Cisco Edge Craft Software Guide, Release 2.0
Chapter 4: General Management

Table Of Contents

General Management

4.1  Manage the Management Interfaces

4.2  MCN Wizard

4.2.1  Manage the Management Interfaces of the Network Element

4.2.2  Before you start - Prerequisites

4.2.3  MCN Wizard - Step by Step

4.2.4  Welcome to the MCN Wizard

4.2.5  Network Element

4.2.6  System Mode

4.2.7  Management Port - System Mode IP Numbered

4.2.8  DCC Encapsulation - System Mode IP Numbered

4.2.9  IP in-band - System Mode IP Numbered

4.2.10  Global Ip Settings - System Mode Ip Numbered

4.2.11  System Mode - IP Broadcast

4.2.12  Summary

4.2.13  Special Requirements

4.2.14  Features Vs. Network Element Types

4.3  Management Modes and Configuration

4.3.1  Management Port Configuration

4.3.2  DCC Configuration

4.3.3  IP Default Gateway Configuration

4.4  ONS 15305 Scenarios

4.4.1  Important Note

4.4.2  Notations Used

4.4.3  Scenario 1: CEC and ONS 15305 on the Same Subnet

4.4.4  Scenario 2: CEC and ONS 15305 on Different Subnets

4.4.5  Scenario 3: IP over DCC

4.4.6  Scenario 4: IP over PPP

4.5  Manage Common Parameters

4.5.1  View Common Parameters

4.5.2  Modify Common Parameters

4.6  Manage Synchronization

4.6.1  SDH Synchronization

4.6.2  ONS 15305

4.6.3  View the Synchronization Data (T0 or T4)

4.6.4  Add Synchronization Source Candidate (T0 or T4)

4.6.5  Modify Synchronization Source Candidate (T0 or T4)

4.6.6  Delete Synchronization Source Candidate (T0 or T4)

4.6.7  Operate Synchronization Switch (T0 or T4)

4.6.8  View Synchronization Switch (T0 or T4)

4.6.9  Operate Synchronization on ONS 15302

4.7  Software download and Configuration- Custom GUI

4.7.1  Introduction

4.7.2  Overview

4.7.3  Software Download Process

4.7.4  Presentation of the Software Download GUI

4.7.5  How To Install A Downloaded File Into The Management System

4.7.6  How to Install Download File to the Network Element

4.7.7  How to Backup and Restore Configuration Data

4.8  Download Software to Network Element

4.8.1  Network Release

4.8.2  Operational and Administrative Software Bank

4.8.3  How do Software Upgrades Affect Traffic?

4.8.4  Download ONS 15305 Network Release

4.8.5  Software Download to ONS 15305

4.8.6  Software Download to ONS 15302

4.9  Backup and Restore NE Configuration Data

4.9.1  Backup Configuration Data

4.9.2  Restore Configuration Data

4.10  Alarm and Event Configuration

4.10.1  Event Forwarding

4.10.2  Configure General Alarm Reporting

4.10.3  Suppress Specific Alarms

4.10.4  Modify Alarm Severity and Description

4.10.5  Set Signal Degrade Threshold

4.10.6  Modify Alarm Persistency

4.10.7  Modify ONS 15302 Alarm Configuration Attributes

4.11  Manage Slots on ONS 15305

4.11.1  View Slot

4.11.2  Modify Slot


General Management


4.1  Manage the Management Interfaces

This chapter describes the configuration operations supported by the Management Interfaces managed object (MO). It is organized by the following sections:

Introduction

MCN Wizard. This section describes how to configure management connectivity for a Cisco network element using the MCN wizard.

ONS 15305 management modes and configurations. This section describes the management modes supported by the management interfaces, and how they can be configured.

ONS 15305 scenarios. This section is a repository of simple, but yet typical configuration scenarios. These can be applied in combination to specific networks.

Manage common parameters

Download Software to network element (NE)

Up/download of NE configuration data

Alarm and event configuration

ONS 15305 manage slots

The attributes under the management interfaces managed object are not unique in the information model. Each attribute mirrors a similar attribute located under another managed object. The attributes under the management interfaces managed object have been put together to allow the user to set-up basic configuration of the management interfaces without having to browse through many managed objects in the management tree. For advanced configuration operations, additional managed objects must still be used.

4.2  MCN Wizard

MCN - Management Communication Network

4.2.1  Manage the Management Interfaces of the Network Element

The purpose of this chapter is to describe how to configure management connectivity for a Cisco network element, taking advantage of the configuration tool - MCN wizard. The advantage of using the MCN wizard for configuration of your MCN, is that you will have guidance through a logical step-by-step process instead of doing all software configurations via the "management tree".

See the "Special Requirements" section for a description of MCN features supported by the different network elements.

4.2.2  Before you start - Prerequisites

Please read through the different preconditions listed in this section.

4.2.2.1  Management Software

Make sure you are assigned sufficient permissions to perform the required tasks available in the MCN wizard. If using Cisco EdgeCraft you will only be limited by the SNMP community string (login rights) configured on NE. Write access is minimum required.

4.2.2.2  NE Requirements

As a minimum, the Management Port must have a valid IP configuration and an instance in the SNMP community table enabling write access.


Note When management connectivity is supposed to be obtained via interfaces on traffic modules, make sure that they are installed and expected or minimum as "expected".


4.2.2.3  General Requirements

The network design and planning must be maintained and the strategy of network element management interface usage must be decided. IP addresses and subnets must be available prior running the wizard.

4.2.3  MCN Wizard - Step by Step

The following procedure describes the main sequences of flow required to configure a network element for management. MCN commissioning (initial setup) is typically done through the network element management port, while MCN maintenance is done through an existing, operative MCN through the management port, any active DCC channel or in-band management channels.

The Management Interface managed objects allows you to configure:

The mode (type of encapsulation for the management traffic) run by a management interface.

Mode-specific parameters for the DCC interfaces, e.g. PPP configuration.

The IP address(es) allocated to a management interface.

The IP address of a default gateway.

The exact steps and the sets of attributes to access, will differ for the different Cisco network element variants installed. See the "Special Requirements" section for details.

See the "Manage Slots on ONS 15305" section for details on creation, deletion and setup of a DCC interface.

4.2.3.1  MCN Commissioning Flow Overview

The commissioning flow has two main flows for setting up the network element for management.

IP Broadcast setup (ONS 15302)

IP numbered (PPP or HDLC encapsulated IP)


Note None of the configuration is sent to the network element until the end of the wizard-flow, where you are presented an overview of the configuration


4.2.3.2  Opening the MCN Wizard


Step 1 Select Equipment > MCN Wizard from the menu.

4.2.4  Welcome to the MCN Wizard

Please read the introduction found in the "Welcome" window before proceeding with the configuration process.

Figure 4-1

Welcome to the MCN Wizard


Step 1 Click Next to proceed.

4.2.5  Network Element


Step 1 The system presents the current MCN configuration of the network element:

Figure 4-2

MCN Current configuration

Step 2 The presented IP address is the "connected IP address", the IP address Cisco EdgeCraft uses to access the network element. This address can be any of several possibilities, depending on the current MCN configuration and MCN route to the network element: Management Port IP address, a DCC channels IP addresses, a VLAN IP address or an in-band IP port address.

Step 3 Click Next to continue.

4.2.6  System Mode

Figure 4-3

System mode

The system presents the current system mode set-up, and the system mode choices.


Note Not all network elements support every mode. Only valid modes for the current selected network element are listed here.



Step 1 Select system mode.

4.2.6.1  IP Numbered

Select this mode if you want to configure the network element to use IP protocol stacks. Each management interface has an IP address (the network element is a multi-homed host), the DCCs, any in-band channels and the Management Port. The routing table can be maintained by static or dynamic routing. Supported routing protocols are RIP and OSPF.

4.2.6.2  IP Broadcast

Select this item if you want to configure the network element to use the proprietary IP Broadcast protocol. See further description in the "System Mode - IP Broadcast" section. The network element is assigned one IP address only (management port IP address). The network element uses forwarding mechanisms to dispatch traffic between the active DCC channel and the Management Port. This mode is typically used for back-to-back configurations of two ONS 15305's or ONS 15302's.

4.2.6.3  IP Un-Numbered


Note This system mode is only supported by ONS 15302 R2.0 and ONS 15302 R2.0. This system mode can only be set using ONSCLI and will deactivate MCN wizard from the Cisco EdgeCraft desktop equipment menu.


Select this mode if you want to share the management port's IP address with DCC management interfaces. The network element is assigned only one IP address that is valid for all of its management interfaces (DCC channels and management port). Routing of messages between the management interfaces is handled by OSPF. To take full advantage of this system mode it is required a network topology built up of just NE's supporting IP un-numbered feature.

See the table below and the "DCC Usage Limitations" section for network element variant available choices and limitations.

Table 4-1 System mode vs. network element

 
ONS 15302
ONS 15305
IP Broadcast

x

--

IP Numbered

x

x

IP Un-numbered

x (rel 2.0 or newer)

x (rel 2.0 or newer)


4.2.7  Management Port - System Mode IP Numbered

Choose the port for management traffic


Step 1 Select which of the available protocol stacks you want to use for the Management port.

Disable

Disables the management port.


Note Disabling the management port should only be performed when connected via other interfaces than the management port.


IP

Select this item if you want to activate the IP protocol for the management port.

The system presents the current set-up of the management port, and the available choices. You select between the following choices:

Table 4-2 Management port modes

Management port mode
Purpose
Comment

Disabled

To turn of local access via MNGT-port.

"Disabled" prohibits access to the MCN through the management port.

IP

Enable IP for MNGT-port.

Default mode.


If IP is selected, the operator is required to set up the IP global attributes. See the "Global Ip Settings - System Mode Ip Numbered" section for details.

4.2.8  DCC Encapsulation - System Mode IP Numbered

This step allows you to set up the DCC configuration. If you don't want management over DCC, select all items and press the "Disable Selected" button.

You select the encapsulation mode of the selected DCC channel, or remove the channel from the MCN. The alternatives are:

Not used

IPOverDcc encapsulated IP (proprietary).

PPP encapsulated IP (IP over PPP).

The following two sections details the setup of IP over DCC and IP over PPP:

For network element type support of the different selections see Table 4-4

4.2.8.1  IP over DCC Encapsulation

Sets up the DCC channel in a proprietary mode where the management MAC packages are encapsulated in HDLC frames and sent across the MCN.


Step 1 Set the mode as "ipOverDcc" and then set up the IP address and subnet mask of the interface and set up the following DCC channel attributes:

IP address of the DCC port

IP subnet mask of the DCC port

Step 2 Press Next when you are satisfied with the DCC setup.


4.2.8.2  Ip Over Ppp Encapsulation

Sets up the DCC channel in ppp mode where the management IP packages are encapsulated in PPP frames and sent across the MCN.


Step 1 Select the DCC channels the list of available DCC channels, and set the following DCC channel attributes:

mode = ppp

IP address of the DCC port

IP subnet mask of the DCC port

Step 2 Press Next when you are satisfied with the DCC setup.


4.2.9  IP in-band - System Mode IP Numbered

This step allows you to configure IP addresses on In-band interfaces, that is a LAN port, a WAN port or a VLAN, which enables you to run management IP traffic (SNMP) over the in-band interfaces.


Note Only LAN and WAN ports have Slot/Port configuration (not VLANs)



Note The table may contain ifIndex that are not associated with IP-In-band configuration.



Note If VLAN is used for management traffic, it is required that the VLAN is configured in advance.


Figure 4-4 Configure VLAN

If VLANs are not already configured, this can be done by clicking the Configure VLANs button found in lower right corner.

The system presents the current IP in-band setup (if any).

Figure 4-5

IP In-band


Step 1 Select what (LAN/WAN) interface to use for management purposes. The choices are:

No change

Continue to sub-flow "Global Ip Settings - System Mode Ip Numbered" section.

Set up In-band channel

Step 2 Click the Add button.

Figure 4-6

Add Row

Step 3 Enter InterfaceNumber. (iFindex)

Step 4 Enter IP address. (xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx)

Step 5 Enter InterfaceNetworkMask (xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx) (subnet mask)


4.2.10  Global Ip Settings - System Mode Ip Numbered

This flow sets up the global IP for the MCN.


Step 1 Click the Add button in the Routing Table and define:

Figure 4-7

Routing Table

InterfaceNumber

DestinationIpAddress

NextHop: IpAddress for next hop

DestinationNetworkMask

RouteType; other, reject, local or remote

Step 2 Enable the OSPF routing protocol, if used in the MCN.

Step 3 Click Add and enter/select values for these attributes:

AreaId

ImportAsExternal; importExternal or importNoExternal

Metric

Step 4 Enter Router Id.

Step 5 Enable the RIP if used in the MCN.

Step 6 Click Next to continue.



Note Global and interface specific OSPF and RIP parameters can be tuned under the IP attribute view (management tree).


4.2.11  System Mode - IP Broadcast

This procedure describe configuration tasks when System Mode is set to IP Broadcast.


Note This system mode is only supported by ONS 15302


4.2.11.1  System Mode

Figure 4-8

System Mode - IP Broadcast


Step 1 Check IP Broadcast as System Mode.

Step 2 Click Next to proceed.


4.2.11.2  Common Settings

This step allows you to configure the default gateway, the management port settings and the MAC filter on the selected network element

4.2.11.3  Gateway

Default gateway address.

4.2.11.4  Management port

Enables/Disables the management port. A disabled management port can be enabled again from ONSCLI.

4.2.11.5  Media Access Control (MAC) Filter

Enables/Disables the MAC-filter. When enabled, the management port will reject ethernet traffic with MAC addresses outside the address range assigned to Cisco products.

4.2.11.6  Active DCC Channels

See "DCC Encapsulation - System Mode IP Numbered" section.

4.2.11.7  Summary

See "Summary" section.

4.2.12  Summary

Figure 4-9

Summary

When the MCN wizard sequence is completed you should review the configuration before committing the changes to the network element. The system presents an overview of the configuration prepared.


Step 1 If the configuration is satisfactory, click Save to commit the configuration into the network element.


When committed, the system sends out a sequence of configuration commands. The commands are sequenced in a way that does not cause deadlocks or loss of communication with the managed element through the implementation of the MCN configuration for the network element.

4.2.13  Special Requirements

Requirements for ONS 15305 and ONS 15302

4.2.13.1  DCC Usage Limitations

4.2.13.2  ONS 15305

8*DCC-R and 4*DCC-M per slot

An MSP 1+1 link with DCC management traffic consumes 2 or 4 DCC's, as both working and protecting DCC channels must be configured

4.2.13.3  ONS 15302

Max. 2 DCC channels per (logical) STM-1 port is allowed, 1*DCC-R and/or 1*DCC-M(1 logical DCC channel = 2*DCC-R or 2*DCC-M, 2 logical DCC channels = 2*DCC-R and 2*DCC-M)

If IP/DCC (proprietary) or IP encapsulation, both working and protecting DCC channels must be configured manually

If IP/PPP, only the working channel needs to be configured - the system automatically configures the protecting channel.

IP/PPP is only supported on DCC-R (IP/PPP supported on DCC-M from ONS 15302 version 2.0)

For ONS 15302 MSP 1+1 configuration requires special attention. There are up to four physically available DCC channels (2*DCC-R plus 2*DCC-M), but logically they operate as up to 2 channels (1*DCC-R and/or 1*DCC-M) in a protection scheme.

4.2.14  Features Vs. Network Element Types

The features supported by the network elements are shown in Table 4-3.

Table 4-3 Features Supported by ONS 15302 and ONS 15305

Feature
ONS 15302
ONS 15305

Communication

IP Broadcast DCC-R/M

X

-

IP HDLC DCC-R/M

X

X

IP/PPP DCCR

X

X

IP/PPP DCCM

X

X

IP Un-numbered

X

X

IP-Routing

X

X1

In-band

X

X2

Security &
Traffic Control

Management Port on/off

X

X

SNMPv1 Community

X

X

SNMP Manager Identity

X

X

SNMP read/write control

X

X

VLAN (802.1Q)

X

X

1 See above.

2 Dependent of equipped module(s)


4.3  Management Modes and Configuration


Note The following sections describe how to configure the Management Port and the DCCs by using the Management Interfaces managed object present in the Management Tree.


The management traffic is IP based (SNMP and TFTP messages), and therefore configuring a management path comes to deciding which encapsulation shall be used to send the IP datagrams carrying the management traffic over the network. For the management interfaces the following encapsulation type is supported

IP directly carried over a layer 2 protocol (Ethernet, PPP, or proprietary).

In addition, each management interface can be turned off. Actual encapsulation support varies depending on the management interface type (management port or DCC). An overview of the different management modes versus the management interfaces is given in Table 4-4.


Note This is an important feature for security purposes, especially for the management port, which is physically accessible on the network element (main card).


Table 4-4 Management Modes Versus Management Interface

Management Interface
Not Used
IP
IP/Ethernet
IP/proprietary encapsulation
IP/PPP

Management Port

X

X

   

DCC

X

 

X

X



Note A DCC can run only one mode at a time. In addition, a maximum of eight DCCs can be used for management purposes, that means only up to eight DCCs can be assigned to a management mode.


The following sections describe how to configure the management port and the DCCs by using the management interfaces managed object present in the management tree.

4.3.1  Management Port Configuration

The management port can run two types of encapsulation, referred to as modes. A particular mode is selected by setting the variable mode (management interfaces >management port > mode). Required configuration for possible modes:

not used

IP

These are further detailed in the next sections.

4.3.1.1  Mode: Not Used

To configure the management port with mode set to not used:


Step 1 Click on the ONS 15305 managed object, then on the management Interfaces managed object in the Management tree, Figure 4-10.

Figure 4-10 Management Interfaces - Managed Object

.

Step 2 Click on managementPort in the attributes window, Figure 4-11.

Figure 4-11 ManagementPort - Attributes

Step 3 In the attributes window, set mode to Not Used, Figure 4-12.

Figure 4-12 ManagementPort - Mode Selector

.

Step 4 Click Save on the toolbar.


4.3.1.2  Mode: IP

To configure the management port with mode set to IP:


Step 1 Click on the ONS 15305 managed object, then on the management Interfaces managed object in the management tree.

Step 2 Click on managementPort in the attributes window.

Step 3 In the attributes window, set mode to IP.

Step 4 Click Save on the toolbar.

Step 5 Click on ipAddress in the attributes window, Figure 4-13.

Figure 4-13 ManagementPort - IP Address Attribute

.

Step 6 Click Add on the toolbar. Set protocol to IP, and set ipAddress and subnetMask according to your IP addressing scheme or plan, Figure 4-14.

Figure 4-14 ManagementPort - Add IP Address

.

Step 7 Click Save on the toolbar.

Depending on your topology, additional routing information might have to be configured. You can define static routes, and or control dynamic protocols (RIP, OSPF) by using the IP managed object in the management tree. Defining a default gateway can be done directly from the management interfaces managed object as explained in the "IP Default Gateway Configuration" section.


4.3.2  DCC Configuration

A DCC can run three types of encapsulation, referred to as mode. A particular mode is selected by setting the variable mode (management interfaces >DCC >mode). Required configuration for one of the three possible modes (not used or IP) is further detailed in the next sections.

4.3.2.1  Mode: Not Used

To configure a DCC with mode set to Not Used


Step 1 Click on the ONS 15305 managed object and then on the management Interfaces managed object in the management tree.

Step 2 Click on dcc in the attributes window.

Step 3 In the attributes window, each row represents a DCC interface. Set mode to Not Used for the desired DCC interface.

Step 4 Click Save on the toolbar.


4.3.2.2  Mode: IP

To configure a DCC with mode set to IP:


Step 1 Click on the ONS 15305 managed object and then on the management Interfaces managed object in the management tree, Figure 4-15.

Step 2 Click on dcc in the attributes window.

Step 3 In the attributes window, each row represents a DCC interface. Set mode to IP over DCC for the desired DCC interface.

Figure 4-15 Management Interfaces - Dcc Attribute

.

Step 4 In addition, when the mode is set to IP, the layer 2 encapsulation for the IP datagrams must be configured. This done by setting the ipEncapsulation variable to the desired encapsulation (proprietary or PPP), Figure 4-16.

Figure 4-16 IPEcapsulation - Encapsulation Selector

.

Step 5 Click Save on the toolbar.

Step 6 Click on ipAddress in the attributes window.

Step 7 Click Add on the toolbar. Set protocol to IP, and set ipAddress and subnetMask according to your IP addressing scheme or plan.

Step 8 Click Save on the toolbar.

If mode is set to IP, and ipEncapsulation is set to PPP, additional configuration for PPP can be performed via the pppConfiguration variable (management interfaces > DCC > pppConfiguration).

Depending on your topology, additional routing information might have to be configured. You can define static routes, and or control dynamic protocols (RIP, OSPF) by using the IP managed object in the management tree. Defining a default gateway can be done directly from the management interfaces managed object as explained in the "IP Default Gateway Configuration" section.


4.3.3  IP Default Gateway Configuration

To configure an IP default gateway on the network element:


Step 1 Click on the ONS 15305 managed object, then on the management Interfaces managed object in the management tree.

Step 2 Click on ipDefaultGateway in the attributes window.

Step 3 Set the defaultGatewayIpAddress and defaultGatewayInterface according to your IP addressing plan.

Step 4 Click Save on the toolbar.


Note The default gateway must be directly reachable from the network element, that means the default gateway must belong to a subnet defined on the interface identified by defaultGatewayInterface.
Modifying the default gateway results in removing the previous default gateway from the network element's routing table, and adding the new (modified) gateway to the routing table.



Note Secure routing before removal of default gateway.



4.4  ONS 15305 Scenarios

This section presents four typical network topologies, and describes how the management interfaces can be configured through the management interfaces managed object in Cisco Edge Craft in order to carry management traffic, Figure 4-17 to Figure 4-20 and Table 4-5 to Table 4-8.

4.4.1  Important Note

In the following scenarios, it is assumed that both RIP and OSPF are disabled. RIP has been manually disabled over the Management Interfaces.

Although each IP network is unique, the topologies and configurations presented in this chapter can be thought of basic building blocks, which can be combined together in order to apply them to a specific network.

In a real network, with a larger number of network elements, additional managed objects can be required to perform the configurations. In particular, configuration of IP, activation and configuration of dynamic routing protocols (RIP, OSPF) require the use of additional managed objects.

IP over DCC (with proprietary or PPP encapsulation) requires configuring a subnet per link (per DCC). Any network element configured with IP over DCC, and located more than two DCC links away form Cisco Edge Craft must either have a static route to Cisco Edge Craft, or run a dynamic routing protocol. As the number of static routes grows with the number of interfaces configured to run IP over DCC, running a dynamic routing protocol can be advantageous. Note that depending on the network topology, care must be taken when enabling IP routing protocol over DCC to prevent the DCC network from being advertised as a path for the user traffic (as opposed to only the management traffic).

Each of the next sections ( Scenario 1: CEC and ONS 15305 on the Same Subnet to Scenario 4: IP over PPP) present a figure of a typical IP topology, together with the required parameters to be configured in the Management interfaces M.O.

4.4.2  Notations Used

The following notations are used throughout the rest of this section:

The /<prefix-length> notation is used to denote the {IP address, subnet mask} pairs. As an example, the notation 192.168.0.1 / 24 refers to the following pair {IP address 192. 168.0.1, subnet mask 255.255.255.0}.


Note The prefix-length is equal to the total number of contiguous 1-bits in the traditional subnet mask.


N/A (non-applicable) is used to denote that an attribute is not relevant for a particular configuration, that means the value of the attribute will not influence the configuration.

The notation Interface: (XXX) used for defining the interface of the default gateway ( Figure 4-18 to Figure 4-20) indicates that the ifIndex of the XXX interface should be used. Possible values for XXX are, (MGMT Port), or (DCC #n) to the ifIndex of the management port, or the ifIndex of DCC channel n respectively. The values of the ifIndex can be found under the respective M.O.s, that means management port, and DCCs.

4.4.3  Scenario 1: CEC and ONS 15305 on the Same Subnet

Figure 4-17 Cisco Edge Craft and ONS 15305 on the Same Subnet

Table 4-5 Cisco Edge Craft and ONS 15305 on the Same Subnet - Settings 

 
ONS 15305 #1
ONS 15305 #2
ONS 15305 #3

Management Port

     

mode

IP

IP

IP

iPAddess

IP, 10.10.10.10 / 24

IP, 10.10.10.20 / 24

IP, 10.10.10.30 / 24

DCC#1

     

mode

notUsed

notUsed

notUsed

ipEncapsulation

N/A

N/A

N/A

pppConfiguration

     

initialMRU

N/A

N/A

N/A

pppIpAdminStatus

N/A

N/A

N/A

compression

N/A

N/A

N/A

ipAddress

N/A

N/A

N/A

DCC#2

     

mode

not used

not used

not used

ipEncapsulation

N/A

N/A

N/A

pppConfiguration

     

initialMRU

N/A

N/A

N/A

pppIpAdminStatus

N/A

N/A

N/A

compression

N/A

N/A

N/A

ipAddress

N/A

N/A

N/A

IP Default Gateway

     

ipAddress

N/A

N/A

N/A

interface

N/A

N/A

N/A


4.4.4  Scenario 2: CEC and ONS 15305 on Different Subnets

Figure 4-18 Cisco Edge Craft and ONS 15305 on Different Subnets

Table 4-6 Cisco Edge Craft and ONS 15305 on Different Subnet - Settings 

 
ONS 15305 #1
ONS 15305 #2
ONS 15305 #3

Management Port

     

mode

IP

IP

IP

iPAddess

IP, 10.10.10.10 / 24

IP, 10.10.10.20 / 24

IP, 10.10.10.30 / 24

DCC#1

     

mode

notUsed

notUsed

notUsed

ipEncapsulation

N/A

N/A

N/A

pppConfiguration

     

initialMRU

N/A

N/A

N/A

pppIpAdminStatus

N/A

N/A

N/A

compression

N/A

N/A

N/A

ipAddress

N/A

N/A

N/A

DCC#2

     

mode

not used

not used

not used

ipEncapsulation

N/A

N/A

N/A

pppConfiguration

     

initialMRU

N/A

N/A

N/A

pppIpAdminStatus

N/A

N/A

N/A

compression

N/A

N/A

N/A

ipAddress

N/A

N/A

N/A

IP Default Gateway

     

ipAddress

10.10.10.1

10.10.10.1

10.10.10.1

interface

mgmt port

mgmt port

mgmt port


4.4.5  Scenario 3: IP over DCC

Figure 4-19 IP over DCC

Table 4-7 IP over DCC - Settings 

 
ONS 15305 #1
ONS 15305 #2
ONS 15305 #3

Management Port

     

mode

IP

IP

IP

iPAddess

N/A

IP, 10.10.10.10 / 24

N/A

DCC#1

     

mode

notUsed

notUsed

notUsed

ipEncapsulation

proprietary

proprietary

proprietary

pppConfiguration

     

initialMRU

N/A

N/A

N/A

pppIpAdminStatus

N/A

N/A

N/A

compression

N/A

N/A

N/A

ipAddress

IP, 192.168.10.1 / 24

IP, 192.168.20.1 / 24

IP, 192.168.30.1 / 24

DCC#2

     

mode

not used

not used

not used

ipEncapsulation

proprietary

proprietary

proprietary

pppConfiguration

     

initialMRU

N/A

N/A

N/A

pppIpAdminStatus

N/A

N/A

N/A

compression

N/A

N/A

N/A

ipAddress

IP, 192.168.30.2 / 24

IP, 192.168.10.2 / 24

IP, 192.168.20.2 / 24

IP Default Gateway

     

ipAddress

192.168.10.2

N/A

192.168.20.1

interface

DCC #1

N/A

DCC #2


4.4.6  Scenario 4: IP over PPP

Figure 4-20 IP over PPP

Table 4-8 IP over PPP- Settings 

 
ONS 15305 #1
ONS 15305 #2
ONS 15305 #3

Management Port

   

mode

notUsed

IP

iPAddess

N/A

IP, 10.10.10.10 / 24

DCC#1

     

mode

IP

notUsed

ipEncapsulation

PPP

PPP

pppConfiguration

     

initialMRU

1500

1500

pppIpAdminStatus

open

open

compression

none

none

ipAddress

IP, 192.168.10.1

IP, 192.168.20.1

IP, 192.168.30.1 / 24

DCC#2

     

mode

IP

IP

ipEncapsulation

PPP

PPP

pppConfiguration

   

initialMRU

1500

1500

pppIpAdminStatus

open

open

compression

none

none

ipAddress

IP, 192.168.30.2

IP, 192.168.10.2

IP, 192.168.20.2 / 24

IP Default Gateway

     

ipAddress

192.168.10.2

N/A

192.168.20.1

interface

DCC #1

N/A

DCC #2


The3rd party equipment supports:

standard IP over PPP over DCC according IF-DN-0101-R1

Ip forwarding between its DCC interface

4.5  Manage Common Parameters

The purpose of this section is guide you through management of the attributes that are related to the NE sub-rack and the NE common hardware and software.

The section involves presentation and modification of the NE identification, time settings, users, available features, the physical inventory, restart issues, LEDs and alarm output, and ping mechanism.

Synchronization, download of software, upload and download of configuration data, and management of NE's are described in separate sections.

4.5.1  View Common Parameters

Select the device in the management tree.

The common attributes (parameters) as defined in the information model, are presented for you.

Identification of the network element

Time settings

Users

Physical inventory

Restart of network element

Logs (alarm logs, performance data logs)

LEDs and alarm output

Ping mechanism

4.5.2  Modify Common Parameters

How to change and update parameters for a Network Element.

4.5.2.1  Identification of the Network Element


Step 1 Select the network element in the management tree, Figure 4-21.

Step 2 The following attributes can be modified:

Location

NativeName

Owner

Figure 4-21 Identification of Network Element

4.5.2.2  Label

The attribute Label is based on the Location attribute and generated, based on the following rules:

Rule 1: Label =Location

Rule 2: Label = Ip address, if no contact with NE first time in management

Rule 3: If Location is blank, Label = Ip address

Step 3 Click Save to commit changes.


4.5.2.3  Time Settings

The example below shows ONS 15305.


Step 1 Select ONS 15305 and then the device managed object, Figure 4-22.

Figure 4-22 Time Settings - Time Attribute

Step 2 Click Time, Figure 4-23.

Figure 4-23 Time Attribute - Values

Step 3 Click SystemTime>Time to view or modify, Figure 4-24.

Figure 4-24 Time Attributes - System Time

.

Step 4 Click TimeProtocol to view or modify the following objects:

TimeServerIpAddress

TimeSyncInterval

Itemizing


4.5.2.4  Users

This section describes how to add a new user, Figure 4-25.

Figure 4-25 Add a New User - Overview

Add a New User

To add a new user, follow these steps:


Step 1 Navigate as described in, Figure 4-25.

Step 2 Click Add.

Step 3 Enter

password

IpAddress

Step 4 Select desired AccessRight from pull-down menu.

Step 5 Select desired TrapsEnable state from pull-down menu.

Step 6 Click Save.


VT 100 Password (ONS 15302 only)

To edit the VT 100 password, follow these steps:


Step 1 Select device>time>VT100.

Step 2 Edit Vt100Password to desired value.

Step 3 Click Save.


4.5.2.5  Physical Inventory - ONS 15305


Step 1 Select device > DevicePhysicalInventory, Figure 4-26.

Figure 4-26 Physical Inventory - Overview

Step 2 Select Hardware hyper link to list hardware inventory.

Step 3 Select Software hyper link to list software inventory.


4.5.2.6  Physical Inventory - ONS 15302

Select device>inventory.

4.5.2.7  Restart of ONS 15305

How to perform a restart or a scheduled restart of the Network Element.


Step 1 Click device>Restart, Figure 4-27.

Figure 4-27 Restart of Network Element - Overview

Step 2 Select desired RestartStatus.

Step 3 If selecting delayedRestart, set time and date.

Step 4 Click Save.


4.5.2.8  Restart of ONS 15302

How to restart ONS 15302:


Step 1 Click device>Restart.

Step 2 Select restart.

Step 3 Click Save.


4.5.2.9  Logs (Alarm Logs, Performance Data Logs)

How to work with logs

Clear Alarm History:


Step 1 Select device > LogAdministration.

Step 2 Set ClearAlarmHistory to clear.

Step 3 Click Save.

Step 4 Refresh Alarm History in the Alarm List.

Clear PM Data:


Step 1 Select device > LogAdministration

Step 2 Set ClearPMData to clear, Figure 4-28.

Step 3 Click Save.

Figure 4-28 Clear Alarm- and Performance Data Log

LEDs and Alarm Output

How to select the severity output level.


Step 1 Click device > LEDandOutput

Step 2 Select severity to light the NE LEDs, Figure 4-29.

Figure 4-29 LEDs - Severity Selector


4.5.2.10  Status Reporting

Status reporting is a kind of "alive" reporting from the device to all trap-receivers defined in the community-table.

This function can be "enabled/disabled" and the status-trap-reporting frequency (time-out) can be specified/altered.

The system currently reports the following in this status-trap:

EquipmentLedStatus,

AlarmTrafficLedStatus,

DeviceStatusReporting,

DeviceStatusReportingFrequency,

sysDescr,

sysObjectID,

sysUpTime,

sysContact,

sysName,

sysLocation

One of the NE/ network discovery criteria in Cisco EdgeCraft is Trap Discovery. The status trap sent by NE default every 10 minutes completes this solution.

Ping Mechanism

Modify the ping mechanism:

Figure 4-30 Ping Mechanism


Step 1 Select device > Ping hyper link, Figure 4-30.

Step 2 The following attributes are modifiable:

Delay

PacketCount

TrapOnCompletion (true/false)

PacketSize

PacketTimeout


Alarm Ports

Modify the Alarm ports:


Step 1 Select device > alarmPort in the management tree, Figure 4-31.

Step 2 The following attributes are modifiable:

Description

Free text description.

Mode

enabled or disabled

TriggeredWhen

opens or closes (when an alarm is to be triggered)

Step 3 Click Save.

Figure 4-31 Alarm Ports

.


AUX Port - ONS 15305

Modify AUX Port on the ONS 15305:


Step 1 Select device > auxPort, Figure 4-32.

Figure 4-32 AUX Port

Step 2 The following attributes are modifiable:

AdminStatus enabled or disabled

AuxPortTimeSlot, refer to the "AUX port - Timeslots" section.

Figure 4-33 AUX port - Timeslots

The following attributes can be modified for AuxPortTimeSlot:

OhByte: e1, e2, f1 or unmapped

Slot:

Description:

Port:


Power Module - ONS 15305

Modify the Power Module attributes:

Figure 4-34 Power Module - Attributes


Step 1 Select device > power, Figure 4-34.

Step 2 The following attributes are modifiable:

AlarmReporting

disabled or enabled

AlarmReportingInputA

disabled or enabled

AlarmReportingInputB

disabled or enabled

Description

free text description


4.6  Manage Synchronization

The purpose of this section is to select the synchronization source for the internal SDH timing (T0) and the external synchronization output (T4).

The ONS 15305 T0 and T4 automatic selection processes can select the source from a shortlist of available inputs. This selection is based on quality and priority.

You can override the automatic selection process by manual commands.

For further reading on SDH synchronization, please see ETSI ETS 300 417-6-1, ITU-T Recommendation G.781, G.812 ("Timing requirements of slave clocks suitable for use as node clocks in synchronization networks") and G.813 ("Timing characteristics of SDH equipment slave clocks (SEC)")

4.6.1  SDH Synchronization

The first part of this section gives a short introduction to SDH synchronization which is meant to help the reader in understanding the requirements specified in this document.The synchronization is G.781 compliant.

4.6.1.1  Synchronization Networks

A synchronization network is a set of clock nodes that are maintained in synchronization with one another. To achieve this it is necessary to accurately transfer synchronization reference information between nodes so that their relative synchronization may be monitored and maintained.

Since it is difficult to synchronize all international nodes from the same master clock, each network operator typically have a primary reference clock (PRC) as defined in ITU-T Recommendation G.811.

From the PRC the synchronization reference information is distributed to all nodes in the SDH network in a tree-type network topology, Figure 4-35.

Figure 4-35 Example Synchronization Network

Intermediate slave clocks can enter holdover conditions if their connection to the master clock is lost. Slave clocks called Synchronization Supply Units (SSU's) will continue to serve their branch of the network until the connection with the PRC is reestablished. There may be several SSU's concatenated in a large network.

Intermediate SDH NEs will also contain slave clocks, the SDH equipment Clock (SEC). Their quality are not sufficient for providing synchronization reference information to other parts of the network, but they can serve the SDH NE itself in holdover mode if all high quality incoming references are lost.

As can be seen from the figure, the SDH NEs have a dual role since they need a synchronization reference to operate properly in a network and they are important for distribution of synchronization reference information to other networks.

4.6.1.2  Selecting the Best Synchronization Reference

To reinforce the reliability of the synchronization network, alternative routes are often used between the clocks. The slave clock can then be switched to another synchronization reference manually, or automatically by monitoring the signal at the physical interface.

An improvement to simple signal monitoring is to send the synchronization status message (SSM) along with the synchronization signal to indicate the quality level (clock type) of the source clock. The next clock in the chain can now select the best clock based on this quality level.

Not all connections used for synchronization can send the SSM along with its synchronization reference. In this case it is possible to manually indicate the quality level for this interface in ONS 15305. This ensures that also references without SSM can be part of the automatic selection process that is based on quality level.

To avoid timing loops in the network it is sometimes necessary to indicate in SSM that this synchronization reference should not be used. This is done by sending the do not use (DNU) message.

4.6.1.3  Synchronizing the SDH Equipment

All SDH equipment contains a clock for the SDH pointer adjustments, cross connection matrix operations and the outgoing line signal (STM-N). It is normally operating as a slave clock and locked to a high quality incoming reference, but can run in holdover mode if the reference is lost.

This section describes how the internal timing (T0) is derived from the available synchronization references in ONS 15305.

Synchronization reference information can be extracted from any of the incoming STM-N SDH interfaces (T1), 2 Mbit/s PDH interfaces (T2) or the external 2 MHz synchronization input (T3) as indicated in Figure 4-36.

The figure shows that only one at the time of the available synchronization references will be used as a reference for the SEC. SEC is the clock used for internal timing (T0). When no reference is available it will run in Hold-over mode.

Figure 4-36 T0 Selection

4.6.2  ONS 15305

Configuration of synchronization for ONS 15305.

4.6.2.1  Signal Monitoring

All interfaces are monitored for signal level and framing errors. The failure will be reported to the candidate selection and QL-monitoring and switching processes.

4.6.2.2  Candidate Selection and Configuration

In ONS 15305 up to five synchronization reference candidates can be selected to participate in the selection process.

For each synchronization source candidate the following parameters can be read or configured:

Type (T1, T2 or T3 where T2 must be a 2Mbit/s PDH Port in PRA mode).

Identification of the synchronization source candidate (via its slot number, port number etc.)

Whether SSM usage is enabled (T1 only).

Assigned quality level (QL). If SSM usage is disabled, the operator is free to assign a fixed QL.

Current quality level. If SSM usage is enabled (T1) the quality level of the incoming signal is seen here. If an alarm is detected on the synchronization source interface, the current quality level indicates failed (Independent on SSM usage).

The priority of the synchronization source candidate. This priority will apply only when there are multiple candidates all having the highest QL among all possible source candidates.

Hold-Off time and wait to restore time. (See the "QL-monitoring and Switching:" section).

For each synchronization source candidate the following methods are available:

Set or Clear lockout. This is used to temporarily exclude a specified synchronization source.

Clear WTR.

4.6.2.3  QL-monitoring and Switching

The QL-monitoring and selection process will continuously monitor the QL of the candidate synchronization references and select the reference with the best QL. Only error free references are included in the selection process. (Alarms are detected in the signal monitoring functional block). If there is more than one candidate with the highest available QL, the priority parameter will be used for selection.

The following parameters can be read or configured for the selection process:

Selected synchronization reference and its QL.

Switch mode. This indicates whether the selection process is running in the automatic, forced or manual switch mode.

The following methods are available for the selection process:

Manual switch command. A manual switch can be performed only to a source with the highest available QL. This means that manual switching can only be used to override the synchronization source priorities.

Forced switch command. This command overrides the currently selected synchronization source.

Clear command. Clears any of the manual or forced switch commands.

4.6.2.4  SEC

The ONS 15305 slave clock.

SEC will enter holdover mode for the specified Hold-Off time if an alarm is detected on the selected synchronization reference. After the Hold-Off time the selection process will switch to the error free reference with the highest QL.

When a candidate synchronization reference recovers from an alarm condition, the signal shall be free for faults for the wait to restore time before taken into consideration by the selection process.

The selected T0 reference is also used on all output STM-N signals.

Synchronizing External Equipment

ONS 15305 also provides an external synchronization output (T4). This is a separate 2 MHz signal that can be used directly as a synchronization reference for other equipment or as a synchronization reference to a separate stand alone synchronization equipment (SASE).

Synchronization reference information can be extracted from any of the incoming STM-N SDH interfaces (T1) or the internal timing (T0) as indicated in Figure 4-37.

The figure shows that only one at the time of the available synchronization references will be used for External Timing (T4).

Figure 4-37 T4 Selection

Here is a short description of the functional blocks for T4 selection:

Signal Monitoring:

See the "SDH Synchronization" section.

Candidate Selection and Configuration:

See the "SDH Synchronization" section.
T0 can be one of the candidates.

QL-monitoring and Switching:

See the "SDH Synchronization" section.

Additional parameter for T4:

QL minimum level (QLM).

4.6.2.5  Rules

When referring to a T1 or T2 synchronization reference slot and port numbering is used.

When referring to the T0 or T3 synchronization reference no further identification is required.

SSM is always disabled for T2 and T3 references

A 2 Mbit/s PDH port should be treated as a T2 source only when it is operating in PRA mode.

In principle a user can add the same source twice, but you should be advised not to do this.

More than one reference can have the same priority.

You should receive a warning before deleting the active synchronization source. However, no further restrictions apply.

The Automatic selection process will find the best source based on the current QL. If more than one source have the highest QL, the source with the highest QL and priority will be selected. If priority is also the same, ONS 15305 will choose the first source in the list with highest QL and priority.

A manual switch can be performed only to a source with the highest available QL.

A forced switch overrides the currently selected synchronization source.

The new source selected by the manual and forced switching cannot have a current quality level of failed or SEC.

WTR clear does not exist as a method in the MIB. Must set WTR = 0 and then back to original value if method is implemented in manager.

T0 is the default candidate for T4.

If no candidates are available for the T4 selection process, no synchronization source is selected and the external synchronization output is squelched.

When QL of the selected T4 reference falls below the QLM level, the T4 output signal shall be squelched (muted) to let the slaved oscillator go into holdover or select another reference.

T4 is only used for external synchronization output (not for output STM-N signals).

4.6.2.6  Synchronization Alarms

Synchronization alarms are treated as any other ONS 15305 alarms as described in a separate section.

The following table identifies the alarms related to SDH synchronization events.

Table 4-9 Alarms related to SDH Synchronization Events 

Alarm ID
Description
Comment
Clearable
Default Severity

T0_HOLDOVER

SETG enters holdover

No sync. sources available (applies to T0 sync. only)

Yes

MAJOR

T0_SWITCH

Change of sync. source

Applies to automatic, manual or forced switchover (T0 only).

No

INFO

SYNCSRC_QL

QL_FAILED or QL_DNU for any sync. candidate

Applies to T1/T2/T3 sources member of the T0 sync. table

No

INFO

T4_SQUELCH

T4 output squelched (on permanent basis)

No T4 sync. candidate with QL equal to or above QLmin

Yes

MAJOR

T0_DEFECT

SETG failure

Caused by defective hardware impacting the internal T0 clock

Yes

CRITICAL



Note By a synchronization candidate is meant a synchronization source contained in either of the T0 or T4 sync. source tables (5 entries each).


4.6.3  View the Synchronization Data (T0 or T4)

T0 and T4 Synchronization are treated in common in the description of the flows due to their common behavior. The user is considered to be an experienced SDH user since synchronization management is not directly related to the services offered by ONS 15305.

You access the synchronization attributes from the management tree, Figure 4-38.

Figure 4-38 Synchronization - Selecting Managed Object

.

The system presents a list of all Synchronization Source candidates.

All attributes of the Synchronization Source candidate are presented as defined in the information mode, Figure 4-39.

Figure 4-39 Synchronization - T0 SynchSources attribute

If the source experiences a signal error the SSM attribute shows failure instead of the SSM value.

The system presents the synchronization attributes with the relevant data.

4.6.4  Add Synchronization Source Candidate (T0 or T4)


Step 1 Select T0 SynchSources or T4 SynchSources, Figure 4-39.

Step 2 Click Add in toolbar, Figure 4-40.

Figure 4-40 Add Synchronization Source

Step 3 Enter the synchronization parameters in the management tree for the new candidate. The list of existing Synchronization source candidates must be less than five.

Type: STM-n, e1, external

Slot/ Port: number

SSM: enabled/disabled

Admin Quality/Assigned Quality Level (N/A when SSM is enabled): sec, ssuL1 , ssuT, prc

Priority: 1 to 5 (where 1 is highest priority)

Lockout:clear/set

Hold-Off Time: 300 to 1800 ms

Wait To Restore Time: 0 to 12 min.

Step 4 Click Save to commit the new synchronization source candidate.

If you attempts to add a new synchronization source candidate when the candidate list is fully populated (five entries), you will be informed that a candidate must be deleted before adding a new.

The system verifies that the candidate is legal before performing the actual add. If any errors are found, the candidate is not added and you is informed and given the opportunity to correct the problem.

You can add more than one candidate before committing and a failure on one candidate has no consequence for the addition of the other candidates.


4.6.5  Modify Synchronization Source Candidate (T0 or T4)


Step 1 Access the synchronization attributes from the management tree, Figure 4-39.

Step 2 Modify the modifiable synchronization source candidate attributes. SSM Enabled can be True only for T1.

QL can only be modified if SSM enabled is False.

Step 3 Click Save to commit the changes.


4.6.6  Delete Synchronization Source Candidate (T0 or T4)

You have two possible choices for deleting a synchronization source candidate:

Alternative 1


Step 1 Access the synchronization attributes from the management tree.

Step 2 Select the synchronization source candidate(s) to delete and click Delete in the toolbar menu.

Step 3 Click Save to commit.


Alternative 2


Step 1 Select the Port (synchronization source) in the management tree

Step 2 Select Do not use for T0 Synchronization from the drop down menu.

Step 3 Select Delete. If you selected synchronization source candidate is the active synchronization source, you receives a warning from the system.

Step 4 Click Save to commit the final delete.


4.6.7  Operate Synchronization Switch (T0 or T4)

Select T0 or T4SwitchCommand and set to desired value, Figure 4-41.

Figure 4-41 Operate Synchronization Switch 1

Click T0 or T4SwitchSource and select new synchronization source. (One of the synchronization source candidates), Figure 4-42.

Figure 4-42 Operate Synchronization Switch 2

.

Click Save to commit the changes.

If the switch parameters are valid, the switch is performed. If a manual or forced switch is performed, the selected source will remain selected until a new forced, manual or clear command is sent.

4.6.8  View Synchronization Switch (T0 or T4)

Access the synchronization attributes from the management tree, Figure 4-43.

The attributes for the synchronization switch are presented:

QLM (T4 Only)

Figure 4-43 View Synchronization Switch

)

Manual, forced or automatic selection mode.

4.6.9  Operate Synchronization on ONS 15302

Below you find guidelines for management of ONS 15302 synchronization.


Step 1 Select device > Synchronization, Figure 4-44,

Figure 4-44 Select Synchronization

Step 2 Select AdministrativeSynchSource from pulldown menu, Figure 4-45.

Figure 4-45 Select AdministravtiveSynchSource

Step 3 Click Save to activate selected synchronization source.

4.7  Software download and Configuration- Custom GUI

This section describes how to upgrade a network element with download files through the Software Download GUI. Configuration backup and restore is also described.


Note ONS 15305 is used as an example in the presented procedures.


The features presented is also available from the Management Tree, see "Download Software to Network Element" section.

See the "1.2  Commissioning Wizard" section on page 1-17 for first time installation.

4.7.1  Introduction

The network element contains device software and firmware, module software and firmware, and configuration data. See the "Network Element Support" section.

Contact your assigned distribution channel to obtain software release available for updates and upgrades of the network element.

4.7.2  Overview

The presentation is split into 5 sub sections:

"Software Download Process" on page -49

"Presentation of the Software Download GUI" on page -53

"How To Install A Downloaded File Into The Management System" on page -59

"How to Install Download File to the Network Element" on page -61

"How To Upgrade A Network Element With A New Network Release" on page -61

"How to Backup and Restore Configuration Data" on page -64

4.7.3  Software Download Process

The management system supplies the selected network element with the necessary information to start downloading new files. The download process is controlled by the element itself.

Figure 4-46

Software download process overview2


Note A download file can contain CEC upgrades and patches for the management system itself. Handling of such tasks is not a part of this presentation.


A network element or network element plug-in module can be upgraded the following ways:

4.7.3.1  Software Upgrade

Software upgrade is performed as file downloads to the network element device or to selected modules.

4.7.3.2  Firmware Upgrade

Some network element types have programmable hardware functionality through the use of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA). The hardware is upgraded by downloading files with new FPGA code.

4.7.3.3  ConfiguRation Backup and Restore

Enables efficient backup and restore of the configuration of network elements. Configuration files are stored on local or remote file systems.

4.7.3.4  Network Element Support

The Software Download GUI support network elements as follows:

ONS 15305:

Network release and embedded software control file

Plug- in module upgrade

Software upgrade

Configuration backup and restore

Firmware (FPGA's) upgrade.

Scheduled and automatic restart of equipment after download completion.


Note One part of the upgrade is controlled by the embedded software on the network element which checks which components are included in the release and ask for upgrade of those components that are newer.


ONS 15302:

Software upgrade

Configuration backup and restore

Manual restart of equipment after download completion


Note A network release supports a given set of traffic modules. If a new module is introduced, the network element needs a new network release.


4.7.3.5  Download Files

There are two classes of download files: "Single Download File" and "Network Release Download File". Download files have administrative information to tell the network element whether it is a Software or Hardware configuration file. The files appear as *.package.zip.

4.7.3.5.1  Single Download File

It consists of one file per download: Software file, firmware file, and configuration file.

4.7.3.5.2  Network Release Download File

It is a collection of upgrade files which are combined and packed into one file. This download file contains one or more independent upgrade components:

Device software

Device firmware

Plug-in module software and firmware

4.7.3.5.3  Location Of Download Files

A prerequisite for software download is that the files are located in a directory where the TFTP download server can locate them. This is the "./res/software" directory to the installed Cisco EdgeCraft. The files may be placed in the download directory manually, or by use of a Package Installer, see the "How To Install A Downloaded File Into The Management System" section. See "Location of backup file".

Figure 4-47

Software directory - location of download files

4.7.3.6  TFTP Server Settings

The embedded TFTP host of the management system has a default interface setup. This is the first network host located on the computer.


Note External TFTP host is not supported by the custom GUI. See the "Download Software to Network Element" section for details.


4.7.3.6.1  Edit TFTP Server Settings

This procedure is for advanced users only, and apply to those environment with several IP interfaces.


Step 1 Open TFTP server settings from File menu.

Step 2 Edit the address to the desired host interface IP.

Figure 4-48

TFTP server settings - Interface IP example

Host: Host interface IP number to run the embedded TFTP server

Timeout: Number on TFTP server time-out in seconds

Retries: Number on package transmission in seconds

Root: Location of the TFTP data repository


Note If the TFTP port is occupied by an other program this will be reported in the Error log, see the "3.1.2.7  Log Viewer" section on page 3-8.



4.7.4  Presentation of the Software Download GUI

The Software GUI lets you download and manage software downloads.

4.7.4.1  Open the Software Download GUI

The Software Download GUI is available from Management Tree and Equipment menu.

Figure 4-49 Open the Software Download GUI

The network element is presented with panes to the left. Data available on the equipment sw banks and data available in the management system repository are listed in the window to the right

Figure 4-50 Software Download GUI - overview

The Figure 4-50 presents an ONS 15305 with two of four possible service modules available on the network element, listing the network release download files available for the equipment.


Note In order to view, navigate and operate on the service modules, they must have the following settings (With reference to the Management Tree and Attributes Viewer):
ServiceState: `inservice'
InstallState: `InstalledAndExpected'

Please see the "Modify Slot" section for further details.


You can navigate in the Software Download GUI when an activated session runs in the background.


Note It is not possible to run several sessions at the same time.


4.7.4.2  Operational and Administrative Software Bank of Network Elements

The network element store its software and firmware in banks. Some network elements have two banks, numbered as bank 1 and bank 2. At any time, only one bank is operational.


Note Both firmware and software downloads are located in two banks, where one is active and the other is passive.


In the example below, bank 1 initially is both the administrative and the operational. After a Software download to bank 2, a switch (bank) command is performed and bank 2 becomes the administrative bank. When a restart is done, bank 2 also becomes the operational bank and the new software is active.

Figure 4-51

General illustration of switching Software banks


Note ONS 15305: You modify the parameters related to the administrative bank. This is the bank that becomes active after restart.


You can switch between the software banks, displayed as active or inactive. Bank switch is supported with progress status such as switching, restarting, and finished.

The inactive bank will be replaced in case of a network release upgrade. However, you can select which bank to be active after a restart of the network element: The current installation state or the downloaded firmware/ software.

4.7.4.3  Manual Switching of Banks


Step 1 Select Inactive bank

Figure 4-52 .Select inactive bank- example

Step 2 Press Switch bank from toolbar or from right- click menu

The system switches bank and restarts the network element

Figure 4-53

Bank switch- example

Step 3 Press Refresh.


The system is updated and presents the equipment with new software bank.

4.7.4.4  Auto Switch

By default, the switch bank is on but this default setting can be changed. Auto switch bank is the recommended setting after a download completion.


Step 1 Select File menu.

Step 2 Uncheck Auto switch bank.


4.7.4.5  Repository

The repository lists the available download files in the management system and firmware, and software, configuration on the equipment.

Download sessions is supported with progress status such as switching, downloading, flashing, finished, and error. The system displays the a progress and status bar, if the network element supports it.

You choose visible columns in the Repository list from the right- click menu:

Figure 4-54 Visible Repository columns

4.7.4.6  Commands

The commands for download sessions are available from toolbar, file menu and a right- click menu. Only the relevant command will be available.

Figure 4-55

Download Command

4.7.4.7  Confirmation Dialog

A confirmation dialog box will appear according to the command you have chosen, prior to the session starts. Only the relevant options will be available.


Note It is not possible to reselect switch bank for sessions concerning configuration.


Figure 4-56

Download Confirmation dialog box - Example Device


Step 1 Press OK to confirm download session.


You may change the restart option and switch bank setting.

4.7.4.7.1  Deactivate Confirmation Dialog

You can turn off this function from View menu.


Step 1 Select View menu from toolbar.

Step 2 Uncheck `Show confirmation dialog'

Figure 4-57

Show Confirmation Dialog.

4.7.4.8  Restart Options

A network element must be restarted after a download session in order to be upgraded with the selected download file.

To restart automatically after download:


Step 1 Choose "Immediately after".

Figure 4-58 Restart options

In case of an immediate restart, the network element will be without contact for a while, presented as connection lost in the Management Tree.

Figure 4-59

Connection Lost During Restart

To see the new installation state of a restarted equipment:

Step 2 Press Refresh in the Software Download GUI.



Note Automatic restart is recommended. Some network elements need a manual restart, please see the "Restart of ONS 15302" section.


To schedule restart after download:


Step 1 Choose `Select date/ time...' from Restart pull- down menu.

Step 2 Set date/ time in calender.

Figure 4-60 Restart Calender

Step 3 Press OK


4.7.5  How To Install A Downloaded File Into The Management System

The Packet Installer will help you install software into the management system. You will select a downloaded file and add this to the central software repository. New software for the equipment will then be available from the Software Download application.

For overview see the "Software Download Process" section and the "Location Of Download Files" section.


Step 1 Select Package Installer from File menu.

Step 2 Read the information in the introduction window, and press Next.

Step 3 Browse and select download file from your software- folder, and press open.

Figure 4-61

Packet Installer- browser example

Step 4 Press Next for summary.

Figure 4-62

Summary of file transfer

Step 5 Verify the compatibility of the selected download file for the network element, and compare the version and ICS numbers of the download file to what is already installed on the equipment.


Note Press Back to reject the current download file and reselect in step 1. Press Cancel to exit the wizard.


Step 6 Press Finish to activate file transfer.

The selected file is unpacked and transferred to the management system software repository.

Step 7 Press Close to exit wizard.


The download file (network release or single file) is available in the repository list(s) in the Software Download GUI, and saved to the ".res/ software" directory. of the installed management system.

4.7.6  How to Install Download File to the Network Element


Note If a scheduled restart is set before a new download session is started; the scheduling parameters will be overwritten.


4.7.6.1  How To Upgrade A Network Element With A New Network Release

This procedure illustrates a network release upgrade to ONS 15305 with automatic restart of the network element and automatically switch of banks. It also apply to firmware and software download sessions.


Step 1 Open the Network Release pane and press Device.

Step 2 Select desired Network Release from the repository list.

Figure 4-63

Select Download File- Example R1.1 Network Release Ics05

Step 3 Choose Immediately after (optional), see Restart Options for other options.

Step 4 Press Download.

The Download Confirmation dialog box appears

Figure 4-64

Download Confirmation Dialog Box

Step 5 Confirm and / or reselect options for restart of the equipment after the download completion, see How To Install A Downloaded File Into The Management System.

Step 6 Press OK to confirm.

The system starts the download session.

Figure 4-65

Download session and progress- example device

Step 7 View the download progress and status bar

Figure 4-66

Restart- example device

When the download session has finished, the status bar displays restart time. This information is kept until the restart of the network element is completed.


Note For manual restart of a network element, please see page 32.


Step 8 Press Refresh.

The installation state of the restarted equipment is updated.

Figure 4-67

New Software installed on network element- example network release

4.7.7  How to Backup and Restore Configuration Data

Configuration data can be backed up on files and restored.

4.7.7.1  Create Backup File of Data Configuration

Follow these steps to create a backup file of your configuration.


Step 1 Open the Configuration pane and press Configuration.

Step 2 Select Active configuration on the network element, see Figure 4-69

Step 3 Press Backup.

The Backup Confirmation dialog box appears.

Figure 4-68

Backup Confirmation dialog box

Step 4 Press OK to confirm.

The system creates a configuration file and saves the active configuration data from the network element.

Figure 4-69

Upload session- example configuration back- up

Step 5 When the status says Finished, press Refresh.

The configuration file is available in the Repository list, as shown in Figure 4-70

Location of backup file

For initial backup, the management system will create a CFG- folder under ".res/ software" directory and save the backup file(s) to this folder, as shown in Figure 4-70.

Figure 4-70

Configuration folder and file- locations

4.7.7.2  Restore Data Configuration From Backup File


Step 1 Open the Configuration pane and press Configuration.

Step 2 Select desired configuration backup file from the Repository list.

Step 3 Click Restore.

The Restore Confirmation dialog box appears.

Figure 4-71 Restore Confirmation Dialog Box

Step 4 Press OK to confirm.

Figure 4-72

Restore data configuration- example

Step 5 Click Refresh after session completion.

The configuration data of the network element is restored.


4.8  Download Software to Network Element

The purpose of this section is to describe the download of new software to the network element. The task of the management system is to give the network element the necessary information for it to be able to start download of new software. The download process is controlled by the element itself.

The section involves presentation of an ongoing download process, starting a new software download process, restart of device after download, and switching between two banks in the element where the software is located.

4.8.1  Network Release

The network element contains device software and firmware, and module firmware. Updates of the software and firmware is delivered in network releases, which supports a given set of traffic modules. If a new module is introduced, the network element needs a new network release.

A network release is delivered as a zip-file together with a network release control file. The file must be unzipped and its contents must be copied to the TFTP server. You must initiate the download of the control file. The remaining part of the upgrade will be controlled by the embedded software on the network element, that means check which files are included in the release and download those files that are missing or are too old in the network element.

4.8.2  Operational and Administrative Software Bank

ONS 15305 store software or firmware in banks. There are two banks, one administrative and one operational. Bank 1 initially is both the administrative and the operational, Figure 4-73. After a Software download to bank 2, a switch (bank) command is performed and bank 2 becomes the administrative bank. When a restart is done, bank 2 also becomes the operational bank and the new software is active.

Figure 4-73 Example of Switching Software Banks

4.8.3  How do Software Upgrades Affect Traffic?

A software update/upgrade including FPGA fix will affect all traffic. Traffic affected depends on module configuration, hence a Network Release download will affect the modules that are target for the FPGA fix in the downloaded Network Release.

It is possible to reset (reboot) the device with or without resetting the current configuration. Reboot have minimal impact on traffic processing. The following situations will affect Ethernet/IP traffic and require a Device reset to become operative:

when STP mode is changed e.g. from per. Device to per VLAN (Ethernet/IP traffic affecting)

when decreasing/increasing entries in tunable tables e.g. maxARP, maxVLAN's, maxBridge, etc.

software upgrade without FPGA fix (Ethernet/IP traffic affecting)

software upgrade with FPGA fix (All traffic affected)

The period of time from the moment you have triggered a restart to the device is up and running is dependent of modules and Software configuration of the device. The down period is dependent of inserted modules and configuration.

4.8.4  Download ONS 15305 Network Release

A Network Release is delivered as a zip-file together with a network release control file, Figure 4-74.


Note Please see Release Notes for an example of a TFTP server that has been verified to work in co- operation with Cisco EdgeCraft.



Step 1 Unzip the Network Release File.

Step 2 Copy the contents to the TFTP - server.

Step 3 In the management tree select device > SWdownload.

Step 4 Set destination to device

Step 5 Set Filetype to networkRelease

Figure 4-74 Download of Release Files

Step 6 Enter FromIPaddress (TFTP server Ip address).

Step 7 Set restartstatus to immediateRestart.

Step 8 Enter SwdlFileName attribute values (File path and name).

Step 9 Click Save.



Note The status of the SwitchBank attribute (switch/noSwitch) is overruled when Filetype is set to networkRelease, thus a switch will be performed.


4.8.5  Software Download to ONS 15305


Step 1 Select device and then SWDownload, Figure 4-75.

Figure 4-75 Select Device

.

The following attributes are modifiable, see Figure 4-76 to Figure 4-82.

Step 2 Select desired destination.

Figure 4-76 Select Destination

.

Step 3 Set Filetype to software.

Figure 4-77 Select Filetype

.

Step 4 Enter FromIPAdress (TFTP server Ip address).

Figure 4-78 Select IP Address

.

Step 5 Set RestartDate if you want delayed restart see Step 6.

Figure 4-79 Set Restart Date

.

Step 6 Select RestartStatus.

Figure 4-80 Select Delayed Restart

.

Select whether network element should restart immediately or at a specific date/time after the download process.

Step 7 Enter SwdlFileName attribute values (File path and name).

Figure 4-81 Set Software Download File Name

Step 8 Set SwitchBank attribute.

Figure 4-82 Select Switch Bank Attributes

.

Switch

After the restart the operational bank will be switched and the new (downloaded) Software will be active.

noSwitch

The operational bank will not be switched after the restart, hence a manual switch must be performed in order to activate the new software. For further details see the "Manual Switch of Banks" section.

Step 9 Click Save.


4.8.5.1  Manual Switch of Banks

Follow these steps to manually switch banks


Step 1 Select device > DevicePhysicalInventory > Software.

Step 2 Select Administrativebank and switch to opposite bank number.

Step 3 Click Save.

Step 4 Perform a restart.


4.8.6  Software Download to ONS 15302

Follow these steps to download software to ONS 15302


Step 1 Select device > SWdownload.

Step 2 Enter FromIPaddress (TFTP server Ip address).

Step 3 Enter SwdlFileName attribute values (File path and name).

Step 4 Click Save.

Step 5 Perform a restart.


4.9  Backup and Restore NE Configuration Data

The purpose of this section is to guide you through management of the configuration data in the network element.

The section involves backup, presentation of an ongoing back-up process and starting a restore process configuration data between a host and a network element.

The configuration data is BER coded and can not be edited on the host.

4.9.1  Backup Configuration Data

Backup CDB will perform a back-up of the configuration data of selected NE and place it on the TFTP-server.


Step 1 Select device in the management tree.

Step 2 Click on ConfigData. Here you select whether to upload or download the configuration from or to the network element, Figure 4-83.

Figure 4-83 Select ConfigData

.

Step 3 Select BackupCDB.

The following attributes values are modifiable:

TftpServerAddress

Destination IP address if configuration data should be uploaded on a remote host.

FileName

File name and path for the configuration data storage.

Trigger

If set to noop only parameters are saved.

If set to backup, the backup operation is started when clicking save.

Step 4 Enter values for the parameters and set trigger to backup.

Step 5 Click Save to commit the changes.

Step 6 The TFTP upload process starts on the network element and the configuration data is stored on the selected host in the specified location (path and file name.)


Note It is recommended to monitor the TFTP console during the upload process.



Note Some TFTP servers requires that the file exist on the TFTP server before and upload can be performed.



4.9.2  Restore Configuration Data

The previous configuration data restore session has finished. If a scheduled restart is set before a new configuration data download process is started, the scheduling parameters will be overwritten.

In order for Cisco Edge Craft to restart the NE after the TFTP download session is terminated, the Cisco Edge Craft needs to be able to capture the endTftpSession trap sent from the NE. This is the trigger needed by Cisco Edge Craft to restart the NE. For enabling trap-sending see Chapter 1, "Configure Community-Handler."


Step 1 Select device in the management tree.

Step 2 Click on ConfigData. Here you select whether to upload or download the configuration from or to the network element, Figure 4-84.

Figure 4-84 Select Device

Step 3 Select RestoreCDB.

The following attributes values are modifiable:

TftpServerAddress

Source IP address if configuration data to be downloaded.

FileName

File name and path for the configuration data storage.

Trigger

If set to noop only parameters are saved.

If set to backup, the restore operation is started when clicking save.

Step 4 Set the parameters for the configuration data restore and set trigger to restore.

Step 5 Click Save to commit the changes.

Step 6 The TFTP upload process starts in the network element and the configuration data is stored in the
network element. Cisco Edge Craft will after a restore is completed, restart the network element.


Note It is recommended to monitor the TFTP console during the download process.



4.10  Alarm and Event Configuration

The purpose of this section is to guide you through the configuration of alarm and event reporting, and to be able to suppress and configure specific alarms.

The network element has a predefined set of combinations of managed objects and alarm types, that means alarm points. These combinations can not be changed by you but the severity level and a description can be defined.

Suppression of specific alarms is important to avoid alarm floods in the network and to focus on the root cause. ONS 15305 let you suppress a number of different alarm types, for example AIS.

In some situation you might want to suppress alarms that are kind of oscillating between being active and not active. A time interval, a persistency filter, indicates the time period an alarm must have been on or off before being reported. The persistency filters are defined for a group of alarms of a specific type.

There are three possible persistency group categories:

High order level alarms

Low order level alarms

Unfiltered alarms

For some managed objects you can enable or disable the alarm reporting.

4.10.1  Event Forwarding

No alarms or events can be reported before the identity of the receiver of alarms and events has been configured. It is possible to forward alarms and events to more than one receiver.

Event forwarding is enabled when a new user is added with the TrapsEnable attribute set to TrapsEnable as described in the "5.4.3  Setting a Loop in an ONS 15302 PDH port" section on page 5-10.

4.10.2  Configure General Alarm Reporting

In ONS 15305 there are several levels where alarm reporting can be disabled or enabled. Alarms will be reported to a manager only when alarm reporting is enabled on all levels, Figure 4-85. In addition the event forwarding must be configured for the managers IP address as described in the "Event Forwarding" section.

Figure 4-85 General Alarm Reporting Filters.

Note that all alarms from objects Device Alarm Enabling to Aux Port Alarm Enabling including itself have to pass through the filter.

In addition to general alarm reporting, it is possible to filter specific alarm types on specific object instances.

4.10.2.1  Device Alarm Enabling

It is possible to enable or disable alarm and event reporting from ONS 15305. In the disabled state, no alarms or events are reported (some generic events, like cold start, etc. are still reported).


Step 1 Select device > AlarmConfig > AlarmReporting.

Step 2 Set AlarmReporting to enabled or disabled.


4.10.2.2  Slot Alarm Enabling

Slot Alarm enabling:


Step 1 Select the slot that should report alarms.

Step 2 Set AlarmReporting to enabled.


4.10.2.3  Traffic Port Alarm Enabling

Traffic port alarm enabling:


Step 1 Select the SDH or PDH port that should report alarms.

Step 2 Set AdminStatus to enabled


4.10.2.4  Alarm Port Alarm Enabling

Alarm port alarm enabling:


Step 1 Select the Alarm port that should report alarms.

Step 2 Set AdminStatus to enabled or disabled.


4.10.2.5  Aux Port Alarm Enabling

Aux port alarm enabling


Step 1 Select the Aux port that should report alarms.

Step 2 Set AdminStatus to enabled.



Note Slot and port alarm reporting is by default disabled when the slot is configured for a new expected module.


4.10.3  Suppress Specific Alarms

In addition to configuration of the general alarm filters described above, it is possible to suppress specific alarm types to avoid alarm floods in the network. Other alarms from the same objects will be reported independently of these settings.

4.10.3.1  Suppress RDI, EXC, DEG, SSF Alarms

RDI, EXC, DEG, SSF alarm reporting can be suppressed from the VC-12, VC-3 or VC-4 layers.


Step 1 Select device > AlarmConfig > AlarmReportingVc.

Step 2 Set suppress for the attributes corresponding to the Alarms that should be suppressed:

RdiAlarms

ExcAlarms

DegAlarms

SsfAlarms


4.10.3.2  Suppress AIS Alarms from SDH Ports

AIS alarm reporting can be suppressed from the TU-12, TU-3 or AU-4 layers.


Step 1 Select device > AlarmConfig > AlarmReportingVc.

Step 2 Set suppress for the AisAlarms attribute.


4.10.3.3  Suppress AIS Alarms from E1 Ports

Suppress AIS Alarms from E1 ports


Step 1 Select device > AlarmConfig > AlarmReportingE1.

Step 2 Set AisAlarms to suppress.


4.10.3.4  Suppress AIS Alarms from AUX Port

Suppress AIS alarms from AUX port


Step 1 Select device > AlarmConfig > AlarmReportingAux.

Step 2 Set AisAlarms to suppress.


4.10.4  Modify Alarm Severity and Description

It is possible to modify the severity of the reported alarms from ONS 15305.


Step 1 Select device > AlarmConfig > AlarmPointConfig.

Step 2 Set the severity level and description for the combination of alarm type and object type of your choice. The next time the alarm is reported from this object type it will come up with the configured severity and description in the alarm list.


4.10.5  Set Signal Degrade Threshold

The threshold for a DEG alarm to be reported (and used for MSP switching) can be set for the VC-12, VC-3, VC-4, MS and RS layers.


Step 1 Select device > AlarmConfig > SdTreshold.

Step 2 Set SdThreshold to a value between -6 and -9 (BER= 10 exp -6 to 10 exp -9).


4.10.6  Modify Alarm Persistency

Alarm reporting on and off can be delayed by setting the alarm persistency filters in ONS 15305. The alarms are divided into groups according to their importance for fault management, Table 4-10 to Table 4-12.

4.10.6.1  Persistency Group 1 (HighOrderLevel)

The table below shows associated alarm types grouped with associated object types:

Table 4-10 Persistency Group 1 (HighOrderLevel)

Associated Alarm Types
Object Classes Associated with Each Alarm Type

LOS

SdhPort, PDHPort

LOF

rs

AIS

ms

EXC

rs, ms

DEG

rs, ms

TIM

rs

RDI

ms

CDF

rs, ms

AUX

auxPort


4.10.6.2  Persistency Group 2 (Unfiltered)

Persistency group 2:

Table 4-11 Persistency Group 2 (Unfiltered)

Associated Alarm Types
Object Classes Associated with Each Alarm Type

LOP

tu4, tu3, tu12

LOM

vc4

LOF-RX, LOF-TX

e1


4.10.6.3  Persistency Group 3 (LowOrderLevel)

Persistency group 3:

Table 4-12 Persistency Group 3 (LowOrderLevel)

Associated Alarm Types
Object Classes Associated with Each Alarm Type

AIS

tu4, tu3, tu12, e1, e3

EXC

vc4, vc3, vc12

DEG

vc4, vc3, vc12

SSF

vc3, vc12

TIM

vc4, vc3, vc12

RDI

vc4, vc3, vc12

UNEQ

vc4, vc3, vc12

PLM

vc4, vc3, vc12



Step 1 Select device > AlarmConfig > AlarmPersistency.

Step 2 Set onFilter or offFilter to a value between 0 and 30 seconds.


4.10.7  Modify ONS 15302 Alarm Configuration Attributes

This section explains how to modify alarm configuration attributes on the ONS 15302

4.10.7.1  Location of Alarm Configuration Attributes

Find alarm configuration attributes:


Step 1 Select device > AlarmConfig, Figure 4-85.

Figure 4-86 Select Device


4.10.7.2  Modify Alarm Severity and Description

Modify Alarm severity and description like this:


Step 1 Select device > AlarmConfig > AlarmConfig, Figure 4-87.

Figure 4-87 Select Alarm Config

Step 2 Set the Severity level and Description for the combination of alarm type and object type of your choice.

Step 3 Click Save. The next time the alarm is reported from this object type it will come up with the configured severity and description in the alarm list.


4.10.7.3  View all Alarm Reporting Instances

View alarm reporting instances:


Step 1 Select AlarmReportingAll to view all alarm reporting instances, Figure 4-88.

Figure 4-88 Select AlarmReportingAll


4.10.7.4  Enable Alarm Reporting

Enable Alarm reporting:


Step 1 Set AlarmReporting to enable using the available pull-down menu, Figure 4-89.

Figure 4-89 Select AlarmReporting

Step 2 Click Save.


4.10.7.5  Modify Ais Rdi Alarm Reporting

How to modify Ais Rdi alarm reporting.


Step 1 Select AlarmreportingAisRdi, Figure 4-90.

Figure 4-90 Select AlarmreportingAisRdi

Step 2 Select desired instance.

Step 3 Select allow or suppress for Ais alarm, Figure 4-91.

Figure 4-91 Select AIS Attributes

Step 4 Repeat for Rdi alarm.

Step 5 Click Save.


4.10.7.6  Modify Alarm Persistency

Modify the alarm persistency:

Figure 4-92 Set Alarm Persistency Attributes

Alarm reporting on and off can be delayed by setting the Alarm Persistency filters in ONS 15302.


Step 1 Select device > AlarmConfig > AlarmPersistency, Figure 4-92.

Step 2 Set onFilter or offFilter to a value between 0 and 255 seconds.

Step 3 Click Save when desired value settings are completed.


4.10.7.7  Modify Signal Degraded (Sd) Threshold

How to modify degraded Sd threshold:


Step 1 Select SdTreshold, Figure 4-93.

Figure 4-93 Select SDTreshold

Step 2 Select desired MO class

Step 3 Set SdTreshold to a value between 6 and 9, Figure 4-94.

Figure 4-94 Set SDTreshold

.

Step 4 Click Save.


4.11  Manage Slots on ONS 15305

A slot represents a physical position on the network element where different Hardware modules can be located, Figure 4-95. The purpose of this section is to describe the tasks and dynamic involved in inserting modules into and removing modules from a slot.

This section also involves presentation and modification of slots. Slots are static and cannot be created or deleted.

Figure 4-95 Slot on the Network Element

4.11.1  View Slot


Step 1 The management tree presents four slots numbered from 1 to 4. The slot attributes as defined in the information model are available in the attribute window. Each slot can be equipped with one Hardware module. By default the slot is unequipped, Figure 4-96.

Step 2 Select a slot in the management tree.

Figure 4-96 Select Slot

Figure 4-97 Slot Module - Port Concept

A slot can be empty or have a Hardware module with a given number of ports and Software version installed as illustrated in Figure 4-97. The physical inventory data for the module, if module present in slot, is also presented in the attribute window.

You can configure the slot and set the expect module type for the slot. The module does not have to be physically inserted. The slot has therefore an attribute that reflects the relation between the expected module and the installed module, that means the slot state:

Empty

Installed and expected

Expected and not installed

Installed and not expected

Mismatch of installed and expected

Unavailable

Unknown

A state diagram for the possible transitions of a slot is shown in Figure 4-98. This is the suggested state machine from TMF 814 supporting documentation.

Figure 4-98 Relation between Installed and Expected Module in a Slot.

A state machine for the values of the attribute describing the relation between installed and expected module in a slot is shown in Figure 4-98.

If a mismatch between the two modules occurs an alarm will be generated. The alarm is cleared if the module is replaced or the expected module is changed, that means a match between expected and installed.

You can configure an expected module and assign it to a slot without any physical module present. The system populates the management tree according to the specified expected module. Before replacing a module, that means selecting a new expected module type, the expected module of the slot must be set to unequipped.

For management of different ports, see Chapter 5, "Traffic Port Management".

4.11.2  Modify Slot

To modify the expected module attribute the ports of the previous expected module must be unused and unstructured.


Step 1 Select target slot, Figure 4-99.

Figure 4-99 Select Target Slot

Step 2 The following attributes are modifiable:

AlarmReporting

enable or disable

ExpectedModule

select module of current interest

ShutdownRestart

noop, restart or shutdown. (noop; No operation is applied)


Note The attribute Module Interface shows physical interface on selected module. Thus this attribute value indicates LongHaul (ex. L-4.2-LC), ShortHaul (ex. S-4.1-LC) for STM modules.
Connector is also indicated. See.


Step 3 Modify the modifiable slot attributes.

Step 4 Click Save to activate the modifications.

For some of the changes to take effect a restart of the module is required. In these cases you are prompted to restart.

Step 5 When a slot has been configured to contain a specific module, the ports of the module are automatically created in the network element. The type of ports created depends on the module type configured for the slot, Figure 4-100.

Figure 4-100 Set View Mode to Children

.

The ports of an installed module were not created if the slot was configured to contain another module type or being empty.


4.11.2.1  ONS 15305 Physical Interface Indices

Figure 4-101 IF-indices for physical/logical ports on the ONS 15305

1 Synchronization Supply Unit (SSU):
1 - High quality
1 - Two types: SSU Transit (ssuT) better quality than SSU Local (ssuL)
1 - Between PRC and SEC
1 - Can sync. a part of a network if connection to PRC is lost
2 Firmware is mentioned as hardware (HW) in figure above