User Guide for the CiscoWorks WLSE and WLSE Express, 2.12
Using the Radio Manager
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Using the Radio Manager

Table Of Contents

Using the Radio Manager

Getting Started with Radio Manager

Using Radio Monitoring to Collect RM Data

Understanding Radio Monitoring

Guidelines for Running Radio Monitoring

Starting Radio Monitoring

Evaluating AP Radio Performance

Understanding Auto Re-Site Survey

Guidelines for Running Auto Re-Site Surveys

Establishing Baseline Data

Monitoring AP Radio Performance

Healing Your Network

Understanding Self Healing

Guidelines for Healing Your Network

Running Self Healing

Managing Self Healing Faults

Using Frame Monitoring

Understanding Frame Monitoring

Guidelines for Using Frame Monitoring

Configuring Frame Monitoring

Displaying Frame Monitoring APs

Disabling Frame Monitoring on Selected APs

Displaying Radio Manager Reports


Using the Radio Manager


The Radio Manager simplifies the deployment, expansion, and day-to-day management of your WLAN radio environment. Using the Radio Manager, you can:

Table 12-1 Radio Manager Features

Feature
For More Information, See:

Continuously monitor the radio environment

Using Radio Monitoring to Collect RM Data

Evaluate current AP radio performance on a per-floor basis against baselined performance data

Evaluating AP Radio Performance

Adjust APs to cover potential areas of lost coverage

Healing Your Network

Feed Frame Monitoring information to a third-party server for further analysis

Using Frame Monitoring

Generate Radio Manager reports

Displaying Radio Manager Reports


Getting Started with Radio Manager

Before you can use the features provided by the Radio Manager:

Radio Management must be enabled.

If Radio Management has been disabled, none of the Radio Manager features will be displayed (see Enabling and Disabling Radio Management Features).

You must set up your network to manage your radio environment.

If your network is not properly configured, none of the Radio Manager features will work. To configure your network, see Configuring Your WLAN Radio Environment.

Using Radio Monitoring to Collect RM Data

Radio location measurements characterize the radio environment and provide the information other Radio Manager features require to determine the channels and power limits for each Basic Service Set (BSS).

To gather these measurements, Radio Monitoring must be enabled. Radio Monitoring periodically gathers radio frequency statistics, identifies specific signal sources, and is your primary means of detecting rogue access points.

The following topics explain how and where to use Radio Monitoring:

Understanding Radio Monitoring

Guidelines for Running Radio Monitoring

Starting Radio Monitoring

You can also use the Assisted Site Survey wizard to walk you through the process of determining optimal radio transmit power and channel selection. This wizard interface helps you through AP radio scan, client walkabout, and radio parameter generation.

Related Topics

Understanding Radio Management

Understanding Radio Monitoring

Radio Monitoring:

Is enabled by default.


Note If you disable Radio Monitoring and do not run AP Radio Scan, no unknown radios (rogue or friendly) will be detected. If you run AP Radio Scan but disable Radio Monitoring, some unknown radios will be detected, but not as many as would be detected if Radio Monitoring was running.


Runs on the specified Cisco IOS APs and its associated CCXV2-compliant clients.

Continuously monitors the WLAN radio environment.

Measures the path loss or RSSI between APs and between regular APs and their clients.

Monitors client registration data for scanning-only APs.

Discovers any new APs that are transmitting beacons.

Generates alerts when new APs appear or interference occurs.

How It Works

During normal operation, the Radio Manager requests measurements from Cisco APs and clients to monitor the WLAN radio frequency environment. These measurements occur less frequently than during a client walkabout (see Using Client Walkabouts to Collect RM Data), typically one or more minutes apart.

Radio Monitoring allows you to select which channels are monitored; both APs and clients can measure serving channels (the channel on which the AP is transmitting) and non-serving channels (the channels on which the AP is not transmitting). You make this choice when you enable Radio Monitoring (see Starting Radio Monitoring).

Radio Monitoring only monitors managed devices that appear in its Selected Devices list. When Radio Monitoring is enabled, all devices in this list are monitored. There are two ways to monitor newly added APs:

By default, any newly managed device is added to the Selected Devices list, regardless of the Radio Monitoring enable status.

As long as the Add Newly Managed AP to Selected AP List check box is selected, future newly-managed APs will be automatically added to Radio Monitoring's Selected Devices list. This check box only affects devices that are managed after this setting has been saved.


Note Radio Monitoring will be turned on for newly-managed devices only if Radio Monitoring has been enabled (see Starting Radio Monitoring).


Data Produced

Radio Monitoring periodically gathers radio frequency statistics and identifies specific signal sources. The channel measurements it collects are used for many features, such as radio configuration, rogue AP discovery, interference detection, network self-healing, auto re-site surveys, and certain Radio Manager reports.


Note Radio Monitoring is enabled by default. If you disable Radio Monitoring, you will not have access to these features.


Related Topics

Guidelines for Running Radio Monitoring

Healing Your Network

Guidelines for Running Radio Monitoring

Prerequisites

Before running Radio Monitoring, you must:

1. Configure your network for radio management (see Getting Started with Radio Manager).


Note If Radio Management has been disabled, none of the Radio Manager features will be displayed (see Enabling and Disabling Radio Management Features).


2. Define the location elements (buildings and floors) and place the APs on the floor images. This step is optional, but will help you get the best results from the Location Manager displays. For more information, see:

Entering Building Information

Adding Floors to Location Manager

Adding Devices to Floors

Tips

Leave Radio Monitoring continuously running on your network so new APs are discovered promptly, the necessary faults are generated, and your reports are accurate and current.

You can add an AP to the Radio Monitoring list and also include it in an AP Radio Scan or Client Walkabout; the measurement requests for these two features supersede the Radio Monitoring requests. When the other, shorter term procedures end, the APs return to normal radio monitoring mode.

Radio Monitoring produces the data for these reports:

The Path Loss Between Managed APs report contains the calculated path loss data (see Viewing Current Path Loss Results).

The Channel Loading report lets you see how busy the environment is before you deploy new sets of access points (see Viewing Current Channel Load Results).

To detect rogue APs, you should enable both serving channel (the channel on which the AP is transmitting) and non-serving channel scanning (the channels on which the AP is not transmitting). If only serving channel scanning is enabled, then only the APs configured on the same channel as the rogue will actually report the rogue. By monitoring non-serving channels as well, Radio Manager can detect rogue APs that might not have been discovered had it monitored only the channel on which the AP is transmitting.

By default, newly managed devices are automatically added to Radio Monitoring's Selected Devices list (see Starting Radio Monitoring). To manually add new devices to this list, select Radio Mgr > Radio Monitoring > Select Options and deselect the Add Newly Managed AP to Selected AP List check box. While that check box is not checked, newly managed devices are not automatically added to the Selected Devices list and you will have to manually select each AP using Radio Mgr > Radio Monitoring > Select AP.


Note Radio Monitoring will be turned on for newly-managed devices only if Radio Monitoring has been enabled (see Starting Radio Monitoring).


Related Topics

Understanding Radio Monitoring

Detecting Rogue APs

Starting Radio Monitoring


Note Your login determines whether you can use this procedure.


Before You Begin

Satisfy the Radio Monitoring prerequisites (see Guidelines for Running Radio Monitoring).

Procedure


Step 1 Select Radio Mgr > Radio Monitoring. The Radio Monitoring Options window appears.

Step 2 Complete the following:

Field
Description

Enable/Disable

Click Enable to re-enable Radio Monitoring.

Note Radio Monitoring is your primary means of detecting rogue APs and is therefore enabled by default. If you disable Radio Monitoring, you will not have access to many features, including rogue AP detection, self-healing networks, auto re-site surveys, and certain Radio Manager reports.

Serving Channel Monitoring

Select one or both check boxes to collect measurements on the channel the devices are configured to:

APs to perform monitoring measurements on the Cisco IOS APs on the serving channel (the channel on which the AP is transmitting).

Clients to perform monitoring measurements on CCXV2-compliant clients on the serving channel.

Non-Serving Channel Monitoring

Select one or both check boxes to measure other channels in the band:

APs to perform monitoring measurements on the Cisco IOS APs on the non-serving channels (the channels on which the AP is not transmitting).

Clients to perform monitoring measurements on CCXV2-compliant clients on the non-serving channels.

Note By monitoring non-serving channels as well as serving channels, Radio Manager can detect rogue APs that might not have been discovered had it monitored only the channel on which the AP is transmitting.

Add Newly Managed AP to Selected AP List

Select to add future newly-managed APs to the Selected Devices list in Step 3.

Note If you deselect this check box, newly managed devices will not be automatically added to the Selected Devices list. You will have to manually move newly managed devices from the Available Devices list to the Selected Devices list.

Note This check box affects devices that are managed only after this setting has been saved.

Note Even if this check box is selected and the devices are appearing in the Selected Devices list, Radio Monitoring is enabled for those devices only if the Enable check box has also been previously selected and saved.


Step 3 From the menu in the left pane, click Select AP. All managed devices are listed in the Device selector in the middle pane.

Step 4 Select the devices you want to monitor (see Using the Device Selector).


Note If the Add Newly Managed AP to Selected AP List check box (see Step 2) is not checked, newly managed devices are not automatically added to the Selected Devices list.


Step 5 From the menu in the left pane, click Filter By PHY to select the type of 802.11 radio that you want to monitor.


Note Only radios of the selected types are monitored. If a selected AP has no interfaces of the desired radio types, this is noted in the job run log.


Step 6 To save your settings, click Finish from the menu in the left pane. The Finish dialog box appears.

Step 7 Click Save to save your Radio Monitoring options.


Related Topics

Viewing Current Path Loss Results

Viewing Current Channel Load Results

Displaying Radio Manager Reports

Understanding Radio Monitoring

Evaluating AP Radio Performance

The following sections will help you understand how to use the Radio Manager Auto Re-Site Survey feature to evaluate AP radio performance:

Understanding Auto Re-Site Survey

Guidelines for Running Auto Re-Site Surveys

Establishing Baseline Data

Monitoring AP Radio Performance

Understanding Auto Re-Site Survey

Auto Re-Site Survey extends the Radio Manager Assisted Site Survey Wizard functionality. It periodically evaluates the current AP radio performance on a per-floor basis against baselined performance data that you specify (see Guidelines for Running Auto Re-Site Surveys) and alerts the user when the performance falls below a preset threshold.

How It Works

The Auto Re-Site Survey option uses data collected from previous RM Assisted Configuration jobs to compare the current performance of the selected APs against the performance data collected the last time radio parameter generation was generated for the specified APs and applied to the specific floor. If the APs' radio performance has decreased by 20% (a user-configurable setting), a fault is generated and you are asked if you want to generate new radio parameters. The new radio parameters are compared against the existing data, and if the newly generated radio parameter yield better results, you can apply the new radio parameters to the selected APs.

Data Produced

Auto Re-Site Survey generates a fault if the radio performance of the specified floor decreases by the specified percentage. It also allows you to generate new radio parameters and apply those parameters to the APs of the specified floor. (See Establishing Baseline Data.)

Guidelines for Running Auto Re-Site Surveys

Prerequisites

Before you run Auto Re-Site Survey, you must:

1. Configure your network for radio management (see Getting Started with Radio Manager).


Note If Radio Management has been disabled, none of the Radio Manager features will be displayed (see Enabling and Disabling Radio Management Features).


2. Define the location elements (buildings and floors) and place the APs on the floor images. This step is optional, but will help you get the best results from the Location Manager displays. For more information, see:

Entering Building Information

Adding Floors to Location Manager

Adding Devices to Floors

3. Perform an AP Radio Scan on all APs on the specified floor (see Using AP Radio Scans to Collect RM Data).

4. Be sure that Radio Monitoring is enabled on all APs on the specified floor. Radio Monitoring is enabled by default; if it has been disabled, you must re-enable it (see Using Radio Monitoring to Collect RM Data).

Tips

You cannot modify the "total throughput" and "coverage details" values after the WLSE has produced the survey results of an Automated Re-site Survey; these values are computed based upon current Radio Management data values.

You can, however, set a percentage value before you save the Auto Re-Site Survey settings. The percentage you set for a floor or building will be monitored with respect to the base for throughput and coverage. For example, if you set the percentage to 15%, WLSE issues a fault whenever the throughput or coverage values have more than a 15% change in the value (up or down) you previously set.

If you would like to change those values, perhaps to increase performance, use RM Assisted Configuration and Client Walkabout to fine-tune the network configuration.

Related Topics

Understanding Auto Re-Site Survey

Establishing Baseline Data

The Auto Re-Site Survey feature compares the current performance of the selected APs against baseline performance data for a floor. You can also use Auto Re-Site Survey to establish this baseline data.


Note You should establish a set of baseline data only after you have determined that your network is stable and the parameter settings are optimal.


Typical Scenarios and FAQs

I want to save the current performance data as the base data for future comparisons.


Note Your login determines whether you can use this option.


Before You Begin

Satisfy the Auto Re-Site Survey prerequisites (see Guidelines for Running Auto Re-Site Surveys).

Procedure


Step 1 Select Radio Mgr > Auto Re-Site Survey. The Review Current screen displays the building, floor, and frequency band of the APs on the specified floor that are already enabled for Auto Re-Site Survey.

Step 2 From the menu in the left pane, click Select Floor, then select a building from the Floors Selector list. The floors for the selected building appear in the Available Floors list.

Step 3 Click on a floor, and click the right arrows (>>) to add it to the Selected Floors list.

Step 4 From the menu in the left pane, click Set Base Values. The default is to calculate the performance of all floors. You can select individual floors from the Selected Floors pull-down menu and set its baseline data.

Step 5 To set the baseline values for all floors, click Compute and Apply. The current performance data for each floor (specified in Step 3) is calculated and becomes the baseline performance data for future comparisons.

Step 6 To set the baseline values for individual floors:

a. Select a floor from the Selected Floors dropdown list. The current values for that floor are displayed.

b. For one or both radio types, select:

Re-evaluate to evaluate the current performance of the selected floor.

Current > Base to make the current data the base for future comparisons.

Now that you have selected your Auto Re-Site Survey options, you need to save your settings.

Step 7 Click Finish. The Finish screen displays the current fault settings:

Field
Description

Enable

Select to enable Auto Re-Site Survey.

Note On floors for which Auto ReSite Survey is enabled, both Serving and Non-Serving Channel Radio Monitoring must be enabled for all APs (see Using Radio Monitoring to Collect RM Data).

Settings

From the dropdown lists, select the severity level and percentage values. The severity level will be assigned to the fault when the radio performance of the AP decreases by the specified percentage.


Step 8 Click Save to save your settings.

Step 9 To view the log generated by the Auto Re-Site Survey process:

a. Click Review Current from the menu in the left pane.

b. Click ARSS Run Log (located below the list of buildings, floors, and frequencies). The ARSS Run Log table appears in a separate browser window. This table contains the following information for each run:

Field
Description

Select Run

Select this button to see the details for that run.

The details for the selected job run appear below the list of runs for that job.

Start Time

The time the job started.

End Time

The time the job ended.


c. The Auto Re-Site Survey run log for the selected run appears below this table. To view the details for a different run, select another run from the table and click ARSS Run Log.

d. To be certain that you are looking at the latest information, click the Refresh button to refresh the job list.

Step 10 Every hour, the collected baseline data is compared against the current performance. If there is a 20% (default value) degradation in performance, a fault is generated.

In the Faults Detail Conditions table for an Auto Re-Site Survey fault, the presence of an icon (a note pad with glasses) between the Description and Timestamp columns in the Fault Detail Conditions table indicates that there is additional building and floor information for this fault. Select the icon to view these details (see Monitoring AP Radio Performance).


Related Topics

Guidelines for Running Auto Re-Site Surveys

Device Fault Details

Displaying Radio Manager Reports

Monitoring AP Radio Performance

Use Faults > Display Faults > Fault Details to view the fault that is generated when any AP radio performance degradations are detected.

Typical Scenarios and FAQs

I want to monitor the performance of an AP radio.

I have just been notified of a decrease in the radio performance of an AP and I want to view the total throughput and coverage details.

I have just been notified of a decrease in the radio performance of an AP and I have determined it is no longer a problem. I want to clear the fault.


Note Your login determines whether you can use this option.


Before You Begin

Establish baseline performance data for each floor (see Establishing Baseline Data).

Procedure


Step 1 Select Faults > Display Faults. The Faults Summary screen appears.

Step 2 Select the filtering criteria to display any faults related to AP radio performance degradation.

Step 3 To display more information about a fault, click the Description or Timestamp fields in the Fault Summary table for that fault.

The Fault Details screen displays details about the device, its current fault conditions, and a fault history (see Viewing Fault Details).

Step 4 The presence of an icon (a note pad with glasses) between the Description and Timestamp columns in the Fault Detail Conditions table indicates that there is additional information about an AP radio performance degradation fault.

If you select this icon, a new window displays the following information:

Table 12-2 Auto Re-Site Survey Fault Details

Column
Description

Faults Details (first row)

See Device Fault Details

Building

All buildings that have performance degradations.

Note Performance degradations are defined as a 20% difference between the base and current performance values.

Floor

All floors that have performance degradations.

Auto Re-Site Survey Details

A note pad with glasses icon. Click this icon to display the Auto Re-Site Survey Details window.


The Auto Re-Site Survey Details window displays the following information for the selected floor:

Table 12-3 Auto Re-Site Survey Details Window 

Column
Description

Faults Details (first row)

See Device Fault Details

PHY Type

The type of 802.11 radio (11a or 11b/11g).

Timestamp

Indicates the time, based on the client browser, that the performance readings were collected for that band on that floor.

Dataset

CURRENT or BASELINE. The BASELINE dataset contains the initial readings for a floor; the CURRENT dataset contains the current values. A fault is issued when there is a 20% difference between the current and baseline values.

Throughput

Data transfer rate.

Coverage Details

A list of the coverage details by power step.

RM Assisted Configuration

Click RM Assisted Configuration to run the RM Assisted Configuration feature.


Step 5 To clear a radio performance fault, see Clearing Summary Table Faults.


Healing Your Network

When the Radio Manager detects the loss or recovery of an AP radio, it can attempt to compensate for that change by adjusting the power levels of the neighboring APs. The following topics describe how and where to use the Radio Manager Self Healing feature:

Understanding Self Healing

Guidelines for Healing Your Network

Running Self Healing

Managing Self Healing Faults

Understanding Self Healing

How It Works

Self Healing runs on the WLSE and uses SNMP to adjust neighboring APs in response to the loss or recovery of a radio. Self Healing performs two functions:

Monitoring:

Self Healing monitoring uses the path loss data collected from AP Radio Scan and Radio Monitoring and WDS registration information to determine a set of radio links for monitoring purposes. It uses this data to periodically check for any new radios or the loss of a radio.

The loss of a radio can be due to:

Radio transmission failure—Every hour Self Healing polls the beacon information obtained using WLCCP via the WDS(s), and triggers an event when a radio has failed to transmit for 30 minutes or more.

WDS deregistration—Self Healing immediately triggers an event when an AP powers down (if the radio was not administratively shut down) or loses connectivity to the WDS.

Radar avoidance— When radar is detected on the current channel and the radio is in a DFS domain, Self Healing immediately triggers an event and changes the channel on that radio.


Note If an asynchronous event (radar avoidance or WDS deregistration) occurs between the hourly monitoring runs, the output of the event is added to the end of the log of the last polled run.


Compensation:

Using the information previously gathered from AP Radio Scans and Radio Monitoring, Self Healing adjusts the transmit power levels of neighboring APs (which might or might not be on the same floor as the failed AP) to cover the potential areas of lost coverage, then generates a self healing fault.


Note Self Healing modifies the power setting only, not the channel frequency or beacon interval, of the neighboring APs.


Self healing faults have three states:

Detection—Self Healing has determined that the network requires healing.

Compensation determination—Self Healing is running Assisted Configuration (RPG—the radio parameter generation process).

Reason—The status of the Self Healing run:

Error: Compensation calculation did not complete due to unrecoverable errors.

Incomplete: Compensation finished with errors.

Timeout: Compensation did not complete due to time-out (30 minutes).

CompensatedDown: Appeared Up/Down: Compensated for by up or down radio(s).

CompensatedUp: Appeared Up/Down: Compensated for by up or down radio(s).

Self healing is not triggered under the following conditions:

When you are adjusting your network and you administratively shut down an AP's radio. Because this is an administrator-controlled operation, WLSE does not perform self healing on the network. In this case, when the device is re-enabled, the APs will still retain its original settings.

When you are adjusting the power settings or channel settings.

If an AP has an enabled hot-standby AP. In the event of a failure and the hot-standby takes over, Self Healing will monitor the hot-standby AP.

If the AP radio avoids radar by selecting a channel that is not in a DFS domain (see Compensating for Radar, below).

WLSE assumes you are using it for your initial setup and site planning, and therefore Self Healing is merely a rerun of the initial calculations minus the downed radio. When WLSE finds that a failed radio is back up, it reruns the calculations, this time including the radio.

If you use WLSE initially, the calculations will yield the same or equivalent results. If you set your power settings manually, then after the radio is detected as down and then back up, the results of the calculations could differ from your manual settings.

For example, assume you have a network with four APs {A,B,C,D}.

When WLSE is used for initial setup:

You use Assisted Site Survey to generate your power settings and apply the following power settings (respectively):

{5,10,20,5}

AP C goes down and Self Healing adjusts the power settings:

{5,20,down,20}

AP C comes back up and Self Healing adjusts the power settings:

{10,5,20,5}

In the final state, this is an equivalent coverage—perhaps not the exact settings, but equivalent.

When you set the power manually and do not use WLSE to calculate the initial coverage:

You manually set the power setting to:

{10,10,10,10}

AP C goes down and Self Healing adjusts the power settings:

{5,20,down,20}

AP C comes back up and Self Healing adjusts the power settings:

{10,5,20,5}

Self Healing uses the WLSE recommended settings when the AP comes back up, not the manual settings. WLSE is not designed to save check point configurations as part of the management.


Note All Self Healing power settings are temporary, so any reload of the APs will revert to the last saved configuration on the AP itself.


Specifying Backup WDSs For Self Healing

The WDS provides WLSE with the data it needs to determine if a radio is up. If all the WDS devices configured for each AP on a floor are down (non-operational), Self Healing might try to heal those APs due to the missing data. Therefore, every AP on a floor configured with Self Healing should be registered with WDSs that have at least one standby.


Note A fault is triggered when Radio Monitoring is not enabled for a radio, when the WDS is not registered, or when the WDS has lost connectivity to the WLSE.


If you have self healing enabled, it is highly recommended that you specify one or more backup WDS devices:

Any AP or WDS router can be used as a backup WDS.

You can have more than one backup, and your backups can have backups.

You can configure HRSP on a second WLSM, which will then function as a standby WDS for your primary WLSM-WDS device.

Compensating for Radar

An AP radio that is in a DFS (Dynamic Frequency Selection) domain will change channels when radar is detected on the current channel.

If the AP radio changes from the current radar detected channel to another DFS channel, the radio must wait one minute before operating on the new channel (if the channel is clear of radar).

During a simulation, if the channel change occurs immediately (that is, there is no one minute delay), self healing is not triggered. This is expected behavior because there is no interruption.

If the AP changes channels from a DFS channel that is detecting radar to a channel that is not in the DFS regulatory domain (a non-DFS channel), the one minute delay does not occur and the AP radio will change channels immediately.

This type of change does not cause any loss in coverage and therefore does not warrant self healing, but may leave the floor in a sub optimal state. In this case, Auto Resite Survey is designed to monitor the performance of a floor and should be used to detect any path loss.

Data Produced

When Self Healing detects a network failure, a series of faults are generated. (See Managing Self Healing Faults.)

Related Topics

What is WDS and Why Do I Need It?

Guidelines for Healing Your Network

Prerequisites

Before you run Self Healing, you must:

1. Configure your network for radio management (see Getting Started with Radio Manager).


Note If Radio Management has been disabled, none of the Radio Manager features will be displayed (see Enabling and Disabling Radio Management Features).



Note Before you enable self healing, you must specify one or more backup AP-WDSs or a single standby WLSM-WDS (see What is WDS and Why Do I Need It?).


2. Define the location elements (buildings and floors) and place the APs on the floor images. For more information, see:

Entering Building Information

Adding Floors to Location Manager

Adding Devices to Floors

3. Perform an AP Radio Scan on all APs on the specified floor (see Using AP Radio Scans to Collect RM Data).

4. Enable Radio Monitoring on all APs (for both serving and non-serving channels) on the specified floor. Radio Monitoring is enabled by default; if it has been disabled, you must re-enable it (see Using Radio Monitoring to Collect RM Data).

5. Ensure that the WLSE has properly authenticated and has connectivity to the WDSs for all APs on the floor to be monitored. To verify this, you can run the RM Capability Verifier in the Location Manager (see Verifying Radio Management Capability).

Tips

To enable Self Healing monitoring:

1. Select the buildings and floors for which self healing will be enabled and assign the self healing settings (see Running Self Healing).

2. View the faults that are generated when self healing is activated (see Managing Self Healing Faults).


Note Self Healing faults are always enabled. When you set up Self Healing for a floor, you will always receive fault notifications when a network disruption occurs.



Note The fault RF Port AdminStatus is enabled by default and must remain enabled with a default polling time of 5 minutes (see Setting RF Port AdminStatus Threshold). Self healing ignores any radio set as administratively down, but this can only be detected if fault polling is enabled.


3. After the self healing process is complete, locate the failed interfaces and the AP interfaces that were modified to replace them (see Running Self Healing).

Self Healing modifies the power setting only, not the channel frequency or beacon interval, of the neighboring APs. Because Self Healing can change APs on different floors from the failed AP but must do so without changing the channel frequency, the network might be operating in a sub-optimal manner. To resolve this problem, enable Auto Re-Site Survey (see Evaluating AP Radio Performance) and/or Self-Healing on the surrounding floors.

If an AP has a hot-standby enabled, it is not monitored by Self Healing. In the event of a failure and the hot-standby takes over, Self Healing will monitor the hot-standby AP.

If you have self healing enabled, you must specify one or more backup WDS devices.

Related Topics

Understanding Self Healing

Running Self Healing

Typical Scenarios and FAQs

How do I specify which floors will run self healing?

I want to set the severity of a self healing notification.

How do I specify whether the changes to neighboring APs are to be applied automatically or manually?

I want to view the current self healing faults for a [P1...P5] setting.

How can I monitor the progress of a self healing job?


Note Your login determines whether you can use this option.


Before You Begin

Satisfy the Self Healing prerequisites (see Guidelines for Healing Your Network).

Procedure


Step 1 Select Radio Mgr > Self Healing. The Review Current form appears displaying the floors currently selected for Self Healing.

Step 2 From the menu in the left pane, click Select Floors and select a building from the Buildings list. The floors for the selected building appear in the Available Floors list.

Step 3 Select a floor and click the right arrows ( >>) to add it to the Selected Floors list.

Now that you have selected your self healing options, you need to save your settings.

Step 4 From the menu in the left pane, click Finish.

Step 5 Select the severity level to assign to the fault when a self healing fault is triggered.

Step 6 You can choose to automatically apply changes to neighboring APs:

When automatic self healing is enabled, neighboring APs are adjusted to accommodate the loss of coverage.

When automatic self healing is disabled, the changes to neighboring APs must be applied from the Faults Display Details page for each fault occurrence.

Step 7 Click Save. A new window displays the buildings and floors on which Self Healing is enabled. Close this window to view the Review Current screen.

Step 8 To view the log generated by the self healing process, select the run and click Self Healing Run Log (located below the list of buildings and floors).

The Self Healing Run Log table appears in a separate browser window. This table contains the following information for each run:

Field
Description

Select Run

Click this button to see the details for that run.

The details for the selected job run appear below the list of runs for that job.

Start Time

The time the job started.

End Time

The time the job ended.


The Self Healing run log for the selected run appears below this table. To view the details for a different run, select another run from the table and click Self Healing Run Log.

Self Healing creates a log file for each run. To be certain you are looking at the latest information, click the Refresh button to refresh the job list.


Note If an asynchronous event (radar avoidance or WDS deregistration) occurs between the hourly monitoring runs, the output of the event is added to the end of the log of the last polled run.


Step 9 To view more details about the fault that is generated while Self Healing is in progress, see Managing Self Healing Faults.

Step 10 Because Self Healing can chose an AP on a different floor from the failed AP to cover any holes in coverage, you should enable Auto Re-Site Survey to monitor performance of your APs (see Evaluating AP Radio Performance).


Related Topic

Understanding Self Healing

Managing Self Healing Faults

Managing Self Healing Faults

To manage the self healing faults in your network, use Faults > Display Faults. Or, to see only those faults pertaining to Self Healing, select Radio Mgr > Self Healing.

Typical Scenarios and FAQs

Why was self healing initiated?

I have just been notified that self healing has been initiated. How do I track its progress?

I have just been notified that self healing has been initiated. How do I display a list of the failed interfaces and the neighboring AP interfaces that were modified to replace them?

How do I review the history of self healing actions in my network?

The self healing process on my network is complete. How can I view the new power settings? How do I clear the faults associated with this process?


Note Your login determines whether you can use this option.


Before You Begin

Satisfy the prerequisites for running self healing (see Guidelines for Healing Your Network).

Select the buildings and floors for which self healing will be enabled and assign the self healing settings (see Running Self Healing).

Procedure


Step 1 To display the Self Healing faults, you can:

Display the general Fault Summary screen:

Select Faults > Display Faults. The Faults Summary screen appears.

Select the filtering criteria to display any self healing faults.

Display only active Self Healing faults:

Select Radio Mgr > Self Healing. The Review Current screen appears.

Select View Active Faults. The active Self Healing faults are displayed in a new window.

Step 2 To display the Fault Details window, select the Description or Timestamp field for a fault.

Step 3 To view the results of Self Healing compensation calculations, click the icon (a note pad with glasses) between the Description and Timestamp columns in the Fault Detail Conditions table. A new window displays the following information:

Table 12-4 Self Healing Compensation Results

Column
Description

Faults Details (first row)

See Device Fault Details

Failed Interface

MAC address of the failed radio.

Modified Interface/ Message

The IP address, MAC address, and radio interface type of the AP that has been modified to compensate for the failed radio.

Old OFDM(11g) Power

Previous OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) setting on the modified AP (11g radios only).

New OFDM(11g) Power

New OFDM setting on the modified AP (11g radios only).

Old CCK/Tx Power

Previous setting on the modified AP. Contains:

For 11b and 11g radios: CCK (Complementary Code Keying) value

For 11a radios: Tx value

New CCK/Tx Power

New setting on the modified AP. Contains:

For 11b and 11g radios: CCK (Complementary Code Keying) value

For 11a radios: Tx value



Note If an asynchronous event (radar avoidance or WDS deregistration) occurs between the monitoring runs, the output of the event is added to the end of the log of the last polled run.


Step 4 When automatic self healing is disabled, the changes to neighboring APs must be applied from this page for each fault occurrence. To apply the new settings, click Apply Changes Now.

Step 5 To see the changes immediately and graphically in Location Manager, run an inventory for the affected APs. This will show the new coverage details for the adjusted APs as well as the previous coverage for the downed AP (see Managing Your WLAN Radio Environment by Sites).

Step 6 To determine why Self Healing was run, check the fault history log (see Running Self Healing).

Step 7 To clear a self healing fault, see Clearing Summary Table Faults.


Related Topics

Understanding Self Healing

Displaying Radio Manager Reports

Using Frame Monitoring

Frame Monitoring allows you to perform network troubleshooting and intrusion detection and send this information to a third-party server for further analysis. The following sections will help you understand how to use Frame Monitoring:

Understanding Frame Monitoring

Guidelines for Using Frame Monitoring

Configuring Frame Monitoring

Displaying Frame Monitoring APs

Disabling Frame Monitoring on Selected APs

Understanding Frame Monitoring

How It Works

You can use the WLSE Frame Monitoring feature:

To configure Frame Monitoring. Upon receiving a request to enable Frame Monitoring, an AP in scanning-only mode will:

a. Abort all its current operations and schedule Frame Monitoring jobs as directed by the given parameters.

b. Start Frame Monitoring on the channel that it was programmed to use on its radios and send the frames to the external UDP end point. If the default parameters were used (the configuration was done using the CLI or WLSE user interface), the AP will continuously monitor the channels it was currently scanning.

To review Frame Monitoring results. The Review Current screen displays information about the APs that are performing Frame Monitoring tasks (see Displaying Frame Monitoring APs).

Guidelines for Using Frame Monitoring

Prerequisites

To use Frame Monitoring, you must:

1. Set up a third-party server to analyze the data collected by Frame Monitoring.

2. Configure your network for radio management (see Getting Started with Radio Manager).


Note If Radio Management has been disabled, none of the Radio Manager features will be displayed (see Enabling and Disabling Radio Management Features).


3. Verify that the access points you have selected to perform Frame Monitoring are scanning-only APs (select Reports > Device Center > Scanning AP). If the APs are not in this list, re-run the inventory process.


Note Only scanning-only APs can perform Frame Monitoring.


4. Enable monitor mode on selected APs (see Configuring Frame Monitoring).

Tips

To remove APs that are already configured to run Frame Monitoring, see Disabling Frame Monitoring on Selected APs.

When an AP that is running in monitor mode receives a message to disable monitor mode, it aborts its Frame Monitoring tasks and resumes its previous scanning job.

The scan duration time is set to 100ms and cannot be changed using the WLSE user interface.

For maximum flexibility, use the XML APIs to configure Frame Monitoring. The WLSE user interface can always be used to check the status of Frame Monitoring.


Note If you are using a third-party system to configure Frame Monitoring via the XML APIs, do not use the WLSE interface to perform any configuration tasks.


Only access points in scanning-only mode can be configured to monitor mode.

After monitor mode has been enabled on an access point, that access point is considered to be a dedicated frame monitor until you explicitly disable monitor mode.

If monitor mode is enabled on an AP that is running Radio Monitoring, Radio Monitoring is automatically disabled.


Note Any AP you select will perform Frame Monitoring indefinitely until you explicitly disable monitor mode on that AP.


Although on dual-mode APs you can use the CLI to enable monitor mode on just one interface, this approach is not officially supported because the stress on the AP will result in dropped client associations.

Configuring Frame Monitoring

You can use the WLSE user interface to enable and disable Frame Monitoring operations and to assign Frame Monitoring configuration settings.


Note Using the WLSE user interface, the Frame Monitoring scanning pattern is fixed and cannot be changed. For maximum flexibility, consider using the XML APIs to configure Frame Monitoring instead, and using the WLSE interface for ongoing monitoring tasks.



Caution If you are using a third-party system to configure Frame Monitoring via the XML APIs, do not use the WLSE interface to perform any configuration tasks.

Typical Scenarios and FAQs

How do I set up selected access points to run Frame Monitoring?


Note Your login determines whether you can use this option.


Before You Begin

Satisfy the Frame Monitoring prerequisites (see Guidelines for Using Frame Monitoring).

Procedure


Step 1 Select Radio Mgr > Frame Monitoring. The Frame Monitoring screen appears.

Step 2 The Review Current screen displays the APs that are currently performing Frame Monitoring tasks (see Displaying Frame Monitoring APs).

Step 3 To assign the Frame Monitoring settings, select Configuration from the menu in the left pane.

Step 4 Complete the following:

Field
Description

Enable/Disable

Click to enable or disable Frame Monitoring:

Enable: Select this option to enable monitor mode and enter the Frame Monitoring configuration settings.

Disable: Select this option to cancel Frame Monitoring.

For scanning only APs, selecting Disable will cancel monitor mode operations on the selected APs.

For normal APs, selecting Disable will remove the selected APs from the Review Current screen only if the AP was a scanning-only AP and was previously performing Frame Monitoring operations.

Note Verify the values in the other fields to make sure you are disabling monitor mode for the correct end point.

End Point IP Address

The IP address of the external third party end point to which the frames are to be sent.

Note This field is restricted to numeric IPV4 addresses.

Note The WLSE does not perform any validation on this IP address. You are responsible for ensuring that this field contains the correct end point IP address.

End Point Port Number

The UDP port number of the external third party end point to which the frames are to be sent. Default = 1024.

Frame Truncation

Frame truncation length (in bytes). Default = 128 bytes.


Step 5 Choose Select Scanning AP from the menu in the left pane.

Step 6 Select the scanning-only APs on which you want to enable or disable monitor mode (see Using the Device Selector).

For scanning only APs, selecting Disable will cancel Frame Monitoring operations on the selected APs.

For normal APs, selecting Disable will remove the selected APs from the Review Current screen only if the AP was a scanning-only AP and was previously performing Frame Monitoring operations.

Step 7 Choose Select Radio Type from the menu in the left pane.

Step 8 Select the types of 802.11 radios that will run Frame Monitoring (default = all radio types).


Note Only radios of the selected types will perform Frame Monitoring. If a selected AP has no interfaces of the desired radio types, this is noted in the Job Run Log.



Note All radio interfaces on an access point must be in scanning-only mode. The WLSE cannot enable monitor mode on an AP that has an interface that is not in scanning-only mode (see Guidelines for Using Frame Monitoring).


Step 9 To save your settings, select Finish from the menu in the left pane. The Finish dialog appears.

Step 10 Click Save to save the Frame Monitoring configuration settings.


Note If a warning message appears saying that WLSE server is ahead of or behind your local time, see Understanding Time Discrepancy Problems in Job Scheduling.


There are three possible results:

An error message is displayed if there is no configuration (IP address and port number), no selected AP, or the selected AP is not a scanning-only AP. No further action can be taken until the problem is resolved.

A warning message is displayed if monitor mode is disabled or no truncation value has been entered. Upon confirmation, the save process will continue.

A summary displays the settings that have been saved. You can refresh the Review Current page to see the saved settings.


Related Topics

Displaying Frame Monitoring APs

Disabling Frame Monitoring on Selected APs

Guidelines for Using Frame Monitoring

Displaying Frame Monitoring APs

You can use Radio Mgr > Frame Monitoring to display the scanning-only APs that are performing frame monitoring.

Typical Scenarios and FAQs

How do I view the access points that are running Frame Monitoring?


Note Your login determines whether you can use this option.


Before You Begin

Satisfy the Frame Monitoring prerequisites (see Guidelines for Using Frame Monitoring).

Procedure


Step 1 Select Radio Mgr > Frame Monitoring. The Review Current screen displays the following information about the APs that are currently performing Frame Monitoring tasks:

Table 12-5 Current Frame Monitoring Details 

Column
Description

AP Name

The IP address of the access point that is currently performing Frame Monitoring tasks.

Channel

The channel that is being monitored.

The channels that are used depend on the radio type:

11b/11g radios use channels 1 through 14.

11a radios use channels 36, 40, 44, 48, 52, 60, 64, 149, 153, 157, and 161.

Note Not all channels will be used for all regulatory domains.

PHY

The physical interface type (11a, 11b, or 11g) that is currently performing Frame Monitoring tasks.

End Point IP Address

The IP address of the external third party end point to which the frames are currently being sent.

End Point Port Number

The port number of the external third party end point to which the frames are currently being sent.

Frame Truncation

The number of bytes you want to see:

Default = 128 bytes

Minimum = 24 bytes of MAC header

Maximum = MTU on the radio

Status

The Frame Monitoring configuration setting status. Possible values:

pending—The initial status when the configuration setting is being saved in the database.

running—The WLSE is sending the configuration to the WDS.

success—The WDS has received the configuration and set up the scanning AP.



Related Topics

Configuring Frame Monitoring

Disabling Frame Monitoring on Selected APs

Guidelines for Using Frame Monitoring

Disabling Frame Monitoring on Selected APs

You can use Radio Mgr > Frame Monitoring to remove APs from the list of APs that are configured to run Frame Monitoring.

Typical Scenarios and FAQs

How do I disable Frame Monitoring on an access point?


Note Your login determines whether you can use this option.


Before You Begin

Satisfy the Frame Monitoring prerequisites (see Guidelines for Using Frame Monitoring).

There must be at least one AP running Frame Monitoring.

Procedure


Step 1 Select Radio Mgr > Frame Monitoring. The Review Current screen displays the APs that are currently performing Frame Monitoring tasks.

Step 2 Select Configuration from the menu, then click Disable (you want to disable Frame Monitoring on selected APs).

Step 3 Choose Select Scanning AP from the menu, then add the APs you want to remove to the Selected Devices list.

Step 4 Choose Select Radio Type and select the radio type (or select both 11a and 11b/11g if you are not sure).

Step 5 Select Finish to save the setting.

The Frame Monitoring operation on the selected APs will be canceled and they will be removed from the Currently Monitoring list.


Related Topics

Guidelines for Using Frame Monitoring

Configuring Frame Monitoring

Displaying Frame Monitoring APs

Displaying Radio Manager Reports


Note If Radio Management has been disabled, the Reports > Radio Manager subtab will not be displayed. To reenable Radio Management, see Enabling and Disabling Radio Management Features.


The Radio Manager reports allow you to view radio management information. You can view, export, and email the following report types:

Configured Radio Parameters Report

Path Loss Between Managed APs Report

Path Loss Historical Report

Channel Loading Report

Channel Loading Historical Report

Radar Detection Report

Radar Detection Historical Report

For more information about these reports, see Displaying Radio Manager Reports.