Cisco ONS 15454 SDH Installation and Operations Guide, Release 3.4
Chapter 5, SDH Topologies

Table of Contents

SDH Topologies
5.1 Before You Begin
5.2 Creating SNCP Rings
5.3 Adding and Removing Nodes from an SNCP Ring
5.4 Creating MS-SPRings
5.5 Adding Nodes to an MS-SPRing
5.6 Removing Nodes from an MS-SPRing
5.7 Upgrading a Two-Fiber MS-SPRing to a Four-Fiber MS-SPRing
5.8 Moving MS-SPRing Trunk Cards
5.9 Subtending Rings
5.10 Creating Linear ADM Configurations
5.11 Extended SNCP Mesh Networks
5.12 Common Ring-Related Procedures

SDH Topologies


This chapter explains how to set up the Cisco ONS 15454 SDH in different SDH topologies. Table 5-1 lists network setup topics.

5.1 Before You Begin

To avoid errors during network configuration, Cisco recommends that you draw the complete ONS 15454 SDH topology on paper (or electronically) before you begin the physical implementation. A sketch ensures that you have adequate slots, cards, and fibers to complete the topology.

The ONS 15454 SDH node offers numerous types of protection. Table 5-2 shows the three main categories of protection types found in a network topology.

Table 5-2   Network Protection Types

Protection Category  Protection Type  For more information 

Equipment

1:1, 1+1, 1:N

"Creating Card Protection Groups" section

Path

Subnetwork connection protection (SNCP ring)

"Creating SNCP Rings" section

"Adding and Removing Nodes from an SNCP Ring" section

Extended SNCP mesh networks

"Extended SNCP Mesh Networks" section

Line (Multiplex Section)

Automatic protection switching (APS), 1:1, 1+1, 1:N

"MS-SPRing Automatic Protection Switching" section

"Creating Card Protection Groups" section

Multiplex section shared protection ring (MS-SPRing), two-fiber and four-fiber

"Creating MS-SPRings" section

Linear add/drop multiplexers (ADM)

"Creating Linear ADM Configurations" section

Table 5-3 shows the number of DCCs used by each SDH ring type.

Table 5-3   ONS 15454 SDH Rings

Ring Type  Number of DCCs Per Node 

SNCP Ring

2 DCCs*

2-Fiber MS-SPRing

2 DCCs*

4-Fiber MS-SPRing

2 DCCs*

* Total DCC usage must be equal to or less than 10 DCCs.

Table 5-4 is a quick reference indicating when to perform a lockout on the ONS 15454 SDH node.

Table 5-4   ONS 15454 SDH Lockout Matrix

Protection Type  XC10G Switch using CTC  Soft Reset of Active XC10G  Card Pull of Active XC10G  Soft Reset of Active TCC-I  Card Pull of Active TCC-I 

Linear

No Lockout

No Lockout

Lockout Span

No Lockout

No Lockout

SNCP

No Lockout

No Lockout

Lockout1

No Lockout

No Lockout

2-fiber MS-SPRing

Lockout2

Lockout2

Lockout2

No Lockout

Lockout2

4-fiber MS-SPRing

Lockout2

Lockout2

Lockout2

No Lockout

Lockout2

1. Lockout all circuits originating from this node because the span card on the remote node detects AIS-P and LOP-P.

2. Lockout the spans coming to this node from the adjacent nodes. The "lockout" is applied on the adjacent node.

Note: The above lockouts do not address "Database Restore" and "Software Upgrades."

The ONS 15454 SDH is a Class 1 (CDRH) and Class 1M (IEC) laser system. Some procedures require the installation or removal of optical cards and fibers. Take appropriate safety precautions while performing these procedures.


Warning Voltage is present on the backplane when the system is operating. To reduce risk of an electric shock, keep hands and fingers out of the power supply bays and backplane areas.


Warning Invisible laser radiation may be emitted from the end of the unterminated fiber cable or connector. Do not stare into the beam or view directly with optical instruments. Viewing the laser output with certain optical instruments (for example, eye loupes, magnifiers, and microscopes) within a distance of 100 mm may pose an eye hazard. Use of controls or adjustments or performance of procedures other than those specified may result in hazardous radiation exposure.

5.2 Creating SNCP Rings

Subnetwork connection protection (SNCP) rings provide duplicate fiber paths in the network. Working traffic flows in one direction and protection traffic flows in the opposite direction. If a problem occurs in the working traffic path, the receiving node switches to the path coming from the opposite direction. With SNCP networks, switching occurs at the end of the path and is triggered by defects or alarms along the path.

The network can be divided into a number of interconnected subnetworks. Within each subnetwork, protection is provided at the path level and the automatic protection switching between two paths is provided at the subnetwork boundaries. The node at the end of the path and the intermediate nodes in the path select the best traffic signal. The virtual container is not terminated at the intermediate node; instead, it compares the quality of the signal on the two incoming ports and selects the better signal.

CTC automates ring configuration. SNCP network traffic is defined within the ONS 15454 SDH on a circuit-by-circuit basis. If an extended SNCP mesh network circuit is not defined within a 1+1 or MS-SPRing line protection scheme and path protection is available and specified, CTC uses an SNCP ring as the default protection mechanism.

Figure 5-1 shows a basic SNCP ring configuration. If Node A sends a signal to Node C, the working signal travels on the working traffic path through Node B. The same signal is also sent on the protect traffic path through Node D. If a fiber break occurs (Figure 5-2), Node C switches its active receiver to the protect signal coming through Node D.

Because each traffic path is transported around the entire ring, SNCPs are best suited for networks where traffic concentrates at one or two locations and is not widely distributed. SNCP ring capacity is equal to its bit rate. Services can originate and terminate on the same SNCP ring, or they can be passed to an adjacent access or interoffice ring for transport to the service-terminating node.


Figure 5-1   Basic, four-node, SNCP ring



Figure 5-2   SNCP ring with a fiber break


5.2.1 Sample SNCP Ring

Figure 5-3 shows a common SNCP ring application. STM-1 path circuits provide remote switch connectivity to a host V5.x switch. In the example, each remote switch requires eight E-1s to return to the host switch. Figure 5-4 and Figure 5-5 show the shelf layout for each node in the example.


Figure 5-3   STM-1 SNCP ring


Node A has four E1-14 cards to provide 56 active E-1 ports. The other sites only require two E1-14 cards to carry the eight E-1s to and from the remote switch. You can use the other half of each ONS 15454 SDH shelf assembly to provide support for a second or third ring to other existing or planned remote sites.

In this sample STM-1 SNCP ring, Node A contains four E1-14 cards and two STM-1 cards. Six free slots are available, which you can provision with cards or leave empty.


Note   Fill unused card slots with a blank faceplate (Cisco P/N 15454E-BLANK). The blank faceplate ensures proper airflow when operating the ONS 15454 SDH.

Figure 5-4 shows the shelf setup for these cards.


Figure 5-4   Card setup of Node A in the STM-1 SNCP ring example


In Figure 5-3, Nodes B through D each contain two E1-14 cards and two STM-1 cards. Eight free slots are available that you can provision with other cards or leave empty. Figure 5-5 shows the shelf assembly setup for this sample configuration.


Figure 5-5   Card setup of Nodes B through D in the STM-1 SNCP ring example


5.2.2 Setting Up an SNCP Ring

To set up an SNCP ring, perform five basic procedures:


Step 1   Complete the "Install the SNCP Ring Trunk Cards" procedure.

Step 2   Complete the "Configure the SNCP Ring DCC Terminations and Place Ports in Service" procedure.

Step 3   Configure the timing. See the "Set Up External, Line, or Mixed Timing for the ONS 15454 SDH" procedure or the "Set Up Internal Timing for the ONS 15454 SDH" procedure.

Step 4   After configuring the timing, set up the SNCP circuits. SNCP signal thresholds—the levels that determine when the SNCP path is switched—are set at the circuit level. To create SNCP circuits, see "Circuits and Tunnels."

Step 5   Repeat Step 1 to Step 4 to configure additional nodes. To create an extended SNCP mesh network, see the "Extended SNCP Mesh Networks" section. To create circuits, see the "Creating VC High-Order Path Circuits" section.





Procedure: Install the SNCP Ring Trunk Cards


Caution   Always wear an authorized ESD wrist band when removing or installing ONS 15454 SDH cards.

Purpose

Install the SNCP ring trunk cards as the first step in setting up an SNCP ring.

Tools/Equipment

You will need all STM-N cards that you will use in the SNCP ring.

Onsite/Remote

Onsite


Step 1   Install the STM-N cards that you will use as the SNCP trunk cards. You can install the STM-1, STM-4, and STM-16 cards in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17. The STM-64 card can only be installed in Slots 5, 6, 12, or 13.

Step 2   Allow the cards to boot. For more information about installing cards, see the "Optical, Electrical, and Ethernet Card Installation" section.

Step 3   Attach the fiber to the west and east STM-N card ports at each node as follows. Refer to Figure 5-6 while installing the fiber.

  • To avoid errors, make the west port the farthest slot to the left and the east port the farthest slot to the right.
  • Plug fiber from a west port at one node into the east port on the adjacent node. Figure 5-6 shows fiber connections for a four-node SNCP ring with trunk cards in Slot 5 (west) and Slot 12 (east).
  • Plug fiber from the transmit (Tx) connector of an STM-N card at one node into the receive (Rx) connector of an STM-N card at the adjacent node. The card displays a signal failure (SF) LED if Tx and Rx fibers are mismatched after the DCCs are on and the ports are in service.

Figure 5-6   Connecting fiber to a four-node SNCP ring






Procedure: Configure the SNCP Ring DCC Terminations and Place Ports in Service


Note   The SDH and SONET versions of the Cisco ONS 15454 do not interoperate via DCC.

Purpose

Create the DCC terminations and place ports in service after installing the STM-N cards.

Prerequisite Procedures

"Install the SNCP Ring Trunk Cards" procedure

Onsite/Remote

Onsite or remote


Step 1   Start CTC for the first node that you will provision for the SNCP.

Step 2   Click the Provisioning > SDH DCC tabs.

Step 3   In the SDCC Terminations section, click Create.

Step 4   In the Create SDCC Terminations dialog box, press the Ctrl key and click the two slots/ports that will serve as the SNCP ports at the node. For example, Slot 5 (STM-16)/Port 1 and Slot 14 (STM-16)/Port 1.


Figure 5-7   Creating SDCC terminations


Step 5   Select the Set to IS, if allowed radio button. This radio button places the trunk card ports in service.


Note    There are four port state options. Select the port state that best fits your requirements. For example, you can select the set OOS to OOS-MT radio button if you are provisioning the SNCP before installing cards and fiber. Also, you can select the OOS-MT port state if you want to avoid DCC termination alarms until you configure all DCCs on the SNCP.


Note    Below the port state options you can also enable or disable OSPF on the DCC according to your requirements.

Step 6   Click OK.

Step 7   The slots and ports appear in the SDCC Terminations list.

Step 8   Complete Step 3 to 6 at each node that will be in the SNCP.


Note    The ONS 15454 SDH uses the SDH regenerator section DCC (SDCC) for data communications. It does not use the multiplex section DCCs; therefore, the multiplex section DCCs are available to tunnel DCCs from third-party equipment across ONS 15454 SDH networks. For more detail, see the "Creating DCC Tunnels" section on page 6-34.

Step 9   After configuring the SDH DCC, set the timing for the node. For procedures, see the "Setting Up ONS 15454 SDH Timing" section.





5.3 Adding and Removing Nodes from an SNCP Ring

This section explains how to add and remove nodes in an ONS 15454 SDH SNCP ring configuration. To add or remove a node in an SNCP ring, perform two basic procedures:


Step 1   Switch traffic on the effected spans to route traffic away from the area of the ring where service will be performed. See the "Switch SNCP Ring Traffic" procedure.

Step 2   Add or remove an SNCP node.





Procedure: Switch SNCP Ring Traffic

Purpose

Use this procedure to route traffic away from the area of the ring where service will be performed by switching traffic on the effected spans.

Prerequisite Procedures

This procedure assumes that you are adding or removing a node from an existing SNCP ring.

Onsite/Remote

Onsite or remote


Step 1   From CTC, display the network view.

Step 2   Right-click the span that will be cut to add or delete a node and choose Circuits from the shortcut menu (Figure 5-8).


Figure 5-8   Using the span shortcut menu to display circuits


Step 3   In the Circuits on Span dialog box (Figure 5-9), choose a protection option from the Perform SNCP span switching menu from the following choices:

  • CLEAR—Removes a previously set switch command.
  • MANUAL_SWITCH AWAY—Switches the span if the new span is error free.
  • FORCE_SWITCH AWAY—Forces the span to switch, even if the path has signal degrade (SD) or signal failure (SF) conditions. Force switch states have a higher priority than manual switches.
  • LOCKOUT OF PROTECTION—Prevents traffic from switching to the protect circuit path under any circumstances. Of all switch states, Lockout has the highest priority.

Caution   Force and lockout commands override normal protective switching mechanisms. Applying these commands incorrectly can cause traffic outages.


Figure 5-9   Switching SNCP circuits


Step 4   Click Apply.

Step 5   When the confirmation dialog box appears, click Yes to confirm the protection switching. The column under Switch State changes to your chosen level of protection.

Step 6   Click Close after Switch State changes.





Procedure: Add an SNCP Node

Purpose

This procedure explains how to add SNCP nodes. You can only add one node at a time.

Prerequisite Procedures

"Switch SNCP Ring Traffic" procedure

Onsite/Remote

Onsite only


Step 1   Start CTC for one of the SNCP ring nodes and display the network view.

Step 2   Clear any alarms or conditions on the ring nodes. See the "Check for Alarms" procedure.

Step 3   At the node that you will add to the SNCP, complete the following steps:

a. Verify that the STM-N cards are installed and fiber is available to connect to the other nodes.

b. Run test traffic through the cards that will connect to the SNCP.

c. Complete the "Setting Up an SNCP Ring" procedure to provision the new node.

Step 4   Start CTC for a node that will physically connect to the new node.

Step 5   See the "Switch SNCP Ring Traffic" procedure to initiate a FORCE switch to move traffic away from the span that will connect to the new node.


Caution   Traffic is not protected during a protection switch.

Step 6   Two nodes will connect directly to the new node; remove their fiber connections:

a. Remove the east fiber connection from the node that will connect to the west port of the new node.

b. Remove the west fiber connection from the node that will connect to the east port of the new node.

Step 7   Replace the removed fiber connections with connections from the new node.


Note    Perform Step 7 on site at the new node.

Step 8   Log out of CTC and then log back into the new node in the ring.

Step 9   Display the network view. The new node should appear in the network view. Wait for a few minutes to allow all the nodes to appear.

Step 10   Click the Circuits tab and wait for all the circuits to appear, including spans. Circuits that will pass through the new node display as incomplete.

Step 11   In the network view, right-click the new node and choose Update Circuits With New Node from the list of options.

Step 12   Click the Circuits tab and verify that no incomplete circuits are displayed. If incomplete circuits are displayed, repeat Step 10.

Step 13   Use the "Switch SNCP Ring Traffic" procedure to clear the protection switch.





Procedure: Remove an SNCP Node


Caution   Although the following procedure is designed to minimize traffic outages while nodes are removed, traffic will be lost when you delete and recreate circuits that passed through the removed node.

Purpose

This procedure explains how to remove SNCP nodes.

Prerequisite Procedures

"Switch SNCP Ring Traffic" procedure

Onsite/Remote

Perform these steps onsite and not from a remote location.


Step 1   Start CTC for one of the SNCP ring nodes and display the network view. Clear any alarms or conditions on the ring nodes. See the "Check for Alarms" procedure.

Step 2   Complete the "Switch SNCP Ring Traffic" procedure to initiate a FORCE switch to move traffic away from the node you will remove. Initiate a FORCE switch on all spans connected to the node you are removing.


Caution   Traffic is not protected during a forced protection switch.

Step 3   Log into the node that you will remove. If you are already logged in, display the node view.

Step 4   Delete circuits that originate or terminate in that node. (If a circuit has multiple drops, delete only the drops that terminate on the node you are deleting.)

a. Click the Circuits tab.

b. Choose the circuit(s) to delete. To choose multiple circuits, press the Shift or Ctrl key while selecting circuits.

c. Click Delete.

d. Click Yes when prompted.

Step 5   From the node that will be deleted, remove the east and west span fibers. At this point, the node is no longer a part of the ring.

Step 6   Reconnect the span fibers of the nodes remaining in the ring.

Step 7   Log out of CTC and then log back into a node in the ring.

Step 8   Click the Alarms tab of each newly connected node and verify that the span cards are free of alarms. Resolve any alarms before proceeding.

Step 9   If the removed node was the building integrated timing supply (BITS), select a new node as the BITS source or select another node as the master timing node.

Step 10   See the "Switch SNCP Ring Traffic" procedure to clear the protection switch.





5.4 Creating MS-SPRings

MS-SPRings share the ring bandwidth equally between working and protection traffic. Half of the payload bandwidth is reserved for protection in each direction, making the communication pipe half-full under normal operation.

There are two types of MS-SPRings: two-fiber and four-fiber. Two-fiber MS-SPRings share service and protection equally, but only two physical fibers are required. For more information, see the "Two-Fiber Multiplex Section Shared Protection Ring" section. With four-fiber MS-SPRings, the nodes on both sides of the failed span perform a span switch and use the second pair of fibers as the new working route. For more information, see the "Four-Fiber MS-SPRings" section.

An MS-SPRing node can terminate traffic it receives from either side of the ring. Therefore, MS-SPRings are suited for distributed node-to-node traffic applications such as interoffice networks and access networks.

MS-SPRings allow bandwidth to be reused around the ring and can carry more traffic than a network with traffic flowing through one central hub. MS-SPRings can also carry more traffic than an SNCP operating at the same STM-N rate. Table 5-5 shows the bidirectional bandwidth capacities of two-fiber MS-SPRings. The capacity is the STM-N rate divided by two, multiplied by the number of nodes in the ring and minus the number of pass-through VC4 circuits.

Table 5-5   Two-Fiber MS-SPRing Capacity

STM Rate  Working Bandwidth  Protection Bandwidth  Ring Capacity 

STM-4

VC4 1-2

VC4 3-4

2 x N1 - PT2

STM-16

VC4 1-8

VC4 9-16

8 x N - PT

STM-64

VC4 1-32

VC4 33-64

32 x N - PT

N equals the number of ONS 15454 SDH nodes configured as MS-SPRing nodes.

PT equals the number of VC4 circuits passed through ONS 15454 SDH nodes in the ring. (Capacity can vary depending on the traffic pattern.)

Table 5-6 shows the bidirectional bandwidth capacities of four-fiber MS-SPRings.

Table 5-6   Four-Fiber MS-SPRing Capacity

STM Rate  Working Bandwidth  Protection Bandwidth  Ring Capacity 

STM-16

VC4 1-16 (Fiber 1)

VC4 1-16 (Fiber 2)

16 x N - PT

STM-64

VC4 1-64 (Fiber 1)

VC4 1-64 (Fiber 2)

64 x N - PT

Figure 5-10 shows an example of MS-SPRing bandwidth reuse. The same VC4 carries three different traffic sets simultaneously on different spans on the ring: one set from Node 3 to Node 1, one set from Node 1 to Node 2, and another set from Node 2 to Node 3.


Figure 5-10   MS-SPRing bandwidth reuse


5.4.1 Two-Fiber Multiplex Section Shared Protection Ring

The ONS 15454 SDH can support a number of ring combinations if the total DCC usage is equal to or less than 10 DCCs. Each MS-SPRing can have up to 16 ONS 15454 SDH nodes. Because the working and protect bandwidths must be equal, you can create only STM-4 (two-fiber only), STM-16, or STM-64 MS-SPRings.


Note   MS-SPRings with 16 or fewer nodes meet the ITU-T G.841 switch time requirement.

In two-fiber MS-SPRings, each fiber is divided into working and protect bandwidths. For example, in an STM-16 MS-SPRing (Figure 5-11), VC4s 1 to 8 carry the working traffic, and VC4s 9 to 16 are reserved for protection. Working traffic (VC4s 1 to 8) travels in one direction on one fiber and in the opposite direction on the second fiber. The CTC circuit routing routines calculate the shortest path for circuits based on requirements set by the circuit provisioner, traffic patterns, and distance. For example, in Figure 5-11, circuits going from Node 0 to Node 1 typically travel on Fiber 1, unless that fiber is full, in which case circuits are routed on Fiber 2 through Node 3 and Node 2. Traffic from Node 0 to Node 2 (or Node 1 to Node 3), can be routed on either fiber, depending on circuit provisioning requirements and traffic loads.


Figure 5-11   Four-node, two-fiber MS-SPRing


The SDH K1 and K2 bytes carry the information that governs MS-SPRing protection switches. Each MS-SPRing node monitors the K bytes to determine when to switch the SDH signal to an alternate physical path. The K bytes communicate failure conditions and actions taken between nodes in the ring.

If a break occurs on one fiber, working traffic that was targeted for a node beyond the break switches to the protect bandwidth on the second fiber. The traffic travels in the reverse direction on the protect bandwidth until it reaches its destination node. At that point, traffic is switched back to the working bandwidth.

Figure 5-12 shows a sample traffic pattern on a four-node, two-fiber MS-SPRing.


Figure 5-12   Four-node, two-fiber MS-SPRing sample traffic pattern


Figure 5-13 shows how traffic is rerouted after a line break between Node 0 and Node 3.

  • All circuits originating on Node 0 and carried to Node 2 on Fiber 2 are switched to the protect bandwidth of Fiber 1. For example, a circuit carried on VC4-1 on Fiber 2 is switched to VC4-9 on Fiber 1. A circuit carried on VC4-2 on Fiber 2 is switched to VC4-10 on Fiber 1. Fiber 1 carries the circuit to Node 3 (the original routing destination). Node 3 switches the circuit back to VC4-1 on Fiber 2 where it is routed to Node 2 on VC4-1.
  • Circuits originating on Node 2 that were normally carried to Node 0 on Fiber 1 are switched to the protect bandwidth of Fiber 2 at Node 3. For example, a circuit carried on VC4-2 on Fiber 1 is switched to VC4-10 on Fiber 2. Fiber 2 carries the circuit to Node 0 where the circuit is switched back to VC4-2 on Fiber 1 and then dropped to its destination.

Figure 5-13   Four-node, two-fiber MS-SPRing traffic pattern following line break


5.4.1.1 Sample MS-SPRing Application

Figure 5-14 shows a sample two-fiber MS-SPRing implementation. A regional long-distance network connects to other carriers at Node 0. Traffic is delivered to the service provider's major hubs.

  • Carrier 1 delivers six E-3s over two STM-1 spans to Node 0. Carrier 2 provides twelve E-3s directly. Node 0 receives the signals and delivers them around the ring to the appropriate node.
  • The ring also brings 14 E-1s back from each remote site to Node 0. Intermediate nodes serve these shorter regional connections.
  • The ONS 15454 SDH STM-1 card supports a total of four STM-1 ports so that two additional STM-1 spans can be added at little cost.

Figure 5-14   Five-node MS-SPRing


Figure 5-15 shows the shelf assembly layout for Node 0, which has one free slot. Figure 5-16 shows the shelf assembly layout for the remaining sites in the ring. In this MS-SPRing configuration, an additional eight E-3s at Node IDs 1 and 3 can be activated. An additional four E-3s can be added at Node ID 4, and ten E-3s can be added at Node ID 2. Each site has free slots for future traffic needs.


Figure 5-15   Shelf assembly layout for Node 0 in Figure 5-14



Figure 5-16   Shelf assembly layout for Nodes 1 to 4 in Figure 5-14


5.4.2 Four-Fiber MS-SPRings

The ONS 15454 SDH can support many ring combinations if the total DCC usage is equal to or less than 10 DCCs. Each MS-SPRing can have up to 16 ONS 15454 SDH nodes. Because the working and protect bandwidths must be equal, you can create only STM-16 or STM-64 MS-SPRings.


Note   MS-SPRings with 16 or fewer nodes meet the ITU-T G.841 switch time requirement.

Four-fiber MS-SPRings double the bandwidth of two-fiber MS-SPRings. Four-fiber MS-SPRings increase the reliability and flexibility of traffic protection because they allow span switching as well as ring switching. Two fibers are allocated for working traffic and two fibers for protection, as shown in Figure 5-17. To implement a four-fiber MS-SPRing, you must install four STM-16 cards or four STM-64 cards at each MS-SPRing node.


Figure 5-17   Four-node, four-fiber MS-SPRing


Four-fiber MS-SPRings provide span and ring switching:

  • Span switching occurs when a working span fails (Figure 5-18). Traffic switches to the protect fibers between the nodes (Node 0 and Node 1 in the Figure 5-18 example) and then returns to the working fibers that did not fail. Multiple span switches can occur at the same time.
  • Ring switching occurs when a span switch cannot recover traffic (Figure 5-19), such as when both the working and protect fibers fail on the same span. In a ring switch, traffic is routed to the protect fibers throughout the full ring.

Figure 5-18   Four-fiber MS-SPRing span switch



Figure 5-19   Four-fiber MS-SPRing switch


5.4.3 MS-SPRing Automatic Protection Switching

The ONS 15454 SDH uses the K3 overhead byte for MS-SPRing APS to allow an ONS 15454 SDH MS-SPRing to have more than 16 nodes. If an MS-SPRing is routed through third-party equipment that cannot transparently transport the K3 byte, you can remap the ring to either the Z2, E2, or F1 byte on STM-16 cards. (K3 byte remapping is not available on any STM-N cards other than STM-16.) If you remap the K3 byte, you must remap it to the same byte on each MS-SPRing trunk card that connects to the third-party equipment. All other MS-SPRing trunk cards should remain mapped to the K3.

For example, in Figure 5-20, an MS-SPRing span between Node 2 and Node 4 passes through third-party equipment. Because this equipment cannot transparently transport the K3 byte, the STM-16 card at Node 2/Slot 12 and the STM-16 card at Node 4/Slot 5 are provisioned to use an alternate byte. Other MS-SPRing trunk cards are not changed.


Figure 5-20   MS-SPRing with a remapped K3 byte


Do not perform K3 byte remapping unless a remap is required to provision an MS-SPRing that uses third-party equipment. See the "Remap the K3 Byte" procedure as needed.

5.4.4 Setting Up MS-SPRings

To set up an MS-SPRing on the ONS 15454 SDH, perform the following procedures:


Step 1   Complete the "Install the MS-SPRing Trunk Cards" procedure .

Step 2   Complete the "Create the MS-SPRing DCC Terminations and Place Ports in Service" procedure.

Step 3   Set up MS-SPRing timing. See the "Set Up External, Line, or Mixed Timing for the ONS 15454 SDH" procedure or the "Set Up Internal Timing for the ONS 15454 SDH" procedure.

Step 4   If an MS-SPRing span passes through equipment that cannot transparently transport the K3 byte, remap the MS-SPRing extension byte on the trunk cards at each end of the span. See the "Remap the K3 Byte" procedure.

Step 5   Complete the "Provision the MS-SPRing Using the Wizard" procedure.





Procedure: Install the MS-SPRing Trunk Cards


Caution   Always wear an authorized ESD wrist band when removing or installing ONS 15454 SDH cards.

Purpose

To set up an MS-SPRing on the ONS 15454 SDH, you must first use this procedure to install the MS-SPRing trunk cards.

Tools/Equipment

All STM-N cards that will be used in the MS-SPRing.

Onsite/Remote

Onsite


Step 1   Install the STM-4, STM-16, or STM-64 cards that will serve as the MS-SPRing trunk cards. You can install the STM-4 and STM-16 cards in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17. The STM-64 card can only be installed in Slots 5, 6, 12, or 13.

Step 2   Allow the cards to boot. For more information about installing cards, see the "Optical, Electrical, and Ethernet Card Installation" section.

Step 3   Attach the fiber to the east and west MS-SPRing ports at each node.

  • To avoid errors, make the west port the farthest slot to the left and the east port the farthest slot to the right.
  • Plug fiber from a west port at one node into the east port on the adjacent node. Figure 5-21 shows fiber connections for a two-fiber MS-SPRing with trunk cards in Slot 5 (west) and Slot 12 (east).

Figure 5-21   Connecting fiber to a four-node, two-fiber MS-SPRing


  • Plug fiber from the transmit (Tx) connector of an STM-N card at one node into the receive (Rx) connector of an STM-N card at the adjacent node. The card displays an SF LED if Tx and Rx fibers are mismatched after the DCCs are created and the ports are in service.
  • For four-fiber MS-SPRings, use the same east/west connection pattern for the working and protect fibers. Do not mix working and protect card connections. The MS-SPRing will not function if working and protect cards are interconnected. Figure 5-22 shows fiber connections for a four-fiber MS-SPRing. Slot 5 (west) and Slot 12 (east) carry the working traffic. Slot 6 (west) and Slot 13 (east) carry the protect traffic.

Figure 5-22   Connecting fiber to a four-node, four-fiber MS-SPRing






Procedure: Create the MS-SPRing DCC Terminations and Place Ports in Service


Note   The SDH and SONET versions of the Cisco ONS 15454 do not interoperate via DCC. DCC interoperability is not available for ONS 15454 SDH Software R3.4 and earlier.

Purpose

Create the DCC terminations and place ports in service after installing the STM-N cards.

Prerequisite Procedures

"Install the MS-SPRing Trunk Cards" procedure

Onsite/Remote

Onsite or remote


Step 1   Start CTC for the first node that you will provision for the MS-SPRing.

Step 2   Click the Provisioning > SDH DCC tabs.

Step 3   In the SDCC Terminations section, click Create (Figure 5-23).

Step 4   In the Create SDCC Terminations dialog box, press Ctrl and click the two slots/ports that will serve as the MS-SPRing ports at the node. For example, Slot 5 (STM-16)/Port 1 and Slot 12 (STM-16)/ Port 1. For four-fiber MS-SPRings, provision the working cards, but not the protect cards, as DCC terminations.


Figure 5-23   Creating SDCC terminations


Step 5   Select the Set to IS, if allowed radio button. This radio button places the trunk card ports in service.


Note    There are four port state options. Select the port state that best fits your requirements. For example, you can select the set OOS to OOS-MT radio button if you are provisioning the MS-SPRing before installing cards and fiber. Also, you can select the OOS-MT port state if you want to avoid DCC termination alarms until you configure all DCCs on the MS-SPRing.

Step 6   (Optional) Below the port state options you can also enable or disable OSPF on the DCC according to your requirements.

Step 7   Click OK.

Step 8   The slots/ports appear in the SDCC Terminations list.

Step 9   Complete Steps 3 to 7 at each node that will be in the MS-SPRing.


Note    The ONS 15454 SDH uses the SDH regenerator section DCC (SDCC) for data communications. It does not use the multiplex section DCCs; therefore, the multiplex section DCCs are available to tunnel DCCs from third-party equipment across ONS 15454 SDH networks. For more detail, see the "Creating DCC Tunnels" section on page 6-34.

Step 10   After configuring the SDH DCC, set the timing for the node. For procedures, see the "Setting Up ONS 15454 SDH Timing" section.





Procedure: Remap the K3 Byte

Purpose

Only use the K3 byte remapping procedure when it is required to run MS-SPRings through third-party equipment that cannot transparently transport the K3 (see the "Sample MS-SPRing Application" section). K3 bytes can only be remapped on STM-16 cards.

Prerequisite Procedures

"Create the MS-SPRing DCC Terminations and Place Ports in Service" procedure

Onsite/Remote

Onsite or remote


Step 1   Start CTC for one of the nodes that connects to the third-party equipment.

Step 2   Double-click the STM-16 card that connects to the third-party equipment. The card view displays.

Step 3   Click the Provisioning > Line tabs.

Step 4   Click MS-SPRing Ext Byte and choose the alternate byte: Z2, E2, or F1.

Step 5   Click Apply.

Step 6   (Four-fiber MS-SPRing only) Repeat Steps 2 to 5 for each protect card.

Step 7   (Two-fiber MS-SPRing only) Repeat Steps 2 to 5 at the node and card on the other end of the MS-SPRing span.





Procedure: Provision the MS-SPRing Using the Wizard

Purpose

After enabling the ports, create a two-fiber or four-fiber MS-SPRing using this procedure.

Prerequisite Procedures

"Create the MS-SPRing DCC Terminations and Place Ports in Service" procedure

"Setting Up ONS 15454 SDH Timing" section

Onsite/Remote

Onsite or remote


Step 1   Start CTC for a node in the MS-SPRing and go to the network view.

Step 2   From network view, choose the Provisioning > MS-SPRing tabs.

Step 3   Click the Create MS-SPRings button.

Step 4   In the Create MS-SPRing dialog box (Figure 5-24), set the MS-SPRing properties.

  • Type—Select the MS-SPRing ring type, either two-fiber or four-fiber.
  • Speed—Select the type of trunk card you are using: STM-4, STM-16, or STM-64.
  • Ring ID—Assign a ring ID (a number between 0 and 9999). Nodes in the same MS-SPRing must have the same ring ID.
  • Ring Reversion—Set the amount of time that will pass before the traffic reverts to the original working path. The default is 5 minutes. All nodes in an MS-SPRing ring should have the same ring reversion setting, particularly if never (i.e., non-revertive) is selected.

Figure 5-24   Setting MS-SPRing properties


For four-fiber MS-SPRings, complete the following:

  • Span Reversion—Choose the amount of time that will elapse before the traffic reverts to the original working path following a traffic failure. The default is 5 minutes. Span reversions can be set to Never. If you set a ring reversion time, the times must be the same for both ends of the span. That is, if Node A's west fiber is connected to Node B's east port, the Node A west span reversion time must be the same as the Node B east span reversion time.

Note    To avoid reversion time mismatches, Cisco recommends that you use the same span reversion time throughout the ring.

Step 5   Click Next.

Step 6   Click on the span you want to include in the MS-SPRing and click the Add Span button. Perform this step for each span you are adding to the MS-SPRing.

Step 7   Click the Finish button after you have selected enough spans to create a two-fiber or four-fiber MS-SPRing.


Note    Some or all of the following alarms display during MS-SPRing setup: E-W MISMATCH, RING MISMATCH, APSCIMP, APSDFLTK, MSSP-OOSYNC. The alarms will clear automatically. If the alarms do not clear, follow alarm troubleshooting procedures provided in the Cisco ONS 15454 SDH Troubleshooting and Maintenance Guide.

Step 8   From the network view, verify the following:

  • A green span line appears between all MS-SPRing nodes.
  • All E-W MISMATCH, RING MISMATCH, APSCIMP, DFLTK, and MSSP-OOSYNC alarms are cleared.

Step 9   Test the MS-SPRing using testing procedures normal for your site; here is a common test procedure:

a. Run test traffic through the ring.

b. From network view, click the Provisioning > MS-SPRing tabs.

c. Click on the ring and click the Edit button.

d. Right click on an East port and choose MANUAL RING from the Set East Protection Operation list (Figure 5-25). Click Apply.


Figure 5-25   Choosing the manual ring option


e. Click the Conditions tab and click Retrieve. You should see a Ring Switch West event, and the far-end node that responded to this request should report a Ring Switch East event.

f. Verify that traffic switches normally.

g. Choose Clear from the Set East Protection Operation list and click Apply.

h. Repeat Steps a to g for the West Switch.

i. Disconnect the fibers at any node on the ring and verify that traffic switches normally.





5.5 Adding Nodes to an MS-SPRing

This section explains how to add nodes in an ONS 15454 SDH MS-SPRing configuration. You can only add one node at a time to an MS-SPRing. To add a node to an MS-SPRing, perform five procedures:


Step 1   First, check for alarms and conditions on the existing MS-SPRing. See the "Check for Alarms" procedure.

Step 2   Install cards and configure the new node. See the "Install Cards and Configure the New MS-SPRing Node" procedure.

Step 3   Before connecting the fiber, route traffic away from the area of the ring where service will be performed. See the "Switch MS-SPRing Traffic Before Connecting a New Node" procedure.

Step 4   After switching ring traffic, connect the fiber. See the "Connect Fiber to the New Node" procedure.

Step 5   Add an MS-SPRing node. See the "Provision the Ring for the New Node" procedure.





Procedure: Install Cards and Configure the New MS-SPRing Node

Purpose

This procedure explains the steps necessary to setup the new MS-SPRing node. You can only add one node at a time to an ONS 15454 SDH MS-SPRing.

Prerequisite Procedures

"Check for Alarms" procedure

Onsite/Remote

Onsite only


Step 1   Install the STM-4, STM-16, or STM-64 cards that you will add to the MS-SPRing. You can install the STM-4 and STM-16 cards in Slots 1 to 6 and 12 to 17. The STM-64 card can only be installed in Slots 5, 6, 12, or 13.

Step 2   Allow the cards to boot. For more information about installing cards, see the "Optical, Electrical, and Ethernet Card Installation" section. Run test traffic through the node to ensure the cards are functioning properly.

Step 3   Log into the new node. Complete the "Add the Node Name, Contact, Location, Date, and Time" procedure.

Step 4   Provision the SDH DCC and place ports in service for the new node's cards. Complete the "Create the MS-SPRing DCC Terminations and Place Ports in Service" procedure.

Step 5   Configure the MS-SPRing timing. See the "Set Up External, Line, or Mixed Timing for the ONS 15454 SDH" procedure or the "Set Up Internal Timing for the ONS 15454 SDH" procedure.

Step 6   If the new node will connect to third-party equipment that cannot transport the K3 byte, see the "Remap the K3 Byte" procedure to remap trunk cards that connect to the third-party equipment. Make sure the trunk card at the other end of the span is mapped to the same byte that is set on the new node.

Step 7   Complete the "Provision the MS-SPRing Using the Wizard" procedure.





Procedure: Switch MS-SPRing Traffic Before Connecting a New Node

Purpose

Use this procedure to route traffic away from the area of the ring where service will be performed.

Prerequisite Procedures

"Check for Alarms" procedure

"Install Cards and Configure the New MS-SPRing Node" procedure

Onsite/Remote

Onsite or remote


Step 1   Log into the existing node that will connect to the new node through its east port (Node 4 in the Figure 5-26 example).


Figure 5-26   Three-node MS-SPRing before adding a new node



Caution   Traffic is unprotected during a protection switch.

Step 2   Switch protection on the node's east port:

a. Click the Maintenance > MS-SPRing tabs.

b. From the East Switch list, choose FORCE RING. Click Apply.

Performing a FORCE switch generates a manual switch request on an equipment (MANUAL-REQ) alarm. This is normal.

Step 3   Log into the existing node that will connect to the new node through its west port (Node 1 in the Figure 5-26 example).

Step 4   Switch protection on the node's west port:

a. Click the Maintenance > MS-SPRing tabs.

b. From the West Switch list, choose FORCE RING. Click Apply.





Procedure: Connect Fiber to the New Node

Purpose

Use this procedure to connect fiber to the new node.

Prerequisite Procedures

"Check for Alarms" procedure

"Install Cards and Configure the New MS-SPRing Node" procedure

"Switch MS-SPRing Traffic Before Connecting a New Node" procedure

Onsite/Remote

Onsite or remote


Note   While performing this procedure, use the diagram that you created showing the nodes, cards (slots), and spans (east and west) that will connect to the new node.


Step 1   Remove the fiber connections from the two nodes that will connect directly to the new node.

a. Remove the east fiber from the node that will connect to the west port of the new node. In the example in Figure 5-26, this is Node 4/Slot 12.

b. Remove the west fiber from the node that will connect to the east port of the new node. In the example in Figure 5-26, this is Node 1/Slot 5.

Step 2   Replace the removed fibers with fibers connected from the new node. Connect the west port to the east port and the east port to the west port. Figure 5-27 shows the MS-SPRing example after the node is connected.


Figure 5-27   MS-SPRing with a newly added fourth node


Step 3   Exit CTC.


Note   The new node will not appear in the ring until you exit CTC, restart, and provision the ring to accept the new node.





Procedure: Provision the Ring for the New Node

Purpose

Use this procedure to finish provisioning a new node in the ring.

Prerequisite Procedures

"Connect Fiber to the New Node" procedure

Onsite/Remote

Onsite or remote


Step 1   Start CTC again from any node in the MS-SPRing.

Step 2   In node (default) view, choose the Provisioning > MS-SPRing tabs.

Step 3   Click a ring and then click Ring Map.

Step 4   In the MS-SPRing Map Ring Change dialog box, click Yes.

Step 5   In the MS-SPRing Map dialog box, verify that the new node is added. If it is, click Accept. If it does not appear, start CTC for the new node. Verify that the MS-SPRing is provisioned correctly according to the "Provision the MS-SPRing Using the Wizard" procedure, then repeat Steps 1 to 4 in this procedure. If the node still does not appear, repeat all procedures for adding a node, making sure that no errors were made.

Step 6   Display the network view and click the Circuits tab. Wait until all the circuits are discovered. The circuits that pass through the new node will be shown as incomplete.

Step 7   Right-click the new node and choose Update Circuits With New Node from the shortcut menu. Verify that the number of updated circuits displayed in the dialog box is correct.

Step 8   Choose the Circuits tab and verify that no incomplete circuits are present.

Step 9   Clear the protection switch on the existing node using its east port to connect to the new node. Then, clear the protection switch on the existing node using its west port to connect to the new node. The protection switches were first performed in the "Switch MS-SPRing Traffic Before Connecting a New Node" procedure.

a. To clear the protection switch from the east port, display the node view and then display the Maintenance > MS-SPRing tabs. From the East Switch list choose CLEAR. Click Apply.

b. To clear the protection switch from the west port, display the node view and then display the Maintenance > MS-SPRing tabs. From the West Switch list choose CLEAR. Click Apply.





5.6 Removing Nodes from an MS-SPRing

This section explains how to remove nodes in an ONS 15454 SDH MS-SPRing configuration.

Procedure: Remove an MS-SPRing Node

Purpose

Use this procedure to remove a node from an MS-SPRing. This procedure is designed to minimize traffic outages during node deletions.

Prerequisite Information

Before you start this procedure, make sure you know the following:

  • Which node is connected through its east port to the node that will be deleted. For example, if you are deleting Node 1 in Figure 5-27, Node 3 is the node connected through its east port to Node 1.
  • Which node is connected through its west port to the node that will be deleted. Node 2 is connected to Node 1 through its west port.

Onsite/Remote

Onsite or remote


Step 1   Start CTC for a node on the same MS-SPRing as the node you will remove, and display the network view. Clear any alarms or conditions on the network/ring. See the "Check for Alarms" procedure.


Note    Do not Start CTC for the node that you will remove.

Step 2   Use the following substeps to delete all the circuits that originate or terminate in that node. Refer to Figure 5-28.


Note    If a circuit has multiple drops, delete only the drops that terminate on the node you want to delete.


Figure 5-28   Deleting circuits from node view


a. Click the Circuits tab. The circuits that use this node are displayed.

b. Choose circuits that originate or terminate on the node. Click Delete.

c. Click Yes when prompted.

d. If a multidrop circuit has drops at the node that will be removed, choose the circuit, click Edit, and remove the drops.

Step 3   Switch traffic away from the ports of neighboring nodes that will be disconnected when the node is removed.


Note    Refer to the list you created. Refer to the information you that you collected about node connections. See the prerequisite information section at the beginning of this procedure.


Caution   Traffic is unprotected during the protection switch.

a. Start CTC for the neighboring node that is connected through its east port to the removed node.

b. Click the Maintenance > MS-SPRing tabs.

c. From the East Switch list, choose FORCE RING. Click Apply.

d. Start CTC for the node that is connected through its west port to the removed node.

e. Click the Maintenance > MS-SPRing tabs.

f. From the West Switch list, choose FORCE RING. Click Apply.

Step 4   Remove all fiber connections between the node being removed and the two neighboring nodes.

Step 5   Reconnect the two neighboring nodes directly, west port to east port.

Step 6   If the removed node contained trunk STM-16 cards with K3 bytes mapped to an alternate byte, use the "Remap the K3 Byte" procedure to verify and remap, if needed, the MS-SPRing extended bytes on the newly connected neighboring nodes.

Step 7   Exit CTC, then start CTC for a node on the reduced ring.

Step 8   Wait for the MS-SPRing Map Ring Change dialog box to display. When the dialog box displays, click Yes.


Note    If the dialog box does not display after 10 to 15 seconds, choose the Provisioning > MS-SPRing tabs and click Ring Map.

Step 9   In the MS-SPRing Ring Map dialog box, click Accept.

Step 10   Display the network view; then, choose the Circuits tab.

Step 11   Delete, then recreate any incomplete circuits. See the "Create an Automatically Routed High-Order Path Circuit" procedure. Recreate the incomplete circuits one at a time.

Step 12   Clear the protection switches on the neighboring nodes.

a. Display the node with the protection switch on its east port.

b. Click the Maintenance > MS-SPRing tabs and choose CLEAR from the East Switch list. Click Apply.

c. Start CTC for the node with the protection switch on its west port.

d. Click the Maintenance > MS-SPRing tabs and choose CLEAR from the West Switch list. Click Apply.

Step 13   If a BITS clock is not used at each node, check that the synchronization is set to one of the eastbound or westbound MS-SPRing spans on the adjacent nodes. If the removed node was the BITS timing source, use a new node as the BITS source or select internal synchronization at one node where all other nodes will derive their timing. (For information about ONS 15454 SDH timing, see the "Setting Up ONS 15454 SDH Timing" section.)





5.7 Upgrading a Two-Fiber MS-SPRing to a Four-Fiber MS-SPRing

Two-fiber STM-16 or STM-64 MS-SPRings can be upgraded to four-fiber MS-SPRings. To upgrade, install two STM-16 or STM-64 cards at each two-fiber MS-SPRing node, then start CTC and upgrade the MS-SPRing from two-fiber to four-fiber. The fibers that were divided into working and protect bandwidths for the two-fiber MS-SPRing are now fully allocated for working MS-SPRing traffic.


Note   Optical transmit and receive levels should be in their acceptable range as shown in the Cisco ONS 15454 SDH Troubleshooting and Maintenance Guide.

Procedure: Upgrade a Two-Fiber MS-SPRing to a Four-Fiber MS-SPRing from Node View

Purpose

Use this procedure to upgrade from a two-fiber MS-SPRing to a four-fiber MS-SPRing.

Prerequisite Procedures

This procedure assumes you have a two-fiber MS-SPRing configured. Verify that there are no protection operations or protection switches before attempting to upgrade the ring.

Onsite/Remote

Onsite


Step 1   Start CTC for one of the two-fiber MS-SPRing nodes and display the network view. Clear any alarms or conditions. See the "Check for Alarms" procedure.

Step 2   Install two STM-16 or STM-64 cards at each MS-SPRing node. You must install the same STM-N card rate as the two-fiber ring. See the "Optical, Electrical, and Ethernet Card Installation" section.

Step 3   Connect the fiber to the new cards. Use the same east/west connection scheme that connected the two-fiber connections. Figure 5-22 shows an example of how to connect fiber.

Step 4   Set the card ports in service for each new STM-N card. See the "Put Ports In or Out of Service" procedure for more information.

Step 5   Test the new fiber connections using procedures standard for your site. For example, pull a Tx fiber for a protect card and verify that an LOS alarm displays for the appropriate Rx card. Do this fiber test for every span in the MS-SPRing protect ring.

Step 6   Upgrade the MS-SPRing.


Note    The upgrade button will be disabled until the ring is upgradeable, which means that there have to be enough protect cards in each shelf with ports in service, no SDCC terminations, and no other protection groups. If all of your nodes meet these conditions, then the Upgrade to 4-Fiber button is enabled.

a. Display the network view and click the Provisioning > MS-SPRing tabs.

b. Click the two-fiber MS-SPRing you want to upgrade; then, click the Upgrade to 4-Fiber button.

c. In the Upgrade MS-SPRing dialog box, click a span reversion time from the pull-down menu, then click Next. The span reversion time sets the amount of time that will elapse before the traffic reverts to the original working path following a traffic failure. The default is 5 minutes.

d. Complete the following from the protection pull-down menus:

  • West Protect—Assign the east MS-SPRing port that will connect to the east protect fiber. (In Figure 5-22, this is Slot 6.)
  • East Protect—Assign the east MS-SPRing port that will connect to the east protect fiber. (In Figure 5-22, this is Slot 13.)

e. Click Finish.

Step 7   Test the MS-SPRing using testing procedures normal for your site; here is a common test procedure:

a. Run test traffic through the ring.

b. Log into a node on the ring, click the Maintenance > MS-SPRing tabs, and choose MANUAL RING from the East Switch list. Click Apply.

c. In network view, click the Conditions tab and click Retrieve. You should see a Ring Switch West event, and the far-end node that responded to this request should report a Ring Switch East event.

d. Verify that traffic switches normally.

e. Choose Clear from the East Switch list and click Apply.

f. Repeat Steps a to e for the West Switch.

g. Disconnect the fibers at any node on the ring and verify that traffic switches normally.





5.8 Moving MS-SPRing Trunk Cards


Caution   To ensure that circuit and provisioning data is preserved, call the Technical Assistance Center (TAC) before performing this procedure. For a complete list of TAC phone numbers, refer to the section called "About this Guide."


Caution   To change MS-SPRing trunk cards, you will drop one node at a time from the current MS-SPRing. This procedure is service affecting during the time needed to complete the steps in the following procedure. Service disruption applies to all MS-SPRing nodes where cards will change slots. Review all the steps before you proceed.

Figure 5-29 shows a four node STM-16 MS-SPRing using trunk cards in Slots 6 and 12 at all four nodes. In this example, the user moves trunk cards at Node 4 in Slots 6 and 12 to Slots 5 and 6. Node 4 must be temporarily removed from the active MS-SPRing while the trunk cards are moved.


Figure 5-29   Four-node MS-SPRing before a trunk card switch


Figure 5-30 shows the MS-SPRing after the cards are moved.


Figure 5-30   Four-node MS-SPRing after the trunk cards are moved to different slots at one node


Procedure: Move an MS-SPRing Trunk Card


Caution   Always wear an authorized ESD wrist band when removing or installing ONS 15454 SDH cards.

Purpose

Use this procedure to move one MS-SPRing trunk card to a different slot. Repeat this procedure for each card you want to move. Although the procedure uses STM-16 MS-SPRing trunk cards, you can use the same procedure for STM-4 or STM-64 cards.

Prerequisite Procedures

Clear active alarms for the STM-16 or STM-4 card host nodes or the MS-SPRing configuration. For more information, see "Check for Alarms" procedure

Onsite/Remote

Onsite


Step 1   Start CTC for one of the MS-SPRing nodes and display the network view. Clear any alarms or conditions in the network/ring. See the "Check for Alarms" procedure.

Step 2   Switch traffic away from the node where the trunk card will be moved:

a. Start CTC for the node that is connected through its east port to the target node. (In the example in Figure 5-29, this is Node 1.) Click the Maintenance > MS-SPRing tabs.

b. From the East Switch list, choose FORCE RING. Click Apply.

When you perform a manual switch, a manual switch request equipment alarm (MANUAL-REQ) is generated. This is normal.


Caution   Traffic is unprotected during a protection switch.

c. Start CTC for the node that is connected through its west port to the target node. (In the example in Figure 5-29, this is Node 3.) Click the Maintenance > MS-SPRing tabs.

d. From the West Switch list, choose FORCE RING. Click Apply.

Step 3   Start CTC on the target node.

Step 4   Click the Circuits tab. Write down the circuit information or, from the File menu, choose Print or Export to print or export the information. You will need this information to restore the circuits later. See the "Printing CTC Data" section and the "Exporting CTC Data into Other Applications" section for more information.

Step 5   Delete the circuits on the card you are removing:

a. Highlight the circuit(s). To choose multiple circuits, press the Shift or Ctrl key while selecting circuits.

b. Click Delete.

c. In the Delete Circuit dialog box, click Yes.

Step 6   Delete the SDH DCC termination on the card you are removing:

a. Click the Provisioning > SDH DCC tabs.

b. From the SDCC Terminations list, click the SDH DCC you need to delete and click Delete.

c. Click the Set Unused Port Out of Service check box.

Step 7   Disable the ring on the target node:

a. Click the Provisioning > MS-SPRing tabs.

b. Highlight the ring and click Delete.

c. In the confirmation message, confirm that this is the ring you want to delete. If so, click Yes.

Step 8   If an STM-N card is a timing source, choose the Provisioning > Timing tabs and set timing to Internal.

Step 9   Physically remove the card.

Step 10   Insert the card into its new slot and wait for the card to boot.

Step 11   To delete the card in CTC from its former slot, right-click the card in node view and choose Delete Card from the list of options.

Step 12   Place the port(s) back in service.

Step 13   Follow the steps described in the "Setting Up MS-SPRings" section to reenable the ring using the same cards (in their new slots) and ports for east and west. Use the same MS-SPRing Ring ID and Node ID that was used before the trunk card was moved.

Step 14   Recreate the circuits that were deleted. See "Create an Automatically Routed High-Order Path Circuit" procedure.

Step 15   If you use line timing and the card you are moving is a timing reference, reenable the timing parameters on the card. See the "Setting Up ONS 15454 SDH Timing" section for instructions.





5.9 Subtending Rings

The ONS 15454 SDH supports up to ten SDH DCCs. Therefore, one ONS 15454 SDH node can terminate and groom any ring combination if the total DCC usage is equal to or less than 10 DCCs.

Figure 5-31 shows an ONS 15454 SDH with multiple subtending rings.


Figure 5-31   ONS 15454 SDH with multiple subtending rings


Figure 5-32 shows an SNCP ring subtending from an MS-SPRing. In this example, Node 3 is the only node serving both the MS-SPRing and SNCP ring. STM-N cards in Slots 5 and 12 serve the MS-SPRing, and STM-N cards in Slots 6 and 13 serve the SNCP ring.


Figure 5-32   SNCP ring subtending from an MS-SPRing


Figure 5-33 shows two MS-SPRings shared by one ONS 15454 SDH. The ONS 15454 SDH can support two MS-SPRings on the same node. This capability allows you to deploy an ONS 15454 SDH in applications requiring SDH Digital Crossconnect Systems (DCSs) or multiple SDH ADMs.

In Figure 5-33, Ring 1 runs on Nodes 1, 2, 3, and 4. Ring 2 runs on Nodes 4, 5, 6, and 7. Two MS-SPRing rings, Ring 1 and Ring 2, are provisioned on Node 4. Ring 1 uses cards in Slots 5 and 12, and Ring 2 uses cards in Slots 6 and 13.


Note   Although different node IDs are used for the two MS-SPRings shown in Figure 5-33, nodes in different MS-SPRings can use the same node ID.


Figure 5-33   MS-SPRing subtending from an MS-SPRing


After subtending two MS-SPRings, you can route circuits from nodes in one ring to nodes in the second ring. For example in Figure 5-33, you can route a circuit from Node 1 to Node 7. The circuit would normally travel from Node 1 to Node 4 to Node 7. If fiber breaks occur, for example between Nodes 1 and 4 and Nodes 4 and 7, traffic is rerouted around each ring: in our example, Nodes 2 and 3 in Ring 1 and Nodes 5 and 6 in Ring 2.

Procedure: Subtend an SNCP Ring from an MS-SPRing

Purpose

Use this procedure to subtend an SNCP ring from an MS-SPRing. A subtended ring reduces the number of nodes and cards required and reduces external shelf-to-shelf cabling.

Prerequisite Procedures

This procedure requires an established MS-SPRing and one node with STM-N cards and fibers to carry the SNCP ring. The procedure also assumes you can set up an SNCP ring. (For SNCP ring setup procedures, see the "Creating SNCP Rings" section.)

Onsite/Remote

Onsite


Step 1   In the node that will subtend the SNCP (Node 3 in Figure 5-32), install the STM-N cards that will serve as the SNCP trunk cards (Node 3, Slots 6 and 13).

Step 2   Attach fibers from these cards to the SNCP trunk cards on the SNCP nodes. In Figure 5-32, Node 3/Slot 6 connects to Node 5/Slot 13, and Slot 13 connects to Node 6/Slot 6.

Step 3   From the node view, click the Provisioning > SDH DCC tabs.

Step 4   Click Create.

Step 5   In the Create SDCC Terminations dialog box, click the slot and port that will carry the SNCP ring.

Step 6   Select the Set to IS, if allowed radio button. This radio button places the trunk card ports in service.


Note    There are four port state options. Select the port state that best fits your requirements. For example, you can select the set OOS to OOS-MT radio button if you are provisioning the SNCP before installing cards and fiber. Also, you can select the OOS-MT port state if you want to avoid DCC termination alarms until you configure all DCCs on the SNCP.

Step 7   (Optional) Below the port state options you can also enable or disable OSPF on the DCC according to your requirements.

Step 8   Click OK.

The selected slots/ports are displayed in the SDCC Terminations section.

Step 9   Follow Steps 1 to 8 for the other nodes you will use for the SNCP ring.

Step 10   Display the network view to view the subtending ring.





Procedure: Subtend an MS-SPRing from an SNCP Ring

Purpose

Use this procedure to subtend an MS-SPRing from an SNCP ring. A subtended ring reduces the number of nodes and cards required and reduces external shelf-to-shelf cabling.

Prerequisite Procedures

This procedure requires an established SNCP ring and one node with STM-N cards and fibers to connect to the MS-SPRing. The procedure also assumes you can set up an MS-SPRing. (For MS-SPRing setup procedures, see the "Setting Up MS-SPRings" section.)

Onsite/Remote

Onsite


Step 1   In the node that will subtend the MS-SPRing (Node 3 in the Figure 5-32 example), install the STM-N cards that will serve as the MS-SPRing trunk cards (in Figure 5-32, Node 3, Slots 6 and 13).

Step 2   Attach fibers from these cards to the MS-SPRing trunk cards on the MS-SPRing nodes. In Figure 5-32, Node 3/Slot 6 connects to Node 5/Slot 13, and Slot 13 connects to Node 6/Slot 6.

Step 3   From the node view, click the Provisioning > SDH DCC tabs.

Step 4   Click Create.

Step 5   In the Create SDCC Terminations dialog box, click the slot and port that will carry the MS-SPRing.

Step 6   Select the Set to IS, if allowed radio button. This radio button places the trunk card ports in service.


Note    There are four port state options. Select the port state that best fits your requirements. For example, you can select the set OOS to OOS-MT radio button if you are provisioning the MS-SPRing before installing cards and fiber. Also, you can select the OOS-MT port state if you want to avoid DCC termination alarms until you configure all DCCs on the MS-SPRing.

Step 7   (Optional) Below the port state options you can also enable or disable OSPF on the DCC according to your requirements.

Step 8   Click OK.

Step 9   The selected slots/ports are displayed under SDCC Terminations.

Step 10   Configure the MS-SPRing. See the "Provision the MS-SPRing Using the Wizard" procedure.

Step 11   Follow Steps 1 to 10 for the other nodes that will be in the MS-SPRing.

Step 12   Display the network view to see the subtending ring.





Procedure: Subtend an MS-SPRing from an MS-SPRing

Purpose

Use this procedure to subtend an MS-SPRing from an MS-SPRing. Subtending rings from an ONS 15454 SDH reduces the number of nodes and cards required and reduces external shelf-to-shelf cabling.

Prerequisite Procedures

This procedure requires an established MS-SPRing and one node with STM-N cards and fibers to carry the MS-SPRing. The procedure also assumes you know how to set up an MS-SPRing. For MS-SPRing setup procedures, see the "Creating MS-SPRings" section.

Onsite/Remote

Onsite


Step 1   In the node that will subtend the MS-SPRing (Node 4 in Figure 5-33), install the STM-N cards that will serve as the MS-SPRing trunk cards (Node 4, Slots 6 and 13).

Step 2   Attach fibers from these cards to the MS-SPRing trunk cards on the MS-SPRing nodes. In Figure 5-33, Node 4/Slot 6 connects to Node 7/Slot 13, and Slot 13 connects to Node 5/Slot 6.

Step 3   From the node view, click the Provisioning > SDH DCC tabs.

Step 4   Click Create.

Step 5   In the Create SDCC Terminations dialog box, click the slot and port that will carry the MS-SPRing.

Step 6   Select the Set to IS, if allowed radio button. This radio button places the trunk card ports in service.


Note    There are four port state options. Select the port state that best fits your requirements. For example, you can select the set OOS to OOS-MT radio button if you are provisioning the MS-SPRing before installing cards and fiber. Also, you can select the OOS-MT port state if you want to avoid DCC termination alarms until you configure all DCCs on the MS-SPRing.

Step 7   (Optional) Below the port state options you can also enable or disable OSPF on the DCC according to your requirements.

Step 8   Click OK.

Step 9   The selected slots/ports are displayed in the SDCC Terminations section.

Step 10   To configure the MS-SPRing, use the "Provision the MS-SPRing Using the Wizard" procedure. The subtending MS-SPRing must have a ring ID that differs from the ring ID of the first MS-SPRing.

Step 11   Follow Steps 1 to 10 for the other nodes that will be in the subtending MS-SPRing.

Step 12   Display the network view to see the subtending ring.

Figure 5-34 shows an example of two subtending MS-SPRings.


Figure 5-34   Viewing subtending MS-SPRings on the network view






5.10 Creating Linear ADM Configurations

You can configure ONS 15454 SDH nodes as a line of ADMs by configuring one set of STM-N cards as the working path and a second set as the protect path. Unlike rings, linear (point-to-point) ADMs require that the STM-N cards at each node have a 1+1 protection scheme to ensure that a break to the working line is automatically routed to the protect line.

Figure 5-35 shows three ONS 15454 SDH nodes in a linear ADM configuration. Working traffic flows from Node 1/Slot 6 to Node 2/Slot 6, and from Node 2/Slot 12 to Node 3/Slot 12. You create the protect path by placing Slot 6 in 1+1 protection with Slot 5 at Nodes 1 and 2, and placing Slot 12 in 1+1 protection with Slot 13 at Nodes 2 and 3.


Figure 5-35   Linear (point-to-point) ADM configuration


Procedure: Create a Linear ADM

Purpose

Use this procedure to create a linear ADM. Complete the steps for each node that will be included in the linear ADM.

Prerequisite Procedures

Complete the general setup information for the node that you want to configure for linear ADM. For procedures, see the "Setting Up Basic Node Information" section.

Set up the network information for the node. For procedures, see the "Setting Up Network Information" section.

Onsite/Remote

Onsite or remote


Step 1   Set up 1+1 protection for the STM-N cards in the ADM. In Figure 5-35, Slots 6 and 12 are the working ports and Slots 5 and 13 are the protect ports. In this example, you would set up one protection group for Node 1 (Slots 5 and 6), two for Node 2 (Slots 5 and 6, and 12 and 13) and one for Node 3 (Slots 12 and 13). To create protection groups, see the "Creating Card Protection Groups" section.

Step 2   For STM-N ports connecting ONS 15454 SDH nodes, set the SDH DCC terminations.

a. Start CTC for a linear ADM node and choose the Provisioning > SDH DCC tabs.

b. In the SDCC Terminations section, click Create.


Note    The terminating nodes (Nodes 1 and 3 in Figure 5-35) will have one SDCC, and the intermediate nodes (Node 2 in Figure 5-35) will have two SDCCs.

Step 3   Select the Set to IS, if allowed radio button. This radio button places the card ports in service.


Note    There are four port state options. Select the port state that best fits your requirements. For example, you can select the set OOS to OOS-MT radio button if you are provisioning the ADM before installing cards and fiber. Also, you can select the OOS-MT port state if you want to avoid DCC termination alarms until you configure all DCCs on all nodes.

Step 4   (Optional) Below the port state options you can also enable or disable OSPF on the DCC according to your requirements.

Step 5   Click OK.

Step 6   The slots/ports appear in the SDCC Terminations list.

Step 7   Complete Step 1 to 5 at each node.


Note    The ONS 15454 SDH uses the SDH regenerator section DCC (SDCC) for data communications. It does not use the multiplex section DCCs; therefore, the multiplex section DCCs are available to tunnel DCCs from third-party equipment across ONS 15454 SDH networks. For more detail, see the "Creating DCC Tunnels" section on page 6-34.

Step 8   Set up the node timing. If a node is using line timing, set the working STM-N card as the timing source. See the "Setting Up ONS 15454 SDH Timing" section.





Procedure: Convert a Linear ADM to an SNCP Ring


Caution   This procedure is service affecting.


Caution   Always wear an authorized ESD wrist band when removing or installing ONS 15454 SDH cards.

Purpose

The following procedures describe how to convert a three-node linear ADM to an SNCP ring.

Tools

SDH test set.

Prerequisite Information

This procedure assumes you have an existing linear ADM that you want to convert to an SNCP ring.

Onsite/Remote

Onsite


Step 1   Start CTC for one of the nodes that you want to convert from a linear ADM to an SNCP ring.

Step 2   Click the Maintenance > Protection tabs.

Step 3   Under Protection Groups, choose the 1+1 protection group (that is, the group supporting the 1+1 span cards).

Step 4   Under Selected Group, verify that the working slot/port is shown as Working/Active. If it is, proceed to Step 5. If the working slot says Working/Standby and the protect slot says Protect/Active, switch traffic to the working slot.

a. Under Selected Group, choose the Protect/Active slot.

a. From the Switch Commands, choose Manual.

b. Click Yes on the confirmation dialog box.

c. Under Selected Group, verify that the working slot/port is Working/Active. If so, continue to Step d. If not, clear the conditions that prevent the card from carrying working traffic before proceeding.

d. From the Switch Commands, choose Clear. A Confirm Clear Operation dialog box is displayed.

e. Click Yes on the confirmation dialog box.

Step 5   Repeat Step 4 for each group in the 1+1 Protection Groups list at all nodes that will be converted.

Step 6   For each node, delete the 1+1 STM-N protection group that supports the linear ADM span.


Note    Deleting a 1+1 protection group may cause unequipped path (UNEQ-P) alarms to occur.

a. Click the Provisioning > Protection tabs.

b. From the Protection Groups list, choose the 1+1 group you want to delete. Click Delete.

c. Click Yes on the confirmation dialog box.

d. Verify that no traffic disruptions are indicated on the test set. If disruptions occur, do not proceed. Recreate the protection group and isolate the cause of the disruption.

e. Continue deleting 1+1 protection groups while monitoring the existing traffic with the test set.

Step 7   Physically remove one of the protect fibers running between the middle and end nodes. For example, in Figure 5-36, the fiber from Node 2/Slot 13 to Node 3/Slot 13 is removed. The corresponding STM-16 card will cause an LOS condition for that fiber and port.


Figure 5-36   Converting a linear ADM to an SNCP ring


Step 8   Physically reroute the other protect fiber to connect the two end nodes. In the Figure 5-36 example, the fiber between Node 1/Slot 5 and Node 2/Slot 5 is rerouted to connect Node 1/Slot 5 to Node 3/Slot 13.

If you are leaving the STM-N cards in place, proceed to Step 13. If you are removing the cards, complete Steps 9 to 12. (In this example, cards in Node 2/Slots 5 and 13 are removed.)

Step 9   In the middle node, place the cards you are removing out of service.

a. Display the first card in card view and choose the Provisioning > Line tabs.

b. Under Status, choose OOS. Click Apply.

c. Repeat Steps a and b for the second card.

Step 10   Delete the equipment records for the cards:

a. Display the node view.

b. Right-click the card you just took out of service (e.g., Slot 5) and choose Delete Card.

c. Click Yes on the confirmation dialog box.

d. Repeat Steps a to c for the second card (e.g., Slot 13).

Step 11   Save all circuit information.

a. In node view, choose the Provisioning > Circuits tab.

b. Record the circuit information using one of the following methods:

  • From the File menu, choose Print to print the circuits table.
  • From the File menu, choose Export to export the circuit data in HTML, CSV (comma separated values), or TSV (tab separated values). Click OK and save the file in a temporary directory.

See the "Printing CTC Data" section and the "Exporting CTC Data into Other Applications" section for more information.

Step 12   Remove the STM-N cards that are no longer connected to the end nodes (Slots 5 and 13, in the example).

Step 13   In CTC, display one of the end nodes (Node 1 or Node 3 in the example).

Step 14   Click the Provisioning > SDH DCC tabs.

Step 15   In the SDCC Terminations section, click Create.

Step 16   In the Create SDCC Terminations dialog box, choose the slot/port that was the protect slot in the linear ADM. For example, in Node 1 the previous protect slot is Slot 5/Port 1 (STM-16).

Step 17   Click OK.

An EOC SDCC alarm will occur until you create an SDCC termination on the adjacent node.

Step 18   Display the node on the opposite end (Node 3 in the Figure 5-36 example) and repeat Steps 14 to 17.

Step 19   Delete and reenter the circuits one at a time. (See the "Creating VC High-Order Path Circuits" section.)


Note    Deleting circuits is traffic affecting.

You can create the circuits automatically or manually. However, circuits must be protected. When they were built in the linear ADM, they were protected by the protect path. (In the example, the protect path is Node 1/Slot 5 to Node 2/Slot 5 to Node 3/Slot 13.) With the new SNCP, create circuits with protection.

Deleting the first circuit and recreating it to the same card/port should restore the circuit immediately.

Step 20   Monitor your SDH test set to verify that the circuit was deleted and restored.

Step 21   You should also verify that the new circuit path for the clockwise (CW) fiber (from Node 1 to Node 3 in the example) is working. To do this, display the network view and move your cursor to the green span (between Node 1 and Node 3 in the example).

Although the cursor only shows the first circuit created, do not become alarmed that the other circuits are not present. Verify with the SDH test set that the original circuits and the new circuits are operational. The original circuits were created on the counterclockwise linear path.

Step 22   Display the network view to view the newly created ring.





Procedure: Convert a Linear ADM to an MS-SPRing


Caution   This procedure is service affecting.


Caution   Always wear an authorized ESD wrist band when removing or installing ONS 15454 SDH cards.

Purpose

The following procedures describe how to convert a three-node linear ADM to an MS-SPRing.

Tools

SDH test set.

Prerequisite Information

This procedure assumes you have an existing linear ADM that you want to convert to an MS-SPRing.

Onsite/Remote

Onsite


Step 1   Start CTC for one of the nodes that you want to convert from linear to ring.

Step 2   Click the Maintenance > Protection tabs.

Step 3   Under Protection Groups, choose the 1+1 protection group (that is, the group supporting the 1+1 span cards).

Step 4   Under Selected Group, verify that the working slot/port is shown as Working/Active. If it is, proceed to Step 5. If the working slot says Working/Standby and the protect slot says Protect/Active, switch traffic to the working slot.

a. Under Selected Group, choose the Protect/Active slot.

a. From the Switch Commands pull-down menu, choose Manual.

b. Click Yes on the confirmation dialog box.

c. Verify that the working slot is carrying traffic. If it is, continue to Step d. If not, clear the conditions that prevent the card from carrying working traffic before proceeding to Step d.

d. From the Switch Commands, choose Clear. A Confirm Clear Operation dialog box is displayed.

e. Click Yes on the confirmation dialog box.

Step 5   Repeat Step 4 for each group in the 1+1 Protection Groups. List at all nodes that will be converted.

Step 6   For each node, delete the 1+1 STM-N protection group that supports the linear ADM span.

a. Click the Provisioning > Protection tabs.

b. From the Protection Groups list, choose the group you want to delete. Click Delete.

c. Click Yes on the confirmation dialog box.

d. Verify that no traffic disruptions are indicated on the SDH test set. If disruptions occur, do not proceed. Add the protection group and begin troubleshooting procedures to find out the cause of the disruption.


Note    Deleting a 1+1 protection group may cause unequipped path (UNEQ-P) alarms to occur.

Step 7   Physically remove one of the protect fibers running between the middle and end nodes. In the example in Figure 5-37, the fiber running from Node 2/Slot 13 to Node 3/Slot 13 is removed. The corresponding end-node trunk card will display an LOS alarm.


Figure 5-37   Converting a linear ADM to an MS-SPRing


Step 8   Physically reroute the other protect fiber so it connects the two end nodes. In the Figure 5-37 example, the fiber between Node 1/Slot 5 and Node 2/Slot 5 is rerouted to connect Node 1/Slot 5 to Node 3/Slot 13.

If you are leaving the STM-N cards in place, proceed to Step 13. If you are removing the cards, complete Steps 9 to 12. (In this example, the cards in Node 2/Slots 5 and 13 are removed.)

Step 9   In the middle node, place the cards that you are removing out of service.

a. Display the first card in card view, then choose the Provisioning > Line tabs.

b. Under Status, choose OOS. Click Apply.

c. Repeat Steps a and b for the second card.

Step 10   Delete the cards from CTC.

a. From the View menu, choose Node View.

b. Right-click the card you just took out of service (e.g., Slot 5) and choose Delete Card.

c. Click Yes on the confirmation dialog box.

d. Repeat Steps a through c for the second card (e.g., Slot 13).

Step 11   Save all circuit information.

a. In node view, choose the Provisioning > Circuits tab.

b. Record the circuit information using one of the following procedures:

  • From the File menu, choose Print to print the circuits table.
  • From the File menu, choose Export to export the circuit data in HTML, CSV (comma separated values), or TSV (tab separated values). Click OK and save the file in a temporary directory.

See the "Printing CTC Data" section and the "Exporting CTC Data into Other Applications" section for more information.

Step 12   Remove the STM-N cards that are no longer connected to the end nodes (Slots 5 and 13 in the example).

Step 13   Start CTC for an end node. In node view, click the Provisioning > SDH DCC tabs.

Step 14   In the SDCC Terminations section, click Create.

Step 15   Highlight the slot that is not already in the SDCC Terminations list (in this example, Port 1 of Slot 5 [STM-16] on Node 1).

Step 16   Click OK. (An EOC SDCC alarm will occur until the DCC is created on the other node; in the example, Node 3/Slot 13.)

Step 17   Start CTC for the node on the opposite end (Node 3 in Figure 5-37) and repeat Steps 13 to 16.

Step 18   For circuits running on an MS-SPRing protect VC4 (VC4 3 to 4 for an STM-4 MS-SPRing, VC4s 9 to 16 for an STM-16 MS-SPRing, and VC4s 33 to 64 for an STM-64), delete and recreate the circuit:.

a. Delete the first circuit by clicking the Circuits tab. Choose the circuit, click Delete, and click Yes when prompted.

b. Recreate the circuit on VC4s 3 to 4 (for an STM-4 MS-SPRing), VC4s 9 to 16 (for an STM-16 MS-SPRing), or VC4s 33 to 64 (for an STM-64 MS-SPRing) on the fiber that served as the protect fiber in the linear ADM. During circuit creation, uncheck Route Automatically and Fully Protected Path on the Circuit Creation dialog box so you can manually route the circuit on the appropriate VC4s. See the "Create a Unidirectional Circuit with Multiple Drops" procedure for more information.

c. Repeat Steps a and b for each circuit residing on an MS-SPRing protect VC4.


Note    Deleting circuits is traffic affecting.

Step 19   Follow all procedures in the "Setting Up MS-SPRings" section to configure the MS-SPRing. The ring should have an East/West logical connection. While it may not physically be possible to connect the STM-N cards in an East/West pattern, it is strongly recommended. If the network ring that is already passing traffic does not provide the opportunity to connect fiber in this manner, logical provisioning can be performed to satisfy this requirement.

Be sure to assign the same ring ID and different node IDs to all nodes in the MS-SPRing. Do not accept the MS-SPRing ring map until all nodes are provisioned.


Note    E-W Mismatch alarms will occur until all nodes are provisioned.

Step 20   Display the network view to verify the newly created ring.





5.11 Extended SNCP Mesh Networks

In addition to single MS-SPRings, SNCP rings, and ADMs, you can extend ONS 15454 SDH traffic protection by creating extended SNCP mesh networks. Extended SNCPs include multiple ONS 15454 SDH topologies and extend the protection provided by a single SNCP ring to the meshed architecture of several interconnecting rings.

In an extended SNCP, circuits travel diverse paths through a network of single or multiple meshed rings. When you create circuits, you can provision CTC to automatically route circuits across the extended SNCP, or you can manually route them. You can also choose levels of circuit protection. For example, if you choose full protection, CTC creates an alternate route for the circuit in addition to the main route. The second route follows a unique path through the network between the source and destination and sets up a second set of cross-connections.

For example, in Figure 5-38, a circuit is created from Node 3 to Node 9. CTC determines that the shortest route between the two nodes passes through Node 8 and Node 7, shown by the dotted line; CTC then automatically creates cross-connections at Nodes 3, 8, 7, and 9 to provide the primary circuit path.

If full protection is selected, CTC creates a second unique route between Nodes 3 and 9 that, in this example, passes through Nodes 2, 1, and 11. Cross-connections are automatically created at Nodes, 3, 2, 1, 11, and 9, shown by the dashed line. If a failure occurs on the primary path, traffic switches to the second circuit path. In this example, Node 9 switches from the traffic coming in from Node 7 to the traffic coming in from Node 11 and service resumes. The switch occurs within 50 ms.


Figure 5-38   Extended SNCP mesh network


Extended SNCPs also allow spans of different SDH line rates to be mixed together in "virtual rings." Figure 5-39 shows Nodes 1, 2, 3, and 4 in a standard STM-16 ring. Nodes 5, 6, 7, and 8 link to the backbone ring through STM-4 fiber. The "virtual ring" is formed by Nodes 5, 6, 7, and 8 uses both STM-16 and STM-4 speeds.


Figure 5-39   Extended SNCP virtual ring


5.12 Common Ring-Related Procedures

You enable card ports and check for alarms during all topology-provisioning procedures. Use the following procedures when required.

Procedure: Put Ports In or Out of Service

Purpose

Use this procedure to put a port in service or to remove a port from service.

Prerequisite Procedures

"Log Into CTC" procedure

Onsite/Remote

Onsite or remote


Note   To provision Ethernet cards, see "Ethernet Operation."


Step 1   Display the node (default) view.

Step 2   In the shelf graphic, double-click the card with the port(s) you want to put in or out of service. The card view displays.

Step 3   Click the Provisioning > Line tabs.

Step 4   Under State, choose one of the following:

  • IS—Puts the port in service.
  • OOS—Puts the port out of service.
  • OOS_MT—Sets the port to a maintenance state; alarms are suppressed and loopbacks can be performed.
  • OOS_AINS—Sets the port to an auto-inservice state; alarms are suppressed and loopbacks can be performed until a signal is received for the time specified in AINS Soak, after which the state is changed to IS.

Step 5   If you set State to OOS-AINS, set the soak period time in the AINS Soak field. This is the amount of time that the state will stay in OOS-AINS state after the signal is continuously received.

Step 6   Click Apply.

Step 7   Repeat this procedure for each port as needed.





Procedure: Check for Alarms

Purpose

This procedure explains how to check for alarms.

Prerequisite Procedures

"Log Into CTC" procedure

Onsite/Remote

Onsite or remote


Step 1   Log into CTC on a network node and display the network view.

Step 2   Verify the following:

  • All spans on the network view are green.
  • In the Alarms tab (Figure 5-40), no critical or major alarms are present, nor any facility alarms, such as LOS or LOF. In a ring, these facility conditions may be reported as minor alarms.
  • In the Conditions tab (Figure 5-41), no ring switches are active.

If trouble is indicated, for example, if a major alarm exists, resolve the problem before proceeding. Refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 SDH Troubleshooting and Maintenance Guide for alarm troubleshooting procedures.

Figure 5-40 shows how to check spans and alarms in the network view. Figure 5-41 shows how to check conditions in the network view.


Figure 5-40   Checking spans and alarms in the network view



Figure 5-41   Checking conditions in network view