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Cisco MDS 9000 NX-OS and SAN-OS Software

Cisco MDS 9000 Family Release Notes for Cisco MDS SAN-OS Release 1.2(1a)

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Table Of Contents

Cisco MDS 9000 Family Release Notes
for Cisco MDS SAN-OS Release 1.2(1a)

Contents

Introduction

System Requirements

Hardware Supported

Determining the Software Version

Image Upgrade Matrix

New Features in Release 1.2(1a)

MDS 9100 Series

Port Security

RSPAN

LUN Zoning

Read-Only Zones

Interface-Based Zoning

SNMP—CLI Roles

VSAN-Based Roles

IP Access Control Lists

Setup Utility

Handling Feature Incompatibility When Downgrading

EPLD Configuration

New or Changed CLI Commands

install all

boot auto-copy

username

clear user

clear ssh hosts

fcping fcid

show tech support detail

MDS 9216 COM1 Port Adapter

Limitations and Restrictions

MDS 9100 Series

LUN Zoning and Read-Only Zoning

Port Security

Link Initialization in 16-Port Modules

Caveats

Resolved Caveats

Open Caveats

Related Documentation

Obtaining Documentation

Cisco.com

Documentation DVD

Ordering Documentation

Documentation Feedback

Cisco Product Security Overview

Reporting Security Problems in Cisco Products

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Cisco Technical Support Website

Submitting a Service Request

Definitions of Service Request Severity

Obtaining Additional Publications and Information


Cisco MDS 9000 Family Release Notes
for Cisco MDS SAN-OS Release 1.2(1a)


Release Date: September 8, 2003

Text Part Number: OL-4391-01, Rev. H0

This document describes the caveats and limitations for switches in the Cisco MDS 9000 Family. Use this document in conjunction with documents listed in the "Related Documentation" section.


Note Releases notes are sometimes updated with new information on restrictions and caveats. Refer to the following website for the most recent version of the Cisco MDS 9000 Family Release Note: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/ps4159/ps4358/prod_release_notes_list.html


Table 1 shows the on-line change history for this document.

Table 1 On-Line Change History

Revision
Date
Description

A0

9/2/2004

Added DDTS CSCed64425.

B0

12/22/2004

Added DDTS CSCeg61535

C0

01/21/2005

Modified DDTS CSCee06496

D0

2/22/2005

Added DDTS CSCee89946

E0

03/24/2005

Added workaround information for all resolved caveats.

Modified DDTS CSCdz12179, CSCeb86793, and CSCec03539.

Added DDTS CSCeb71406, CSCec06947, CSCec08028, CSCec15273, CSCec17467, CSCec23079, CSCec23320, CSCec24378, CSCec25886, CSCec27835, CSCec29150, CSCec30443, CSCec31567, CSCec34016, CSCec38706, CSCec52509,CSCec53210, CSCed21583, CSCed32729, CSCed58155, CSCed65607, CSCed75825, CSCee01143, CSCee43249, CSCeh21199.

F0

06/23/2005

Added DDTS CSCei25319

G0

05/02/2006

Added DDTS CSCeg84871

H0

02/26/2007

Added DDTS CSCsh27840.


Contents

This document includes the following section:

Introduction

System Requirements

Image Upgrade Matrix

New Features in Release 1.2(1a)

Limitations and Restrictions

Caveats

Related Documentation

Obtaining Documentation

Documentation Feedback

Cisco Product Security Overview

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Obtaining Additional Publications and Information

Introduction

The Cisco MDS 9000 Family of multilayer directors and fabric switches offer intelligent fabric-switching services that realize maximum performance while ensuring high reliability levels. They combine robust and flexible hardware architecture with multiple layers of network and storage management intelligence. This powerful combination enables highly available, scalable storage networks that provide advanced security and unified management features.

The Cisco MDS 9000 Family provides intelligent networking features such as multiprotocol and multitransport integration, virtual SANs (VSANs), advanced security, sophisticated debug analysis tools, and unified SAN management.

System Requirements

This section describes the system requirements for Cisco MDS SAN-OS Release 1.2(1a) and includes the following topics:

Hardware Supported2

Determining the Software Version

Hardware Supported

Table 2 lists the hardware components supported on the Cisco MDS 9000 Family and the minimum software version required. See the "Determining the Software Version" section.

Table 2 Cisco MDS 9000 Family Supported Hardware Modules and Minimum Software Requirements 

Component
Part Number
Description
Applicable Products

Software

M95S1K9-1.2.1

MDS 9500 Series supervisor/fabric-I, enterprise software

MDS 9500 Series only

M92S1K9-1.2.1

MDS 9216 enterprise software

MDS 9216 only

M91S1K9-1.2.1

MDS 9100 Series enterprise software

MDS 9100 Series only

Chassis

DS-C9509

MDS 9509 director, base configuration (9-slot modular chassis includes 7 slots for switching modules and 2 slots for supervisor modules—SFPs sold separately)

MDS 9509 only

DS-C9506

MDS 9506 director (6-slot modular chassis includes 4 slots for switching modules and 2 slots for supervisor modules—SFPs sold separately.

MDS 9506 only

DS-C9216-K9

MDS 9216 16-port semi-modular fabric switch (includes sixteen 1 / 2-Gbps Fibre Channel ports, power supply, and expansion slot—SFPs sold separately)

MDS 9216 only

DS-C9120-K9

MDS 9120 fixed configuration, non-modular, fabric switch (includes 4 full rate ports and 16 oversubscribed ports)

MDS 9120 only

DS-C9140-K9

MDS 9140 fixed configuration (non-modular) fabric switch (includes 8 full rate ports and 32 oversubscribed ports)

MDS 9140 only

Supervisor modules

DS-X9530-SF1-K9

MDS 9500 supervisor/fabric-I, module

MDS 9500 Series only

Switching modules

DS-X9016

MDS 9000 16-port 2/1-Gbps Fibre Channel module (SFPs sold separately)

MDS 9500 Series and 9216

DS-X9032

MDS 9000 32-port 2/1-Gbps Fibre Channel module (SFPs sold separately)

Services modules

DS-X9308-SMIP

An eight-port (8) Gigabit Ethernet IP storage services module.

LC-type fiber-optic SFP1

DS-SFP-FC-2G-SW

2/1-Gbps Fibre Channel — short wave SFP

MDS 9000 Family

DS-SFP-FC-2G-LW

2/1-Gbps Fibre Channel — long wave SFP

DS-SFP-FCGE-SW

1-Gbps Ethernet and 2/1-Gbps Fibre Channel—short wave SFP

DS-SFP-FCGE-LW

1-Gbps Ethernet and 2/1-Gbps Fibre Channel — long wave SFP

CWDM2

CWDM-SFP-xxxx-2G

Gigabit Ethernet and 2/1-Gbps Fibre Channel SFP LC interface xxxx nm, where xxxx = 1470, 1490, 1510, 1530, 1550, 1570, 1590, or 1610 nm

MDS 9000 Family

CWDM-MUX-4

Add/drop multiplexer for four CWDM wavelengths

CWDM-MUX-8

Add/drop multiplexer for eight CWDM wavelengths

CWDM-CHASSIS-2

Two slot chassis for CWDM add/drop multiplexer(s)

Power supplies

DS-CAC-300W

300W AC power supply

MDS 9100 Series only

DS-CAC-845W

845W3 AC power supply

MDS 9216 only

DS-CAC-2500W

2500W AC power supply

MDS 9509 only

DS-CDC-2500W

2500W DC power supply

DS-CAC-4000W-US

4000W AC power supply for US (cable attached)

DS-CAC-4000W-INT

4000W AC power supply international (cable attached)

DS-CAC-1900W

1900W AC power supply

MDS 9506 only

DS-CDC-1900W

1900W DC power supply

CompactFlash

MEM-MDS-FLD512M

MDS 9500 supervisor CompactFlash disk, 512MB

MDS 9500 Series only

Port analyzer adapter

DS-PAA

A standalone Fibre Channel-to-Ethernet adapter that allows for simple, transparent analysis of Fibre Channel traffic in a switched fabric.

MDS 9000 Family

1 SFP = small form factor pluggable

2 CWDM = coarse wave division multiplexing

3 W = Watt


Determining the Software Version


Note We strongly recommend that you use the latest available software release for all Cisco MDS 9000 Family products.


To determine the version of the Cisco SAN-OS software currently running on a Cisco MDS 9000 Family switch, log in to the switch and enter the show version EXEC command.

Image Upgrade Matrix

Table 3 lists the image upgrade options and Table 4 lists the image downgrade options for Cisco MDS SAN-OS Release 1.2(1a) on Cisco MDS 9500 Series Directors.

Table 3 Cisco MDS SAN-OS Release 1.2(1a) Image Upgrade/Downgrade Matrix 

Upgrade To Release 1.2(1a) From
Non-Disruptive

Release 1.1(2)

Yes

Release 1.1(1a)

Yes

Release 1.0(5)

Yes

Release 1.0(4)

Yes

Release 1.0(3a)

Yes

Release 1.0(2a)

No


Table 4 Cisco MDS SAN-OS Release 1.2(1a) Image Downgrade Matrix 

Downgrade From Release 1.2(1a) To
Non-Disruptive

Release 1.1(2)

Yes

Release 1.1(1a)

Yes

Release 1.0(5)

Yes

Release 1.0(4)

Yes

Release 1.0(3a)

Yes

Release 1.0(2a)

No


New Features in Release 1.2(1a)

SAN-OS Release 1.2(1a) is a minor release for switches in the Cisco MDS 9000 Family. See the "Caveats" section for details on closed and outstanding caveats and limitations.

The following new features are introduced in Release 1.2(1a):

MDS 9100 Series

Port Security

RSPAN

LUN Zoning

Read-Only Zones

Interface-Based Zoning

SNMP—CLI Roles

VSAN-Based Roles

IP Access Control Lists

Setup Utility

Handling Feature Incompatibility When Downgrading

EPLD Configuration

New or Changed CLI Commands

install all

boot auto-copy

username

clear user

clear ssh hosts

Limitations and Restrictions

show tech support detail

MDS 9216 COM1 Port Adapter

MDS 9100 Series

Cisco MDS 9100 Series includes two multilayer, fixed configuration (non-modular) switches:

The Cisco MDS 9140 contains 40-ports (8 full rate ports, 32 oversubscribed ports)

The Cisco MDS 9120 contains 20-ports (4 full rate ports, 16 oversubscribed ports)

These fixed configuration switches are packaged in a 1 RU enclosures and have the following features:

Two redundant, hot-swappable power supplies have AC connections, each of which can supply power to the entire chassis.

Two hot-swappable fan modules with two fans each manage the airflow and cooling for the entire switch.

The 1-Gbps or 2-Gbps autosensing Fibre Channel ports support Inter-Switch Links (E ports), Extended Inter-Switch Links (TE ports), loop (FL and TL ports), and fabric (F ports) connectivity. Besides Telnet access, a 10/100BASE-T Ethernet port provides switch access.

Hot-swappable, small form-factor pluggable (SFP) ports can be configured with either short or long wavelength SFPs for connectivity up to 500m and 10km, respectively.

Refer to the Cisco MDS 9100 Series Hardware Installation Guide the Cisco MDS 9000 Family Configuration Guide for further information.

Port Security

Port security features prevent unauthorized access to a switch port in the Cisco MDS 9000 Family. Login requests from unauthorized Fibre Channel devices (Nx ports) and switches (xE ports) are rejected. All intrusion attempts are reported to the SAN administrator through syslog messages.

Refer to the Cisco MDS 9000 Family Configuration Guide for further information.

RSPAN

The Remote SPAN (RSPAN) feature enables you to remotely monitor traffic for one or more SPAN sources distributed in one or more source switches in a Fibre Channel fabric. The SPAN destination (SD) port is used for remote monitoring in a destination switch. A destination switch may be different from the source switch(es) but is attached to the same Fibre Channel fabric. You can replicate and monitor traffic in any remote Cisco MDS 9000 Family switch or director, just as you would monitor traffic in a MDS destination switch. This feature is nonintrusive and does not affect network traffic switching for any SPAN source ports.

Refer to the Cisco MDS 9000 Family Configuration Guide for further information.

LUN Zoning

Logical unit number (LUN) zoning is a feature specific to switches in the Cisco MDS 9000 Family. A storage device can have multiple LUNs behind it. If the device port is part of a zone, a member of the zone can access any LUN in the device. With LUN zoning, you can restrict access to specific LUNs associated with a device. Note that all switches in the fabric (or VSAN) must be running SAN-OS 1.2(x) or above for LUN zoning to be effective. LUN zoning does not work if interop mode is configured in that VSAN.

Refer to the Cisco MDS 9000 Family Configuration Guide for further information.

Read-Only Zones

By default, an initiator has both read and write access to the target's media when they are members of the same Fibre Channel zone. The read-only zone feature allows members to have only read access to the media within a read-only Fibre Channel zone. You can also configure LUN zones as read-only zones. Read-only zones do not work if interop mode is configured in that VSAN.

Refer to the Cisco MDS 9000 Family Configuration Guide for further information.

Interface-Based Zoning

Interface-based zoning is similar to port-based zoning because the switch interface is used to configure the zone. You can specify a switch interface as a zone member for both local and remote switches. To specify a remote switch, enter the remote switch WWN (sWWN). Interface-based zoning only works with Cisco MDS 9000 family switches. Interface-based zoning does not work if interop mode, LUN Zoning, or Read-only Zones are configured in that VSAN.

Refer to the Cisco MDS 9000 Family Configuration Guide for further information.

SNMP—CLI Roles

From Release 1.2(x), CLI and SNMP in all switches in the Cisco MDS 9000 Family use common roles, which apply to any role that is created using CLI or SNMP. You can use SNMP to modify a role that was created using CLI and vice versa. Each role in SNMP is the same as a role created or modified through the CLI. Each role can be restricted to one or more VSANs as required. Note that while the roles are common, the user name spaces in SNMP and the CLI are still separate and distinct.

Refer to the Cisco MDS 9000 Family Configuration Guide for further information.

VSAN-Based Roles

You can configure a role so that it only allows commands to be performed for a selected set of VSANs. By default, the VSAN policy of a role is permit. In other words, the role can perform commands configured by the rule command in all VSANs. In order to selectively allow VSANs for a role, the VSAN policy needs to be set to deny and then the appropriate VSANs need to be permitted.

Refer to the Cisco MDS 9000 Family Configuration Guide for further information.

IP Access Control Lists

IP Access control lists (IP-ACLs) provide basic network security to all switches in the Cisco MDS 9000 Family. IP-ACLs restricts IP-related in-band and out-of-band management traffic based on IP addresses (layer 3 and layer 4 information). Access restrictions can be qualified by protocol types like ICMP, TCP, IP, and UDP.

Refer to the Cisco MDS 9000 Family Configuration Guide for further information.

Setup Utility

IP routing and static routing can now be configured in separate steps during the initial switch setup process. Earlier, these two features were configured in nested steps.

Refer to the Cisco MDS 9000 Family Configuration Guide for further information.

Handling Feature Incompatibility When Downgrading

When you are downgrading a Cisco MDS 9000 switch to a version less than SAN-OS Release 1.2(1a), and you are currently running features that are not compatible with the image you want to install, the installation will fail. Use the show incompatibility command to obtain a list of incompatible features. Then you must disable the incompatible features on the SAN-OS 1.2(1a) image and retry the installation procedure.

Refer to the Cisco MDS 9000 Family Configuration Guide further information.

EPLD Configuration

Switches and directors in the Cisco MDS 9000 Family contain several electrically programmable logical devices (EPLDs) that provide hardware functionalities in all modules. Starting with Cisco MDS SAN-OS Release 1.2(1a), EPLD image upgrades will be provided as needed to include enhanced hardware functionality or to resolve known issues. EPLDs can be upgraded or downgraded using CLI commands.

Refer to the Cisco MDS 9000 Family Configuration Guide for further information.

New or Changed CLI Commands

The following SAN-OS command line interface (CLI) commands have been changed or added for release 1.2(1a):

install all

boot auto-copy

username

clear user

clear ssh hosts

fcping fcid

show tech support detail

Refer to the Cisco MDS 9000 Family Command Reference for further information.

install all

The install all command can only be issued from the switch console. The output of the install all command is changed as shown in the Cisco MDS 9000 Family Command Reference.

boot auto-copy

The boot auto-copy command copies the boot variable images which are local (present) in the active supervisor module (but not in the standby supervisor module) to the standby supervisor module. Only those KICKSTART and SYSTEM boot variables that are set for the standby supervisor module may be copied.

username

The username [sshkey] command configures a user name to identify the contents of the SSH key.

clear user

The clear user command logs out another user on the switch.

clear ssh hosts

The clear ssh hosts command clears trusted SSH host entries.

fcping fcid

The fcping fcid command verifies connectivity to a destination switch.

show tech support detail

The show tech-support detail command is useful when collecting a large amount of information about your switch for troubleshooting purposes. The output of this command can be provided to technical support representatives when reporting a problem. The show tech-support detail command displays detailed output of several show commands.

MDS 9216 COM1 Port Adapter

The COM1 port on a Cisco MDS 9000 Family switch is a serial port with a DB-9 connector. The pinouts for this connecter on the Cisco MDS 9216 switch are different than the pinouts for this connector on the Cisco MDS 9500 series switches. In order to connect the Cisco MDS 9216 switch to a modem, you must use the RJ-45 to DB-9 adapter specifically labeled for use with the Cisco MDS 9216 switch (provided in the accessory kit).

Limitations and Restrictions

The following limitations and restrictions apply to all switches in the Cisco MDS 9000 Family:

MDS 9100 Series

LUN Zoning and Read-Only Zoning

Port Security

Link Initialization in 16-Port Modules

Resolved Caveats

Open Caveats

MDS 9100 Series

Switches in the Cisco MDS 9100 Series:

do not have a COM1 port.

do not support iSCSI and FCIP

do no have a DC power supply

do not support a forced EPLD upgrade

Refer to the Cisco MDS 9100 Series Hardware Installation Guide the Cisco MDS 9000 Family Configuration Guide for further information.

LUN Zoning and Read-Only Zoning

LUN zoning and read-only zoning can only be implemented in VSANs where all Cisco MDS 9000 Family switches are running Cisco MDS SAN-OS Release 1.2(x) or above.

Refer to the Cisco MDS 9000 Family Configuration Guide for further information.

Port Security

Port security is only supported for Fibre Channel ports.

Refer to the Cisco MDS 9000 Family Configuration Guide for further information.

Link Initialization in 16-Port Modules

The procedure provided in this section is only required if all of the following conditions apply to your switch:

Your switch belongs to the Cisco MDS 9500 Series.

Your switch is running Release 1.1(1a) or earlier images.

Your switch has one or more 16-port Fibre Channel modules.

Your switch must be upgraded to Release 1.1(2) or Release 1.2(1a).

Prior to SAN-OS Release 1.1(2), the software did not differentiate between low and high priority traffic. From Release 1.1(2), the software enables a priority mechanism at the port level to differentiate between low and high priority traffic.

A Cisco MDS 9500 director, with 16-port modules currently running version 1.1(2), 1.1(3), or 1.2(1A), that was non-disruptively upgraded from version 1.0(x), 1.1(1), or 1.1(1A) and then encountered a link reinitialization on one of the 16 ports can cause the system to get into an unpredictable state and may require a switch reset to recover.

The way this change is applied in releases prior to 1.2(2a) requires the user to proactively reload (power-cycle) all 16-port Fibre Channel modules at the end of the upgrade procedure from image 1.1(1a) or earlier to image 1.1(2) or later as described in Table 5.

Table 5 describes different upgrade scenarios for the MDS 9500 Series Directors and identifies the scenarios requiring additional user attention.

Table 5 Resetting Fibre Channel Module in Cisco MDS 9500 Series Directors

Upgrade From
Upgrade to
Procedure Application

Any version

Release 1.2(1b)
Release 1.2(2a)

Does not apply—no action required

Release 1.0(x)
Release 1.1(1a)

Release 1.1(2)
Release 1.1(3)

Applies—16-port Fibre Channel modules must be reset after the image upgrade on the Cisco MDS 9500 Series director.

Release 1.0(x)
Release 1.1(1a)

Release 1.2(1a)

Applies—16-port Fibre Channel modules must be reset after the image upgrade on the Cisco MDS 9500 Series director.

Release 1.1(2)

Release 1.1(3)
Release 1.2(1a)

Does not apply—no action required

Release 1.1(3)

Release 1.2(1a)

Does not apply—no action required

Release 1.2(1a)

Release 1.1(2)
Release 1.1(3)

Does not apply—no action required

Release 1.2(2a)

Release 1.1(2)
Release 1.1(3)

Does not apply—no action required


To proactively power-cycle the affected switching module(s) after completing the upgrade procedure specified in the Cisco MDS 9000 Family Configuration Guide, follow these steps:


Step 1 Refer to Table 5 and identify the procedure application status for your MDS switch.

If Fibre Channel modules need to be reset in your MDS switch, continue with Step 2.

If no action is required, do not continue with this procedure.

Step 2 Identify the Fibre Channel modules that need to be reset in the MDS switch using the show module command.

switch# show module
Mod  Ports  Module-Type                     Model              Status
---  -----  ------------------------------- ------------------ ------------
4 	 16     	1/2 Gbps FC Module 					 				 DS-X9016					ok
5    0      Supervisor/Fabric-1             DS-X9530-SF1-K9    active *
...

In this example, only module 4 needs to be reset.

Step 3 Issue the reload module command to reset the identified module. This command power cycles the selected module.

switch# reload module number

Where number indicates the slot in which the identified module resides. For example:

switch# reload module 4

Step 4 Verify the Fibre Channel module that was reset in the MDS switch using the show module command.

The same command issued within a few seconds of each other displays the varying states of the reloaded Fibre Channel module in this recently upgrade Cisco MDS 9500 Series Director.

switch# show module
Mod  Ports  Module-Type                     Model              Status
---  -----  ------------------------------- ------------------ ------------
4	 16     	1/2 Gbps FC Module 					 				 DS-X9016					pwr-cycld
5	 0      Supervisor/Fabric-1             DS-X9530-SF1-K9    active *
...

switch# show module
Mod  Ports  Module-Type                     Model              Status
---  -----  ------------------------------- ------------------ ------------
4 	 16     	1/2 Gbps FC Module 					 				 DS-X9016					powered-up
5	 0      Supervisor/Fabric-1             DS-X9530-SF1-K9    active *
...

switch# show module
Mod  Ports  Module-Type                     Model              Status
---  -----  ------------------------------- ------------------ ------------
4 	16     	1/2 Gbps FC Module 					 				 DS-X9016					ok
5    0      Supervisor/Fabric-1             DS-X9530-SF1-K9    active *

...

Refer to the Cisco MDS 9000 Family Configuration Guide or to CSCeb83751 for further information.


Caveats

This section lists the caveats and corrected caveats for this release. Use Table 6 to determine the status of a particular caveat. In the table, "R" indicates a resolved caveat, and "O" indicates an open caveat.

Table 6 Release Caveats and Caveats Corrected Reference 

DDTS Number
Software Release (Resolved or Open)
1.1.(2)
1.2(1a)

Severity 1

CSCdz18723

O

R

CSCeb83751

 

R

CSCec09428

 

R

Severity 2

CSCdz31332

O

R

CSCeb01264

O

R

CSCeb05095

O

R

CSCeb16270

O

R

CSCeb71406

 

O

CSCeb78431

 

R

CSCeb82753

 

R

CSCeb87363

 

R

CSCeb87704

 

R

CSCec00838

 

R

CSCec09545

 

R

CSCec12608

 

R

CSCec15273

 

O

CSCec16242

 

R

CSCec21032

 

R

CSCec24378

 

O

CSCec27835

 

O

CSCec30443

 

O

CSCec38706

 

O

CSCec52509

 

O

CSCec53210

 

O

CSCed21583

 

O

CSCed65607

 

O

CSCed75825

 

O

CSCee01143

O

O

CSCee06496

O

O

CSCee43249

 

O

CSCeg84871

O

O

CSCei25319

O

O

CSCsh27840O

O

O

Severity 3

CSCdz12179

O

O

CSCdz43106

O

R

CSCdz43707

O

O

CSCea45726

O

O

CSCea60652

O

R

CSCea80896

O

R

CSCea82028

O

O

CSCeb01112

O

R

CSCeb10797

O

R

CSCeb18066

O

R

CSCeb19588

O

O

CSCeb19609

O

R

CSCeb34865

O

O

CSCeb74526

O

R

CSCeb75360

 

O

CSCeb83984

 

O

CSCeb84217

 

O

CSCeb86793

O

O

CSCec00031

 

O

CSCec03298

 

O

CSCec03539

 

O

CSCec06947

 

O

CSCec08028

 

O

CSCec09158

 

R

CSCec17467

 

O

CSCec21278

 

R

CSCec23079

 

O

CSCec23320

 

O

CSCec25886

 

O

CSCec29150

 

O

CSCec31567

 

O

CSCec34016

 

O

CSCed32729

 

O

CSCed58155

O

O

CSCed64425

 

O

CSCee89946

O

O

CSCeg61535

O

O

CSCeh21199

O

O


Resolved Caveats

CSCdz18723

Symptom: An EPLD upgrade for Cisco MDS 9500 Series Directors and Cisco MDS 9100 Series Fabric Switches is being released concurrently with the Cisco MDS SAN-OS 1.2(1a) software. This recommended upgrade (m9000-epld-1.2.1a.img) can be applied after updating to Cisco MDS SAN-OS 1.2(1a).

There are no adverse affects after applying the EPLD upgrade if the Cisco MDS SAN-OS version is downgraded from 1.2(1a), but the new functionality will not be available for switches using earlier Cisco MDS SAN-OS versions.

Workaround: None.

CSCeb83751

Symptom: A Cisco MDS 9500 director, with 16-port modules currently running version 1.1(2), 1.1(3), or 1.2(1A), that was non-disruptively upgraded from version 1.0(x), 1.1(1), or 1.1(1A) and then encountered a link reinitialization on one of the 16 ports can cause the system to get into an unpredictable state and may require a switch reset to recover.

Workaround: To prevent this unpredictable state, proactively reset the 16 port line-card after the upgrade. The following command can be used for this purpose:

reload module <module-num>

To proactivly power-cycle the affected switching module(s) after completing the upgrade procedure specified in the Cisco MDS 9000 Family Configuration Guide, follow these steps:

1. Identify the Fibre Channel modules that need to be reset in the MDS switch using the show module command.

switch# show module
Mod Ports Module-Type Model Status
--- ----- ------------------ ----- ------------
4 16 1/2 Gbps FC Module DS-X9016 ok
5 0 Supervisor/Fabric-1 DS-X9530-SF1-K9 active *

In this example, only module 4 needs to be reset.

2. Issue the reload module command to reset the identified module. This command power cycles the selected module.

switch# reload module number

Where number indicates the slot in which the identified module resides. For example:

switch# reload module 4

3. Verify the Fibre Channel module that was reset in the MDS switch using the show module command.

The same command issued within a few seconds of each other displays the varying states of the reloaded Fibre Channel module in this recently upgrade Cisco MDS 9500 Series Director.

switch# show module
Mod Ports Module-Type Model Status
--- ----- ------------------ ----- ------------
4 16 1/2 Gbps FC Module DS-X9016 pwr-cycled
5 0 Supervisor/Fabric-1 DS-X9530-SF1-K9 active *
...

switch# show module
Mod Ports Module-Type Model Status
--- ----- ------------------ ----- ------------
4 16 1/2 Gbps FC Module DS-X9016 powered-up
5 0 Supervisor/Fabric-1 DS-X9530-SF1-K9 active *
...

switch# show module
Mod Ports Module-Type Model Status
--- ----- ------------------ ----- ------------
4 16 1/2 Gbps FC Module DS-X9016 ok
5 0 Supervisor/Fabric-1 DS-X9530-SF1-K9 active *
...

CSCec09428

Symptom: If hosts registered with the SNMP target table are deleted repeatedly, while the switch is busy sending notifications to them, the SNMPD process may restart.

Workaround: None. This problem is resolved in release 1.2(1a).

CSCdz31332

Symptom: If automatic image synchronization is enabled, and the standby supervisor module is synchronizing the image from the active supervisor, the switch will not stop you from issuing the reload command on the active or standby supervisor modules. This may result in a failure to synchronize the images.

Workaround: Please allow enough time for the images to be synchronized before reloading a supervisor.

CSCeb01264

Symptom: When you issue the copy startup-config running-config command on a switch which is already up and running, the trunking ports may flap, due to reapplication of allowed VSANs for trunking ports in the startup configuration.

Workaround: Use care when issuing this command. If the startup-config does not contain any allowed VSAN configuration for trunking ports (for example, trunking ports had the default allowed VSAN configuration), this problem will not occur.

CSCeb05095

Symptom: If a copy running-config startup-config command is issued when a switching module is temporarily down, the configuration for that module will be deleted from the system. This primarily occurs at boot time before all the modules are online.

Workaround: Issue a show module command to verify that all the linecards are online before issuing a copy running-config startup-config command.

CSCeb16270

Symptom: Unexpected behavior may occur if the same TCP port number is used for iSCSI and FCIP protocols on an IP Storage Services module (IPS module) port.

Workaround: Do not use the same TCP port number for iSCSI and FCIP protocols on a port.

CSCeb78431

Symptom: If a port flap occurs during a supervisor switchover, the line card resets.

Workaround: None. This problem is resolved in release 1.2(1a).

CSCeb82753

Symptom: When creating VSANs using the Device Manager (DM), the name automatically assigned by DM may not be as expected, so it appears that the desired VSAN was not created. This situation occurs if a VSAN is created, deleted, then created again without closing the VSAN dialog. For example, if you created VSAN0006, deleted it, then create another VSAN (VSAN0006 again) DM automatically names it VSAN0007 instead of VSAN0006.

Workaround: If you create the VSAN and then delete it, close the VSAN dialog and reopen it before you create the VSAN again.

CSCeb87363

Symptom: If FC4 features are registered by Fibre Channel devices, they are not distributed correctly to neighboring switches. To prevent accidental misinterpretation, the distribution of this feature within Cisco MDS switches is disabled.

Workaround: None. This problem is resolved in release 1.2(1a).

CSCeb87704

Symptom: When you repeatedly delete and add roles in a fully-loaded chassis with large configuration, the SNMP process may be forced to restart.

Workaround: Make sure that a role change is correctly done (added/deleted) before making any further changes.

CSCec00838

Symptom: When you repeatedly delete and add ports, VSANs, and hosts in a fully-loaded chassis with large configuration, the SNMP process may be forced to restart.

Workaround: None. This problem is resolved in release 1.2(1a).

CSCec09545

Symptom: A Compaq HSG device connecting to a Cisco MDS switch fails to establish connection to a remote HSG due to an invalid response from the Name Server.

Workaround: None. This problem is resolved in release 1.2(1a).

CSCec12608

Symptom: On issuing the show port internal info command, the port process may fail. This command is also executed as part of the show tech-support details command. There is no effect on the software when the port process restarts.

Workaround: None. Allow the port process to restart and try the command again.

CSCec16242

Symptom: Issuing the show fcdom fcid persistent command sometimes causes core dumps.

Workaround: None. This problem is resolved in release 1.2(1a).

CSCec21032

Symptom: If you specify a bit size which is not a multiple of 64 while generating a DSA key, a key with a bit size value of nearest multiple of 64 is applied.

Workaround: None. DSA keys are generated in bit sizes which are multiples of 64. This is expected behavior.

CSCdz43106

Symptom: The counter values freeze if the Device Manager port monitor window has been up and running for a long time (overnight or a few days).

Workaround: Close the Device Manager and open a new one.

CSCea60652

Symptom: For iSCSI configurations with multiple pWWNs, both no pwwn hh:hh:hh:hh:hh:hh:hh:hh and no pwwn auto number delete all the pWWNs for a given target.

Workaround: None.

CSCea80896

Symptom: The Fabric Manager and Device Manager do not support iSCSI TCP parameter configuration and display.

Workaround: Use the CLI to configure TCP parameters.

CSCeb01112

Symptom: Importing the ASCII configuration multiple times in the same switch can cause the FCIP interface to go into error disabled state.

Workaround: This is a duplicate of CSCeb01264.

CSCeb10797

Symptom: When you delete a pWWN for an auto-created iSCSI initiator using the Device Manager, (removed from snmp fcAddress table), it still shows up in the CLI (the initiator is still auto-created).

Workaround: None.

CSCeb18066

Symptom: If you change the iSCSI switchport identification from name to IP address, the TCP sessions are not terminated.

Workaround: Do not make the change when there are TCP sessions. This problem is resolved in release 1.2(1a).

CSCeb19609

Symptom: When there are multiple FCIP interfaces in a port-channel, the port-channel may go into an isolated state if all the FCIP links are brought down/up at the same time.

Workaround: Administratively shut/no-shut the port channel interface.

CSCeb74526

Symptom: SNMP timeouts occur, or you have difficulty logging into a switch. This can happen if there are two Network Interface Cards (NICs) in the same host, and the Java environment attempts to access a switch through the incorrect NIC.

Workaround: You can force the Fabric Manager and the Device Manager to use a particular network interface. You must change the desktop shortcut/shell script/batch file, by adding the following parameter:

-Dmds.nmsAddress=<local-IP-address>

On a Windows server, the line would look like this:

..javaw.exe -Dmds.nmsAddress=X.X.X.X -cp ..

In case the desktop shortcut exceeds the maximum length delete, use the following phrase to make more space:

-Dsun.java2d.ddoffscreen=false

You can also choose a network interface after starting the Fabric Manager or Device Manager by going to Preferences.

CSCec09158

Symptom: When you issue the show hardware command for a Cisco MDS 9100 Series switch, only one fan is listed in the output.

Workaround: None.

CSCec21278

Symptom: The receive BB_Credit value for any FL port in Cisco MDS 9120 switches (with interfaces ranging from fc1/9 to fc1/20) and in Cisco MDS 9140 switches (with interfaces ranging from fc1/9 to fc1/40) have a BB_credit value of 8. This is displayed as 12 in the show interface command output.

Workaround: None.

Open Caveats

CSCeb71406

Symptom: When more than one change is detected within a 50 msec window in the membership of the egress port of an existing route, the Forwarding Information Base (FIB) properly pauses the Virtual Output Queues (VOQs) of the newly added egress ports. When the pause timer expires, instead of resuming the VOQs of the paused ports related to this timer, the FIB resumes the VOQs of the paused ports related to the last timer started.

Workaround: None.

CSCec15273

Symptom: When node positions are fixed on the Fabric Manager topology map, switches may disappear from the topology map if links to devices are physically moved between different switch ports.

Workaround: None.

CSCec24378

Symptom: The show version command output may create a core file when a image is downgraded. This does not impact system behavior.

Workaround: None.

CSCec27835

Symptom: When the port security or the fabric binding features are enabled in switches in the Cisco MDS 9000 Family, you cannot add members to Gigabit Ethernet PortChannels.

Workaround: None.

CSCec30443

Symptom: The iSCSI host cannot open an iSCSI session to the IPS module when the TCP selective acknowledgement (SACK) option is enabled. The Cisco iSCSI initiator for Windows 2000, version 3.1.2, is not able to initiate an iSCSI session to an IPS-8 in an MDS 9509 running SAN-OS 1.2(1a).

Workaround: Downgrade to SAN-OS 1.1.

CSCec38706

Symptom: When you issue a REPORT_LUNS inquiry to a XIOtech storage target, an unusual check condition with 0x062900 (Unit Attention due to power down/up, bus reset...) is returned.

Workaround: None.

CSCec52509

Symptom: If a Fabric Manager client has two NIC cards and launches the Fabric Manager, the resulting dialog box allows you to choose between the two NICs. SNMP times out, regardless of which NIC is selected.

Workaround: Use Device Manager.

CSCec53210

Symptom: After upgrading to Release 1.2(2), a rare combination of removing a switching (or services) module and deleting a VSAN may cause the standby supervisor module to remain in the down state.

Workaround: Follow these steps to reload the switch, or upgrade to Cisco MDS SAN-OS Release 1.2(2a).

1. Issue the command:

copy startup-config bootflash:saved-config

2. Issue the command:

write erase

3. Issue the command:

copy bootflash:saved-config startup-config

4. Reload. Standby should come up properly.

CSCed21583

Symptom: Upgrading from Release 1.2(1a) to 1.2(1b), or downgrading from 1.2(1b) to 1.2(1a) is disruptive. Using the installer does not upgrade line cards and switchover because the SRG is same.

Workaround: None. Do not use "install all" to upgrade from 1.2(1a) to 1.2(1b) or to downgrade from 1.2(1b) to 1.2(1a). The recommended procedure is to copy the images onto the supervisors, set the boot variables and then reboot the system.

CSCed65607

Symptom: A vulnerability in the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) specification (RFC 793) was discovered by an external researcher. The successful exploitation enables an adversary to reset any established TCP connection in a much shorter time than was previously discussed publicly. Depending on the attacked protocol, a successful attack may have additional consequences beyond terminated connection. This attack vector is only applicable to those sessions terminating in a device (such as a router, switch, or computer) and not to the sessions that are only passing through the device (for example, transit traffic that is being routed by a router). In addition, this attack vector does not directly compromise data integrity or confidentiality. All Cisco products which contain TCP stack are susceptible to this vulnerability.

This advisory is available at the following website, and it describes this vulnerability as it applies to Cisco products that run Cisco IOSĀ® software. http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20040420-tcp-ios.shtml

A companion advisory that describes this vulnerability for products that do not run Cisco IOS software is available at http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20040420-tcp-nonios.shtml.

Workaround: Depending on the application, the connection may get automatically reestablished. In other cases, a user will have to repeat the action (for example, open a new Telnet or SSH session).

CSCed75825

Symptom: If a spare supervisor module has the local boot variables pointing to Release 1.0(1) or 1.0(2) images, inserting that spare supervisor module into a functioning switch will cause the active supervisor module to fail. This issue exists in all releases up to and including Release 1.3(3c).

Workaround: If the active supervisor runs any of the affected releases, check the version of the spare supervisor module before inserting it, or issue the reload module slot-number force-dnld command immediately after the insertion. The slot-number is the number of the slot in which the spare module is inserted.

CSCee01143

Symptom: When trying to access Fabric or Device Manager using SNMPv3, the user is unable to access the switch and is prompted with the error message "notintimewindow".

Workaround: Set the clock on the switch to the highest, and then to the lowest. From there, set it back to the regular time.

CSCee06496

Symptom: If you are running Cisco MDS SAN-OS releases 1.1(3), 1.2(1a), 1.2(1b), 1.2(2a), 1.3(1), 1.3(2a), 1.3(3), or 1.3(3c), the following sequence of operations might lead to the failure of one or both supervisor modules simultaneously:

a. Removing an IPS-8 module from the switch.

b. Inserting a different type of module in the same slot.

c. Configuring the new module.

d. Issuing the copy running-config startup-config command.

Removing the IPS-8 module at any time and replacing with another IPS-8 module does not cause this problem.

Workaround: Before replacing an IPS-8 module with a different type of module in the same slot, upgrade to Cisco MDS SAN-OS Release 1.3(4a).

CSCee43249

Symptom: If a malfunctioning device does not swap the source and destination FCIDs, a PLOGI frame sent by this device can cause high CPU utilization. These PLOGI frame errors are reported by the zone server.

Workaround: None.

CSCeg84871

Symptom: When an iSCSI initiator logs in to a Gigabit Ethernet port number 1 on an IPS module in slot 1, the switch sends a login response with the value of the Target Session Identifying Handle (TSIH) field set to zero (0), which is an iSCSI protocol violation. This situation can also occur when an iSCSI initiator logs in to Ethernet PortChannel number 1. The Qlogic iSCSI initiator may verify the TSIH value and reject it.

Workaround: None.

CSCei25319

Sympton: An error message in the log file occurs because the platform manager component passes the wrong parameter while responding to a SNMP query. In some cases, this results in the query not being responded to.

Workaround: Perform a refresh on Device Manager to clear the problem.

CSCsh27840

Symptom: While using an FCIP link for remote SPAN, it is possible that the FCIP link may flap.

Workaround: Do not use FCIP links for Remote SPAN.

CSCdz12179

Symptom: When the Fabric Manager or Device Manager communicates with the Cisco MDS switch through Virtual Private Network (VPN) or any Network Address Translation (NAT) scheme, a generic error message occurs while adding duplicate zone members from a VPN connection.

Workaround: None. If an error occurs while running through VPN/NAT, all errors will show up as generic errors without a detailed message describing the error.

CSCdz43707

Symptom: The Fabric Manager or Device Manager reports an error for all operations if the switch is multihomed (both IPFC-based in-band management and the out-of-band management interface are up) and the Fabric or Device Manager was started using the IPFC address. Typically, you will see a notInTime window error in the Device Manager and all SNMP set operations fail.

Workaround: If the switch is multihomed, then start the Fabric or Device Manager on the switch using the out-of-band management interface IP address.

CSCea45726

Symptom: The Device Manager shows a port in the down state (red square) when the operational status of the port is up. This rare occurrence is due to the failure cause of the port not being empty (for example, the failure case reflects the initializing state).

Workaround: None.

CSCea82028

Symptom: When a switch is upgraded while the Device Manager for that switch is open, a Java error of class cast exception occurs. When this error occurs, some Device Manager menu items are unusable while other menu items remain in this error state.

Workaround: Close the Device Manager and reopen it.

CSCeb19588

Symptom: Sometimes, the zone merge import command results in isolation.

Workaround: Reissue the command to resolve the isolation problem.

CSCeb34865

Symptom: The following error message is issued when you try configuring switch drop latency:

changing this parameter is not allowed could not update the value

Workaround: None. Switch drop latency is not configurable in this release of the software.

CSCeb75360

Symptom: When issuing a command that shows PortChannels (such as show interface port-channel or show port-channel summary), EtherChannel interfaces are also displayed in the VSAN membership database. This does not cause any performance issues.

Workaround: None.

CSCeb83984

Symptom: When downgrading a Cisco MDS 9000 Family switch to an older release version which does not contain the LUN zoning feature, for example, Release 1.1(x), the configuration is not erased completely.

Workaround: Delete the LUN zoning configuration before downgrading the switch.

CSCeb84217

Symptom: When running the install module loader command, you must wait for this command to finish before issuing the reload module command or the system will hang.

Workaround: None.

CSCeb86793

Symptom: If SNMP role-based users modify their own roles using the Device Manager, then the rules for those role are removed and those users will not be able to connect to the switch using SNMP.

Workaround: None.

CSCec00031

Symptom: While configuring an "ip access-list" and a switchover occurs for whatever reason, the standby may only have partial ip access-list information. This results in an inconsistency in applying the ip access-list policy after switchover. If this occurs, remove that recently configured ip access-list and configure it again.

Workaround: None.

CSCec03298

Symptom: For iSCSI hosts connected to Cisco MDS switches, XIOtech storage devices may not be visible as iSCSI targets.

Workaround: None.

CSCec03539

Symptom: Using the Fabric Manager, you may set a NULL server address for the syslog and RADIUS servers.

Workaround: None. You must set the correct address.

CSCec06947

Symptom: A FC-tunnel interface is not completely displayed when configured as a SPAN destination using the Fabric Manager application.

Workaround: None.

CSCec08028

Symptom: The Fabric Manager provides an option to choose a NIC from within a multi-NIC system, but the Device Manager does not provide this option. If the Device Manager is opened from the Fabric Manager, this feature still works. If the Device Manager is opened from a desktop, a timeout error occurs.

Workaround: Start the Device Manager from the command line, using the option -Dmds.nmsAddress=XX to set a preferred address.

CSCec17467

Symptom: After creating a read-only zone using Fabric Manager version 1.2(1), if you select the zone in the left hand pane (in the tree), the Members tab in the top pane may be empty.

Workaround: None.

CSCec23079

Symptom: Incorrect, large values are returned for SysUptime queries by the MDS SNMP agent.

Workaround: None.

CSCec23320

Symptom: Removing enclosures using the Fabric Manager removes member ports from fabric map.

Workaround: None.

CSCec25886

Symptom: While upgrading from 1.0(x) to 1.2(1a) space is not created in forwarding tables for new MPLS segments using remote span. This causes RSPAN to fail.

Workaround: None.

CSCec29150

Symptom: Activating a zone using the Fabric Manager fails when the interop mode is enabled, but works from the CLI.

Workaround: None.

CSCec31567

Symptom: When a VSAN with the interop 2 option in a Cisco MDS 9000 Family switch is configured to interoperate with a Brocade switch running in Native mode, the Cisco MDS switch permits the use of $ and - characters in zone set, zone, and alias names. The Brocade switch rejects zone updates containing objects with these special characters, and in some situations may isolate the ISL and segment the fabric.

Workaround: When administering zoning from an MDS switch, be sure that the zone set, zone, and alias names do not include "$" and "-" characters. The underscore character is permitted.

CSCec34016

Symptom: When two TE ports are configured as a part of port channels, the transition ports intermittently show up as invalid ports in the Fabric Manager. They later merge to come up as PortChannel.

Workaround: None.

CSCed32729

Symptom: When altering an Fx-port state using SNMP, the following error is reported:

snmpset: Agent reported error with variable #1.
.iso.org.dod.internet.mgmt.mib-2.75.1.2.2.1.1.22.0:  SNMP: A general
failure occurred on the agent.

Workaround: None.

CSCed58155

Symptom: The Fabric Manager (FM) cannot correlate an iSCSI host with two NIC cards when the iSCSI initiator is identified by the IP address (either from a matching static iscsi initiator ip-address command or from an iSCSI interface switchport initiator id ip-address command for dynamic initiators). This is a result of the switch putting IP address in the symbolic-node-name field in the FCNS entry for that initiator. This was done to allow zoning based on IP address in ISAN software Release 1.1(x) and 1.2(x) where zone membership for iSCSI initiator can only be based on symbolic-node-name value.

Workaround: To allow FM to show the above-mentioned host properly, the switch will instead fill the FCNS entry's symbolic-node-name field with the actual iSCSI initiator node name (i.e. its IQN name).

This impacts for users who configure zoning based on iSCSI initiator's IP address via the symbolic node name field, e.g.

zone name a vsan 1 
member symbolic-nodename 10.2.2.112

Change the above configuration to the following for this configuration to continue working after upgrading to Release 1.3(4a).

zone name a vsan 1 
member ip-address 10.2.2.112

CSCed64425

Symptom: You can TFTP to a Cisco MDS switch through the management interface from any TFTP client. In SAN-OS Releases 1.3(4a), 1.3(4b) and 1.3(5), a default IP access control list (ACL) rule is added to block frames for ports like TFTP, SUNRP and BOOTP.

Workaround: For SAN-OS Releases 1.2(1a), 1.2(1b), 1.2(2a), 1.3(1), 1.3(2a), 1.3(3), and 1.3(3c), manually create the drop rule by issuing the following commands in succession:

switch(config)# ip access-list abc deny udp any any eq port 69 
switch(config)# ip access-list abc permit ip any any 
switch(config)# interface mgmt 0  
switch(config-if)# ip access-group abc

CSCee89946

Symptom: This caveat applies to Release 1.1(1) up to, and including, Release 1.3(4b). The Fibre Channel port link reinitialization sequence triggered by a link down event does not succeed if the switching module is up for more than 248 days and the last shutdown command on that port was issued 248 days prior to the link failure. After the link-down event, the port remains in the link failure or not connected state as shown in the following command output:

switch# show interface fc2/1
fc2/1 is down (Link failure or not-connected) 

Workaround: Issue the shutdown command, followed by the no shutdown command, on the affected port to bring the port back to link-up state as shown in the following command output:

switch# config t
switch(config)# interface fc2/1 
switch(config)# shutdown
switch(config)# no shutdown

Issue the following commands to verify the module uptime.

switch# attach module 2
Attaching to module 2 ...

To exit type exit, to abort type $.

module-2# show version
Software
BIOS:      version 1.0.8
system:    version 2.0(1) [build 2.0(0.139)]
BIOS compile time:       08/07/03
system compile Time:     10/25/2020 12:00:00
Hardware
RAM 186668 kB
bootflash: 125184 blocks (block size 512b)
lc02   uptime is 11 days 18 hours 18 minute(s) 9 second(s)

Other notes:

Any nondisruptive upgrade or downgrade resets the 248-day window.

Once the shutdown and no shutdown commands are issued, it is good for another 248 days.

If the switch has been up for a long time and the customer wants to connect new devices to the switch ports, then you may start with the shutdown and no shutdown commands on those ports

CSCeg61535

Symptom: The Telnet server may not be disabled even if you disable it through setup. A telnet session will still work in the switch.

Workaround: Issue the no telnet server enable command in configuration mode to disable telnet after you login to the switch.

CSCeh21199

Symptom: If the NetApp file server appliance is configured as an initiator performing a Network Data Management Protocol (NDMP) backup, then the fabric login (FLOGI) process on the MDS switch might terminate because of excessive LSTS requests.

This might happen if your N port or NL port uses extended link services to manage and control a public remote loop. The NetApp file server appliance configuration uses these services, namely LSTS and LINIT, which are documented in the Fibre Channel standards compliance (FC-FLA standard) specification.

Workaround: Upgrade to Cisco MDS SAN-OS Release 2.0(4).

Related Documentation

Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for the Cisco MDS 9000 Family

Cisco MDS 9100 Series Quick Start Guide

Cisco MDS 9500 Series and Cisco MDS 9216 Quick Start Guide

Cisco MDS 9100 Series Hardware Installation Guide

Cisco MDS 9216 Switch Hardware Installation Guide

Cisco MDS 9500 Series Hardware Installation Guide

Cisco MDS 9000 Family Command Reference

Cisco MDS 9000 Family Configuration Guide

Cisco MDS 9000 Family Fabric Manager User Guide

Cisco MDS 9000 Family Troubleshooting Guide

Cisco MDS 9000 Family System Messages Guide

Cisco MDS 9000 Family MIB Reference Guide

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Cisco provides a free online Security Vulnerability Policy portal at this URL:

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Cisco is committed to delivering secure products. We test our products internally before we release them, and we strive to correct all vulnerabilities quickly. If you think that you might have identified a vulnerability in a Cisco product, contact PSIRT:

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Cisco Technical Support Website

The Cisco Technical Support Website provides online documents and tools for troubleshooting and resolving technical issues with Cisco products and technologies. The website is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport

Access to all tools on the Cisco Technical Support Website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password. If you have a valid service contract but do not have a user ID or password, you can register at this URL:

http://tools.cisco.com/RPF/register/register.do


Note Use the Cisco Product Identification (CPI) tool to locate your product serial number before submitting a web or phone request for service. You can access the CPI tool from the Cisco Technical Support Website by clicking the Tools & Resources link under Documentation & Tools. Choose Cisco Product Identification Tool from the Alphabetical Index drop-down list, or click the Cisco Product Identification Tool link under Alerts & RMAs. The CPI tool offers three search options: by product ID or model name; by tree view; or for certain products, by copying and pasting show command output. Search results show an illustration of your product with the serial number label location highlighted. Locate the serial number label on your product and record the information before placing a service call.


Submitting a Service Request

Using the online TAC Service Request Tool is the fastest way to open S3 and S4 service requests. (S3 and S4 service requests are those in which your network is minimally impaired or for which you require product information.) After you describe your situation, the TAC Service Request Tool provides recommended solutions. If your issue is not resolved using the recommended resources, your service request is assigned to a Cisco TAC engineer. The TAC Service Request Tool is located at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport/servicerequest

For S1 or S2 service requests or if you do not have Internet access, contact the Cisco TAC by telephone. (S1 or S2 service requests are those in which your production network is down or severely degraded.) Cisco TAC engineers are assigned immediately to S1 and S2 service requests to help keep your business operations running smoothly.

To open a service request by telephone, use one of the following numbers:

Asia-Pacific: +61 2 8446 7411 (Australia: 1 800 805 227)
EMEA: +32 2 704 55 55
USA: 1 800 553-2447

For a complete list of Cisco TAC contacts, go to this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport/contacts

Definitions of Service Request Severity

To ensure that all service requests are reported in a standard format, Cisco has established severity definitions.

Severity 1 (S1)—Your network is "down," or there is a critical impact to your business operations. You and Cisco will commit all necessary resources around the clock to resolve the situation.

Severity 2 (S2)—Operation of an existing network is severely degraded, or significant aspects of your business operation are negatively affected by inadequate performance of Cisco products. You and Cisco will commit full-time resources during normal business hours to resolve the situation.

Severity 3 (S3)—Operational performance of your network is impaired, but most business operations remain functional. You and Cisco will commit resources during normal business hours to restore service to satisfactory levels.

Severity 4 (S4)—You require information or assistance with Cisco product capabilities, installation, or configuration. There is little or no effect on your business operations.

Obtaining Additional Publications and Information

Information about Cisco products, technologies, and network solutions is available from various online and printed sources.

Cisco Marketplace provides a variety of Cisco books, reference guides, and logo merchandise. Visit Cisco Marketplace, the company store, at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/marketplace/

Cisco Press publishes a wide range of general networking, training and certification titles. Both new and experienced users will benefit from these publications. For current Cisco Press titles and other information, go to Cisco Press at this URL:

http://www.ciscopress.com

Packet magazine is the Cisco Systems technical user magazine for maximizing Internet and networking investments. Each quarter, Packet delivers coverage of the latest industry trends, technology breakthroughs, and Cisco products and solutions, as well as network deployment and troubleshooting tips, configuration examples, customer case studies, certification and training information, and links to scores of in-depth online resources. You can access Packet magazine at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/packet

iQ Magazine is the quarterly publication from Cisco Systems designed to help growing companies learn how they can use technology to increase revenue, streamline their business, and expand services. The publication identifies the challenges facing these companies and the technologies to help solve them, using real-world case studies and business strategies to help readers make sound technology investment decisions. You can access iQ Magazine at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/iqmagazine

Internet Protocol Journal is a quarterly journal published by Cisco Systems for engineering professionals involved in designing, developing, and operating public and private internets and intranets. You can access the Internet Protocol Journal at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/ipj

World-class networking training is available from Cisco. You can view current offerings at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/learning/index.html