Cisco ONS 15454 User Documentation, Release 2.2.x
Chapter 7, Ethernet Applications

Table Of Contents

Ethernet Applications

7.1 Ethernet over SONET Application

7.2 Router Aggregation Application

7.3 Transparent LAN Application

7.4 ONS 15454 Ethernet Cards

7.4.1 E100T

7.4.2 E1000-2

7.5 Virtual Local Area Networks (VLANs)

7.5.1 IEEE 802.1Q

7.5.2 IEEE 802.1Q Priority Queuing (formerly IEEE 802.1P)

7.6 Spanning Tree

7.6.1 Spanning Tree Parameters

7.6.2 Spanning Tree Configuration

7.6.3 Viewing Spanning Tree

7.7 Multicard and Single-card EtherSwitch

7.8 ONS 15454 Ethernet Circuit Configurations

7.8.1 E-Series Circuit Protection

7.8.2 Multicard EtherSwitch Ethernet Circuit Provisioning

7.8.3 Shared Packet Ring Ethernet Circuit Provisioning

7.8.4 Hub and Spoke Ethernet Circuit Provisioning

7.8.5 Ethernet Manual Cross-Connects

7.9 VLAN Membership and Ethernet Port Provisioning

7.10 Ethernet Maintenance and Performance Screens

7.10.1 Statistics Screen

7.10.2 Line Utilization Screen

7.10.3 History Screen

7.10.4 Spanning Trees Screen

7.10.5 MAC Addresses Screen

7.10.6 Trunk Utilization Screen

7.11 Remote Monitoring Specification Alarm Thresholds

7.12 Basic Ethernet Connectivity Testing


7

Ethernet Applications


This chapter explains how to use the Ethernet features of the Cisco ONS 15454.

7.1 Ethernet over SONET Application

To maximize Ethernet cost effectiveness, the ONS 15454 integrates Ethernet access into the same SONET platform that transports data and voice traffic. The ONS 15454 supports layer 2 switching and the ability to classify Ethernet traffic as defined in IEEE 802.1 Q. You can switch tagged traffic onto separate SONET STS channels to engineer bandwidth by traffic class. Ethernet over SONET lets service providers augment Time Division Multiplexing (TDM) services with Ethernet, and allows users to deliver data traffic over existing facilities. The ONS 15454 can also concentrate Ethernet ports into one or more STS-n circuits to use bandwidth more efficiently.

7.2 Router Aggregation Application

The ONS 15454 Ethernet solution uses existing SONET infrastructure to transport aggregate traffic from multiple, remote sources. illustrates the aggregation and transport.

Figure 7-1 Router Aggregation Application

7.3 Transparent LAN Application

The ONS 15454 supports Transparent LAN Service (TLS) that provides private network service across a SONET backbone. Because network subscribers sometimes share the same equipment or even the same STS channels, it is necessary to logically isolate subscriber traffic. Service providers can use the IEEE 802.1Q feature in the ONS 15454 to define multiple, virtual local area networks (VLANs) across the backbone. Specific Ethernet ports and SONET STS channels can be defined as a VLAN group. VLAN groups isolate the subscriber's traffic from users outside the VLAN group and keep "outside" traffic from "leaking" into the VPN. illustrates a transparent LAN application.

Figure 7-2 Transparent LAN Application

7.4 ONS 15454 Ethernet Cards

The ONS 15454 supports two separate Ethernet cards, the E100T and the E1000-2. This section describes the characteristics of each card.

7.4.1 E100T

The ONS 15454 uses E100T cards for Ethernet (10 Mbps) and Fast Ethernet (100 Mbps). The E100T enables network operators to provide multiple 10/100 Mbps access drops for high-capacity customer LAN interconnections. The card provides efficient transport and co-existence of traditional TDM traffic with packet switched data traffic. The E100T eliminates the need for external Ethernet aggregation equipment.

Specifications:

Operating Temperature: 0 to +55 degrees Celsius

Operating Humidity: 5 - 95% non-condensing

Power Consumption: 40 Watts

Figure 7-3 E100T Card, Front view

Table 7-1

LED State
Description

Amber

Transmitting and Receiving

Solid Green

Idle and Link Integrity

Flashing Green

Transmitting only or Receiving only

Green Off

Inactive connection or uni-directional traffic.


E100T Ethernet Port LED States

7.4.2 E1000-2

The ONS 15454 uses the E1000-2 cards for Gigabit Ethernet (1000 Mbps). The E1000-2 enables network operators to provide multiple 1000 Mbps access drops for high-capacity customer LAN interconnections. The E1000-2 provides efficient transport and co-existence of traditional TDM traffic with packet-switched data traffic.

For Cisco Release 2.2.0, two GBIC modules are offered as separate products for flexibility: an IEEE 1000Base-SX compliant 850 nm optical module and an IEEE 1000Base-LX compliant 1300 nm optical module. The 850 nm SX optics are designed for multimode fiber and distances of up to
220 meters on 62.5 micron fiber and up to 550 meters on 50 micron fiber. The 1300 nm LX optics are designed for single-mode fiber and distances of up to 5 kilometers.


Caution   IE1000-2 cards lose traffic for approximately 30 seconds when an ONS 15454 database is restored. Traffic is lost during the period of spanning tree reconvergence. The CARLOSS alarm will appear and clear during this period.

Specifications:

Operating Temperature: 0 to +55 degrees Celsius

Operating Humidity: 5 - 95% non-condensing

Power Consumption: 40 Watts

Figure 7-4 E1000-2 Card, Front view

Table 7-2

LED State
Description

Amber

Transmitting and Receiving

Solid Green

Idle and Link Integrity

Flashing Green

Transmitting only or Receiving only

Green Off

Inactive connection or uni-directional traffic.


E1000-2 Ethernet Port LED States

7.5 Virtual Local Area Networks (VLANs)

As Ethernet networks grow, too many hosts transmitting data within a single broadcast domain cause an increase in "broadcast storms." You can create VLANs with the CTC to partition the broadcast domain into several domains and decrease the likelihood of broadcast storms. A VLAN carves out its own single broadcast domain from the larger Ethernet network.

The ONS 15454 supports port-based VLANs that group ports into virtual workgroups. These VLANs ensure that Ethernet ports see only traffic from ports within the same VLAN. These different VLANs communicate with each other through a router that spans multiple VLANs by using router ports in each VLAN, or through a router that understands IEEE 802.1Q.

7.5.1 IEEE 802.1Q

IEEE 802.1Q, the VLAN standard, places a Q-tag in the frame header. The 802.1Q-aware devices look at Q-tags to differentiate LANs. Therefore, multiple 802.1Q VLANs representing different logical networks can be transported over the same physical port. If a frame is received without a Q-tag, the frame is given a Q-tag based on the default VLAN assigned to the ingress port. If a frame is received with a Q-tag attached, the port classifies the frame based on the VLAN identifier present in the Q-tag.

Many older Ethernet devices do not understand 802.1Q tagging. Because 802.1Q lengthens the Ethernet header, older (non-802.1Q) devices may incorrectly identify the 802.1Q tagged packets as giants (an Ethernet frame larger than 1518 bytes) and drop them. The ONS 15454 takes non-tagged packets from the ingress port and assigns the frame to the VLAN associated with the ingress port. If packets come into the ONS 15454 network already tagged, the ONS 15454 uses the already-attached tag to forward the packet accordingly. Figure 7-5 illustrates different ways the ONS 15454 performs 802.1Q tagging.

The CTC allows the user to assign specific ports to specific VLANs and prohibit ports from being part of specific VLANs. ONS 15454 ports can also be set to Untag or Tagged. See the "Provision Ethernet Ports for VLAN Membership" section for more information on these operations.

Figure 7-5 Q-tag

7.5.2 IEEE 802.1Q Priority Queuing (formerly IEEE 802.1P)

Priority Queuing eases network congestion by mapping Ethernet traffic to different priority levels. Networks without Priority Queing handle all packets on a first-in-first-out basis. Priority Queuing assigns priorities to data packets. The ONS 15454 uses a "leaky bucket" algorithm to establish a weighted priority (not a strict priority). A weighted priority gives high-priority packets greater access to bandwidth, but does not totally preempt low priority packets. 70% of bandwidth goes to the high priority que and the remaining 30% goes to the low priority que. Low priority packets can also be dropped when the network is congested. The ONS 15454 takes the eight priorities specified in IEEE 802.1Q and maps them to two queues (shown in ). Priority Queuing information is carried through the network via IEEE 802.1Q tags

.

Table 7-3 Priority Queuing

User Priority
Queue
Allocated Bandwidth
0,1,2,3
Low
30%
4,5,6,7
High
70%

Figure 7-6 Priority Queuing

7.6 Spanning Tree

STP detects and eliminates network loops. By default, the ONS 15454 uses IEEE 802.1D STP on the optical line interfaces. When STP detects multiple paths between any two network hosts, STP blocks ports until only one path exists between any two network hosts ( ). The single path eliminates possible bridge loops.

Figure 7-7 Spanning Tree Blocked Path

When loops occur, some Ethernet switches see the same stations transmitting data on more than one interface. This condition disables the forwarding algorithm and allows duplicate frames to be forwarded. To remove loops, STP defines a tree that spans all the switches in an extended network. STP forces certain redundant data paths into a standby (blocked) state. If one network segment in the STP becomes unreachable, the spanning-tree algorithm reconfigures the spanning-tree topology and reactivates the blocked path to re-establish the link. STP operation is transparent to end stations, which do not discriminate between connections to a single LAN segment or a switched LAN with multiple segments. The ONS 15454 supports one STP instance per circuit up to a maximum of eight instances per shelf.

Starting with Release 2.2.0, users have the ability to enable STP on the Ethernet ports of the E100 and E1000 cards. This allows redundant circuit paths to be available for additional fault tolerance, but not cause a loop, as they are blocked by STP.

Figure 7-8 Enabling Spanning Tree

Procedure: Enable Spanning Tree on Ethernet Ports


Step 1 At the card-level view, click the Provisioning tab and the Port subtab.

Step 2 In the left-hand column, find the applicable port number and check the Stp Enabled box to enable STP for that port (see ).

Step 3 Click Apply.


7.6.1 Spanning Tree Parameters

Default spanning tree parameters are appropriate for most situations. Contact the Technical Assistance Center (TAC) at 1-877-323-7368 before you change the default STP parameters.

At the node view click the Maintenance>Spanning Trees> Etherbridge tabs to view spanning tree parameters.

Figure 7-9 Spanning Tree Parameters

Table 7-4 Spanning Tree Parameters

BridgeID

The unique identifier of the ONS 15454 that is transmitting the configuration bridge protocol data unit (BPDU). The bridge ID combines ONS 15454's MAC address and Priority.

TopoAge

The amount of time in seconds since the last topology change.

TopoChanges

Number of times the spanning tree topology has been changed since the shelf was booted.

DesignatedRoot

Identifies the spanning tree's designated root for a particular spanning tree instance.

RootCost

Identifies the total path cost to the designated root.

RootPort

The port used to reach the root.

MaxAge

The maximum time that received-protocol information is retained before it is discarded.

HelloTime

The time interval, in seconds, of the transmission of configuration BPDUs by a bridge attempting to become the spanning tree root or a bridge that is the spanning tree root.

HoldTime

The minimum time period, in seconds, that elapses during the transmission of configuration information on a given port.

ForwardDelay

The time spent by a port in the listening state and the learning state.


7.6.2 Spanning Tree Configuration

To view the spanning tree configuration, at the node view click the Provisioning tab and Etherbridge subtab.

Figure 7-10 Spanning Tree Configuration

Table 7-5

Column
Default Value
Value Range

Priority

32768

0-65535

Bridge max age

20 seconds

6-40 seconds

Bridge Hello Time

2 seconds

1-10 seconds

Bridge Forward Delay

15 seconds

4-30 seconds


Spanning Tree Configuration

7.6.3 Viewing Spanning Tree

Figure 7-11 Circuit Screen

Procedure: View Spanning Tree


Step 1 On the circuit screen ( Figure 7-11), highlight an Ethernet circuit.

Step 2 Click the Map button.


Note   On the spanning tree map, green represents forwarding spans and purple represents blocked (protect) spans. If you have a packet ring configuration, at least one span should be purple.



7.7 Multicard and Single-card EtherSwitch

Release 2.0 of the ONS 15454 used multicard EtherSwitch exclusively. As Ethernet cards were added within a shelf, they would combine to form a single layer 2 switch. The bandwidth of the single switch formed by the Ethernet cards matches the bandwidth of the provisioned Ethernet circuit up to STS-6C worth of bandwidth. Figure 7-12 illustrates a multicard EtherSwitch configuration.

Figure 7-12 Multicard EtherSwitch

In Release 2.2.0 and later, single-card EtherSwitch Ethernet is an additional option that allows each Ethernet card to remain a single switching entity within the ONS 15454 shelf. Both E100 and E1000 cards allow either multicard EtherSwitch or single-card EtherSwitch operation. Single-card EtherSwitch allows a full STS-12C worth of bandwidth between two Ethernet circuit points.
Figure 7-13 illustrates a single-card EtherSwitch configuration.

Figure 7-13 Single-card EtherSwitch

Seven scenarios for provisioning single-card EtherSwitch bandwidth are possible:

1 12c

2 6c 6c

3 6c 3c 3c

4 6c 6 STS-1s

5 3c 3c 3c 3c

6 3c 3c 6 STS-1s

7 12 STS-1s


Note   When configuring scenario 3, the STS 6c must be provisioned before either of the STS 3c circuits. A future software release will resolve this issue.



Note   When deleting and recreating Ethernet circuits that have different sizes, all STS circuits provisioned to the EtherSwitch must be deleted before the new circuit scenario is created. A future software release will resolve this issue.


illustrates the Card Mode screen where the EtherSwitch option is provisioned.

Figure 7-14 Card Mode

7.8 ONS 15454 Ethernet Circuit Configurations

There are three common methods for configuring Ethernet circuits between ONS 15454 nodes: a straight circuit configuration, a shared packet ring configuration, and a hub and spoke configuration. Two nodes usually connect with a straight circuit configuration. More than two nodes usually connect with a shared packet ring configuration or a hub and spoke configuration.

Figure 7-15 shows a straight circuit configuration, Figure 7-16 shows a shared packet ring configuration, and shows a hub and spoke configuration.

Figure 7-15 Straight Circuit Configuration

Figure 7-16 Shared Packet Ring Ethernet Circuit Configuration

Figure 7-17 Hub and Spoke Ethernet Circuit Configuration

7.8.1 E-Series Circuit Protection

Different combinations of E-Series circuit configurations and SONET network topologies offer different levels of E-Series circuit protection. details the available protection.

Table 7-6 Protection for E-Series Circuit Configurations 

Configuration
UPSR
BLSR
1 + 1

Point-to-Point Multicard Etherswitch

None

SONET

SONET

Point-to-Point Single-Card Etherswitch

SONET

SONET

SONET

Shared Packet Ring (multicard only)

STP

SONET

SONET

Common Control Card Switch

STP

STP

STP



Caution   Multi-card Etherswitch circuits are not supported on UPSR.


Note   Before making Ethernet connections, choose a circuit size from STS-1, STS-3C, STS-6C, or STS-12C.



Note   When making an STS-12C Ethernet circuit, the E100 and the E1000 cards must be configured as single-card EtherSwitch.


7.8.2 Multicard EtherSwitch Ethernet Circuit Provisioning

Procedure: Provision a Multicard Straight Ethernet Circuit


Note   Single-card EtherSwitch allows a full STS-12C worth of bandwidth between two Ethernet circuit points. Multicard EtherSwitch limits bandwidth to STS-6C worth of bandwidth between two Ethernet circuit points.


Figure 7-18 Multicard Straight Circuit


Step 1 Log into one of the ONS 15454 Ethernet circuit endpoints.

Step 2 Double click one of the Ethernet cards included in the circuit.

Step 3 Click the Provisioning tab and the Card subtab.

Figure 7-19 Card Mode Window

Step 4 Under Card Mode, verify that Multi-card EtherSwitch Group is checked.

Step 5 Display the node view.

Step 6 Repeat Steps 2-4 for all other Ethernet cards in the ONS 15454 that will make up the circuit.

Step 7 Log into the other ONS 15454 endpoint.

Step 8 Repeat Steps 2-6.

Step 9 Click the Circuits tab.

Step 10 Click Create.

The Circuit Attributes dialog opens (see ).

Figure 7-20 Circuit Attributes Dialog

Step 11 In the Name field, type a name for the circuit.

Step 12 From the Type menu, choose STS.


Note   VT and VT Tunnel Type: do not apply to Ethernet circuits.


Step 13 Choose the size of the circuit from the Size menu.


Note   The valid circuit sizes for an Ethernet Multicard circuit are STS-1, STS-3C, and STS-6C.


Step 14 Verify that the Route Automatically box is checked.

Step 15 Verify that the Bidirectional box is checked.

Step 16 Click Next.

Figure 7-21 Circuit Source

Step 17 Choose the circuit source from the Node menu (see ) in the circuit creation dialog box.


Note   Either end node can be the circuit source.


Step 18 Choose Ethergroup from the Slot menu.

Step 19 Click Next.

Figure 7-22 Circuit Destination

Step 20 Choose a circuit destination from the Node menu (see ). Choose the node that is not the source.

Step 21 Choose Ethergroup from the Slot menu.

Step 22 Click Next.

The Circuit VLAN Selection window displays (see ).


Note   Do not use the default VLAN to pass traffic between nodes.


Step 23 Create the VLAN:

(a) Click the New VLAN tab.

The Define New VLAN dialog opens (see ).

Figure 7-23 Define New VLAN Dialog

(b) Assign a name to your VLAN that will allow you to easily identify a particular network.

(c) Assign a VLAN ID.

This should be the next available number between 2 and 4093 that is not already assigned to an existing VLAN. Each ONS 15454 network supports a maximum of 509 user provisionable VLANs.

(d) Click OK.

Figure 7-24 Circuit VLAN Selection

(e) Highlight the VLAN name and click the arrow >> tab to move the available VLAN(s) to the Circuit VLANs column.

Step 24 Click Next.

Figure 7-25 Circuit Confirmation

Step 25 The Confirm Circuit Creation dialog opens and displays the following information about the point-to-point circuit:

Circuit is bidirectional Ethernet

Circuit size

Circuit name

VLANs that will be transported across this circuit

ONS 15454 nodes included in the circuit


Note   If the circuit information is not correct, use the <Back button to correct the information.


Step 26 Click Finish.

You now need to provision the Ethernet ports and assign these ports to VLANs. For port provisioning instructions, see the "VLAN Membership and Ethernet Port Provisioning" section. For information about manually provisioning circuits, see the "Ethernet Manual Cross-Connects" section.


Procedure: Provision a Single Card Ethernet Straight Circuit

Figure 7-26 Single-card Straight Circuit


Step 1 Log into one of the ONS 15454 Ethernet circuit endpoints.

Step 2 Double click the Ethernet card that will make the circuit.

Step 3 Click the Provisioning tab and the Card subtab.

Figure 7-27 Single-card EtherSwitch Screen

Step 4 Under Card Mode, check the Single-card EtherSwitch.

Step 5 Click Apply.

Step 6 Log into the other ONS 15454 endpoint and repeat Steps 2-5.

Step 7 Display the node view.

Step 8 Click the Circuits tab.

Step 9 Click Create.

The Circuit Attributes window opens.

Figure 7-28 Circuit AttributesDialog

Step 10 In the Name field, type a name for the circuit.

Step 11 From the Type menu, choose STS.


Note   VT and VT Tunnel Type: do not apply to Ethernet circuits.


Step 12 Choose the size of the circuit from the Size menu.

Step 13 Verify that the Route Automatically box is checked.

Step 14 Verify that the Bidirectional box is checked.

Step 15 Click Next.

Figure 7-29 Circuit Source

Step 16 Choose the circuit source from the Node menu.


Note   Either end node can be the circuit source.


Step 17 From the Slot menu, choose the Ethernet card for which you enabled the single-card EtherSwitch.

Step 18 Click Next.

Figure 7-30 Circuit Destination

Step 19 Choose the circuit destination from the Node menu.


Note   Choose the node that is not the source.


Step 20 From the slot menu, choose the Ethernet card for which you enabled the single-card EtherSwitch.

Step 21 Click Next.

The Circuit VLAN Selection window displays. See .


Note   Do not use the default VLAN to pass traffic between nodes.


Step 22 Create the VLAN:

(a) Click the New VLAN tab.

The Define New VLAN dialog opens.

Figure 7-31 Define New VLAN Dialog

(b) Assign a name to your VLAN to help you easily identify a particular network.

(c) Assign a VLAN ID.

This should be the next available number (between 2 and 4093) not already assigned to an existing VLAN. Each ONS 15454 network supports a maximum of 509 user provisionable VLANs.

(d) Click OK.

(e) Highlight the VLAN name and click the arrow >> tab to move the VLAN(s) from the Available VLANs column to the Circuit VLANs column (see ).

Figure 7-32 Circuit VLAN Selection

Step 23 Click Next.

Figure 7-33 Circuit Confirmation

The Confirm Circuit Creation dialog opens and displays the following information about the point-to-point circuit (see ):

Circuit is bidirectional Ethernet

Circuit size

Circuit name

VLANs that will be transported across this circuit

ONS 15454 nodes included in the circuit


Note   If the circuit information is not correct, use the <Back button to correct the information.


Step 24 Click Finish.

You now need to provision the Ethernet ports and assign these ports to VLANs. For port provisioning instructions, see the "VLAN Membership and Ethernet Port Provisioning" section. For information about manually provisioning circuits, see the "Ethernet Manual Cross-Connects" section.


7.8.3 Shared Packet Ring Ethernet Circuit Provisioning

This section provides steps for creating a shared packet ring. Figure 7-34 illustrates a sample shared packet ring. (Your network architecture may differ from the example.)

Figure 7-34 Shared Packet Ring

Procedure: Provision a Shared Packet Ring


Step 1 Log into one of the ONS 15454 Ethernet circuit endpoints.

Step 2 Double click one of the Ethernet cards that will make up the circuit.

Step 3 Click the Provisioning tab and the Card subtab.

Figure 7-35 Multicard EtherSwitch Group

Step 4 Under Card Mode, verify that Multi-card EtherSwitch Group is checked.

Step 5 Display the node view.

Step 6 Repeat Steps 2-4 for all other Ethernet cards in the ONS 15454 that will make up the shared packet ring.

Step 7 Log into the other ONS 15454 endpoint.

Step 8 Repeat Steps 2-6.

Step 9 Click the Circuits tab.

Step 10 Click Create.

The Circuit Creation dialog opens (see ).

Figure 7-36 Circuit Attributes Dialog

Step 11 In the Name field, type a name for the circuit.

Step 12 From the Type menu, choose STS.

Step 13 From the Size menu, choose the size of the circuit.


Note   For shared packet ring Ethernet, valid circuit sizes are STS-1, STS-3C, and STS-6C.


Step 14 Verify that Route Automatically is not selected.

Step 15 Verify that Bidirectional is selected.


Note   You must manually provision the circuits if you are building a shared packet ring configuration.


Step 16 Click Next.

Figure 7-37 Circuit Source Dialog

Step 17 Choose the circuit source from the Node menu.


Note   Any shared packet ring node can serve as the circuit source.


Step 18 Choose Ethergroup from the Slot menu.

Step 19 Click Next.

Step 20 Choose the circuit destination in the Node menu.


Note   Except for the source node, any shared packet ring node can serve as the circuit destination.


Step 21 Choose Ethergroup from the Slot menu.

Figure 7-38 Circuit VLAN Selection

Step 22 Click Next.

The Circuit VLAN Selection window opens (see ).


Note   Do not use the default VLAN to pass traffic between nodes.


Step 23 Create the VLAN:

(a) Click the New VLAN tab.

The Define New VLAN dialog opens.

(b) Assign a name to your VLAN. The name should be one that allows you to easily identify a particular network.

(c) Assign a VLAN ID.

This VLAN ID number must be unique. It is usually the next available number not already assigned to an existing VLAN (between 2 and 4093). Each ONS 15454 network supports a maximum of 509 user-provisionable VLANs.

(d) Click OK.

(e) Highlight the VLAN name and click the arrow >> tab to move the VLAN(s) from the Available VLANs column to the Circuit VLANs column.

By moving the VLAN from the Available VLANs column to the Circuit VLANs column, all the VLAN traffic is forced to use the shared packet ring circuit you created.

Step 24 Click Next.

Figure 7-39 Circuit Path Selection

Step 25 Click the line representing the span between Node 1 (Source) and Node 2 (Drop 1). Click the line again until the arrow points from the source (in this case, Node 1) to the destination (Node 2).

Step 26 Click the Source STS menu and choose a source STS.

The menu shows the STSs available to carry the shared packet ring circuit.

Step 27 Click Add Span.

Step 28 Repeat Steps 25, 26, and 27 for the next span (between nodes 2 and 3 in this example).

Step 29 Repeat Steps 25, 26, and 27 for the span between nodes 3 and 1. Figure 7-40 shows the Circuit Path Selection dialog with all the spans selected.


Note   As each new span is selected, make sure the direction arrow on each span continues along a continuous path of travel. The arrows should connect head-to-tail in a circle (see ).


Figure 7-40 Circuit Path Selection (all spans)

Step 30 Click Next.

Figure 7-41 Circuit Creation

Step 31 Verify that the new circuit is correctly configured.


Note   If the circuit information is not correct, use the <Back button to correct the information.


Step 32 Click Finish.

Step 33 Add the remaining packet ring drops:

(a) Highlight the shared packet ring circuit (see ).

Figure 7-42 Highlighted Circuit Path

(b) Click Edit.

Figure 7-43 Edit Circuit Dialog Box

(c) Click the Nodes tab.

(d) Click the Add button to add additional drops.

(e) Choose Node 3 from the Node menu.

(f) Choose Ethergroup from the Slot menu.

(g) Click OK

(h) Click Close.

You now need to provision the Ethernet ports and assign ports to VLANs. For instructions on port provisioning, see the "VLAN Membership and Ethernet Port Provisioning" section. For information about manually provisioning Ethernet circuits, see the "Ethernet Manual Cross-Connects" section.

Figure 7-44 shows a completed shared packet ring circuit.

Figure 7-44 Completed Shared Packet Ring Circuit


7.8.4 Hub and Spoke Ethernet Circuit Provisioning

This section provides steps for creating a hub and spoke Ethernet circuit configuration. The hub and spoke configuration connects point-to-point circuits (the spokes) to an aggregation point (the hub). In many cases, the hub is an E1000-2 card that links to a high-speed connection and the spokes are E100T cards. illustrates a sample hub spoke ring. (Your network architecture may differ from the example.)

Figure 7-45 Hub and Spoke Ethernet Circuit

Procedure: Provision a Hub and Spoke Ethernet Circuit


Step 1 Log into one of the ONS 15454 Ethernet circuit endpoints.

Step 2 Double-click the Ethernet card that will create the circuit.

Step 3 Click the Provisioning tab and the Card subtab.

Figure 7-46 Single-card EtherSwitch Screen

Step 4 Under Card Mode, check the Single-card EtherSwitch.

Step 5 Click Apply.

Step 6 Log into the other ONS 15454 endpoint and repeat Steps 2-5.

Step 7 Display the network view.

Step 8 Click the Circuits tab.

Step 9 Click Create.

The Circuit Attributes dialog opens (shown in ).

Figure 7-47 Circuit Attributes Dialog

Step 10 In the Name field, type a name for the circuit.

Step 11 From the Type menu, choose STS.


Note   VT and VT Tunnel Type: do not apply to Ethernet circuits.


Step 12 Choose the size of the circuit from the Size menu.

Step 13 Verify that the Route Automatically box is checked.

Step 14 Verify that the Bidirectional box is checked.

Step 15 Click Next.

Figure 7-48 Circuit Source

Step 16 Choose the circuit source from the Node menu.


Note   Either end node can be the circuit source.


Step 17 From the Slot menu, choose the Ethernet card for which you enabled the single-card EtherSwitch.

Step 18 Click Next.

Step 19 Choose the circuit destination from the Node menu.


Note   Choose the node that is not the source.


Step 20 From the Slot menu, choose the Ethernet card for which you enabled the single-card EtherSwitch.

Step 21 Click Next.

The Circuit VLAN Selection dialog displays.

Figure 7-49 Circuit VLAN Selection


Note   Do not use the default VLAN to pass traffic between nodes.


Step 22 Create the VLAN:

(a) Click the New VLAN tab.

The Define New VLAN dialog opens (see Figure 7-49).

(b) Assign a name to your VLAN that will allow you to easily identify a particular network.

(c) Assign a VLAN ID.

This should be the next available number (between 2 and 4093) not already assigned to an existing VLAN. Each ONS 15454 network supports a maximum of 509 user-provisionable VLANs.

(d) Click OK.

Figure 7-50 Selected VLANs

(e) Highlight the VLAN name and click the arrow >> tab to move the VLAN(s) from the Available VLANs column to the Circuit VLANs column.

Step 23 Click Next.

Figure 7-51 Circuit Confirmation

The Confirm Circuit Creation dialog opens and displays the following information about the point-to-point circuit (see Figure 7-51):

Circuit is bidirectional Ethernet

Circuit size

Circuit name

VLANs that will be transported across this circuit

ONS 15454 nodes that are part of this circuit


Note   If the circuit information is not correct, use the <Back button to correct the information.


Step 24 Click Finish.

You must now provision the second circuit and attach it to the already-created VLAN.

Step 25 Log into the ONS 15454 Ethernet circuit endpoint for the second circuit.

Step 26 Double-click the Ethernet card that will create the circuit and go to the card view.

Step 27 Click the Provisioning tab and the Card subtab.

Step 28 Under Card Mode, check Single-card EtherSwitch.

Step 29 Click Apply.

Step 30 Log into the other ONS 15454 endpoint and repeat Steps 26-30.

Step 31 Go to the node view.

Step 32 Click the Circuits tab.

Step 33 Click Create.

Step 34 Choose STS from the Type menu.


Note   VT and VT Tunnel Type: do not apply to Ethernet circuits.


Step 35 Choose the size of the circuit from the Size menu.

Step 36 Verify that the Route Automatically box is checked.

Step 37 Verify that the Bidirectional box is checked.

Step 38 Click Next.

Step 39 Choose the circuit source from the Node menu.


Note   Either end node can be the circuit source.


Step 40 Click Next.

Step 41 Choose the circuit destination from the Node menu.


Note   Choose the node that is not the source.


Step 42 From the Slot menu, choose the Ethernet card for which you enabled the single-card EtherSwitch.

Step 43 Click Next.

The Circuit VLAN Selection dialog is displayed.


Note   Do not use the default VLAN to pass traffic between nodes.


Step 44 Highlight the VLAN that you created for the first circuit and click the arrow >> tab to move the VLAN(s) from the Available VLANs column to the Selected VLANs column.

Step 45 Click Next.

Step 46 Click Finish.

You now need to provision the Ethernet ports and assign the ports to VLANs. For instructions about port provisioning, see the "VLAN Membership and Ethernet Port Provisioning" section. For information about assigning Ethernet ports to VLANs, see the "Provision Ethernet Ports for VLAN Membership" section.


7.8.5 Ethernet Manual Cross-Connects

ONS 15454s require end-to-end CTC visibility between nodes for normal provisioning of Ethernet circuits. When other vendors' equipment sits between ONS 15454s, OSI/TARP- based equipment does not allow tunneling of the ONS 15454 TCP/IP-based DCC. To circumvent this lack of continuous DCC, the Ethernet circuit must be manually cross-connected to an STS channel riding through the non-ONS network. This allows an Ethernet circuit to run from ONS node to ONS node utilizing the non-ONS network.


Note   Provisioning manual cross-connects for multi-card Etherswitch circuits is a separate procedure from provisioning manual cross-connects for single-card Etherswitch circuits. Both procedures are listed below.



Caution   If a CARLOSS alarm repeatedly appears and clears on an Ethernet manual cross connect, the two Ethernet circuits may have a circuit-size mismatch. For example, a circuit size of STS-3c was configured on the first ONS 15454 and circuit size of STS-12c was configured on the second ONS 15454. To troubleshoot this occurrence of the CARLOSS alarm, refer to the CARLOSS alarm troubleshooting procedure in the Alarm Troubleshooting chapter of the Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and Maintenance Guide.

Figure 7-52 Ethernet manual cross-connects

Procedure: Provision a Single-card Etherswitch Manual Cross-Connect


Step 1 Log into one of the ONS 15454 Ethernet circuit endpoints.

Step 2 Double-click one of the Ethernet cards that will comprise the circuit.

Step 3 Click the Provisioning > Card tabs.

Step 4 Under Card Mode, verify that Single-card EtherSwitch is checked.

If the Single-card EtherSwitch is not checked, check it and click Apply.

Step 5 Display the node view.

Step 6 Click the Circuits tab and click Create.

The Circuit Creation (Circuit Attributes) dialog box opens ( ).

Figure 7-53 Creating an Ethernet circuit

Step 7 In the Name field, type a name for the circuit.

Step 8 From the Type menu, choose STS.

The types VT and VT Tunnel do not apply to Ethernet circuits.

Step 9 Choose the size of the circuit from the Size menu.

The valid circuit sizes for an Ethernet Multicard circuit are STS-1, STS-3c and STS-6c.

Step 10 Verify that the Bidirectional checkbox is checked and click Next.

The Circuit Creation (Circuit Source) dialog box opens.

Step 11 From the Node menu, choose the current node as the circuit source.

Step 12 Choose the Ethernet card that will comprise the circuit from the Slot menu and click Next.

The Circuit Creation (Circuit Destination) dialog box opens.

Step 13 From the Node menu, choose the current node as the circuit destination.

Step 14 Choose the optical card that will comprise the circuit from the Slot menu.

Step 15 Choose the STS that will comprise the circuit from the STS menu and click Next.


Note   For the Ethernet manual cross-connect, the destination and source should be the same node.


The Circuit Creation (Circuit VLAN Selection) dialog box opens ( ).


Note   As a general rule, do not use the default VLAN to pass traffic between nodes.


Step 16 Create the VLAN:

(a) Click the New VLAN tab.

The Circuit Creation (Define New VLAN) dialog box opens ( ).

(b) Assign an easily-identifiable name to your VLAN.

(c) Assign a VLAN ID.

The VLAN ID should be the next available number (between 2 and 4093) that is not already assigned to an existing VLAN. Each ONS 15454 network supports a maximum of 509 user-provisionable VLANs.

(d) Click OK.

Figure 7-54 Selecting VLANs

(e) Highlight the VLAN name and click the arrow >> tab to move the VLAN(s) from the Available VLANs column to the Circuit VLANs column ( ).

Step 17 Click Next.

The Circuit Creation (Circuit Routing Preferences) dialog box opens.

Step 18 Confirm that the following information is correct:

Circuit name

Circuit type

Circuit size

VLANs that will be transported across this circuit

ONS 15454 nodes included in this circuit


Note   If the circuit information is not correct use the Back button, then redo the procedure with the correct information. Alternately, you can click Finish, then delete the completed circuit and start the procedure from the beginning.


Step 19 Click Finish.

You now need to provision the Ethernet ports and assign these ports to VLANs. For port provisioning instructions, see the "VLAN Membership and Ethernet Port Provisioning" section. Return to the following step after assigning the ports to VLANs.

Step 20 Repeat Steps 1 - 19 at the second ONS 15454 Ethernet manual cross-connect endpoint.


Note   The appropriate STS circuit must exist in the non-ONS 15454 equipment to connect the two STSs from the ONS 15454 Ethernet manual cross-connect endpoints.



Procedure: Provision a Multi-card Etherswitch Manual Cross-Connect


Step 1 Log into one of the ONS 15454 Ethernet circuit endpoints.

Step 2 Double-click one of the Ethernet cards that will comprise the circuit.

Step 3 Click the Provisioning > Card tabs.

Step 4 Under Card Mode, verify that Multi-card EtherSwitch is checked.

If the Multicard-card EtherSwitch is not checked, check it and click Apply.

Step 5 Display the node view.

Step 6 Repeat Steps 2 - 5 for any other Ethernet cards in the ONS 15454 that will comprise the circuit.

Step 7 Click the Circuits tab and click Create.

The Circuit Creation (Circuit Attributes) dialog box opens ( ).

Figure 7-55 Creating an Ethernet circuit

Step 8 In the Name field, type a name for the circuit.

Step 9 From the Type menu, choose STS.

The types VT and VT Tunnel do not apply to Ethernet circuits.

Step 10 Choose the size of the circuit from the Size menu.

The valid circuit sizes for an Ethernet Multicard circuit are STS-1, STS-3c and STS-6c.

Step 11 Verify that the Bidirectional checkbox is checked and click Next.

The Circuit Creation (Circuit Source) dialog box opens.

Step 12 From the Node menu, choose the current node as the circuit source.

Step 13 Choose Ethergroup from the Slot menu and click Next.

The Circuit Creation (Circuit Destination) dialog box opens.

Step 14 From the Node menu, choose the current node as the circuit destination.

Step 15 Choose Ethergroup from the Slot menu and click Next.


Note   For the Ethernet manual cross-connect, the destination and source should be the same node.


The Circuit Creation (Circuit VLAN Selection) dialog box opens ( ).


Note   Do not use the default VLAN to pass traffic between nodes.


Step 16 Create the VLAN:

(a) Click the New VLAN tab.

(b) Assign an easily-identifiable name to your VLAN.

(c) Assign a VLAN ID.

The VLAN ID should be the next available number (between 2 and 4093) that is not already assigned to an existing VLAN. Each ONS 15454 network supports a maximum of 509 user-provisionable VLANs.

(d) Click OK.

Figure 7-56 Selecting VLANs

(e) Highlight the VLAN name and click the arrow >> tab to move the VLAN(s) from the Available VLANs column to the Circuit VLANs column ( ).

Step 17 Click Next.

The Circuit Creation (Circuit Routing Preferences) dialog box opens.

Step 18 Confirm that the following information is correct:

Circuit name

Circuit type

Circuit size

VLANs that will be transported across this circuit

ONS 15454 nodes included in this circuit


Note   If the circuit information is not correct use the Back button, then redo the procedure with the correct information. Alternately, you can click Finish, then delete the completed circuit and start the procedure from the beginning.


Step 19 Click Finish.

You now need to provision the Ethernet ports and assign these ports to VLANs. For port provisioning instructions, see the "VLAN Membership and Ethernet Port Provisioning" section. Return to the following step after assigning the ports to VLANs.

Step 20 Highlight the circuit and click Edit.

The Edit Circuit dialog box opens.

Step 21 Click Drops and click Create.

The Define New Drop dialog box opens.

Step 22 From the Slot menu, choose the optical card that links the ONS 15454 to the non-ONS 15454 equipment.

Step 23 From the Port menu, choose the appropriate port.

Step 24 From the STS menu, choose the STS that matches the STS of the connecting non-ONS 15454 equipment.

Step 25 Click OK.

The Edit Circuit dialog box opens.

Step 26 Confirm the circuit information that displays in the Circuit Information dialog box and click Close.

Step 27 Repeat Steps 1 - 26 at the second ONS 15454 Ethernet manual cross-connect endpoint.


Note   The appropriate STS circuit must exist in the non-ONS 15454 equipment to connect the two ONS 15454 Ethernet manual cross-connect endpoints.



7.9 VLAN Membership and Ethernet Port Provisioning

This section explains how to provision Ethernet ports, including provisioning Ethernet ports for VLAN membership.

Procedure: Provision Ethernet Ports for VLAN Membership


Note   The same basic procedure configures E100T-12 and E1000-2 Ethernet ports for VLAN membership. The VLAN port provisioning screen shown in this example is for an E100T-12 card.


The ONS 15454 allows you to configure the VLAN membership and the Q-tag handling of individual Ethernet ports.


Step 1 With the Provisioning menu tab selected, click the VLAN subtab (see ).

Figure 7-57 VLAN Port Provisioning Screen

Step 2 To place a port in a VLAN, click the port and choose either Tagged or Untag. Figure 7-57 shows Port 1 placed in the test 1 VLAN and Port 2-Port 12 in the default VLAN. Table 7-7 shows valid port settings.

If a port belongs to only one VLAN, go to that VLAN's row and choose Untag from that port's column. Choose -- for all the other VLAN rows under that port. This allows the VLAN with Untag selected to access that port and prohibits the other VLANS with -- selected to access the port.

If a port is a trunk port, it connects multiple VLANs to an external device, such as a router. This port must have tagging (8021.Q) enabled for all the VLANs that connect to the external device. Choose Tagged at each VLAN row in the trunk port column. Choose Untag in the default VLAN row in the column under the trunk port's heading.

Table 7-7 Port Settings

Setting
Description
--
A port marked with this symbol does not belong to the VLAN.
Untag
The ONS 15454 will tag ingress frames and strip tags from egress frames.
Tagged
The ONS 15454 will handle ingress frames according to VLAN ID, egress frames will not have their tags removed.


Note   If Tagged is chosen, the attached devices must be IEEE 802.1Q VLAN aware.


Step 3 After each port is placed in the appropriate VLAN, click Apply.


Note   Both ports on an individual E1000-2 card cannot be members of the same VLAN.



Procedure: Provision E1000-2 Ethernet Ports


Step 1 Double-click the card graphic to open the Ethernet card.

Step 2 From the Ethernet card view, choose the Provisioning menu tab.

Step 3 Choose the Port subtab.


Note   Most provisioning requires only two fields: Enabled and Mode.


shows the Provisioning menu screen with the Port subtab selected.

Figure 7-58 Port Provisioning Screen

Step 4 From the Port Provisioning screen, choose the appropriate mode for each Ethernet port. The valid choices for the E1000-2 card are 1000 Full or Auto.

Step 5 Click the Enabled box to activate the desired Ethernet ports.


Note   The Status column displays information about the port's current operating mode.


Step 6 Click Apply.

Your Ethernet ports are now provisioned and ready to be configured for VLAN membership (see the "Provision Ethernet Ports for VLAN Membership" section).


Procedure: Provision E100T-12 Ethernet Ports


Step 1 Double click the card graphic to open the E100T-12 card.

Step 2 From the Ethernet card view, choose the Provisioning menu tab.

Step 3 Choose the Port subtab.

shows the Provisioning menu screen with the Port function subtab selected.

Figure 7-59 Port Provisioning Screen

Step 4 From the Port Provisioning screen, choose the appropriate mode for each Ethernet port. Valid choices for the E100T-12 card are Auto, 10 Half, 10 Full, 100 Half or 100 Full.

Step 5 In the Enabled column, click the box to activate the desired Ethernet ports.

Most provisioning requires filling in two fields: Enabled and Mode. However, the user may also map incoming traffic to a low priority or a high priority using the Priority column or enable spanning tree with the Stp Enabled column. The Status column displays information about the port's current operating mode, and the Stp State column gives the current Spanning tree status.

Step 6 Click Apply.

Your Ethernet ports are now provisioned and ready to be configured for VLAN membership (see the "Provision Ethernet Ports for VLAN Membership" section).


7.10 Ethernet Maintenance and Performance Screens

The CTC provides several screens of information to help manage and maintain Ethernet performance.

7.10.1 Statistics Screen

The Ethernet statistics screen lists Ethernet parameters at the port level. defines the parameters. Click the Performance and Statistics tabs at the card level view to display the screen (see ).

Figure 7-60 Ethernet Statistics

Table 7-8 Ethernet Parameters

Parameter
Meaning

Link Status

Indicates if link integrity is present; up indicates present, and down indicates not present

RX Packets

Number of packets received since the last counter reset

RX Bytes

Number of bytes received since the last counter reset

TX Packets

Number of packets transmitted since the last counter reset

TX Bytes

Number of bytes transmitted since the last counter reset

RX Total Errors

Total number of receive errors

RX FCS

Number of packets with a Frame Check Sequence (FCS) error. FCS errors indicate Frame corruption during transmission

RX Alignment

Number of packets with alignment error; alignment errors are Frames not received whole

RX Runts

Number of packets received that are less than 64 bytes in length

RX Giants

Number of packets received that are greater than 1518 bytes in length

TX Collisions

Number of transmit packets that are collisions; collisions are caused by the port and attached device transmitting at the same time

TX Excessive

Number of consecutive collisions

TX Deferred

Number of packets deferred


7.10.2 Line Utilization Screen

The Line Utilization screen shows the percentage of line or port bandwidth currently used and the percentage used in the past. Click the Performance and Utilization tabs at the Ethernet card view to display the screen (see ). At the Interval drop-down menu, choose a time segment variable for the intervals. Valid intervals are 1 minute, 15 minutes, 1 hour, and 1 day.


Note   Line utilization numbers express the average of ingress and egress traffic as a percentage of capacity.


Figure 7-61 Line Utilization

7.10.3 History Screen

The Ethernet History screen lists past Ethernet statistics. Choose the appropriate port from the Line menu. defines the listed parameters. At the Ethernet card view, click the Performance tab and History subtab to view the screen (shown in ).

Figure 7-62 Ethernet History

7.10.4 Spanning Trees Screen

The Spanning Trees screen lists information about spanning trees on the ONS 15454. Click the Maintenance>EtherBridge>Spanning Trees tabs to view the screen (shown in ). For more information about spanning trees and the ONS 15454, see the "Spanning Tree" section.

Figure 7-63 Spanning Tree Topology

7.10.5 MAC Addresses Screen

A MAC address is a hardware address that physically identifies the equipment attached to the ONS 15454 port or the network attached to the port. The MAC addresses table (also called the MAC forwarding table) lists the MAC Addresses stored by the ONS 15454 and the VLAN, Slot/Port/STS, and circuit that links the ONS 15454 to each MAC address (see ).

Figure 7-64 MAC Addresses Discovered

Click the Maintenance>EtherBridge>MAC Addresses tabs to view the screen (see ).

Click Retrieve for the ONS 15454 to retrieve and display the current MAC IDs.

Click Clear to clear the highlighted rows.

Click Clear All to clear all displayed rows.

Figure 7-65 MAC Forwarding Table

7.10.6 Trunk Utilization Screen

The Trunk Utilization screen is similar to the Line Utilization screen, but the Trunk Utilization screen shows the percentage of circuit bandwidth being used rather than the percentage of line bandwidth being used. Choose a time segment variable for the intervals at the Interval menu. Click the Maintenance>EtherBridge>Trunk Utilization tabs to view the screen (shown in ).


Note   The percentage shown is the average of ingress and egress traffic.


Figure 7-66 Trunk Utilization

7.11 Remote Monitoring Specification Alarm Thresholds

The ONS 15454 features SNMP Remote Network Monitoring (RMON) that allows network operators to monitor the health of the network with a Network Management System (NMS). For a complete list of the implemented RMON Management Information Bases (MIBs), see the "SNMP Remote Network Monitoring" section on page 8-8.

One of the ONS 15454's RMON MIBs is the Alarm group. The alarm group contains the alarmTable. An NMS uses the alarmTable to find the alarm-causing thresholds for network performance. The thresholds apply to the current 15-minute interval and the current 24-hour interval. The RMON monitors several variables, such as Ethernet collisions, and triggers an event when the variable crosses a threshold during that time interval. For example, if a threshold is set at 1000 collisions and 1001 collisions occur during the 15-minute interval, an event triggers.

CTC allows you to provision these thresholds for Ethernet statistics. The following tables define the variables provisioned in the CTC. For example, to set the collision threshold, click etherStatsCollisions in the Variable menu.

Table 7-9 Ethernet Threshold Variables (MIBs)

Variable
Definition

iflnOctets

Total number of octets received on the interface, including framing octets.

iflnUcastPkts

Total number of unicast packets delivered to an appropriate protocol.

iflnErrors

Number of inbound packets discarded because they contain errors.

ifOutOctets

Total number of transmitted octets, including framing packets.

ifOutUcastPkts

Total number of unicast packets requested to transmit to a single address.

dot3statsAlignmentErrors

Number of frames with an alignment error, i.e., the length is not an integral number of octets and the frame cannot pass the FCS test.

dot3StatsFCSErrors

Number of frames with framecheck errors, i.e. there is an integral number of octets, but an incorrect FCS.

dot3StatsSingleCollisionFrames

Number of successfully transmitted frames for which there was exactly one collision.

dot3StatsMutlipleCollisionFrame

Number of successfully transmitted frames for which there were multiple collisions.

dot3StatsDeferredTransmissions

Number of times the first transmission was delayed because the medium was busy.

dot3StatsLateCollision

Number of times that a collision was detected later than 64 octets into the transmission (also added into collision count).

dot3StatsExcessiveCollision

Number of frames for which transmissions failed because of excessive collisions.

dot3StatsFrameTooLong

Number of received frames that were bigger than the maximum size permitted.

etherStatsUndersizePkts

Number of packets received with a length less than 64 octets.

etherStatsFragments

Total number of packets without an integral number of octets or with a bad FCS and less than 64 octets long.

etherStatsPkts64Octets

Total number of packets received (including error packets) that were
64 octets in length.

etherStatsPkts65to127Octets

Total number of packets received (including error packets) that were 65 - 172 octets in length.

etherStatsPkts128to255Octets

Total number of packets received (including error packets) that were 128 - 255 octets in length.

etherStatsPkts256to511Octets

Total number of packets received (including error packets) that were 256 - 511 octets in length.

etherStatsPkts512to1023Octets

Total number of packets received (including error packets) that were 512 - 1023 octets in length.

etherStatsPkts1024to1518Octets

Total number of packets received (including error packets) that were 1024 - 1518 octets in length.

etherStatsBroadcastPkts

Total number of good broadcast packets received.

etherStatsMulticastPkts

Total number of good multicast (non broadcast) packets received.

etherStatsJabbers

Total number of packets longer than 1518 octets without an integral number of octets or a bad FCS.

etherStatsCollisions

Best estimate of the total number of collisions on this segment.

etherStatsCollisionFrames

Best estimate of the total number of frame collisions on this segment.

etherStatsCRCAlignErrors

Total number of packets with a length between 64 and 1518 octets (inclusive) that had a bad FCS or were not an integral number of octets in length.


Procedure: Creating Ethernet Thresholds

Figure 7-67 Ethernet Alarm Screen


Step 1 From the node view, click the Provisioning tab and the Etherbridge subtab.

Step 2 Click the Thresholds tab.

Step 3 Click Create.

The Create Ether Threshold menu appears.

Figure 7-68 Ethernet Alarm Thresholds

Step 4 Click the Slot menu to choose the appropriate Ethernet card.

Step 5 Click the Port menu to choose the Port on the Ethernet card.

Step 6 Click the Variable menu to choose the variable. lists and defines the Ethernet Threshold Variables available in this field.

Step 7 Click the Alarm Type to choose whether the event will be triggered by the rising threshold, falling threshold, or both the rising and falling thresholds.

Step 8 Click the Sample Type, either Relative or Absolute. Relative restricts the threshold to use the number of occurrences in the user-set sample period. Absolute sets the threshold to use the total number of occurrences, regardless of any time period.

Step 9 Type in an appropriate number of seconds for the Sample Period.

Step 10 Type in the appropriate number of occurrences for the Rising Threshold.


Note   The rising threshold is the number of occurrences that must be exceeded to trigger an event. For example, if a network problem causes 1001 collisions in 15 seconds, these occurrences cross a rising threshold set at 1000 collisions in 15 seconds.


Step 11 Type in the appropriate number of occurrences for the Falling Threshold. In most cases a falling threshold is set lower than the rising threshold.


Note   A falling threshold is the counterpart to a rising threshold. When the number of occurrences drops below a falling threshold, it resets the rising threshold. For example, when the network problem that caused 1001 collisions in 15 minutes subsides and creates only 799 collisions in 15 minutes, occurrences fall below a falling threshold of 800 collisions. This resets the rising threshold so that if network collisions again spike over a 1000 per 15- minute period, an event again triggers when the rising threshold is crossed. An event is triggered only the first time a rising threshold is exceeded (otherwise a single network problem might cause a rising threshold to be exceeded multiple times and cause a flood of events).


Step 12 Click the OK button to complete the procedure.


7.12 Basic Ethernet Connectivity Testing

Most connectivity problems experienced in an Ethernet network can be fixed by following a few guidelines. Refer to this section if you have problems connecting Ethernet networks. See when consulting these guidelines.

Figure 7-69 Ethernet Connectivity Reference

Procedure: Test Ethernet Connectivity


Step 1 Verify that no SONET alarms exist for the STS-N that carries the VLAN #1 Ethernet
circuit.

Step 2 Verify that no Ethernet specific alarms exist.

Step 3 Verify that the ACT LED on the Ethernet card is green.

Step 4 Verify that Ports 1 and 3 on ONS 15454 #1 and Port 1 and Port 2 on ONS 15454 #2 have green link-integrity LEDs. If there is no green link-integrity LED for any of these ports:

(a) Verify physical connectivity between the ONS 15454s and the attached device.

(b) Verify that the ports are enabled on the Ethernet cards.

(c) Verify that you are using the proper Ethernet cable and that it is wired correctly.

Step 5 Verify connectivity between device A and device C by performing an ICMP ping between these locally attached devices. If the ping is unsuccessful:

(a) Verify that device A and device C can ping each other.

(b) Verify that device A and device C are on the same IP subnet.

(c) Verify that both Port 1 and Port 3 on the Ethernet card are assigned to the same VLAN.

Step 6 Repeat Steps 4 and 5 for devices B and D.

Verify that the Ethernet circuit that carries VLAN #1 is provisioned and that both ONS 15454 #1 and ONS 15454 #2 are included in the VLAN #1 circuit.