Cisco London 2012

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Cisco's role at The Games

As the official network infrastructure supporter for London 2012, we helped to deliver the most connected Games ever.

This meant that Cisco's network infrastructure underpinned the delivery of voice, video and data traffic for London 2012, which was carried out over BT's communications services network to the thousands of people officiating, reporting, competing in or enjoying the Games.

We also provided essential network infrastructure equipment that brought the Games time and administration applications on the LOCOG network.

This included network security appliances, routing and switching equipment, wireless access points and controllers, IP telephony, handsets and the call manager system via our Hosted Unified Collaboration Service (HUCS from BT).

London Olympics and Collaboration

Cisco Key Facts

Cisco's Delivery to London 2012

  • 94 Sites
  • 1800 Wireless Access Points
  • 16500 IP Telephones
  • 65000 Active Connections
  • 80000 Data Ports

Which were vital in connecting:

  • Equivalent to 46 World Championships at the same time:
    • 300 medal events for 26 Olympic Sports in 34 venues over 17 days of competition
    • 471 medal events for 20 Paralympic sports in 21 venues over 11 days of competition
    • Altogether, there will be 36 competition venues and 41 training venues.
    • If all London 2012 sports competitions were held on consecutive days, it would last 451 days.
  • 10,500 Olympic Athletes from 205 NOCs and 4,200 Paralympic Athletes from 162 NPCs
  • Over 10 million tickets (8.8m Olympic, 2m Paralympic). 1.9 million people have signed-up.
  • 21,000 media and broadcasters for the Olympic games and 6,500 media and broadcasters for the Paralympic games.
  • Transport for 800,000 spectators & 55,000 athletes/ officials/ media/ sponsors on busiest Olympic competition day - more than the entire population of Leeds (160,000 and 16,500 respectively for Paralympics)
  • up to 70,000 London 2012 Games Makers – 240,000 applications
Cisco Key Facts

Cisco's Delivery to London 2012

  • 94 Sites
  • 1800 Wireless Access Points
  • 16500 IP Telephones
  • 65000 Active Connections
  • 80000 Data Ports

Which were vital in connecting:

  • Equivalent to 46 World Championships at the same time:
    • 300 medal events for 26 Olympic Sports in 34 venues over 17 days of competition
    • 471 medal events for 20 Paralympic sports in 21 venues over 11 days of competition
    • Altogether, there will be 36 competition venues and 41 training venues.
    • If all London 2012 sports competitions were held on consecutive days, it would last 451 days.
  • 10,500 Olympic Athletes from 205 NOCs and 4,200 Paralympic Athletes from 162 NPCs
  • Over 10 million tickets (8.8m Olympic, 2m Paralympic). 1.9 million people have signed-up.
  • 21,000 media and broadcasters for the Olympic games and 6,500 media and broadcasters for the Paralympic games.
  • Transport for 800,000 spectators & 55,000 athletes/ officials/ media/ sponsors on busiest Olympic competition day - more than the entire population of Leeds (160,000 and 16,500 respectively for Paralympics)
  • up to 70,000 London 2012 Games Makers – 240,000 applications

Network infrastructure at its best

The network infrastructure offered a much greater capacity than previous Games, based on the anticipated increase in traffic demand. In all, it marked a huge leap forward in the way technology enabled, delivered and transformed the Olympic experience for its global audience.

Cisco's network infrastructure helped to connect nearly 100 locations including:

  • 34 competition venues across the UK from Wimbledon to Weymouth
  • 20 mission critical venues such as the Olympic Village and network operations centre
  • Up to 50 spectator and athlete sites including transport hubs, training grounds and ticketing booths

For London 2012, Cisco is built one of the most robust, secure and available network infrastructures. The stadia, venues and infrastructure built around the Olympic Park and beyond are second to none and Cisco's borderless network infrastructures connect it all together.

Cisco also worked with BT to provide LOCOG with BT MeetMe Webex conferencing and collaboration software allowing staff access to virtual meetings, helping to aid planning and preparation ahead of London 2012.

Network is critical

At the very heart of London 2012 are The Games themselves and the media that brought them to the attention of the world. From Cisco's point of view there was no second chance – The Games had to be played without a single hitch. So, to give you an idea of our involvement, we looked at what being the Official Network Infrastructure Provider meant.

Cisco's primary role was as the ‘enabler’. In other words, it was our responsibility to provide the Core, Distribution and Access layers of the network that the Games ran on. The reliability of the network was paramount to making the event a success after all, the whole world was watching. Therefore the pressure was on to ensure everything worked perfectly and that we had planned for any eventuality, as this was one deadline nobody could afford to miss.

With the management team in place, the next step was for us to agree the system architecture. Systems integration was one of our toughest technology challenges due to The Games complexity. This in itself was no mean feat as we had to work with the dispersed nature of The Games across all 90 to 100 venues, with the Olympic Park in London at the heart. We also had to allow for converged network services too. Delivering converged services not only required the integration of IT and communications but also a services-oriented architecture approach to both IT and networks.

The best approach was to create several Core PoPs (Points of Presence) connecting the Olympic Park sites to the local PoP and other sites such as Broxbourne, Eton, Hadleigh Park and other more dispersed UK venues into their nearest PoP. In essence this created a network-centric architecture designed to form the base from which any number of services was then added.

The need for network speed

The Cisco network infrastructure is capable of transmitting over 80Gbps (10GBps). Compared to the previous facts it doesn't sound like much. But when you realise it's the equivalent of downloading 6,000 novels, or the entire contents of Wikipedia every 5 seconds or 2,000 songs per second it suddenly feels very fast indeed. And that's before we even get out of the blocks. To deliver an optimum traffic speed of 10Gbps per network link, we have been working closely with BT. With a premium quality fibre network infrastructure laid between venues, eliminating any buffering and queuing in the core network infrastructure, the capacity will be mind-blowing.

A smart call
With an explosive use of private smartphones and tablets in numbers which are only set to grow and grow, our thinking has taken us in a new direction as we work to progress the wireless design. We are currently in discussion with BT Openzone regarding the deployment of HD (High Density) Wireless for spectators visiting Olympic Park and also looking at the options available in how we use ‘Clean Air’ technologies to monitor the wireless frequency spectrum. More about these developments will follow in good time.

Network is critical

At the very heart of London 2012 are The Games themselves and the media that brought them to the attention of the world. From Cisco's point of view there was no second chance – The Games had to be played without a single hitch. So, to give you an idea of our involvement, we looked at what being the Official Network Infrastructure Provider meant.

Cisco's primary role was as the ‘enabler’. In other words, it was our responsibility to provide the Core, Distribution and Access layers of the network that the Games ran on. The reliability of the network was paramount to making the event a success after all, the whole world was watching. Therefore the pressure was on to ensure everything worked perfectly and that we had planned for any eventuality, as this was one deadline nobody could afford to miss.

With the management team in place, the next step was for us to agree the system architecture. Systems integration was one of our toughest technology challenges due to The Games complexity. This in itself was no mean feat as we had to work with the dispersed nature of The Games across all 90 to 100 venues, with the Olympic Park in London at the heart. We also had to allow for converged network services too. Delivering converged services not only required the integration of IT and communications but also a services-oriented architecture approach to both IT and networks.

The best approach was to create several Core PoPs (Points of Presence) connecting the Olympic Park sites to the local PoP and other sites such as Broxbourne, Eton, Hadleigh Park and other more dispersed UK venues into their nearest PoP. In essence this created a network-centric architecture designed to form the base from which any number of services was then added.

Need for speed

The Cisco network infrastructure is capable of transmitting over 80Gbps (10GBps). Compared to the previous facts it doesn't sound like much. But when you realise it's the equivalent of downloading 6,000 novels, or the entire contents of Wikipedia every 5 seconds or 2,000 songs per second it suddenly feels very fast indeed. And that's before we even get out of the blocks. To deliver an optimum traffic speed of 10Gbps per network link, we have been working closely with BT. With a premium quality fibre network infrastructure laid between venues, eliminating any buffering and queuing in the core network infrastructure, the capacity will be mind-blowing.

A smart call
With an explosive use of private smartphones and tablets in numbers which are only set to grow and grow, our thinking has taken us in a new direction as we work to progress the wireless design. We are currently in discussion with BT Openzone regarding the deployment of HD (High Density) Wireless for spectators visiting Olympic Park and also looking at the options available in how we use ‘Clean Air’ technologies to monitor the wireless frequency spectrum. More about these developments will follow in good time.

Cisco's role after The Games

For Cisco, London 2012 is not the finish line, but the starting gun for a bigger challenge. The foundation of London 2012 is that it builds a lasting legacy of regeneration and prosperity.

Stretching out across the UK, using the investment, infrastructure and inspiration of The Games to revitalise and invigorate education, high-tech business and technological innovation. We call this 'Building a Brilliant Future.' Cisco was founded over 25 years ago on the principles of education, innovation and entrepreneurship and that's how we've run ourbusiness ever since. It's why we became the offcial network infrastructure supporter for London 2012 and why we're investing in and supporting so many exciting initiatives to make things better.

Cisco's role after The Games

BIG

The initiative is the start of Cisco's five-year effort to drive economic growth in the UK through high-tech innovation. The British Innovation Gateway (BIG) is the start of a five year programme agreed between Cisco's CEO, John Chambers, and Prime Minister David Cameron on February 11th 2011.

This programme aims to increase the number of pioneering, high-tech small to medium-size enterprises (SMEs) in a sustainable and scalable way. Crucial to its success will be discovering, driving and supporting innovation and entrepreneurship in the UK.

More Information

More on BIG
Visit the BIG website

Cisco: BIG

BIG

The initiative is the start of Cisco's five-year effort to drive economic growth in the UK through high-tech innovation. The British Innovation Gateway (BIG) is the start of a five year programme agreed between Cisco's CEO, John Chambers, and Prime Minister David Cameron on February 11th 2011.

This programme aims to increase the number of pioneering, high-tech small to medium-size enterprises (SMEs) in a sustainable and scalable way. Crucial to its success will be discovering, driving and supporting innovation and entrepreneurship in the UK.

More Information

More on BIG
Visit the BIG website

Cisco: BIG