Solutions

Public Sector - Education - Solutions & Benefits

Solutions & Benefits

e-Learning

Pupil using technologyWhen pupil:teacher ratios are on the increase, schools can make better use of resources by supplementing traditional classroom methods with electronically delivered education. The teacher can be attending to one individual or group while others work on-line; this makes it possible to cater for different educational levels and learning styles without anyone feeling left out. Research shows that computers in the classroom also promote effective collaboration between students - if there is good interactive content and students are given fulfilling tasks. For adult learners, too, e-Learning can be the ideal solution to the need to deliver education or training flexibly enough to fit alongside existing commitments, so equipping older members of the workforce with the updated skills they need to remain economically active.

In addition, moving to a digital curriculum, means less administration and marking for teachers. And access to real, live data enables students to make learning more meaningful - or "authentic" - and to have a greater choice about where and when they learn. Education can move to a more learner-centric approach.

Cisco has invested directly in helping to equip the workforce with IT and networking skills. The Cisco Networking Academy program is an e-learning model that delivers web-based educational content, on-line testing, student performance tracking, and instructor training and support as well as hands-on labs. The curriculum is given free to not-for-profit institutions such as schools, colleges, universities, military bases, retraining centres, juvenile detention centres and homeless shelters. Its aim is to provide companies in Europe, the Middle East and Africa with qualified networking staff. There are over 3,000 Cisco Networking Academies in EMEA in 98 countries and is delivered as a partnership between Cisco, local and central governments and NGOs, and in some cases central government.

Remote/Distance learning

Smart use of the Internet allows students to work with teachers and fellow-students in other establishments than their own - even in other countries - through facilities like on-line conferencing as well as e-mail. With these methods a teacher can bring in a specialist on a particular subject to fill in the gaps in the school's local knowledge. Multimedia presentation methods such as video on demand can supplement conventional teaching whenever needed.

Open universities can provide more interactive methods of learning to long-distant students, so the resources available to a particular educational institution need not limit the topics that a student can learn and how it is delivered. Unequal opportunities between rural and urban schools that have beset some countries can be a thing of the past. A teacher can work simultaneously with a virtual class distributed over several schools via videoconferencing, providing they had access to a broadband network.

Wireless campus and wireless classroom

Wireless technology allows educational institutions to bring the lab to the classroom, rather than making students move to separate classrooms when they need to use computers. It therefore saves costs and makes students more productive. For example, the Universidad Europea CEES, one of Spain's leading private universities, developed a local area network (LAN)with Cisco. Students, faculty and staff can access courses, administrative and research services via the Internet and to each other via e-mail, anytime and anywhere on campus, using wireless laptop computers. Students can receive class assignments or virtual tutorials from their professors, communicate with each other and their instructors via e-mail, access research resources, and store files at a central server, while moving from the library, to the cafeteria, to an outdoor common area.

Video, Voice and Data integration (AVVID)

Voice

Voice over IP allows institutes to place phones in every classroom without additional wiring. IP telephony can act as a terminal for class registration, provide a fast method for locating students and staff through an online timetable and give access to email. Coursework help can be introduced by using intelligent call handling software so that teachers on duty can be contacted no matter where they are and data on student attendance can be collated and sent to the management information system with minimum effort and error.

Video

Smart use of the Internet allows students to work with teachers and fellow-students in other establishments than their own - even in other countries - through facilities like on-line conferencing as well as e-mail. With these methods a teacher can bring in a specialist on a particular subject to fill in the gaps in the school's local knowledge. Multimedia presentation methods such as video on demand can supplement conventional teaching whenever needed.

Open universities can provide more interactive methods of learning to long-distant students, so the resources available to a particular educational institution need not limit the topics that a student can learn and how it is delivered. Unequal opportunities between rural and urban schools that have beset some countries can be a thing of the past. A teacher can work simultaneously with a virtual class distributed over several schools via videoconferencing, providing they have access to a broadband network.

National research networks

Cisco is working closely with educational institutions to help them establish high-speed IP-based networks that eliminate the barriers of time and distance that have hampered the sharing and development of ideas and learning. For example, Cisco helped power Europe's first 10 GBPS (gigabits per second) academic network. SURFnet5, constitutes a national network linking over 200 institutions in higher education and research in the Netherlands, which will benefit from the availability of large-scale deployment of new Internet applications. SURFnet is part of Nordunet, the Nordics Academic Networks, which connects the 5 Scandinavian countries Denmark, Norway, Iceland, Finland and Sweden. National Research Networks (NRNs) are beginning to reach down to other sectors of education, such as secondary education.

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