Cisco ONS 15454 User Documentation, Release 2.2.x
Chapter 8, Network Management

Table Of Contents

Network Management

8.1 Simple Network Management Protocol

8.1.1 SNMP Basic Components

8.1.2 SNMP Support

8.1.3 SNMP MIBs

8.1.4 SNMP Traps

8.1.5 SNMP Community Names

8.1.6 SNMP Remote Network Monitoring

8.2 IP Address Entry Using Front Panel LCD

8.3 Proxy ARP

8.4 IP Addressing and Subnets

8.4.1 Types of IP Addresses

8.4.2 Common IP Addressing Scenarios with the ONS 15454

8.5 IP Troubleshooting

8.6 Static Route Provisioning


8

Network Management


This chapter explains concepts related to network management with the ONS 15454. It includes Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP), front panel LCD IP entry, Proxy ARP, IP addressing and subnets, IP troubleshooting, and Static Route Provisioning.

8.1 Simple Network Management Protocol

Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is an application-layer Internet Protocol (IP) that allows network devices to exchange management information. SNMP enables network administrators to manage network performance, find and solve network problems, and plan for network growth.

The Cisco ONS 15454 supports SNMP Version 1 (SNMPv1) and SNMP Version 2c (SNMPv2c). Both versions share many features, but SNMPv2c offers additional protocol operations. This section describes both versions and explains how to configure SNMP on the ONS 15454. illustrates a basic network managed by SNMP.

Figure 8-1 Basic Network Managed by SNMP

8.1.1 SNMP Basic Components

An SNMP-managed network consists of three primary components: managed devices, agents, and management systems. A managed device is a network node that contains an SNMP agent and resides on a managed network. Managed devices collect and store management information and use SNMP to make this information available to management systems that use SNMP. Managed devices include routers, access servers, switches, bridges, hubs, computer hosts, and printers.

An agent is a software module that resides in a managed device. An agent has local knowledge of management information and translates that information into a form compatible with SNMP. The SNMP agent gathers data from the management information base (MIB), which is the repository for information about device parameters and network data. The agent can also send traps, or notification of certain events, to the manager. illustrates these SNMP operations.

Figure 8-2 SNMP Operations

A management system executes applications that monitor and control managed devices. Management systems provide the bulk of the processing and memory resources required for network management. One or more management systems must exist on any managed network. illustrates the relationship between the three key SNMP components.

Figure 8-3 SNMP Components

8.1.2 SNMP Support

The ONS 15454 supports SNMP v1 and v2c traps and gets. The SNMP MIBs in the ONS 15454 define alarms, traps, and status. Through SNMP, network management system (NMS) applications can query a management agent using a supported MIB. The functional entities include an Ethernet switch, SONET multiplexer, and many others. SNMP can access the ONS 15454 through the Timing Communication and Control (TCC) card Ethernet port, the backplane LAN wire-wrap, or SONET Data Communication Channel (SDCC).

Procedure: Set up SNMP Support


Step 1 On the Cisco Transport Controller (CTC) window, click the Provisioning tab.

Step 2 From the Provisioning menu, click the SNMP function tab.

Step 3 Click Create.

The Create SNMP Trap Destination dialog opens ( Figure 8-4).

For a description of SNMP traps, see the "SNMP Traps" section.

Figure 8-4 Create SNMP Trap Destination Dialog

Step 4 Type the IP address of your NMS in the IP Address field.

Step 5 Type the SNMP community name in the Community Name field.

For a description of SNMP community names, see the "SNMP Community Names" section.


Note   The community name is a form of authentication and access control. The community name assigned to the ONS 15454 is case-sensitive and must match the community name of the NMS.



Note   The default UDP port for SNMP is 162.


Step 6 Set the Trap Version field for either SNMPv1 or SNMPv2.

Refer to your NMS documentation to determine whether to use SNMP v1 or v2.

Step 7 Set your maximum traps per second in the Max Traps per Second field.


Note   The max traps per second is the maximum number of traps per second that you want sent to the SNMP manager. If set to 0, there is no maximum and all traps are sent.


Step 8 Click OK.

SNMP settings are now configured. To view SNMP information for each node, click the IP address of a node on the Trap Destinations screen ( Figure 8-5).

Figure 8-5 Trap Destinations Screen


8.1.3 SNMP MIBs

A Management Information Base (MIB) is a hierarchically-organized collection of information. MIBs are accessed using a network-management protocol such as SNMP. They are comprised of managed objects and are identified by object identifiers.

The ONS 15454 SNMP manager uses information in the MIB to perform the operations described in Table 8-1

.

Table 8-1 SNMP Manager Operations

Operation

Description

get-request

Retrieve a value from a specific variable

get-next-request

Retrieve the value following the named variable; Often used to retrieve variables from within a table (1)

get-response

The reply to a get-request, get-next-request, get-bulk-request, or set-request sent by an NMS

get-bulk-request

Similar to get-next-request, but fill the get-response with up to max-repetition number of get-next interactions

trap

An unsolicited message sent by an SNMP agent to an SNMP manager indicating that some event has occurred


1.With this operation, an SNMP manager does not need to know the exact variable name. A sequential search is performed to find the needed variable from within the MIB.

A managed object (sometimes called a MIB object) is one of any number of specific characteristics of a managed device. Managed objects are comprised of one or more object instances that are essentially variables.

The ONS 15454 MIBs ship on the accompanying software CD. These MIBs need to be compiled in the following order. If the order is not followed, one or more MIB files may not compile.

1 cerentregistry.mib

2 cerentTC.mib

3 cerent454.mib

If you are unable to compile the ONS 15454 MIBs, call the Technical Assistance Center (TAC) at 1-877-323-7368.

Table 8-2 IETF Standard MIBs Implemented in the ONS 15454 SNMP Agent

RFC#
Module Name
Title/Comments

1213

+1907

RFC1213-MIB,

SNMPV2-MIB

MIB-II from RFC1213 with enhancement from RFC1907 for v2

1493

BRIDGE-MIB

Bridge/Spanning Tree (SNMPv1 MIB)

2037

ENTITY-MIB

Entity MIB using SMI v2

2233

IF-MIB

Interface evolution (enhances MIB-II)

2358

Etherlike-MIB

Ethernet-like interface (SNMPv2 MIB)

2495

 

DS-1/E1

2496

 

DS-3/E3

2558

SONET-MIB

SONET

2674

 

P-Bridge and Q-Bridge MIB


8.1.4 SNMP Traps

The ONS 15454 can receive SNMP requests from a number of SNMP managers and send traps to ten trap receivers. The ONS 15454 generates all alarms and events as SNMP traps.

Traps generated by the ONS 15454 contain an object ID that uniquely identifies the alarm. An entity identifier uniquely identifies which entity generated the alarm (slot, port, STS, VT, BLSR, STP, etc.). The traps give the severity of the alarm (critical, major, minor, event, etc.) and indicate whether the alarm is service affecting or non-service affecting. The traps also contain a date/time stamp that shows the date and time the alarm occurred. The ONS 15454 also generates a trap for each alarm when the alarm condition clears.

Each SNMP trap contains seven variable bindings ( ).

Table 8-3 SNMP Trap Variable Bindings

Number
Name
Description

1

cerentNodeTime

Indicates current local time as reflected by the ONS 15454

2

cerent454AlarmState

Specifies alarm severity and service affecting status (SA/NSA); only {minor|major|critical}+{NA|NSA} are represented here

3

cerent454AlarmObjectType

Indicates what type of entity raised this alarm (for example, DS-3, etherBridge, VT-TERM, etc); the NMS often uses this value to decide which table to poll for further information about the alarm

4

cerent454AlarmObjectIndex

Every alarm is raised by an object that is an entry in a specific table. This is the index of the object in that table; in other words, if the alarm is interface related, this is the index of the interface in the interface table.

5

cerent454AlarmSlotNumber

This indicates the object slot that raised this alarm; if no slot is relevant to the alarm, the object slot will be zero

6

cerent454AlarmPortNumber

This indicates the object port that raised this alarm; if no object port is relevant to the alarm, the object port will be zero.

7

cerent454AlarmLineNumber

This indicates the object LINE that raised this alarm; If no LINE is relevant to the alarm, the LINE will be zero.


The ONS 15454 supports generic and Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) traps. The generic traps are listed in . IETF-supported traps are listed in .

Table 8-4 Generic Traps Supported in the ONS 15454

Trap
From RFC#
IETF Standard Objects in Varbind List
Description

ColdStart

RFC1213-MIB

None

Agent up - cold start

WarmStart

RFC1213-MIB

None

Agent up - warm start

AuthenticationFailure

RFC1213-MIB

None

Community string did not match


Table 8-5 IETF Traps Supported by the ONS 15454

Trap
From RFC #
IETF standard objects in varbind list
Description

NewRoot

RFC1493/

BRIDGE-MIB

None

Sending agent is the new root of the spanning tree

TopologyChange

RFC1493/

BRIDGE-MIB

None

A port in a bridge has changed from Learning to Forwarding or Forwarding to Blocking

EntConfigChange

RFC2037/

ENTITY-MIB

None

entLastChangeTime value has changed


8.1.5 SNMP Community Names

You can provision community names for all SNMP requests from the SNMP Trap Destination window in CTC (see the "Set up SNMP Support" section). In effect, any SNMP request using a community name that matches a community name on the list of provisioned SNMP trap destinations is considered valid. Otherwise, the request is considered invalid and is dropped.

If an SNMP request contains an invalid community name, the request is silently dropped and the MIB variable, snmpInBadCommunityNames, is incremented. All SNMP requests containing a validated community name are granted access to all MIB variables managed by the agent.

8.1.6 SNMP Remote Network Monitoring

The ONS 15454 incorporates Remote Monitoring (RMON) to allow network operators to monitor the ONS 15454's E100 and E1000 cards. This feature is not apparent to the typical CTC user, because RMON interoperates with a network management application. However, with CTC the user can provision the RMON alarm thresholds (see the "Remote Monitoring Specification Alarm Thresholds" section on page 7-69). The CTC also monitors the five RMON groups implemented by the ONS 15454.

The ONS 15454 RMON implementation is based on the IETF standard MIB Request for Comment (RFC)1757. The ONS 15454 implements five groups from the standard MIB: Ethernet Statistics, History Control, Ethernet History, Alarm, and Event.

8.1.6.1 Ethernet Statistics Group

The Statistics group contains the basic statistics for each monitored subnetwork in a single table named etherstats.

8.1.6.2 History Control Group

The History Control group defines sampling functions for one or more monitor interfaces. RFC 1757 defines the historyControlTable.

8.1.6.3 Ethernet History Group

RFC 1757 defines the etherHistoryTable. The etherHistoryTable will be implemented as defined in RFC 1757, within the bounds of the historyControlTable.

8.1.6.4 Alarm Group

The alarm group consists of a single alarm table. This table provides the network performance alarm thresholds for the network management application.You can provision the thresholds in the table with CTC.

8.1.6.5 Event Group

The event group consists of two tables, evenTable and logTable. The evenTable is read-only. The logTable is implemented as specified in RFC 1757.

8.2 IP Address Entry Using Front Panel LCD

Users can set up the IP address, subnet mask, and default router addresses of the ONS 15454 using the slot, status, and port buttons on the front panel LCD (see ). This allows users to accomplish these basic operations without a computer.


Note   You can lock out the front panel LCD access to network configuration. Using the CTC at the shelf view, click the Provisioning and Network tabs. Check Prevent LCD IP Config and click Apply.


Figure 8-6 Front Panel LCD

Procedure: Enter IP Address Using Front Panel LCD


Note   The LCD reverts to normal display mode after 30 seconds of button inactivity.



Step 1 Repeatedly press the Slot button until Slot-0 appears on the LCD panel. This is the Slot-0 menu.

Step 2 Repeatedly press the Port button to scroll through the configuration menus.

Figure 8-7 IP Address Option

Step 3 When the IP Address option appears, press the Status button ( ).

Figure 8-8 IP Address LCD Screen

Step 4 Push the Slot (Next) button to move to the IP address digit you need to change. The selected digit flashes.

Step 5 Press the Port (Modify) button to cycle the IP address digit to the correct digit.

Step 6 When the desired IP address is set, press the Status (Done) button to return to the Slot-0 menu.

Figure 8-9 Save Configuration Option LCD Screen

Step 7 At the Slot-0 menu, repeatedly press the Port button until the Save Configuration option appears ( ).

Step 8 Press the Status button to select the Save Configuration option.

Figure 8-10 Save and REBOOT LCD Screen

The Save and REBOOT screen appears ( ).

Step 9 Press the Slot (Apply) button to save the new IP address configuration.

Figure 8-11 Saving Changes LCD Screen

Saving a new configuration reboots the TCC cards. The Saving Changes LCD appears for several minutes while the TCC cards reboot ( ). When the LCD screen returns to the normal alternating display mode, the procedure is complete.


8.3 Proxy ARP

Proxy Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) enables a LAN-connected gateway ONS 15454 to automatically handle ARP requests for remote non-LAN ONS 15454s connected via DCC to the gateway ONS 15454. Proxy ARP requires no configuration from the user and eliminates the need for the user to set up static host routes.

Proxy ARP works by having a single LAN-connected ONS 15454 proxy for remote ONS 15454s. If a device on the LAN sends an ARP request intended for one of the DCC-connected ONS 15454s, then the gateway ONS 15454 ONS 15454 returns its own MAC address to the LAN device (proxies). The LAN device then sends the datagram intended for the remote ONS 15454 to the MAC address of the proxy ONS 15454. The proxy ONS 15454 forwards this data to the remote 15454 using its own ARP table. The ARP table matches IP addresses with the MAC IDs of remote ONS 15454s and is built through internal OSPF routing protocol. illustrates Proxy ARP.

Figure 8-12 ONS 15454 Network Using Proxy ARP


Note   Proxy ARP is automatic and requires no user input.


8.4 IP Addressing and Subnets

This section provides IP addressing guidelines for the ONS 15454. The IP addressing information includes IP addressing classes and IP configuration scenarios.

8.4.1 Types of IP Addresses

IP addresses are categorized as either Class A, B, or C. The different classes refer primarily to how the addresses may be used and how many subnets and hosts will be available for use in the network.

Each network needs its own, unique network number and each host within a network needs a unique host number.

Subnetting is used to maximize the number of networks available within a range (class) of addresses. Each class of address allows a different number of subnets to be configured.

8.4.1.1 Class A Addresses and Subnets

In a class A IP address, the first eight bits are used for the network ID, and the last 24 bits are used for the host ID. The first bit of a network address will be 0 when the number is converted to binary. For example, 5.xxx.xxx.xxx = 00000101 (5). The maximum number of network addresses that can be derived in class A is 126; the maximum number of hosts is 16,777,214. The address 0.0.0.0 is reserved as the default route and 127.xxx.xxx.xxx is reserved as the loopback address. The natural mask is 255.0.0.0 and the available addresses are 1.xxx.xxx.xxx through 126.xxx.xxx.xxx.

8.4.1.2 Class B Addresses and Subnets

In a class B IP address, the first 16 bits are used for the network ID and the last 16 bits are used for the host ID. The first two bits of a network address begin with 10 when the number is converted to binary. For example, 128.x.x.x = 10000000. The maximum number of network addresses that can be derived from class B is 16,384; the maximum number of hosts is 65,534. The natural mask is 255.255.0.0 and the available addresses are 128.0.xxx.xxx through 191.255.0.0.

8.4.1.3 Class C Addresses and Subnets

In a class C IP address, the first 24 bits are used for the network ID and the last eight bits are used for the host ID. The first two bits of a network address begin with 11 when the number is converted to binary. For example, 192.x.x.x = 11000000. The maximum number of network addresses that can be derived from class C is 2,097,152; the maximum number of hosts is 254. The natural mask is 255.255.255.0 and the available addresses are 192.0.0.xxx through 223.255.255.xxx.

8.4.2 Common IP Addressing Scenarios with the ONS 15454

ONS 15454 IP addressing generally has seven common IP addressing scenarios or configurations. Refer to the following illustrations and checklists when setting IP addresses and configuring subnets. You must be able to answer yes to each checklist question to be sure that all IP addressing guidelines are met. The following figures illustrate these seven scenarios and provide an IP checklist for each scenario.


Note   Beginning with Release 2.2.0, LAN devices no longer need host routes to communicate with other ONS 15454s on the same subnet that connect through DCC.


8.4.2.1 IP Scenario 1

ONS 15454s and CTC are on the same subnet; all ONS 15454s attach to LAN A.

If you answer No to any of the questions in the checklist see the "IP Troubleshooting" section.

Figure 8-13 IP Addressing Scenario 1

Procedure: IP Checklist for Scenario 1

Are the IP addresses of ONS 15454s #1, #2 and #3 on the same IP subnet?

Are all of the IP addresses unique?

Can the workstation running CTC ping itself?

Is there link integrity between the CTC workstation and the hub/switch?

Do the LAN wire-wrap pins on the backplane/TCC's RJ-45 port have link integrity? On all ONS 15454s and the hub/switch?

Is the hub/switch port for all ONS 15454s set for 10 Mbps half-duplex?

Can you ping ONS 15454 #1, #2, and #3 from the CTC workstation?

Do you have a web browser installed (either Netscape Navigator version 4.08 or higher or Internet Explorer 4 or higher)?

Do you have the Java plug-in installed (version 1.2.2. or higher for Microsoft Windows and version 1.2.1_03 for Sun Solaris)?

Do you have the Java policy file installed?

Are you using the browser to connect to the IP address of the ONS 15454?

Can you log into the ONS 15454?

8.4.2.2 IP Scenario 2

ONS 15454s and CTC are on different subnets; all ONS 15454s attach to LAN B.

If you answer No to any of the questions in the checklist see the "IP Troubleshooting" section.

Figure 8-14 IP Addressing Scenario 2

Procedure: IP Checklist for Scenario 2

Is the IP address of the CTC workstation and the router interface A on the same subnet?

Can the workstation running CTC ping itself?

Is the workstation's default gateway set to the same IP address as the router A interface?

Are the IP addresses of the ONS 15454 #1, #2, and #3 on the same subnet as the router's B interface?

Are all of the IP addresses unique?

Is the default router of the ONS 15454 #1, #2, and #3 set to the IP address of the router's B interface?

Is there link integrity between the workstation and the hub/switch?

Is there link integrity between the LAN wire-wrap pins on the backplane or the TCC's RJ-45 port of all nodes and the hub/switch(es)?

Is there link integrity between the router ports and their hubs/switches?

Are the hub/switch ports on all ONS 15454s set for 10 Mbps half-duplex?

Can you ping ONS 15454 #1, #2 and #3 from the CTC workstation?

Do you have a web browser installed (either Netscape Navigator version 4.08 or higher or Internet Explorer 4 or higher)?

Do you have the Java plug-in installed (version 1.2.2 or higher for Microsoft Windows and version 1.2.1_03 for Sun Solaris)?

Do you have the Java policy file installed?

Are you using the browser to connect to the IP address of the ONS 15454?

Can you log into the ONS 15454?

8.4.2.3 IP Scenario 3

CTC and all ONS 15454s are on the same subnet; ONS 15454 #1 is attached to LAN A and ONS 15454 #2 and #3 are at remote sites

If you answer No to any of the questions in the checklist, see the "IP Troubleshooting" section.

Figure 8-15 IP Addressing Scenario 3

Procedure: IP Checklist for Scenario 3

Is the workstation IP address and the IP address of all ONS 15454s on the same IP subnet?

Are all of the IP addresses unique?

Can the workstation running CTC ping itself?

Are host routes configured on the CTC workstation for each remote node
(ONS 15454 #2 and #3)?

Is there link integrity between the CTC workstation and the hub/switch?

Is there link integrity between the LAN wire-wrap pins on the backplane or the active TCC RJ-45 port and the hub/switch?

Is the hub/switch port set for 10 Mbps half-duplex?

Can you ping ONS 15454 #1 from the CTC workstation?

Are the optical trunk ports on all nodes in service?

Is the DCC enabled for all optical trunk ports that are in service?

Can you ping the remote nodes (ONS 15454 #2 and #3) from the CTC workstation?

Do you have a web browser installed (either Netscape Navigator version 4.08 or higher or Internet Explorer 4 or higher)?

Do you have the Java plug-in installed (version 1.2.2 or higher for Microsoft Windows and version 1.2.1_03 for Sun Solaris)?

Do you have the Java policy file installed?

Are you using the browser to connect to the IP address of the ONS 15454?

Can you log into the ONS 15454?

8.4.2.4 IP Scenario 4

CTC and ONS 15454 #1 are on the same subnet, while ONS 15454 #2 and # 3 are on different subnets; ONS 15454 #1 is attached to LAN A and ONS 15454 #2 and #3 are at remote sites.

If you answer No to any of the questions in the checklist, see the "IP Troubleshooting" section.

Figure 8-16 IP Addressing Scenario 4

Procedure: IP Checklist for Scenario 4

Is the CTC workstation IP address and the ONS 15454 #1 IP address on the same subnet?

Are the IP addresses of ONS 15454 #1, #2, and #3 on different subnets?

Are all of the IP addresses unique?

Can the workstation running the CTC ping itself?

Is the CTC workstation's default gateway set to the same IP address as ONS 15454 #1?

Is there link integrity between the workstation and the hub/switch?

Is there link integrity between the LAN wire-wrap pins on the backplane or the active TCC RJ-45 port and the hub/switch?

Is the hub/switch port set for 10 Mbps half-duplex?

Can you ping ONS 15454 #1 from the CTC workstation?

Are the optical trunk ports on all nodes in service?

Is the DCC enabled for all optical trunk ports that are in service?

Can you ping the remote nodes (ONS 15454 #2 and #3) from the CTC workstation?

Do you have a web browser installed (either Netscape Navigator version 4.08 or higher or Internet Explorer 4 and higher)?

Do you have the Java plug-in installed (version 1.2.2 or higher for Microsoft Windows and version 1.2.1_03 for Sun Solaris)?

Do you have the Java policy file installed?

Are you using the browser to connect to the IP address of the ONS 15454?

Can you log into the ONS 15454?

8.4.2.5 IP Scenario 5

CTC and each of the ONS 15454s are on different subnets; ONS 15454 #1 is attached to LAN A and ONS 15454 #2 and #3 are at remote sites.

If you answer No to any of the questions in the checklist, see the "IP Troubleshooting" section.

Figure 8-17 IP Addressing Scenario 5

Procedure: IP Checklist for Scenario 5

Is the IP address of the CTC workstation and the router A interface on the same subnet?

Can the workstation running the CTC ping itself?

Is the workstation's default gateway set to the IP address of the local router's A interface?

Are the IP addresses of ONS 15454 #1, #2, and #3 on the different subnets?

Are all of the IP addresses unique?

Is the Default Router of ONS 15454 #1 set to the same IP address as the router's B interface?

Does ONS 15454 #1 have static routes pointing to the CTC workstation?

Does the router have host routes configured for all the remote ONS 15454s?

Is there link integrity between the workstation and the hub/switch?

Is there link integrity between the LAN wire-wrap pins on the backplane or the TCC RJ-45 ports and the hub/switch?

Is there link integrity between the router ports and their hubs/switches?

Is the hub/switch port for ONS 15454 #1 set for 10 Mbps half-duplex?

Can you ping ONS 15454 #1 from the CTC workstation?

Are the optical trunk ports on all nodes in service?

Is the DCC enabled for all optical trunk ports that are in service?

Can you ping the remote nodes (ONS 15454 #2 and #3) from the CTC workstation?

Do you have a web browser installed (either Netscape Navigator version 4.08 or higher or Internet Explorer 4 and higher)?

Do you have the Java plug-in installed (version 1.2.2 or higher for Microsoft Windows and version 1.2.1_03 for Sun Solaris)?

Do you have the Java policy file installed?

Are you using the browser to connect to the IP address of the ONS 15454?

Can you log into the ONS 15454?

8.4.2.6 IP Scenario 6

CTC is on a different subnet and all ONS 15454s are on the same subnet; ONS 15454 #1 attached to LAN A and ONS 15454 #2 and #3 are at remote sites.

If you answer No to any of the questions in the checklist, see the "IP Troubleshooting" section.

Figure 8-18 IP Addressing Scenario 6

Procedure: IP Checklist for Scenario 6

Is the IP address of the CTC workstation and the router A interface on the same subnet?

Can the workstation running the CTC ping itself?

Is the workstation's default gateway set to the same IP address as the local router's A interface?

Are the IP addresses of ONS 15454 #1, #2 and #3 on the same subnet as the local router's B interface?

Are all of the IP addresses unique?

Is the Default Router of ONS 15454 #1 set to the IP address of the router's B interface?

Is there link integrity between the workstation and the hub/switch?

Is there link integrity between the LAN wire-wrap pins on the backplane or the TCC RJ-45 port and the hub/switch?

Is there link integrity between the router ports and their hubs/switches?

Is the hub/switch port for ONS 15454 #1 set for 10 Mbps half-duplex?

Can you ping ONS 15454 #1 from the CTC workstation?

Are the optical trunk ports on all nodes in service?

Is the DCC enabled for all optical trunk ports that are in service?

Can you ping the remote nodes (ONS 15454 #2 and #3) from the CTC workstation?

Do you have a web browser installed (either Netscape Navigator version 4.08 or higher or Internet Explorer 4 and higher)?

Do you have the Java plug-in installed (version 1.2.2 or higher for Microsoft Windows and version 1.2.1_03 for Sun Solaris)?

Do you have the Java policy file installed?

Are you using the browser to connect to the IP address of the ONS 15454?

Can you log into the ONS 15454?

8.4.2.7 IP Scenario 7

CTC #1 and #2 and all ONS 15454s are on the same IP subnet; ONS 15454 #1 and CTC #1 are attached to LAN A. ONS 15454 #2 and CTC #2 are attached to LAN B.

If you answer No to any of the questions in the checklist, see the "IP Troubleshooting" section.

Figure 8-19 IP Addressing Scenario 7

Procedure: IP Checklist for Scenario 7

Are the two CTC workstations IP addresses and all the ONS 15454s IP addresses on the same subnet?

Are all of the IP addresses unique?

Does ONS 15454 #1 have static routes pointing to CTC workstation #1?

Does ONS 15454 #2 have static routes pointing to CTC workstation #2?

Can the workstations running the CTC ping itself?

Is there link integrity between the workstation and the hub/switch?

Is there link integrity between the wire-wrap pins on the backplane (or the active TCC) and the hub/switch?

Is the hub/switch port set for 10 Mbps half-duplex?

Can you ping ONS 15454 #1 from the CTC workstation?

Are the optical trunk ports on all nodes in service?

Is the DCC enabled for all optical trunk ports that are in service?

Can you ping the remote nodes (ONS 15454 #2 and #3) from the CTC workstation?

Do you have a web browser installed (either Netscape Navigator version 4.08 or higher or Internet Explorer 4 and higher)?

Do you have the Java plug-in installed (version 1.2.2 or higher for Microsoft Windows and version 1.2.1_03 for Sun Solaris)?

Do you have the Java policy file installed?

Are you using the browser to connect to the IP address of the ONS 15454?

Can you log into the ONS 15454?

8.5 IP Troubleshooting

Look for solutions in the following section if you answered No to any of the questions in the IP scenarios checklists or encounter any of the listed IP problems.

Table 8-6 IP Troubleshooting Solutions

Problem
Solution

The workstation running the CTC cannot ping itself.

 
 

Verify the IP address of your workstation.

 

If unable to ping, there is a problem with your workstation. Contact the network administrator.

There is no link integrity between the workstation and the hub/switch.

 
 

Verify that you are using a straight-through Ethernet cable.

 

Verify there is a link-integrity indicator for the port on the hub/switch.

 

Change the Ethernet cable.

 

Verify that the hub/switch port is enabled.

 

Verify wire-wrap connection.

 

Contact the network administrator.

No link integrity exists between the hub/switch and the ONS 15454's LAN wire-wraps or RJ-45 port.

 
 

Verify that you are using a cross-over Ethernet cable.

 

Change the Ethernet cable.

 

Verify that the hub/switch port is enabled.

 

Verify wire-wrap connection.

 

Contact the network administrator.

You do not know if the hub/switch port that connects to the ONS 15454(s) is properly set at 10 Mbps half-duplex.

 
 

Contact the network administrator.

Although the workstation is capable of pinging other devices sucessfully, it cannot ping a specific ONS 15454.

 
 

Verify that the IP address of ONS 15454 entered on the workstation matches the IP address displayed on the ONS 15454 LCD screen.

 

Check the routing of the workstation, router and any CTC static routes.

 

Check that optical card ports are in service and have DCC enabled.

The Java policy file was not installed or it was installed before the Java plug-in.

 
 

The policy file and installation instructions are on the software CD that accompanies every ONS 15454.

 

Call the Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) at 1-877-323-7368.

You do not know whether the IP addresses of ONS 15454s #X, #Y and #Z lie on the same or different subnets?

 
 

Contact the network administrator.

It is not known whether the default router entry for the ONS 15454 is set correctly to match the IP address of the router's B interface.

 
 

Using the CTC, verify that the default router configuration entered on the ONS 15454 matches the verified IP address of the router's interface B.

 

See the "Static Route Provisioning" section.

 

Is there link integrity between the ports on the router and the hubs/switches?

 

Contact the network administrator to verify the IP address of the router's B interface.

No link integrity exists between the router ports and the hub/switches.

 
 

Contact the network administrator.

You do not know if the optical trunk ports on the ONS 15454s are in service.

 
 

Verify trunk ports are in service through the CTC:

Click the Provisioning tab.

Click the Line subtab.

Click Status column.

Verify the ports are set to In Service.

You do not know if the DCC is enabled on in-service optical trunk ports.

 
 

Verify that DCC is enabled through the CTC:

Go to the card level view of the optical card.

Click the Provisioning tab.

Click the Sonet DCC subtab.

Verify that the optical cards are listed.

The web browser will not connect to the ONS 15454, but connects successfully to other sites.

 
 

Verify that the IP address of the ONS 15454 entered on the workstation matches the IP address displayed on the LCD screen of the ONS 15454.

 

Verify that the workstation can ping the ONS 15454.

Unable to ping remote ONS 15454s.

 
 

Verify that the IP address of ONS 15454 entered on the workstation matches the IP addresses displayed on the LCD screen of the remote ONS 15454s.

 

Check the routing of the ONS 15454 and the workstation.


8.6 Static Route Provisioning

The ONS 15454 provisions static network routes in the ONS 15454 network element through the CTC. This makes it possible to have multiple CTC sessions, with different destination IP addresses, on a network of ONS 15454s that all lie on the same subnet. For example, a Network Operations Center (NOC) may be remotely monitoring an ONS 15454 through CTC, while at the same time an on-site employee is logged into an ONS 15454 on the network with a separate CTC session. It also allows workstations to connect to ONS 15454s through routers.

To achieve CTC connectivity, interconnected ONS 15454 network elements use the SONET DCC (SDCC) for communication. Communication is accomplished using a combination of the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) routing protocol and manually-entered static routes.

The CTC adds static route entries to the network element's routing table. This routing table information is advertised to the other ONS 15454s connected by DCCs.

Adding static route provisioning on the ONS 15454 requires configuration changes in the network elements and CTC workstations. Only one example is given below. For other typical IP addressing scenarios, see the "Common IP Addressing Scenarios with the ONS 15454" section. These scenarios contain additional details on router and CTC workstation setup that support the configurations described below.

Procedure: Provision Static Routing to a Router Linked Workstation

This procedure provisions a static route to connect an ONS 15454 through a router and to a CTC workstation. All networks in this example use a 24-bit subnet mask. The CTC workstation IP address is 192.168.100.20, the ONS 15454 IP address is 192.168.90.11, and the IP address of the router port on the same segment as the ONS 15454 is 192.168.90.1.


Step 1 Go to the node view of the CTC.

Step 2 Click the Provisioning tab.

Step 3 Click the Network tab.

Step 4 In the Static Routes pane, click Create.

The Create Static Route dialog opens (see Figure 8-20 ).

Figure 8-20 Create Static Route Window

Step 5 In the Destination field, enter the IP address of the workstation running the CTC (in this example, 192.168.100.20.)

Step 6 In the Mask field, enter a 32 bit subnet mask to designate that this is a host route (255.255.255.255).

Step 7 In the Next Hop field, enter the IP address of the router port (in this example, 192.168.90.1).

Step 8 In the Cost field enter the number of hops (in this example, 2). See the following note for information on determining cost.


Note   To determine cost, count the number of hops between the ONS 15454 and the CTC workstation. In this example, the count is two, one hop from the ONS 15454 to the router and a second hop from the router to the CTC workstation.


Step 9 Click OK.

Step 10 To confirm that you have successfully completed the procedure, view the static route in the Static Route Window (show in ) or ping the node.

Figure 8-21 Static Route Window


Note   The Default Router entry for the ONS 15454 should be the router port (in this example, 192.168.90.1).