectors.

When replacing a card with an identical type of card, you do not need to change the CTC database.


9.67 RAI

9.67.1 DS3XM-6

Explanation    Remote Alarm Indication signifies an end-to-end failure. The error condition is sent from one end of the SONET path to the other.

RAI on the DS3XM-6 card indicates that far-end signalling is receiving a DS-3 AIS.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   

Troubleshoot the far-end DS-3 node for AIS.


9.68 RCVRMISS

9.68.1 DS1

Explanation    Facility termination equipment detects a missing receive cable on the DS-1 port or a possible mismatch of backplane equipment, for example, an SMB connector or a BNC connector is connected to a DS-1 card.


Note   DS-1s are four-wire circuits and need a positive and negative connection for both transmit and receive.


Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Check that the device attached to the DS-1 port is operational.

Step 2 Verify that the cabling is securely connected.

Step 3 Verify that the pinouts are correct.

Step 4 Replace the receive cable, if steps 1-3 do not clear the alarm.


9.69 RFI-L

9.69.1 OCN, EC-1

Explanation    The ONS 15454 detects a remote fault indication (RFI) in the SONET overhead because a fault exists in another network element. Resolving the fault in the adjoining node clears the RFI-L alarm in the reporting node.

RFI-L indicates that the alarm is occurring at the line level. The line layer is the segment between two SONET devices in the circuit and is also known as a maintenance span. The line layer deals with SONET payload transport and its functions include multiplexing and synchronization.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Log into the far-end node from the reporting ONS 15454.

Step 2 Check for alarms in the far-end node, especially UNEQ-P or UNEQ-V.

Step 3 Resolve alarms in the far-end node.


9.70 RFI-P

9.70.1 DS3, DS3XM-6, DS1, E100-T12, E1000-2

Explanation    A Remote Failure Indication Path alarm occurs when the ONS 15454 detects a remote fault indication (RFI) in the SONET overhead because a fault exists in another network element. Resolving the fault in the adjoining node clears the RFI-P alarm in the reporting node.

RFI-P occurs in the node that terminates a path. The path layer is the segment between the originating equipment and the terminating equipment. This segment might encompass several consecutive line segments. The originating equipment puts bits together into a SONET payload and the terminating equipment breaks the bits apart again. SONET multiplexers, such as the ONS 15454, often perform the origination and termination tasks of the SONET payload.

An RFI-P error message on the ONS 15454 indicates that the node reporting the RFI-P is the terminating node on that path segment. If there is a node between the failing node and the terminating node, this node reports an RFI-L.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Verify that the ports are enabled and in service on the reporting ONS 15454.

Step 2 To find the path failure, verify the integrity of the SONET STS circuit path at each of the intermediate SONET nodes.

Step 3 Log into the far-end node from the reporting ONS 15454.

Step 4 Check for alarms in the far-end node, especially UNEQ-P or UNEQ-V.

Step 5 Resolve alarms in the far-end node.


9.71 RFI-V

9.71.1 DS3XM-6, DS1

Explanation    The ONS 15454 detects a remote fault indication (RFI) because a fault exists in another network element. Resolving the fault in the adjoining node clears the RFI-V alarm in the reporting node.

RFI-V indicates that an upstream failure has occurred at the VT layer. The VT (electrical) layer occurs when the SONET signal is broken down into an electrical signal, for example when an OC-48 signal comes into an OC-48 optical card contained in the ONS 15454. If this OC-48 signal is demultiplexed and one of the channels separated from the OC-48 is cross connected into the DS-1 card in the ONS 15454, the DS-1 card reports an RFI-V alarm.

An AIS-V error message on the electrical card is accompanied by an AIS-P error message on the cross-connected optical card.


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Check connectors on the Electrical Interface Assembly (EIA) or balun and make sure they are securely fastened and connected to the proper slot/port.

Step 2 Verify that the DS1/DS3XM-6 card is active and in service.

Step 3 Check the signal source for errors.

Step 4 Log into the far-end node from the reporting ONS 15454.

Step 5 Check for alarms in the far-end node, especially UNEQ-P or UNEQ-V.

Step 6 Resolve alarms in the far-end node.


9.72 SDBER

9.72.1 OCN

Explanation    The SDBER alarm indicates that the quality of the signal is so poor that the bit error rate (BER) on the incoming OCN line has passed the signal degrade threshold. The ONS 15454 sets the BER threshold for SDBER from 10-9 to 10-5. Signal degrade is defined by Telcordia as a "soft failure" condition. SDBER and SFBER (Signal Fail Bit Error Rate) both monitor the incoming bit error rate and are similar alarms, but SDBER is triggered at a lower bit error rate than SFBER. SDBER causes the card to switch from working to protect. The ONS 15454 detects SDBER on the STS level, not the VT level.

SDBER causes a switch from the working card to the protect card at either the path or line level. The SDBER alarm clears when the BER level falls to one-tenth of the threshold level that triggered the alarm. A BER increase is sometimes caused by a physical fiber problem, including a poor fiber connection, a bend in the fiber that exceeds the permitted bend radius, or a bad fiber splice.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.


Warning   Invisible laser radiation may be emitted from the aperture ports of the single-mode fiber optic modules when no cable is connected. Avoid exposure and do not stare into open apertures.


Recommended Action   


Step 1 With an optical test set, measure the power level of the line to ensure it is within guidelines.

Step 2 Verify that optical receive levels are within the acceptable range.

Step 3 Clean the fibers at both ends for a line signal degrade, but not for a path signal degrade. (If you do not know whether the signal degrade is path or line, clean the fibers.)

(a) Clean fiber according to local site practice.

(b) If no local practice exists, use a CLETOP Real-Type or equivalent fiber optic cleaner and follow the instructions accompanying the product.

Step 4 Verify that single mode fiber is being used.

Step 5 Verify that a single mode laser is being used at the far-end.

Step 6 If the problem persists, the transmitter at the other end of the OCN line might be failing and require replacement.


9.73 SFBER

9.73.1 OCN

Explanation    The quality of the signal is so poor that the bit error rate (BER) on the incoming OCN line passed the signal failure threshold. The ONS 15454 sets the BER threshold for SFBER from 10-5 to 10-3. Signal failure is defined by Telcordia as a "hard failure" condition. SDBER and SFBER both monitor the incoming bit error rate and are similar alarms, but SFBER is triggered at a higher bit error rate than SDBER. The ONS 15454 detects SFBER on the STS level, not the VT level.

SFBER causes a switchover from working to protect at either the path or line level. The SFBER alarm clears when the BER level falls to one-tenth of the threshold level that triggered the alarm. A BER increase is sometimes caused by a physical fiber problem, including a poor fiber connection, a bend in the fiber that exceeds the permitted bend radius, or a bad fiber splice.

Active: Critical, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.


Warning   Invisible laser radiation may be emitted from the aperture ports of the single-mode fiber optic modules when no cable is connected. Avoid exposure and do not stare into open apertures.


Recommended Action   


Step 1 Using an optical test set, measure the power level of the line and ensure it is within the guidelines.

Step 2 Verify that optical receive levels are within the acceptable range.

Step 3 Clean the fibers at both ends for a line signal degrade, but not for a path signal degrade. (If you do not know whether the signal degrade is path or line, clean the fibers.)

(a) Clean fiber according to local site practice.

(b) If no local practice exists, use a CLETOP Real-Type or equivalent fiber optic cleaner and follow the instructions accompanying the product.

Step 4 Verify that single-mode fiber is being used.

Step 5 Verify that a single-mode laser is being used at the far-end node.

Step 6 If the problem persists, the transmitter at the other end of the OCN line might be failing and need replacement.


9.74 SQUELCH

Explanation    The Squelch alarm occurs in a BLSR when a a node that originates or terminates STS circuits fails or is isolated by multiple fiber cuts. The isolation or failure of the node will disable the circuits that originate or terminate on the failed node. Squelch alarms appear on one or both of the nodes on either side of the isolated/failed node. The AIS-P alarm will also appear on all nodes in the ring, except the isolated node.

Active: Major, Service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.


Warning   Invisible laser radiation may be emitted from the aperture ports of the single-mode fiber optic modules when no cable is connected. Avoid exposure and do not stare into open apertures.


Recommended Action   


Step 1 Determine the isolated node:

(a) Go to Network View.

(b) The grayed out node with red spans will be the isolated node.

Step 2 Verify fiber continuity to the ports on the isolated node.

Step 3 Verify that the proper ports are in service.

Step 4 Use an optical test set to verify that a valid signal exists on the line.

Test the line as close to the receiving card as possible.

Step 5 Verify that the power level of the optical signal is within the optical card's receiver specifications. Each individual card section in Chapter 2 lists the receiver specifications for that card.

Step 6 Ensure that the optical transmits and receives are connected properly.

Step 7 Replace the OCN card.


9.75 STU

Explanation    The Synchronization Traceability Unknown alarm means the reporting node is timed to a reference that does not support Sync Status Messaging (SSM). SSM is a SONET protocol that communicates information about the quality of the timing source. SSM messages are carried on the S1 byte of the SONET Line layer. SSM enables SONET devices to automatically select the highest quality timing reference and to avoid timing loops. The ONS 15454 supports SSM.

This alarm indicates that the reporting node has SSM enabled but the timing source does not support SSM, or the reporting node does not have SSM enabled but the timing source supports SSM.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 From the node view, click the Provisioning tab and the Timing tab.

Step 2 If Sync Messaging is checked, uncheck the box.

Step 3 If Sync Messaging is unchecked, check the box.

Step 4 Click Apply.


9.76 SWTOPRI

Explanation    The ONS 15454 has switched to the primary timing source (reference 1). The ONS 15454 uses three ranking timing references. The timing references are typically two BITS-level or line-level sources and an internal reference.

Active: Not reportable, Non-service affecting

Standby: Not reportable, Non-service affecting


Note   This is an informational alarm.


9.77 SWTOSEC

Explanation    The ONS 15454 has switched to the secondary timing source (reference 2). The ONS 15454 uses three ranking timing references. The timing references are typically two BITS-level or line-level sources and an internal reference.

Active: Not reportable, Non-service affecting

Standby: Not reportable, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   

Troubleshoot alarms related to failures of the primary timing source, such as SYNCPRI.


9.78 SWTOTHIRD

Explanation    The ONS 15454 has switched to the third timing source (reference 3). The ONS 15454 uses three ranking timing references. The timing references are typically two BITS-level or line-level sources and an internal reference.

Active: Not reportable, Non-service affecting

Standby: Not reportable, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   

Troubleshoot alarms related to failures of the primary and secondary reference source, such as SYNCPRI and SYNCSEC.


9.79 SWTRANSFER

9.79.1 TCC/TCC+

Explanation    TCC/TCC+ is downloading or transferring software. This operation takes approximately 20 to 30 minutes.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   

No action is necessary. Wait for the transfer to complete or the software to download.


9.80 SYNCPRI

9.80.1 TCC/TCC+

Explanation    A Loss of Timing on Primary Reference alarm means that the ONS 15454 lost the primary timing source (reference 1). The ONS 15454 uses three ranking timing references. The timing references are typically two BITS-level or line-level sources and an internal reference. If SYNCPRI occurs, the ONS 15454 should switch to secondary timing (reference 2) to obtain valid timing for the ONS 15454. This switch also triggers the SWTOSEC alarm.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 From the card level screen for the reporting TCC card, click the Provisioning tab and Timing tab.

Step 2 Check the current configuration for the REF-1 for the NE Reference.

Step 3 If the primary reference clock is an incoming port on the ONS 15454, check the timing source for this port to make sure the current configuration of REF-1 matches the configuration of the timing source.


9.81 SYNCSEC

9.81.1 TCC/TCC+

Explanation    A Loss of Timing on Secondary Reference alarm means that the ONS 15454 lost the secondary timing source (reference 2). The ONS 15454 uses three ranking timing references. The timing references are typically two BITS-level or line-level sources and an internal reference. If SYNCSEC occurs, the ONS 15454 should automatically switch to the third timing source (reference 3) to obtain valid timing for the ONS 15454. This switch also triggers the SWTOTHIRD alarm.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 From the card-level screen for the reporting TCC card, click the Provisioning tab and Timing tab.

Step 2 Check the current configuration for the REF-2 for the NE Reference.

Step 3 If the secondary timing source is an incoming port on the ONS 15454, check the timing source for this port to make sure the current configuration of REF-2 matches the configuration of the timing source.


9.82 SYNCTHIRD

9.82.1 TCC/TCC+

Explanation    The Loss of Timing on Third Reference alarm means that the ONS 15454 lost the third timing source (reference 3). The ONS 15454 uses three ranking timing references. The timing references are typically two BITS-level or line-level sources and an internal reference. If SYNCTHIRD occurs, and the ONS 15454 uses an internal reference for source three, then the TCC card might have failed. The ONS 15454 often reports either FRNSYNC or HLDOVERSYNC after SYNCTHIRD.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 From the card-level screen for the reporting TCC card, click the Provisioning tab and Timing tab.

Step 2 Check the current configuration for the REF-3 of the NE Reference.

Step 3 If the third timing source is an incoming port on the ONS 15454, check the timing source for this port to make sure the current configuration of REF-3 matches the configuration of the timing source.

Step 4 If the third timing source uses the internal ONS 15454 timing:

(a) Perform a software reset on the XC/XCVT card.

Go to the node view.

Position the CTC cursor over the slot reporting the alarm.

Right click to select RESET CARD.

(b) If this fails to clear the alarm, physically reseat the TCC card.

(c) If this fails to clear the alarm, replace the TCC card.

Open the card ejectors.

Slide the card out of the slot.

Open the ejectors on the replacement card.

Slide the replacement card into the slot along the guide rails.

Close the ejectors.

When replacing a card with an identical type of card, you do not need to change the CTC database.


9.83 SYSBOOT

9.83.1 TCC/TCC+

Explanation    This alarm indicates new software is activating.

Active: Minor, Non-service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

No action is required. The alarm clears when all cards finish rebooting the new software. (The reboot might take up to thirty minutes.)


9.84 TRMTMISS

9.84.1 DS1

Explanation    The facility termination equipment detects a missing transmit cable on the DS-1 port. A transmit cable connector may have come off or the wrong backplane may be installed on an ONS 15454. For example, an ONS 15454 with DS1-14 cards may have a BNC backplane installed, when an AMP Champ backplane is the correct backplane for these cards.


Note   DS-1s are four-wire circuits and need a positive and negative connection for both transmit and receive.


Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Check that the device attached to the DS-1 port is operational.

Step 2 Verify that the cabling is securely connected.

Step 3 Verify that the pinouts are correct.

Step 4 Replace the transmit cable, if steps 1-3 do not clear the alarm.


9.85 UNEQ-P

9.85.1 I/O

Explanation    An Unequipped Path Alarm means the path does not have a valid sender or receiver. This message is carried in the C2 signal path byte in the SONET overhead. The message informs the system that the SONET payload envelope (SPE) is invalid.

UNEQ-P occurs in the node that terminates a path. The path layer is the segment between the originating equipment and the terminating equipment. This segment might encompass several consecutive line segments. The originating equipment puts bits together into a SONET payload and the terminating equipment breaks the bits apart again. SONET multiplexers, such as the ONS 15454, often perform the origination and termination tasks of the SONET payload.

A UNEQ-P error message on the ONS 15454 indicates that the node reporting the RFI-P is the terminating node on that path segment.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.

Recommended Action   


Step 1 Verify that all circuits terminating in the reporting card are active.

(a) Click the Circuits tab.

(b) Verify that the State column lists the port as ACTIVE.

(c) If the State column lists the port as INCOMPLETE, call the Technical Assistance Center (TAC) at 1-877-323-7368.

Step 2 Verify the signal source to the DSN card reporting the alarm.

Step 3 If traffic is being affected, delete and recreate the circuit.


Caution   Deleting a circuit might affect traffic.

Step 4 Check the far-end OCN card that provides STS payload to the DSN card.

Step 5 Verify cross connect between the OCN card and the DSN card.

Step 6 Clean the far-end OCN fiber.

(a) Clean the fiber according to local site practice.

(b) If no local practice exists, use a CLETOP Real-Type or equivalent fiber optic cleaner and follow the instructions accompanying the product.


9.86 UNEQ-V

9.86.1 DS1, DS3XM-6

Explanation    The VT is receiving an unequipped signal.

Active: Major, Service affecting

Standby: Minor, Non-service affecting


Caution   Always use the supplied electrostatic discharge wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.


Warning   Invisible laser radiation may be emitted from the aperture ports of the single-mode fiber optic modules when no cable is connected. Avoid exposure and do not stare into open apertures.


Recommended Action   


Step 1 Verify that all circuits terminating in the reporting card are active.

(a) Click the Circuits tab.

(b) Verify that the State column lists the port as ACTIVE.

(c) If the State column lists the port as INCOMPLETE, call the Technical Assistance Center (TAC) at 1-877-323-7368.

Step 2 Verify the signal source to the DSN card reporting the alarm.

Step 3 If traffic is being affected, delete and recreate the circuit.


Caution   Deleting a circuit might affect traffic.

Step 4 Check the far-end OCN card that provides STS payload to the DSN card.

Step 5 Verify cross connect between the OCN card and the DSN card.

Step 6 Clean the far-end OCN fiber.

(a) Clean the fiber according to local site practice.

(b) If no local practice exists, use a CLETOP Real-Type or equivalent fiber optic cleaner and follow the instructions accompanying the product.

Step 7 Replace OCN/DSN cards.

(a) Open the card ejectors.

(b) Slide the card out of the slot.

(c) Open the ejectors on the replacement card.

(d) Slide the replacement card into the slot along the guide rails.

(e) Close the ejectors.

When replacing a card with an identical type of card, you do not need to change the CTC database.


.

Table 9-2 Entity Alarms, Equipment Alarms and Common Equipment Alarms 

 
Facility Alarms
Equipment
Common Equipment
 
OCN
DS3
DS3XM
DS1
EC1
E100
STS
   

AIS

 

X

 

X

       

X

AIS-L

X

     

X

       

AIS-P

           

X

   

AIS-V

           

X

   

APSB

X

               

APSC-DFLTK

X

               

APSCIMP

X

               

APSCM

X

               

APSMM

X

               

AUTORESET

             

X

 

BKUPMEMP

             

X

 

BLSROOSYNC

               

X

CARLOSS

         

X

X

 

CONCAT

             

X

 

CONNLOS

X

               

CONTBUS-A-FAIL18

             

X

 

CONTBUS-A-FAILx

             

X

 

CONTBUS-B-FAIL18

             

X

 

CONTBUS-B-FAILx

             

X

 

CTNEQPT-PBxPROT

             

X

 

CTNEQPT-PBxWORK

             

X

 

DFLTK

X

               

DISCONNECTED

                 

DS3FEEQPTFAILSA

   

X

           

DS3FE-LOF

                 

EOC

                 

EQPT

             

X

X

EXTERNAL

                 

FAILTOSW

           

X

   

FAILTOSW-RNG

X

               

FAILTOSW-SPAN

X

               

FAN

             

X

X

FE-AIS

   

X

           

FE-DS1-MULTLOS

   

X

           

FE-DS1-SNGLLOS

   

X

           

FE-EQPT-NSA

   

X

           

FE-IDLE

   

X

           

FE-LOF

   

X

           

FE-LOS

   

X

           

FORCED-REQ

X

               

FRNGSYNC

               

X

HITEMP

             

X

X

HLDOVERSYNC

               

X

IMPROPRMVL

             

X

 

INCON

X

               

LBKFACILITY

                 

LOCKOUTOFPR-RING

X

               

LOF

X

X

 

X

X

     

X

LOP

           

X

X

 

LOP-V

           

X

X

 

LOS

X

X

 

X

X

     

X

LPBKDS1FEAC

   

X

X

         

LPBKDS1FEAC-CMD

     

X

         

LPBKDS3FEAC

   

X

           

LPBKDS3FEAC-CMD

   

X

           

LPBKFACILITY

X

X

 

X

X

       

LPBKTERMINAL

X

X

 

X

X

       

MACFAIL

               

X

MANRESET

             

X

 

MANUAL

           

X

X

 

MANUAL-REQ

X

               

MEA

             

X

 

NODEMIS

X

               

PDI-P

           

X

   

PLM-P

           

X

   

PLM-V

           

X

   

PRCDERR

               

X

PWRESTART

             

X

 

RAI

     

X

         

RCVRMISS

     

X

         

RFI-L

X

     

X

       

RFI-P

           

X

   

RFI-V

           

X

   

SD

X

         

X

   

SFBER

X

         

X

   

SLMF

           

X

   

SQUELCH

X

               

STU

X

             

X

SWTOPRI

               

X

SWTOSEC

               

X

SWTOTHIRD

               

X

SWTRANSFER

             

X

 

SYNCPRI

               

X

SYNCSEC

               

X

SYNCTHIRD

               

X

SYSBOOT

               

X

TRMTMISS

     

X

         

UNEQ-P

           

X

   

UNEQ-V

           

X

   

and list system-issued EVTs. The tables do not indicate which cards issue which EVTs or suggest that all of the EVTs on a table row are issued at the same time. For example, the transmux performs DS1, DS3, and SONET path monitoring.

Table 9-3 Threshold Crossing Events (EVTs) 

   
DS1
DS3
SONET Section
SONET Line
SONET Path
SONET VT

T-CVL

Coding Violations-Line

X

X

 

X

   

T-CVP

Coding Violations-Path

X

X

   

X

 

T-CVS

Coding Violations-Section

           

T-CVV

Errored Seconds-Line

         

X

T-ESL

Errored Seconds-Path

X

X

 

X

   

T-ESP

Errored Seconds-Section

X

X

   

X

 

T-ESS

Failure Count-Path

           

T-ESV

Failure Count-Line

         

X

T-FCP

Failure Count-Path

           

T-FCL

Failure Count-Line

     

X

   

T-PJNEG

PPJC-PDET: Negative Pointer Justification

     

X

   

T-PJPOS

PPJC-PDET: Positive Pointer Justification

     

X

   

T-PSC

Protection Switching Count

     

X

   

T-PSD

Protection Switching Duration

     

X

   

T-SASP

 

X

X

       

T-SEFS

Severely Errored Framing Seconds

   

X

     

T-SESL

Severely Errored Second Line

X

X

 

X

   

T-SESP

Severely Errored Second-Path

X

X

   

X

 

T-SESS

Severely Errored Section-Section

           

T-SESV

           

X

T-UASL

Unavailable Second-Line

     

X

   

T-UASP

Unavailable Second-Path

X

X

   

X

 

T-UASV

           

X

T-AISSP

 

X

X

       

T-CVCPP

   

X

       

T-ESCPP

   

X

       

T-LOSSL

   

X

       

T-SASCPP

   

X

       

T-SESCPP

   

X

       

T-UASCPP

   

X

       

Table 9-4 Additional Events (EVTs)

   
Etherbridge
System

TOP-CHANGE

Ethernet bridge topology change

X

 

NEW-ROOT

Ethernet bridge is New Root of spanning tree

X

 

CLDRESTART

Cold Restart

 

X

WRMRESTART

Warm Restart

 

X

BLSR-RESYNC

BLSR tables resynchronized

 

X

WKSWPR

Working unit switched to protection unit

   

WKSWBK

Protection unit switched back to working unit