Cisco Prime Infrastructure Configuration Guide, Release 1.2
Chapter 5: Monitoring Devices
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Monitoring Devices

Table Of Contents

Monitoring Devices

Information About Monitoring

Monitoring Controllers

Searching Controllers

Viewing a List of Controllers

Configuring the Controller List Display

Monitoring System Parameters

Monitoring System Summary

Monitoring Spanning Tree Protocol

Monitoring CLI Sessions

Monitoring DHCP Statistics

Monitoring WLANs

Monitoring Ports

Monitoring General Ports

Monitoring CDP Interface Neighbors

Monitoring Controller Security

Monitoring RADIUS Authentication

Monitoring RADIUS Accounting

Monitoring Management Frame Protection

Monitoring Rogue AP Rules

Monitoring Guest Users

Monitoring Controllers Mobility

Monitoring Mobility Stats

Monitoring Controller 802.11a/n

Monitoring 802.11a/n Parameters

Monitoring 802.11a/n RRM Groups

Monitoring Controllers 802.11b/g/n

Monitoring 802.11b/g/n Parameters

Monitoring 802.11b/g/n RRM Groups

Monitoring Controllers IPv6

Monitoring Neighbor Bind Counter Statistics

Monitoring Switches

Searching Switches

Viewing the Switches

Configuring the Switch List Page

Monitoring Switch System Parameters

Viewing Switch Summary Information

Viewing Switch Memory Information

Viewing Switch Environment Information

Viewing Switch Module Information

Viewing Switch VLAN Information

Viewing Switch VTP Information

Viewing Switch Physical Ports Information

Viewing Switch Sensor Information

Viewing Switch Spanning Tree Information

Viewing Switch Stacks Information

Viewing Switch NMSP and Location Information

Monitoring Switch Interfaces

Monitoring Switch Ethernet Interfaces

Monitoring Switch IP Interfaces

Monitoring Switch VLAN Interfaces

Monitoring Switch EtherChannel Interfaces

Monitoring Switch Clients

Monitoring Access Points

Searching Access Points

Viewing a List of Access Points

Configuring the Access Point List Display

Configuring the List of Access Points Display

Generating a Report for Access Points

Monitoring Traffic Load

Monitoring Dynamic Power Control

Monitoring Access Points Noise

Monitoring Access Points Interference

Monitoring Access Points Coverage (RSSI)

Monitoring Access Points Coverage (SNR)

Monitoring Access Points Up/Down Statistics

Monitoring the Access Points Voice Statistics

Monitoring the Access Points Voice TSM Table

Monitoring the Access Points Voice TSM Reports

Monitoring Access Points 802.11 Counters

Monitoring Access Points AP Profile Status

Monitoring Access Points Radio Utilization

Monitoring Access Points Traffic Stream Metrics

Monitoring Access Points Tx Power and Channel

Monitoring VoIP Calls

Monitoring Voice Statistics

Monitoring Air Quality

Monitoring Access Points Details

General Tab

Interfaces Tab

CDP Neighbors Tab

Current Associated Clients Tab

SSID Tab

Clients Over Time Tab

Monitoring Access Point Radio Details

Monitoring On Demand Statistics

General Tab

CleanAir Tab

Monitoring Operational Parameters

Monitoring 802.11 MAC Counters

Monitoring View Alarms

Monitor View Events

Monitoring Third Party Access Points

Monitoring Mesh Access Points

Mesh Statistics Tab

Mesh Links Tab

Retrieving the Unique Device Identifier on Controllers and Access Points

Monitoring Coverage Holes

Monitoring Pre-Coverage Holes

Monitoring Rogue Access Points

Detecting Rogue Devices

Classifying Rogue Access Points

Monitoring Rogue AP Alarms

Viewing Rogue AP Alarm Details

Viewing Rogue Client Details

Viewing Rogue AP History Details

Viewing Rogue AP Event History Details

Monitoring Ad hoc Rogues

Monitoring Ad hoc Rogue Alarms

Viewing Ad hoc Rogue Alarm Details

Searching Rogue Clients Using Advanced Search

Monitoring Rogue Access Point Location, Tagging, and Containment

Detecting Access Points

Monitoring Rogue Alarm Events

Viewing Rogue AP Event Details

Monitoring Ad hoc Rogue Events

Viewing Ad hoc Rogue Event Details

Troubleshooting Unjoined Access Points

Monitoring RFID Tags

Tag Summary

Searching Tags

Viewing RFID Tag Search Results

Viewing Tag List

Monitoring Chokepoints

Performing a Chokepoint Search

Monitoring Interferers

Monitoring AP Detected Interferers

Monitoring AP Detected Interferer Details

Monitoring AP Detected Interferer Details Location History

Configuring the Search Results Display

Monitoring Spectrum Experts

Spectrum Experts Summary

Interferers Summary

Interferers Search

Spectrum Experts Details

Monitoring WiFi TDOA Receivers

Monitoring Media Streams

Monitoring Radio Resource Management (RRM)

Channel Change Notifications

Transmission Power Change Notifications

RF Grouping Notifications

Viewing the RRM Dashboard

Monitoring Clients and Users

Monitoring Alarms

Alarms and Events Overview

Viewing List of Alarms

Filtering Alarms

Exporting Alarms

Viewing Alarm Details

Viewing Events Related to Alarms

Modifying Alarms

Specifying Email Notifications for Alarms

Modifying the Alarm Browser

Viewing the Alarm Summary

Modifying Alarm Settings

Modifying Alarm Count Refresh Rate

Configuring Alarm Severity Levels

Working with Alarms

Monitoring Access Point Alarms

Monitoring Air Quality Alarms

Monitoring CleanAir Security Alarms

Monitoring Email Notifications

Monitoring Severity Configurations

Monitoring Cisco Adaptive wIPS Alarms

Monitoring Cisco Adaptive wIPS Alarm Details

Monitoring Events

Searching Events

Exporting Events

Monitoring Failure Objects

Monitoring Events for Rogue APs

Monitoring Events for Ad hoc Rogues

Monitoring Cisco Adaptive wIPS Events

Monitoring CleanAir Air Quality Events

Viewing Air Quality Event Details

Monitoring Interferer Security Risk Events

Viewing Interferer Security Risk Event Details

Monitoring Health Monitor Events

Viewing Health Monitor Event Details

Working with Events

Monitoring Site Maps

Monitoring Google Earth Maps


Monitoring Devices


Information About Monitoring

This chapter describes how to use the Cisco Prime Infrastructure to monitor Cisco WLAN Solution device configurations. This chapter contains the following sections:

Monitoring Controllers, page 5-1

Monitoring Switches, page 5-33

Monitoring Access Points, page 5-43

Monitoring RFID Tags, page 5-115

Monitoring Chokepoints, page 5-118

Monitoring Interferers, page 5-118

Monitoring Spectrum Experts, page 5-122

Monitoring WiFi TDOA Receivers, page 5-124

Monitoring Media Streams, page 5-125

Monitoring Radio Resource Management (RRM), page 5-126

Monitoring Clients and Users, page 5-129

Monitoring Alarms, page 5-129

Monitoring Events, page 5-144

Monitoring Site Maps, page 5-153

Monitoring Google Earth Maps, page 5-153

Monitoring Controllers

Choose Monitor > Controllers to access the controller list page. Click a controller IP address to view its details.

This section contains the following topics:

Searching Controllers, page 5-2

Viewing a List of Controllers, page 5-2

Monitoring System Parameters, page 5-3

Monitoring Ports, page 5-9

Monitoring Controller Security, page 5-15

Monitoring Controllers Mobility, page 5-23

Monitoring Controller 802.11a/n, page 5-25

Monitoring Controllers 802.11b/g/n, page 5-29

Monitoring Controllers IPv6, page 5-32

Searching Controllers

Use Prime Infrastructure Search feature to find specific controllers or to create and save custom searches.

For a controller search, you can search using the following fields:

Table 5-1 Search Controllers

Fields
Description

Search for controller by

Choose All Controllers, IP Address, Controller Name, or Network.

Note Search fields might change depending on the selected category. When applicable, enter the additional field or filter information to help identify the Search By category.

Enter Controller IP Address

This field only appears if you select IP Address from the Search for controller by field.

Enter Controller Name

This field only appears if you select Controller Name from the Search for controller by field.

Audit Status

Choose one of the following from the drop-down list:

All Status

Mismatch—Configuration differences were found between Prime Infrastructure and controller during the last audit.

Identical—No configuration differences were found during the last audit.

Not Available—Audit status is unavailable.


See the following topics for additional information:

Using the Search Feature, page 2-54

Quick Search, page 2-54

Advanced Search, page 2-55

Saved Searches, page 2-67

Viewing a List of Controllers

Choose Monitor > Controllers or perform a controller search to access the controller list page.


Note See the "Advanced Search" section on page 2-55 for more information on performing an advanced search.


The data area of this page contains a table with the following columns.

Table 5-2 Controller List Details

Fields
Description

IP Address

Local network IP address of the controller management interface. Click an IP address in the list to display the controller details.

Controller Name

Name of the controller.

Location

The geographical location (such as a campus or building).

Mobility Group Name

Name of the controller mobility or WPS group.

Reachability Status

Reachable or Unreachable. Click the title to toggle from ascending to descending order.


Click the title to toggle from ascending to descending order. To add, remove, or reorder columns in the table, click the Edit View link to go to the Edit View page.

Configuring the Controller List Display

The Edit View page allows you to add, remove, or reorder columns in the Controllers table.

To edit the available columns in the Controllers table, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Controllers.

Step 2 Click the Edit View link.

Step 3 To add an additional column to the controllers table, click to highlight the column heading in the left list. Click Show to move the heading to the right list. All items in the right list are displayed in the Controllers table.

Step 4 To remove a column from the Controllers table, click to highlight the list heading in the right list. Click Hide to move the heading to the left list. All items in the left list are not displayed in the Controllers table.

Step 5 Use the buttons to specify the order in which the information appears in the table. Highlight the desired list heading and click Up or Down to move it higher or lower in the current list.

Step 6 Click Reset to restore the default view.

Step 7 Click Submit to confirm the changes.


Monitoring System Parameters

This section provides the detailed information regarding monitoring controller system parameters and contains the following topics:

Monitoring System Summary, page 5-4

Monitoring Spanning Tree Protocol, page 5-6

Monitoring CLI Sessions, page 5-7

Monitoring DHCP Statistics, page 5-8

Monitoring WLANs, page 5-9

Monitoring System Summary

This page displays a summary of the controller parameters with a graphic displaying the status of the controller. The graphic of the front of the controller shows front-panel ports (click a port to go to Monitor Controllers > IPaddr > Ports > General for information about that port). You can find the links to alarms, events and access points details related to the controller.

You can access this page in the following ways:

Choose Monitor > Controllers and click the applicable IP address.

Choose Monitor > Access Points, click a list item under AP Name, then click Registered Controller.

Choose Configure > Access Points, choose a list item under AP Name, then click Registered Controller.

Click Controllers in the page title to view a list of all the controllers. See the "Viewing a List of Controllers" section on page 5-2.

Table 5-3 lists the Monitoring System Summary page fields.

Table 5-3 Monitoring System Summary Page Fields 

Field
Description
General

IP Address

Local network IP address of the controller management interface.

Name

User-defined name of the controller.

Device Type

Type of controller.

UP Time

Time in days, hours and minutes since the last reboot.

System Time

Time used by the controller.

Internal Temperature

The temperature of the controller.

Location

User-defined physical location of the controller.

Contact

Contact person or the owner of the controller.

Total Client Count

Total number of clients currently associated with the controller.

Current CAPWAP Transport Mode

Control and Provisioning of Wireless Access Points (CAPWAP) protocol transport mode. Communications between controllers and access points. Choose Layer 2 or Layer 3.

Power Supply One

If the power supply is available and operation. This is only for 4400 series controller.

Power Supply Two

If the power supply is available and operation. This is only for 4400 series controller.

Inventory

Software Version

The operating system release.version.dot.maintenance number of the code currently running on the controller.

Emergency Image Version

An image version of the controller.

Description

Description of the inventory item.

Model No

Specifies the machine model as defined by the Vital Product Data.

Serial No

Unique serial number for this controller.

Burned-in MAC Address

The burned-in MAC address for this controller.

Number of APs Supported

The maximum number of access points supported by the controller.

Gig Ethernet/Fiber Card

Displays the presence or absence of the optional 1000BASE-T/1000BASE-SX GigE card.

Crypto Card One

Displays the presence or absence of an enhanced security module which enables IPsec security and provides enhanced processing power.

Note By default, the enhanced security module is not installed on a controller.

Maximum number of crypto cards that can be installed on a Cisco Wireless LAN controller:

Cisco 2000 Series—None

Cisco 4100 Series—One

Cisco 4400 Series—Two

Crypto Card Two

Displays the presence or absence of a second enhanced security module.

GIGE Port(s) Status

Up or Down. Click to review the status of the port.

Unique Device Identifier (UDI)

Name

Product type. Chassis for controller and Cisco AP for access points.

Description

Description of controller and might include number of access points.

Product ID

Orderable product identifier.

Version ID

Version of product identifier.

Serial No

Unique product serial number.

Utilization

CPU Utilization

Displays a graph of the maximum, average, and minimum CPU utilization over the specified amount of time.

Memory Utilization

Displays a graph of the maximum, average, and minimum memory utilization over the specified amount of time.


Monitoring Spanning Tree Protocol

The Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) is a link management protocol. Cisco WLAN Solution implements the IEEE 802.1D standard for media access control bridges.

Spanning tree algorithm provides redundancy while preventing undesirable loops in a network that are created by multiple active paths between stations. STP allows only one active path at a time between any two network devices (this prevents the loops) but establishes the redundant links as a backup if the initial link should fail.

You can access this page in the following ways:

Choose Monitor > Controllers, select an IP address, and choose System > Spanning Tree Protocol from the left sidebar menu.

Choose Monitor > Clients, click a list item under AP Name, click Registered Controller, then choose System > Spanning Tree Protocol from the left sidebar menu.


Note The controllers that do not support Spanning Tree Protocol are WISM, 2500, 5500, 7500 and SMWLC.


Table 5-4 lists the Spanning Tree Protocol page fields.

Table 5-4 Spanning Tree Protocol Fields Page Fields 

Field
Description
General

Spanning Tree Specification

An indication of what version of the Spanning Tree Protocol is being run. IEEE 802.1D implementations return 'IEEE 802.1D'. If future versions of the IEEE Spanning Tree Protocol are released that are incompatible with the current version, a new value is defined.

Spanning Tree Algorithm

Specifies if this controller participates in the Spanning Tree Protocol. Might be enabled or disabled by choosing the corresponding line in the drop-down list. The factory default is disabled.

Priority

The value of the writable portion of the Bridge ID, that is, the first two octets of the (8 octet long) Bridge ID. The other (last) 6 octets of the Bridge ID are given by the value of Bridge MAC Address. The value might be specified as a number between 0 and 65535. The factory default is 32768.

STP Statistics

Topology Change Count

The total number of topology changes detected by this bridge since the management entity was last reset or initialized.

Time Since Topology Changed

Time (in days, hours, minutes, and seconds) since a topology change was detected by the bridge.

Designated Root

The bridge identifier of the root of the spanning tree as determined by the Spanning Tree Protocol as executed by this node. This value is used as the Root Identifier parameter in all Configuration Bridge PDUs originated by this node.

Root Cost

The cost of the path to the root as seen from this bridge.

Root Port

The port number of the port which offers the lowest cost path from this bridge to the root bridge.

Maximum Age (seconds)

The value that all bridges use for MaxAge when this bridge is acting as the root.

Note The 802.1D-1990 specifies that the range for this parameter is related to the value of Stp Bridge Hello Time. The granularity of this timer is specified by 802.1D-1990 to be 1 second. Valid values are 6 through 40 seconds. The factory default is 20.

Hello Time (seconds)

The value that all bridges use for HelloTime when this bridge is acting as the root. The granularity of this timer is specified by 802.1D-1990 to be 1 second. Valid values are 1 through 10 seconds. The factory default is 2.

Forward Delay (seconds)

The value that all bridges use for ForwardDelay when this bridge is acting as the root. Note that 802.1D-1990 specifies that the range for this parameter is related to the value of Stp Bridge Maximum Age. The granularity of this timer is specified by 802.1D-1990 to be 1 second. An agent might return a badValue error if a set is attempted to a value which is not a whole number of seconds. Valid values are 4 through 30 seconds. The factory default is 15.

Hold Time (seconds)

The minimum time period to elapse between the transmission of Configuration BPDUs through a given LAN Port: at most one Configuration BPDU shall be transmitted in any Hold Time period.


Monitoring CLI Sessions

The CLI Sessions page for a controller can be accessed in the following ways:

Choose Monitor > Controllers, click the applicable IP address, then choose System > CLI Sessions from the left sidebar menu.

Choose Monitor > Clients, click a list item under AP Name, click Registered Controller, then choose System > CLI Sessions from the left sidebar menu.

Table 5-5 lists CLI Sessions page fields.

Table 5-5 CLI Sessions Page Fields 

Field
Description

Session Index

Session identification.

Username

Login username.

Connection Type

Telnet or serial session.

Connection From

IP address of the client computer system.

Session Time

Elapsed active session time.

Idle Time

Elapsed inactive session time.


Monitoring DHCP Statistics

Prime Infrastructure provides DHCP server statistics for Version 5.0.6.0 controllers or later. These statistics include information on the packets sent and received, DHCP server response information, and the last request time stamp.

To access this page, choose Monitor > Controllers, click the applicable IP address, then choose System > DHCP Statistics from the left sidebar menu.

Table 5-6 lists the The DHCP Statistics page fields.

Table 5-6 DHCP Statistics Page Fields 

Field
Description

Server IP

Identifies the IP address of the server.

Is Proxy

Identifies whether or not this server is proxy.

Discover Packets Sent

Identifies the total number of packets sent intended to locate available servers.

Request Packets Sent

Identifies the total number of packets sent from the client requesting parameters from the server or confirming the correctness of an address.

Decline Packets

Identifies the number of packets indicating that the network address is already in use.

Inform Packets

Identifies the number of client requests to the DHCP server for local configuration parameters because the client already has an externally configured network address.

Release Packets

Identifies the number of packets that release the network address and cancel the remaining lease.

Reply Packets

Identifies the number of reply packets.

Offer Packets

Identifies the number of packets that respond to the discover packets with an offer of configuration parameters.

Ack Packets

Identifies the number of packets that acknowledge successful transmission.

Nak Packets

Identifies the number of packets that indicate that the transmission occurred with errors.

Tx Failures

Identifies the number of transfer failures that occurred.

Last Response Received

Provides a timestamp of the last response received.

Last Request Sent

Provides a timestamp of the last request sent.


Monitoring WLANs

Choose Monitor > Controllers click a controller IP address, and choose WLANs from the left sidebar menu. This page enables you to view a summary of the wireless local access networks (WLANs) that you have configured on this controller.

Table 5-7 lists the WLAN Details page fields.

Table 5-7 WLAN Page Fields 

Field
Description

WLAN ID

Identification number of the WLAN.

Profile Name

User-defined profile name specified when initially creating the WLAN. Profile Name is the WLAN name.

SSID

User-defined SSID name.

Security Policies

Security policies enabled on the WLAN.

No of Mobility Anchors

Mobility anchors are a subset of a mobility group specified as the anchor controllers for a WLAN.

Admin Status

Status of the WLAN is either enabled or disabled.

No. of Clients

Current number of clients currently associated with this WLAN.


Monitoring Ports

This section provides the detailed information regarding monitoring controller port parameters and contains the following topics:

Monitoring General Ports, page 5-9

Monitoring CDP Interface Neighbors, page 5-14

Monitoring General Ports

The Ports > General page provides information regarding physical ports on the selected controller. Click a port number to view details for that port. See the "Port Details" section on page 5-10 for more information.

Table 5-8 lists the General page fields.

Table 5-8 General Page Fields 

Field
Description

Port

Click the port number to view port details. See the "Port Details" section on page 5-10 for more information.

Physical Mode

Displays the physical mode of all ports. The choices include the following:

100 Mbps Full Duplex

100 Mbps Half Duplex

10 Mbps Full Duplex

10 Mbps Half Duplex

Admin Status

Displays the port state as either Enable or Disable.

STP State

Displays the STP state of the port as either Forwarding or Disabled.

Physical Status

Displays the actual port physical interface:

Auto Negotiate

Half Duplex 10 Mbps

Full Duplex 10 Mbps

Half Duplex 100 Mbps

Full Duplex 100 Mbps

Full Duplex 1 Gbps

Link Status

Red (down/failure), Yellow (alarm), Green (up/normal).


To access the Monitor > Ports > General page, do one of the following:

Choose Configure > Controllers, click the applicable IP address. From the left sidebar menu, choose General under Ports.

Choose Monitor > Controllers, click the applicable, and click a port to access this page.

Choose Monitor > Access Points and click a list item under AP Name, click Registered Controller, then click a port to access this page.

Choose Monitor > Clients and click a list item under AP Name, then click Registered Controller, then click a port to access this page.

Port Details


Note Click Alarms to open the Monitor Alarms page. See the "Monitoring Alarms" section on page 5-129 for more information.
Click Events to open the Monitor Events page. See the "Monitoring Events" section on page 5-144 for more information.


Table 5-9 lists the Port Detail page fields.

Table 5-9 Port Details Page Fields 

Field
Description
Interface

Operational Status

Displays the operational status of the controller: The options are UP or DOWN.

Unknown Protocol Packets

The number of packets of unknown type which were received from this server on this port.

Traffic (Received and Transmitted)

Total Bytes

The total number of packets received.

Packets

The total number of packets (including bad packets) received that were within the indicated octet range in length (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets).

Ranges include the following:

64 Octets

65-127 Octets

128-255 Octets

256-511 Octets

512-1023 Octets

1024-1518 Octets

Packets (Received and Transmitted)

Total

Total number of packets received/transmitted.

Unicast Packets

The number of subnetwork-unicast packets delivered/sent to a higher-layer protocol.

Broadcast Packets

The total number of packets received/sent that were directed to the broadcast address.

Packets Discarded

Packets Discarded (Received/Transmitted): The number of inbound/outbound packets which were chosen to be discarded even though no errors had been detected to prevent their being deliverable to a higher-layer protocol. A possible reason for discarding a packet could be to free up buffer space.

Errors in Packets

The total number of packets received with errors.

Received packets with MAC errors

Jabbers

The total number of packets received that were longer than 1518 octets (excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets), and had either a bad Frame Check Sequence (FCS) with an integral number of octets (FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a non-integral number of octets (Alignment Error).

Note This definition of jabber is different than the definition in IEEE-802.3 section 8.2.1.5 (10Base-5) and section 10.3.1.4 (10Base-2). These documents define jabber as the condition where any packet exceeds 20 ms. The allowed range to detect jabber is between 20 and 150 ms.

Fragments/Undersize

The total number of packets received that were less than 64 octets in length (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets).

Alignment Errors

The total number of packets received that had a length (excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets) of between 64 and 1518 octets, inclusive, but had a bad Frame Check Sequence (FCS) with a non-integral number of octets.

FCS Errors

The total number of packets received that had a length (excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets) of between 64 and 1518 octets, inclusive, but had a bad Frame Check Sequence (FCS) with an integral number of octets.

Transmit discards

Single Collision Frames

A count of the number of successfully transmitted frames on a particular interface for which transmission is inhibited by exactly one collision.

Multiple Collision Frames

A count of the number of successfully transmitted frames on a particular interface for which transmission is inhibited by more than one collision.

Deferred Transmissions

A count of frames for which transmission on a particular interface fails due to deferred transmissions.

Late Collisions

A count of frames for which transmission on a particular interface fails due to late collisions.

Excessive Collisions

A count of frames for which transmission on a particular interface fails due to excessive collisions.

Ether Stats

CRC Align Errors

The number of incoming packets with the Checksum (FCS) alignment error. This represents a count of frames received on a particular interface that are not an integral number of octets in length and do not pass the FCS check. Received frames for which multiple error conditions obtain are, according to the conventions of IEEE 802.3 Layer Management, counted exclusively according to the error status presented to the LLC.

Undersize Packets

The total number of packets received that were less than 64 octets in length (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets).

Oversize Packets

The total number of frames that exceeded the maximum permitted frame size. This counter has a maximum increment rate of 815 counts per second at 10 Mbps.

Ether Stats Collisions

The number of packets with collision errors.

SQE Test Errors

Signal Quality Error Test errors (that is, Heartbeat) during transmission. This tests the important collision detection electronics of the transceiver, and lets the Ethernet interface in the computer know that the collision detection circuits and signal paths are working correctly. The errors indicate a count of times that the SQE TEST ERROR message is generated by the PLS sublayer for a particular interface. The SQE TEST ERROR message is defined in section 7.2.2.2.4 of ANSI/IEEE 802.3-1985 and its generation is described in section 7.2.4.6 of the same document.

Internal MAC Receive Errors

A count of frames for which reception on a particular interface fails due to an internal MAC sublayer receive error. A frame is only counted by an instance of this object if it is not counted by the corresponding instance of either the FrameTooLong property, the AlignmentErrors property, or the FCSErrors property. The precise meaning of the count represented by an instance of this object is implementation-specific. In particular, an instance of this object might represent a count of receive errors on a particular interface that are not otherwise counted.

Internal MAC Transmit Errors

A count of frames for which transmission on a particular interface fails due to an internal MAC sublayer transmit error. A frame is only counted by an instance of this object if it is not counted by the corresponding instance of either the LateCollisions property, the ExcessiveCollisions property, or the CarrierSenseErrors property. The precise meaning of the count represented by an instance of this object is implementation-specific. In particular, an instance of this object might represent a count of transmission errors on a particular interface that are not otherwise counted.

Carrier Sense Errors

The Carrier Sense detects the presence of a carrier. The number of times that the carrier sense condition was lost or never asserted when attempting to transmit a frame on a particular interface.

Too Long Frames

A count of frames received on a particular interface that exceed the maximum permitted frame size. The count represented by an instance of this object is incremented when the FrameTooLong status is returned by the MAC layer to the LLC (or other MAC user). Received frames for which multiple error conditions obtain are, according to the conventions of IEEE 802.3 Layer Management, counted exclusively according to the error status presented to the LLC.


Monitoring CDP Interface Neighbors

To access the Monitor CDP Interface Neighbors page, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Controllers.

Step 2 Click the IP address of the applicable controller.

Step 3 From the left sidebar menu, choose CDP Interface Neighbors (under the Port heading).

Step 4 Table 5-10 lists the CDP Interface Neighbors page fields.

Table 5-10 CDP Interface Neighbors Page Fields 

Field
Description

Local Interface

Local Port information.

Neighbor Name

The name of each CDP neighbor.

Neighbor Address

The IP address of each CDP neighbor.

Neighbor Port

The port used by each CDP neighbor for transmitting CDP packets.

Capability

The functional capability of each CDP neighbor.

Platform

The hardware platform of each CDP neighbor device.

Duplex

Indicates Full Duplex or Half Duplex.

Software Version

The software running on the CDP neighbor.



Monitoring Controller Security

This section provides the detailed information regarding monitoring controller security and contains the following topics:

Monitoring RADIUS Authentication, page 5-15

Monitoring RADIUS Accounting, page 5-17

Monitoring Management Frame Protection, page 5-19

Monitoring Rogue AP Rules, page 5-20

Monitoring Guest Users, page 5-22

Monitoring RADIUS Authentication

The RADIUS Authentication page displays RADIUS authentication server information and enables you to add or delete a RADIUS authentication server.

To access this page, do one of the following:

Choose Monitor > Controllers, click the applicable IP address, then choose Security > Radius Authentication from the left sidebar menu.

Choose Monitor > Access Points, click a list item under AP Name, click Registered Controller, then choose Security > Radius Authentication from the left sidebar menu.

Choose Monitor > Clients, click a list item under AP Name, click Registered Controller, then choose Security > Radius Authentication from the left sidebar menu.

Table 5-11 lists the RADIUS Authentication page fields.

Table 5-11 RADIUS Authentictaion Page Fields 

Field
Description
RADIUS Authentication Servers

Server Index

Access priority number for RADIUS servers. Up to four servers can be configured, and controller polling of the servers starts with Index 1, Index 2 second, and so forth. The index number is based on when the RADIUS server is added to the controller.

IP Address

The IP address of the RADIUS server.

Ping

Click the icon to ping the RADIUS server from the controller to verify the link.

Port

Controller port number for the interface protocols.

Admin Status

Indicates whether the server is enabled or disabled.

Authentication Server Statistics

Msg Round Trip Time

The time interval (in milliseconds) between the most recent Access-Reply/Access-Challenge and the Access-Request that matched it from this RADIUS authentication server.

First Requests

The number of RADIUS Access-Request packets sent to this server. This does not include retransmissions.

Retry Requests

The number of RADIUS Authentication-Request packets retransmitted to this RADIUS authentication server.

Accept Responses

The number of RADIUS Access-Accept packets (valid or invalid) received from this server.

Reject Responses

The number of RADIUS Access-Reject packets (valid or invalid) received from this server.

Challenge Responses

The number of RADIUS Access-Challenge packets (valid or invalid) received from this server.

Malformed Msgs

The number of malformed RADIUS Access-Response packets received from this server. Malformed packets include packets with an invalid length. Bad authenticators or Signature attributes or unknown types are not included as malformed access responses.

Pending Requests

The number of RADIUS Access-Request packets destined for this server that have not yet timed out or received a response. This variable is incremented when an Access-Request is sent and decremented due to receipt of an Access-Accept, Access-Reject or Access-Challenge, a timeout, or retransmission.

Bad Authentication Msgs

The number of RADIUS Access-Response packets containing invalid authenticators or Signature attributes received from this server.

Timeouts Requests

The number of authentication timeouts to this server. After a timeout the client might retry to the same server, send to a different server, or give up. A retry to the same server is counted as a retransmit as well as a timeout. A send to a different server is counted as a Request as well as a timeout.

Unknown Type Msgs

The number of RADIUS packets of unknown type which were received from this server on the authentication port.

Other Drops

The number of RADIUS packets received from this server on the authentication port and dropped for some other reason.


Monitoring RADIUS Accounting

You can access this page by any of the following ways:

Choose Monitor > Controllers and click the applicable IP address, then choose Security > Radius Accounting from the left sidebar menu.

Choose Monitor > Clients and click a list item under AP Name, click Registered Controller, then choose Security > Radius Accounting from the left sidebar menu.

Choose Monitor > Maps, click an item in the Name column, click an access point icon, click Controller, then choose Security > Radius Accounting from the left sidebar menu.

Choose Configure > Access Points and select a list item under AP Name, click Registered Controller, then choose Security > Radius Accounting from the left sidebar menu.

Table 5-12 lists the RADIUS Accounting page fields.

Table 5-12 RADIUS Accoungting Page Fields 

Field
Description
RADIUS Accounting Server

Server Index

Access priority number for RADIUS servers. Up to four servers can be configured, and controller polling of the servers starts with Index 1, Index 2 second, and so forth. Index number is based on when the RADIUS server is added to the controller.

IP Address

The IP address of the RADIUS server.

Ping

Click the icon to ping the RADIUS Server from the controller to verify the link.

Port

The port of the RADIUS server.

Admin Status

Indicates whether the server is enabled or disabled.

Accounting Statistics

Msg Round Trip Time

The time interval (in milliseconds) between the most recent Accounting-Response and the Accounting-Request that matched it from this RADIUS accounting server.

First Requests

The number of RADIUS Accounting-Request packets sent. This does not include retransmissions.

Retry Requests

The number of RADIUS Accounting-Request packets retransmitted to this RADIUS accounting server. Retransmissions include retries where the Identifier and Acct-Delay have been updated, as well as those in which they remain the same.

Accounting Responses

The number of RADIUS packets received on the accounting port from this server.

Malformed Msgs

The number of malformed RADIUS Accounting-Response packets received from this server. Malformed packets include packets with an invalid length. Bad authenticators and unknown types are not included as malformed accounting responses.

Bad Authentication Msgs

The number of RADIUS Accounting-Response packets which contained invalid authenticators received from this server.

Pending Requests

The number of RADIUS Accounting-Request packets sent to this server that have not yet timed out or received a response. This variable is incremented when an Accounting-Request is sent and decremented due to receipt of an Accounting-Response, a timeout or a retransmission.

Timeouts Requests

The number of accounting timeouts to this server. After a timeout the client might retry to the same server, send to a different server, or give up. A retry to the same server is counted as a retransmit as well as a timeout. A send to a different server is counted as an Accounting-Request as well as a timeout.

Unknown Type Msgs

The number of RADIUS packets of unknown type which were received from this server on the accounting port.

Other Drops

The number of RADIUS packets which were received from this server on the accounting port and dropped for some other reason.


Monitoring Management Frame Protection

This page displays the Management Frame Protection (MFP) summary information. MFP provides the authentication of 802.11 management frames. Management frames can be protected to detect adversaries who are invoking denial of service attacks, flooding the network with probes, interjecting as rogue access points, and affecting the network performance by attacking the QoS and radio measurement frames.

If one or more of the WLANs for the controller has MFP enabled, the controller sends each registered access point a unique key for each BSSID the access point uses for those WLANs. Management frames sent by the access point over the MFP enabled WLANs is signed with a Frame Protection Information Element (IE). Any attempt to alter the frame invalidates the message causing the receiving access point configured to detect MFP frames to report the discrepancy to the WLAN controller.

Access this page in one of the following ways:

Choose Monitor > Controllers. From the Controllers > Search Results page, click the applicable IP address, then choose Security > Management Frame Protection from the left sidebar menu.

Choose Monitor > Access Points, click a list item under AP Name, click Registered Controller, then choose Security > Management Frame Protection from the left sidebar menu.

Choose Monitor > Clients, click a list item under AP Name, click Registered Controller, then choose Security > Management Frame Protection from the left sidebar menu.

Table 5-13 lists the MFP page fields.

Table 5-13 MFP Page Fields 

Field
Description
General

Management Frame Protection

Indicates if the infrastructure MFP is enabled globally for the controller.

Controller Time Source Valid

The Controller Time Source Valid field indicates whether the controller time is set locally (by manually entering the time) or through an external source (such as NTP server). If the time is set by an external source, the value of this field is "True." If the time is set locally, the value is "False." The time source is used for validating the timestamp on management frames between access points of different controllers within a mobility group.

WLAN Details

WLAN ID

The WLAN ID, 1 through 17.

WLAN Name

User-defined profile name when initially creating the WLAN. Both the SSID name and profile name are user-defined. The WLAN name is same as the profile name.

MFP Protection

Management Frame Protection is either enabled or disabled.

Status

Status of the WLAN is either enabled or disabled.

AP Details

AP Name

Operator-defined name of access point.

MFP Validation

Management Frame Protection is enabled or disabled.

Radio

802.11a or 802.11b/g.

Operation Status

Displays the operational status: either UP or DOWN.

Protection

Full (All Frames).

Validation

Full (All Frames).


Monitoring Rogue AP Rules

Rogue AP rules automatically classify rogue access points based on criteria such as authentication type, matching configured SSIDs, client count, and RSSI values. Prime Infrastructure applies the rogue access point classification rules to the controllers and respective access points.

These rules can limit a rogue appearance on maps based on RSSI level (weaker rogue access points are ignored) and time limit (a rogue access point is not flagged unless it is seen for the indicated period of time).

Rogue AP Rules also help reduce false alarms.


Note Rogue classes include the following types:
Malicious Rogue—A detected access point that matches the user-defined malicious rules or has been manually moved from the Friendly AP category.
Friendly Rogue—Known, acknowledged, or trusted access point or a detected access point that matches user-defined friendly rules.
Unclassified Rogue—A detected access point that does not match the malicious or friendly rules.


Choose Monitor > Controllers. From the Controllers > Search Results page, click the applicable IP address, then choose Security > Rogue AP Rules from the left sidebar menu.

The Rogue AP Rules page provides a list of all rogue access point rules currently applied to this controller.

The following information is displayed for rogue access point rules:

Rogue AP Rule name—Click the link to view Rogue AP Rule details.

Rule Type—Malicious or Friendly.

Malicious Rogue—A detected access point that matches the user-defined Malicious rules or has been manually moved from the Friendly AP category.

Friendly Rogue—Known, acknowledged, or trusted access point or a detected access point that matches user-defined Friendly rules.

Priority—Indicates the priority level for this rogue AP rule.


Note See the "Configuring a Rogue AP Rules Template" section on page 11-636 for more information on Rogue AP Rules.


Rogue AP Rules

Table 5-14 lists the Rogue AP Rules page fields.

Table 5-14 Rogue AP Rule Page Fields 

Field
Description

Rule Name

Name of the rule.

Rule Type

Malicious or Friendly

Malicious Rogue—A detected access point that matches the user-defined Malicious rules or has been manually moved from the Friendly AP category.

Friendly Rogue—Known, acknowledged, or trusted access point or a detected access point that matches user-defined Friendly rules.

Match Type

Match any or match all conditions.

Enabled Rule Conditions

Indicates all enabled rule conditions including:

Open Authentication

Match Managed AP SSID

Match User Configured SSID

Minimum RSSI

Time Duration

Minimum Number Rogue Clients



Note See the "Configuring a Rogue AP Rules Template" section on page 11-636 for more information on Rogue AP Rules.


Monitoring Guest Users

Choose Monitor > Controllers. From the Controllers > Search Results page, click the applicable IP Address, then choose Security > Guest Users from the left sidebar menu.

Prime Infrastructure allows you to monitor guest users from the Guest Users page as well as from Prime Infrastructure home page.

The Guest Users page provides a summary of the guest access deployment and network use.

The following information is displayed for guest users currently associates on the network. Table 5-15 lists the Guest Users page fields.

Table 5-15 Guest Users Page Fields 

Field
Description

Guest User Name

Indicates the guest user login name.

Profile

Indicates the profile to which the guest user is connected.

Lifetime

Indicates the length of time that the guest user account is active. Length of time appears in days, hours, and minutes or as Never Expires.

Start Time

Indicates when the guest user account was activated.

Remaining Lifetime

Indicates the remaining time for the guest user account.

Role

Indicates the designated user role.

First Logged in at

Indicates the date and time of the user first login.

Number of logins

Indicates the total number of logins for this guest user.

Description

User-defined description of the guest user account for identification purposes.


Monitoring Controllers Mobility

Monitoring Mobility Stats

The Mobility Stats page displays the statistics for mobility group events.

Access this page in one of the following ways:

Choose Monitor > Controllers and click the applicable IP address, then choose Mobility > Mobility Stats from the left sidebar menu.

Choose Monitor > Access Points, click a list item under AP Name, click Registered Controller, then choose Mobility > Mobility Stats from the left sidebar menu.

Choose Monitor > Clients, click a list item under AP Name, click Registered Controller, then choose Mobility > Mobility Stats from the left sidebar menu.

Table 5-16 lists the Mobility Stats page fields.

Table 5-16 Mobility Stats Page Fields 

Field
Description
Global Mobility Statistics

Rx Errors

Generic protocol packet receive errors, such as packet too short or format incorrect.

Tx Errors

Generic protocol packet transmit errors, such as packet transmission fail.

Responses Retransmitted

The Mobility protocol uses UDP and it resends requests several times if it does not receive a response. Because of network or processing delays, the responder might receive one or more retry requests after it initially responds to a request. This is a count of the response resends.

Handoff Requests Received

Total number of handoff requests received, ignored or responded to.

Handoff End Requests

Total number of handoff end requests received. These are sent by the Anchor or the Foreign to notify the other about the close of a client session.

State Transitions Disallowed

PEM (policy enforcement module) has denied a client state transition, usually resulting in the handoff being aborted.

Resource Unavailable

A necessary resource, such as a buffer, was unavailable, resulting in the handoff being aborted.

Mobility Responder Statistics

Handoff Requests Ignored

Number of handoff requests/client announces that were ignored. The controller simply had no knowledge of that client.

Ping Pong Handoff Requests Dropped

Number of handoff requests that were denied because the handoff period was too short (3 sec).

Handoff Requests Dropped

Number of handoff requests that were dropped due to a either an incomplete knowledge of the client or a problem with the packet.

Handoff Requests Denied

Number of handoff requests that were actively denied.

Client Handoff as Local

Number of handoffs responses sent while in the local role.

Client Handoff as Foreign

Number of handoffs responses sent while in the foreign role.

Anchor Requests Received

Number of anchor requests received.

Anchor Requests Denied

Number of anchor requests denied.

Anchor Requests Granted

Number of anchor requests granted.

Anchor Transferred

Number of anchors transferred because the client has moved from a foreign controller to controller on the same subnet as the current anchor.

Mobility Initiator Statistics

Handoff Requests Sent

Number of clients that have associated with controller and have been announced to the mobility group.

Handoff Replies Received

Number of handoff replies that have been received in response to the requests sent.

Handoff as Local Received

Number of handoffs in which the entire client session has been transferred.

Handoff as Foreign Received

Number of handoffs in which the client session was anchored elsewhere.

Handoff Denies Received

Number of handoffs that were denied.

Anchor Request Sent

Number of anchor requests that were sent for a three party (foreign to foreign) handoff. Handoff was received from another foreign and the new controller is requesting the anchor to move the client.

Anchor Deny Received

Number of anchor requests that were denied by the current anchor.

Anchor Grant Received

Number of anchor requests that were approved by the current anchor.

Anchor Transfer Received

Number of anchor transfers that were received by the current anchor.


Monitoring Controller 802.11a/n

This section provides detailed information regarding monitoring 802.11a/n parameters and contains the following topics:

Monitoring 802.11a/n Parameters, page 5-25

Monitoring 802.11a/n RRM Groups, page 5-27

Monitoring 802.11a/n Parameters

Access the 802.11a/n Parameters page in one of the following ways:

Choose Monitor > Controllers and click the applicable IP address, then choose Parameters from the 802.11a/n section of the left sidebar menu.

Choose Monitor > Access Points, click a list item under AP Name, click Registered Controller, then choose Parameters from the 802.11a/n section of the left sidebar menu.

Choose Monitor > Clients, click a list item under AP Name, click Registered Controller, then choose Parameters from the 802.11a/n section of the left sidebar menu.

Table 5-17 lists the 802.11a/n Parameters page fields.

Table 5-17 802.11 a/n Parameters Page Fields 

Field
Description
MAC Operation Parameters

RTS Threshold

Indicates the number of octets in an MPDU, below which an RTS/CTS handshake is not performed.

Note An RTS/CTS handshake is performed at the beginning of any frame exchange sequence where the MPDU is a data or management type, the MPDU has an individual address in the Address1 field, and the length of the MPDU is greater than this threshold. Setting this attribute higher than the maximum MSDU size turns off the RTS/CTS handshake for data or management type frames transmitted by this STA. Setting this attribute to zero turns on the RTS/CTS handshake for all transmitted data or management type frames.

Short Retry Limit

The maximum number of transmission attempts of a frame (less than or equal to dot11RTSThreshold) made before a failure condition is indicated. The default value is 7.

Long Retry Limit

The maximum number of transmission attempts of a frame (greater than dot11RTSThreshold) made before a failure condition is indicated. The default value is 4.

Max Tx MSDU Lifetime

The elapsed time in TU, after the initial transmission of an MSDU, after which further attempts to transmit the MSDU are terminated. The default value is 512.

Max Rx Lifetime

The elapsed time in TU, after the initial reception of a fragmented MMPDU or MSDU, after which further attempts to reassemble the MMPDU or MSDU are terminated. The default value is 512.

Physical Channel Fields

TI Threshold

The threshold being used to detect a busy medium (frequency). CCA shall report a busy medium upon detecting the RSSI above this threshold.

Channel Agility Enabled

Physical channel agility functionality is or is not implemented.

Station Configuration Fields

Medium Occupancy Limit

Indicates the maximum amount of time, in TU, that a point coordinator might control the usage of the wireless medium without relinquishing control for long enough to allow at least one instance of DCF access to the medium. The default value is 100, and the maximum value is 1000.

CFP Period

The number of DTIM intervals between the start of CFPs. It is modified by MLME-START.request primitive.

CFP Max Duration

The maximum duration of the CFP in TU that might be generated by the PCF. It is modified by MLME-START.request primitive.

CF Pollable

When this attribute is implemented, it indicates that the client is able to respond to a CF-Poll with a data frame within a SIFS time. This attribute is not implemented if the STA is not able to respond to a CF-Poll with a data frame within a SIFS time.

CF Poll Request

Specifies whether CFP is requested by the client.

DTIM Period

The number of beacon intervals that elapse between transmission of Beacon frames containing a TIM element whose DTIM Count field is 0. This value is transmitted in the DTIM Period field of Beacon frames.


Monitoring 802.11a/n RRM Groups

Access the RRM Grouping page in one of the following ways:

Choose Monitor > Controllers and click the applicable IP address, then choose Grouping or WPS Grouping from the 802.11a/n section of the left sidebar menu.

Choose Monitor > Access Points, click a list item under AP Name, click Registered Controller, then choose RRM Grouping or WPS Grouping from the 802.11a/n section of the left sidebar menu.

Choose Monitor > Clients, click a list item under AP Name, click Registered Controller, then choose RRM Grouping or WPS Grouping from the 802.11a/n section of the left sidebar menu.

Table 5-18 lists the 802.11a/n RRM Grouping page fields.

Table 5-18 802.11 a/n RRM Grouping Page Fields 

Field
Description
802.11a Grouping Control

Grouping Mode

Dynamic grouping has two modes: on and off. When the grouping is off, no dynamic grouping occurs. Each controller optimizes only its own parameters of the access point. When grouping is on, the controller forms groups and elects leaders to perform better dynamic parameter optimization.

Grouping Role

There are five grouping roles:

None—This grouping role appears when the RF Group Mode is configured as Off.

Auto-Leader—This grouping role appears when the RF Group Mode is configured as Automatic and the controller is elected as a leader by the automatic grouping algorithm.

Auto-Member—This grouping role appears when the RF Group Mode is configured as Automatic and the controller is selected as a member by the automatic grouping algorithm.

Static-Leader—This grouping role appears when the RF Group Mode is configured as Leader.

Static-member—This grouping role appears when the RF Group Mode is configured as automatic and the controller joins the leader as a result of the join request from the leader.

Group Leader IP Address

This is the IP address of the group leader.

Group Leader MAC Address

This is the MAC address of the group leader for the group containing this controller.

Is 802.11a Group Leader

Yes, if this controller is the group leader or No if the controller is not the group leader.

Last Update Time (secs)

The elapsed time since the last group update in seconds. This is only valid if this controller is a group leader.

Group Update Interval (secs)

When grouping is on, this interval (in seconds) represents the period with which the grouping algorithm is run by the Group Leader. Grouping algorithm also runs when the group contents changes and the automatic grouping is enabled. A dynamic grouping can be started upon request from the system administrator. Default value is 3600 seconds.

Group Members

Group Member Name

Name of group member(s).

Group Member IP Address

IP address of group member(s).

Member Join Reason

Current state of the member(s).


Monitoring Controllers 802.11b/g/n

This section provides the detailed information regarding monitoring 802.11b/g/n parameters and contains the following topics:

Monitoring 802.11b/g/n Parameters, page 5-29

Monitoring 802.11b/g/n RRM Groups, page 5-30

Monitoring 802.11b/g/n Parameters

Access the 802.11b/g/n Parameters page in one of the following ways:

Choose Monitor > Controllers and click the applicable IP Address, then choose Parameters from the 802.11b/g/n section of the left sidebar menu.

Choose Monitor > Access Points, click a list item under AP Name, click Registered Controller, then choose Parameters from the 802.11b/g/n section of the left sidebar menu.

Choose Monitor > Clients, click a list item under AP Name, click Registered Controller, then choose Parameters from the 802.11b/g/n section of the left sidebar menu.

Table 5-19 lists the 802.11b/g Parameters page fields.

Table 5-19 802.11 b/g/n Parameters Page Fields 

Field
Description
MAC Operation Parameters

RTS Threshold

Indicates the number of octets in an MPDU, below which an RTS/CTS handshake is not performed.

Note An RTS/CTS handshake is performed at the beginning of any frame exchange sequence where the MPDU is a data or management type, the MPDU has an individual address in the Address1 field, and the length of the MPDU is greater than this threshold. Setting this attribute higher than the maximum MSDU size turns off the RTS/CTS handshake for data or management type frames transmitted by this STA. Setting this attribute to zero turns on the RTS/CTS handshake for all transmitted data or management type frames.

Short Retry Limit

The maximum number of transmission attempts of a frame (less than or equal to dot11RTSThreshold) made before a failure condition is indicated. The default value is 7.

Long Retry Limit

The maximum number of transmission attempts of a frame (greater than dot11RTSThreshold) made before a failure condition is indicated. The default value is 4.

Max Tx MSDU Lifetime

The elapsed time in TU, after the initial transmission of an MSDU, after which further attempts to transmit the MSDU are terminated. The default value is 512.

Max Rx Lifetime

The elapsed time in TU, after the initial reception of a fragmented MMPDU or MSDU, after which further attempts to reassemble the MMPDU or MSDU are terminated. The default value is 512.

Physical Channel Fields

TI Threshold

The threshold being used to detect a busy medium (frequency). CCA shall report a busy medium upon detecting the RSSI above this threshold.

Channel Agility Enabled

Physical channel agility functionality is or is not implemented.

Station Configuration Fields

Medium Occupancy Limit

Indicates the maximum amount of time, in TU, that a point coordinator might control the usage of the wireless medium without relinquishing control for long enough to allow at least one instance of DCF access to the medium. The default value is 100, and the maximum value is 1000.

CFP Period

The number of DTIM intervals between the start of CFPs. It is modified by MLME-START.request primitive.

CFP Max Duration

The maximum duration of the CFP in TU that might be generated by the PCF. It is modified by MLME-START.request primitive.

CF Pollable

When this attribute is implemented, it indicates that the client is able to respond to a CF-Poll with a data frame within a SIFS time. This attribute is not implemented if the STA is not able to respond to a CF-Poll with a data frame within a SIFS time.

CF Poll Request

Specifies whether CFP is requested by the client.

DTIM Period

The number of beacon intervals that elapse between transmission of Beacon frames containing a TIM element whose DTIM Count field is 0. This value is transmitted in the DTIM Period field of Beacon frames.


Monitoring 802.11b/g/n RRM Groups

Access the 802.11b/g/n RRM Grouping page in one of the following ways:

Choose Monitor > Controllers and click the applicable IP address, then choose RRM Grouping or WPS Grouping from the 802.11b/g/n section of the left sidebar menu.

Choose Monitor > Access Points, click a list item under AP Name, click Registered Controller, then choose RRM Grouping or WPS Grouping from the 802.11b/g/n section of the left sidebar menu.

Choose Monitor > Clients, click a list item under AP Name, click Registered Controller, then choose RRM Grouping or WPS Grouping from the 802.11b/g/n section of the left sidebar menu.

Table 5-20 lists the 802.11b/g/n RRM grouping page fields.

Table 5-20 802.11 b/g/n RRM Grouping Page Fields 

Field
Description
802.11 b/g/n Grouping Control

Grouping Mode

Dynamic grouping has two modes: on and off. When the grouping is off, no dynamic grouping occurs. Each controller optimizes only its own parameters of the access point. When grouping is on, the controller forms groups and elects leaders to perform better dynamic parameter optimization.

Grouping Role

There are five grouping roles:

None—This grouping role appears when the RF Group Mode is configured as Off.

Auto-Leader—This grouping role appears when the RF Group Mode is configured as Automatic and the controller is elected as a leader by the automatic grouping algorithm.

Auto-Member—This grouping role appears when the RF Group Mode is configured as Automatic and the controller is selected as a member by the automatic grouping algorithm.

Static-Leader—This grouping role appears when the RF Group Mode is configured as Leader.

Static-member—This grouping role appears when the RF Group Mode is configured as automatic and the controller joins the leader as a result of the join request from the leader.

Group Leader IP Address

This is the IP address of the group leader.

Group Leader MAC Address

This is the MAC address of the group leader for the group containing this controller.

Is 802.11a Group Leader

Yes, if this controller is the group leader or No if the controller is not the group leader.

Last Update Time (secs)

The elapsed time since the last group update in seconds. This is only valid if this controller is a group leader.

Group Update Interval (secs)

When grouping is on, this interval (in seconds) represents the period with which the grouping algorithm is run by the Group Leader. Grouping algorithm also runs when the group contents changes and the automatic grouping is enabled. A dynamic grouping can be started upon request from the system administrator. Default value is 3600 seconds.

Group Members

Group Member Name

Name of group member(s).

Group Member IP Address

IP address of group member(s).

Member Join Reason

Current state of the member(s).


Monitoring Controllers IPv6

Monitoring Neighbor Bind Counter Statistics

Access the Neighbor Bind Counter Statistics page in one of the following ways:

Choose Monitor > Controllers, select an IP Address, and choose IPv6 > Neighbor Bind Counters from the left sidebar menu.

Choose Monitor > Access Points, click a list item under AP Name, click Registered Controller, then choose IPv6 > Neighbor Bind Counters from the left sidebar menu.

Choose Monitor > Clients, click a list item under AP Name, click Registered Controller, then choose IPv6 > Neighbor Bind Counters from the left sidebar menu.

Table 5-21 lists the Neighbor Bind Counter Stats page fields.

Table 5-21 Neighbor Bind Counter Stats Page Fields 

Field
Description

Neighbor Bind Counters

Provides the statistics of the number of messages exchanged between the host or client and the router to generate and acquire IPv6 addresses, link, MTU, and so on.

Received Messages

The number of Advertisement, Solicitation and other messages received for NDP and DHCPv6.

Bridged Messages

The number of Advertisement, Solicitation and other messages bridged for NDP and DHCPv6.

Total Snooping Dropped Messages

The number of Advertisement, Solicitation and other messages bridged for NDP and DHCPv6 along with the reason for the drop.

Neighbor Discovery Suppress Drop Counter

The total number of neighbor discovery messages dropped.

Total Suppress Dropped Messages

The reason for the neighbor discovery messages drop.



Note Hover your mouse cursor over the values in the Total Snooping/Suppress Drop Messages column to see the reasons due to which the corresponding messages were dropped.


Monitoring Switches

Choose Monitor > Switches to view the detailed information about the switches. This section provides more detailed information regarding monitoring switches and includes the following topics:

Searching Switches, page 5-33

Viewing the Switches, page 5-34

Monitoring Switch System Parameters, page 5-34

Monitoring Switch Interfaces, page 5-40

Monitoring Switch Clients, page 5-42

Searching Switches

Use Prime Infrastructure search feature to find specific switches or to create and save custom searches.

You can configure the following fields when performing an advanced search for switches (see Table 5-22).

Table 5-22 Search Switches Fields 

Field
Options

Search for Switches by

Choose All Switches, IP Address, or Switch Name. You can use wildcards (*). For example, if you select IP Address and enter 172*, Prime Infrastructure returns all switches that begin with IP address 172.

Items per page

Select the number of switches to return per page.


See one of the following topics for additional information:

Using the Search Feature, page 2-54

Quick Search, page 2-54

Advanced Search, page 2-55

Saved Searches, page 2-67

Viewing the Switches

Choose Monitor > Switches to view a list of the switches. From this page you can view a summary of the switches including the default information shown in Table 5-23.

Table 5-23 Viewing the Switches 

Field
Description

IP Address

The IP address assigned to the switch. Click a list item to view access point details.

Device Name

Name of the switch.

Device Type

Type of switch.

Reachability Status

Indicates OK if the switch is reachable or Unreachable if the switch is not reachable.

Endpoint Count

Number of endpoints on the switch.


Configuring the Switch List Page

The Edit View page allows you to add, remove, or reorder columns in the Switches table.

To edit the available columns in the table, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Switches.

Step 2 Click the Edit View link.

Step 3 To add an additional column to the table, click to highlight the column heading in the left column. Click Show to move the heading to the right column. All items in the right column are displayed in the table.

Step 4 To remove a column from the table, click to highlight the column heading in the right column. Click Hide to move the heading to the left column. All items in the left column are not displayed in the table.

Step 5 Use the Up/Down buttons to specify the order in which the information appears in the table. Highlight the desired column heading and click Up or Down to move it higher or lower in the current list.

Step 6 Click Reset to restore the default view.

Step 7 Click Submit to confirm the changes.


Monitoring Switch System Parameters

Choose Monitor > Switches, then click an IP address in the IP Address column to view details about the switch. This section provides the detailed information regarding each switch details page and contains the following topics:

Viewing Switch Summary Information, page 5-35

Viewing Switch Memory Information, page 5-36

Viewing Switch Environment Information, page 5-36

Viewing Switch Module Information, page 5-37

Viewing Switch VLAN Information, page 5-37

Viewing Switch VTP Information, page 5-37

Viewing Switch Physical Ports Information, page 5-38

Viewing Switch Sensor Information, page 5-38

Viewing Switch Spanning Tree Information, page 5-39

Viewing Switch Stacks Information, page 5-40

Viewing Switch NMSP and Location Information, page 5-40

Viewing Switch Summary Information

Choose Monitor > Switches, then click an IP address in the IP Address column to view details about the switch. Table 5-24 describes the summary information that is displayed.

Table 5-24 Viewing Switches Summary Information  

General

IP Address

IP address of the switch.

Device Name

Name of the switch.

Device Type

Switch type.

Up Time

Time since last reboot.

System Time

Time on the switch.

Reachability Status

which can be the following:

Reachable

Unreachable

Location

Location of the switch.

Contact

Contact name for the switch.

Cisco Identity Capable

Specifies if the switch is identity-capable.

Location Capable

Specifies if the switch is capable of storing the location information.

CPU Utilization

Displays a graph of the maximum, average, and minimum CPU utilization over the specified amount of time.

Unique Device Identifier (UDI)

Name

Product type.

Description

Description of UDI.

Product ID

Orderable product identifier.

Version ID

Version of product identifier.

Serial Number

Unique product serial number.

Inventory

Software Version

Version of software currently running on the switch.

Model No.

Model number of the switch.

Port Summary

Number of Ports Up

Number of ports up on the switch.

Number of Ports Down

Number of ports down on the switch.

Memory Utilization

Displays a graph of the maximum, average, and minimum memory utilization over the specified amount of time.


Related Topic

Monitoring Switch Interfaces, page 5-40

Viewing Switch Memory Information

Choose Monitor > Switches, then click an IP address in the IP Address column to view details about the switch. From the System menu, choose Memory. Table 5-25 describes the memory information that is displayed.

Table 5-25 Viewing Switches Memory Information 

Memory Pool

Type

Type of memory.

Name

Name assigned to the memory pool.

Used (MB)

Amount of memory (in MB) used.

Free (MB)

Amount of memory (in MB) available.


Viewing Switch Environment Information

Choose Monitor > Switches, then click an IP address in the IP Address column to view details about the switch. From the System menu, choose Environment. Table 5-26 describes the environment information that is displayed.

Table 5-26 Viewing Switches Environment Information 

Power Supply

Model Name

Model name of the power supply.

Description

Description of the power supply.

Operational Status

Status of the associated power supply:

Green—Power supply is operational.

Red—Power supply is inoperable.

Manufacturer Name

Name of the power supply manufacturer.

Free

Free power supply slots.

Vendor Equipment Type

Description of vendor equipment type.

Fans

Name

Name of fan.

Description

Description of fan.

Operational Status

Status of the fan:

Green—Fan is operational.

Red—Fan is inoperable.

Vendor Equipment Type

Description of vendor equipment type.

Serial Number

Serial number of the fan.


Viewing Switch Module Information

Choose Monitor > Switches, then click an IP address in the IP Address column to view details about the switch. From the System menu, choose Modules. Table 5-27 describes the module information that is displayed.

Table 5-27 Viewing Switches Modules Information 

Modules

Product Name

Name of the module.

Physical Location

Location where the module is contained.

Number of Ports

Number of ports supported by the module.

Operational State

Operational status of the module.

Equipment Type

Type of equipment.

Inline Power Capable

Specifies whether the module has inline power capability.


Viewing Switch VLAN Information

Choose Monitor > Switches, then click an IP address under the IP Address column to view details about the switch. From the System menu, choose VLANs. Table 5-28 describes the VLAN information that is displayed.

Table 5-28 Viewing Switches VLANs Information 

VLANs

VLAN ID

ID of the VLAN.

VLAN Name

Name of the VLAN.

VLAN Type

Type of VLAN.


Viewing Switch VTP Information

Choose Monitor > Switches, then click an IP address in the IP Address column to view details about the switch. From the System menu, choose VTP. Table 5-29 describes the VTP information that is displayed.

Table 5-29 Viewing Switches VTP Information 

VTP

VTP Domain Name

Name of the VTP domain.

VTP Version

Version of VTP in use.

VTP Mode

The VTP mode:

Client

Server

Transparent—Does not generate or listen to VTP messages, but forwards messages.

Off—Does not generate, listen to, or forward any VTP messages.

Pruning Enabled

Specifies whether VTP pruning is enabled.


Viewing Switch Physical Ports Information

Choose Monitor > Switches, then click an IP address in the IP Address column to view details about the switch. From the System menu, choose Physical Ports. Table 5-30 describes the physical ports information that is displayed.

Table 5-30 Viewing Switches Physical Ports Information 

Physical Ports

Port Name

Name of the physical port.

Port Description

Description of the physical port.

Residing Module

Module on which the physical port resides.

Vendor Equipment Type

Description of vendor equipment type.


Viewing Switch Sensor Information

Choose Monitor > Switches, then click an IP address under the IP Address column to view details about the switch. From the System menu, choose Sensors. Table 5-31 describes the sensor information that is displayed.

Table 5-31 Viewing Switches Sensors Information 

Sensors

Sensor Name

Name of the sensor.

Sensor Description

Description of the sensor.

Type

Type of sensor.

Vendor Sensor Type

Description of vendor sensor type.

Equipment Name

Name of equipment.

Precision

When in the range 1 to 9, precision is the number of decimal places in the fractional part of a Sensor Value fixed-point number. When in the range -8 to -1, Sensor Precision is the number of accurate digits in a SensorValue fixed-point number.

Status

Operational status of the sensor.


Viewing Switch Spanning Tree Information

Choose Monitor > Switches, then click an IP address in the IP Address column to view details about the switch. From the System menu, choose Spanning Tree. Table 5-32 describes the spanning tree information that is displayed.

Table 5-32 Viewing Switches Spanning Tree Information 

Spanning Tree

STP Instance ID

ID of the STP. Click an STP Instance ID to see the spanning tree details as described in the "Viewing Spanning Tree Details" section on page 5-39.

VLAN ID

ID of the VLAN.

Root Path Cost

Root cost of the path.

Designated Root

Forwarding port.

Bridge Priority

Priority of the bridge.

Root Bridge Priority

Priority number of the root bridge.

Max Age (sec)

STP timer value for maximum age (in seconds).

Hello Interval (sec)

STP timer value (in seconds).


Viewing Spanning Tree Details

Choose Monitor > Switches, then click an IP address in the IP Address column to view details about the switch. From the System menu, choose Spanning Tree, then click an STP instance ID to see the spanning tree details as described in Table 5-33.

Table 5-33 Viewing Spanning Tree Details

Spanning Tree

STP Port

Name of the STP port.

Port Role

Role of the port.

Port Priority

Priority number of the port.

Path Cost

Cost of the path.

Port State

State of the port.

Port Type

Type of port.


Viewing Switch Stacks Information

Choose Monitor > Switches, then click an IP address in the IP Address column to view details about the switch. From the System menu, choose Stacks. Table 5-34 describes the spanning tree information that is displayed.

Table 5-34 Viewing Switches Stacks Information

Stacks

MAC Address

MAC address of the stack.

Role

Role of the stack:

Master—Stack master

Member—Active member of the stack

Not Member—Non-active stack member

Switch Priority

Priority number of the switch.

State

Current state of the stack.

Software Version

Software image running on the switch.


Viewing Switch NMSP and Location Information

You can view the NMSP and Location information for a switch using the System left sidebar menu.

To view the NMSP and Location information for a switch, choose Monitor > Switches, then click an IP address in the IP Address column. Choose System > NMSP and Location.

The NMSP and Location page appears.

You can view the NMSP Status in the NMSP Status group box and Location information in the Location group box.

For more information on NMSP and Location, see the Configuring Switch NMSP and Location.

Monitoring Switch Interfaces

Choose Monitor > Switches, then click an IP address in the IP Address column. From the System menu, choose Interfaces, then select one of the following interfaces described in this section. This section contains the following topics:

Monitoring Switch Ethernet Interfaces, page 5-40

Monitoring Switch IP Interfaces, page 5-41

Monitoring Switch VLAN Interfaces, page 5-42

Monitoring Switch EtherChannel Interfaces, page 5-42

Monitoring Switch Ethernet Interfaces

Choose Monitor > Switches, then click an IP address in the IP Address column. From the System menu, choose Interfaces > Ethernet Interfaces. Table 5-35 describes the Ethernet interface information that is displayed.

Table 5-35 Viewing Switch Ethernet Interfaces

Name

Name of the Ethernet interface. Click an Ethernet interface name to see details as described in "Monitoring Switch Ethernet Interface Details" section on page 5-41.

MAC Address

MAC address of the Ethernet interface.

Speed (Mbps)

Estimate of the current bandwidth of the Ethernet interface in bits per second.

Operational Status

Current operational state of the Ethernet interface.

MTU

Size of the largest packet that can be sent/received on the interface.

Desired VLAN Mode

VLAN mode.

Access VLAN

VLAN on which the port is configured.


Monitoring Switch Ethernet Interface Details

Choose Monitor > Switches, then click an IP address in the IP Address column. From the System menu, choose Interfaces > Ethernet Interfaces, then click an Ethernet interface name in the Name column. Table 5-36 describes the Ethernet interface detail information that is displayed.

Table 5-36 Viewing Switch Ethernet Interface Details

Ethernet Interfaces

Name

Name of the Ethernet interface.

Admin Status

Administration status of the interface.

Duplex Mode

Duplex mode configured on the interface.

VLAN Switch Port

Operational VLAN Mode

Specifies the operational mode of the VLAN switch port, which can be either an access port or a trunk port.

Desired VLAN Mode

VLAN mode, which can be truck, access, dynamic, or desirable.

Access VLAN

VLAN on which the port is configured.

Operational Truck Encapsulation

Trunk encapsulation, which can be 802.1Q or none.

VLAN Trunk

Native VLAN

Untagged VLAN on the trunk switch port.

Prune Eligible

Specifies whether VLANs on the trunk port can be pruned.

Allows VLANs

List of allowed VLANs on the trunk port.

Desired Trunking Encapsulation

Trunk encapsulation.

Trunking Encapsulation Negotiation

Specifies that the interface negotiate with the neighboring interface to become an ISL (preferred) or 802.1Q trunk, depending on the configuration and capabilities of the neighboring interface.


Monitoring Switch IP Interfaces

Choose Monitor > Switches, then click an IP address in the IP Address column. From the System menu, choose Interfaces > IP Interfaces. Table 5-37 describes the IP interface information that is displayed.

Table 5-37 Viewing Switch IP Interfaces

Interface

Name of the interface.

IP Address

IP address of the interface.

Address Type

Type of address (IPv4 or IPv6).


Monitoring Switch VLAN Interfaces

Choose Monitor > Switches, then click an IP address in the IP Address column. From the System menu, choose Interfaces > VLAN Interfaces. Table 5-38 describes the VLAN interface information that is displayed.

Table 5-38 Viewing Switch VLAN Interfaces

Port Name

Name of the VLAN port.

VLAN ID

ID of the VLAN port.

Operational Status

Current operational state of the VLAN interface.

Admin Status

Current administrative state of the VLAN interface.

Port Type

Type of VLAN port.

Maximum Speed (Mbps)

Maximum supported speed for the VLAN interface.

MTU

Size of the largest packet that can be sent/received on the VLAN interface.


Monitoring Switch EtherChannel Interfaces

Choose Monitor > Switches, then click an IP address in the IP Address column. From the System menu, choose Interfaces > EtherChannel Interfaces. Table 5-39 describes the EtherChannel interface information that is displayed.

Table 5-39 Viewing Switch EtherChannel Interfaces

Name

Name of the EtherChannel interface.

Channel Group ID

Numeric identifier for the EtherChannel.

Control Method

Protocol for managing the EtherChannel either LACP or TAgP.

Actor Admin Key

Channel Identifier.

Number of (LAG) Members

Number of ports configured.


Monitoring Switch Clients

Choose Monitor > Switches, then click an IP address in the IP Address column. From the System menu, choose Clients. Table 5-39 describes the EtherChannel interface information that is displayed.

Table 5-40 Viewing Current Associated Client

IP Address

IP address of the client.

MAC Address

MAC address of the client.

User Name

Username of the client.

Vendor Name

Vendor Name of the client.

Map Location

Location of the client.

VLAN

VLAN on which the client is configured.

Interface

Interface on which the client is configured.

Association Time

Timestamp of the client association.

Authorization Profile Name

Authorization Profile Name stored.


Monitoring Access Points

This section describes access to the controller access points summary details. Use the main date area to access the respective access point details.

Choose Monitor > Access Points to access this page. This section provides more detailed information regarding monitoring access points and contains the following topics:

Searching Access Points, page 5-43

Viewing a List of Access Points, page 5-44

Generating a Report for Access Points, page 5-47

Monitoring Access Points Details, page 5-57

Monitoring Access Point Radio Details, page 5-71

Monitoring Mesh Access Points, page 5-82

Retrieving the Unique Device Identifier on Controllers and Access Points, page 5-88

Monitoring Coverage Holes, page 5-88

Monitoring Rogue Access Points, page 5-90

Monitoring Ad hoc Rogues, page 5-105

Searching Rogue Clients Using Advanced Search, page 5-109

Monitoring Rogue Access Point Location, Tagging, and Containment, page 5-110

Searching Access Points

Use Prime Infrastructure Search feature to find specific access points or to create and save custom searches. See one of the following topics for additional information:

Using the Search Feature, page 2-54

Quick Search, page 2-54

Advanced Search, page 2-55

Saved Searches, page 2-67

Viewing a List of Access Points

Choose Monitor > Access Points or perform an access point search to access this page.

This page enables you to view a summary of access points including the default information listed in Table 5-41.

Table 5-41 Access Point Search Results

Field
Description

AP Name Ethernet MAC

The name assigned to the access point. Click a list item to view access point details. See the "Monitoring Access Points Details" section on page 5-57 for more information.

IP Address

Local IP address of the access point.

Radio

Protocol of the rogue access point is 802.11a, 802.11b or 802.11g. Click a list item to view access point radio details. See the "Monitoring Access Point Radio Details" section on page 5-71 for more information.

Map Location

Click a list item to go to the location indicated on the list.

Controller

Click a list item to display a graphic and information about the controller. See the "Monitoring System Summary" section on page 5-4 for more information.

Client Count

Displays the total number of clients currently associated with the controller.

Admin Status

Displays the administration state of the access point as either enabled or disabled.

AP Mode

Displays the operational mode of the access point.

Oper Status

Displays the operational status of the Cisco WLAN Solution device, either Up or Down. If the admin status is disabled, the operation status is labeled as down and there are no alarms.

Alarm Status

Alarms are color coded as follows:

Clear—No Alarm

Red—Critical Alarm

Orange—Major Alarm

Yellow—Minor Alarm

Note This status is radio alarm status ONLY and does not includes the admin status in the operation status.


Configuring the Access Point List Display

To add, remove, or reorder columns in the table, click the Edit View link to go to the Edit View page. Table 5-42 lists the optional access point parameters available for the search results.

Table 5-42 Edit View Search Results 

Field
Description

AP Type

Indicates the type of access point (unified or autonomous).

Antenna Azim. Angle

Indicates the horizontal angle of the antenna.

Antenna Diversity

Indicates if antenna diversity is enabled or disabled. Antenna diversity refers to the access point sampling the radio signal from two integrated antenna ports to choose the preferred antenna.

Antenna Elev. Angle

Indicates the elevation angle of the antenna.

Antenna Gain

The peak gain of the dBi of the antenna for directional antennas and the average gain in dBi for omni-directional antennas connected to the wireless network adapter. The gain is in multiples of 0.5 dBm. An integer value 4 means 4 x 0.5 = 2 dBm of gain.

Antenna Mode

Indicates the antenna mode such as omni, directional, or non-applicable.

Antenna Name

Indicates the antenna name or type.

Audit Status

Indicates one of the following audit statuses:

Mismatch—Configuration differences were found between Prime Infrastructure and controller during the last audit.

Identical—No configuration differences were found during the last audit.

Not Available—Audit status is unavailable.

Base Radio MAC

Indicates the MAC address of the base radio.

Bridge Group Name

Indicates the name of the bridge group used to group the access points, if applicable.

CDP Neighbors

Indicates all directly connected Cisco devices.

Channel Control

Indicates whether the channel control is automatic or custom.

Channel Number

Indicates the channel on which the Cisco Radio is broadcasting.

Channel Width

Indicates the channel bandwidth for this radio. The Channel Width field is supported only for 11n APs. Displays "N/A" for other APs.

Controller Port

Indicates the number of controller ports.

Google Earth Location

Indicates whether or not a Google Earth location is assigned and indicates the location.

Location

Indicates the physical location of the access point.

Node Hops

Indicates the number of hops between access points.

OfficeExtend AP

Specifies whether or not OfficeExtend access is enabled. If it is disabled, the access point is remotely deployed which increases the security risk.

PoE Status

Indicates the power over Ethernet status of the access point. The possible values include the following:

Low—The access point draws low power from the Ethernet.

Lower than 15.4 volts—The access point draws lower than 15.4 volts from the Ethernet.

Lower than 16.8 volts—The access point draws lower than 16.8 volts from the Ethernet.

Normal—The power is high enough for the operation of the access point.

Not Applicable—The power source is not from the Ethernet.

Primary Controller

Indicates the name of the primary controller for this access point.

Radio MAC

Indicates the radio MAC address.

Reg. Domain Supported

Indicates whether or not the regulatory domain is supported.

Serial Number

Indicates the access point serial number.

Slot

Indicates the slot number.

Tx Power Control

Indicates whether the transmission power control is automatic or custom.

Tx Power Level

Indicates the transmission power level.

Up Time

Indicates how long the access point has been up in days, hours, minutes and seconds.

WLAN Override Names

Indicates the WLAN override profile names.

WLAN Override

Indicates whether WLAN Override is enabled or disabled.


Configuring the List of Access Points Display

The Edit View page allows you to add, remove, or reorder columns in the Access Points table.

To edit the available columns in the alarms table, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Access Points.

Step 2 Click the Edit View link.

Step 3 To add an additional column to the access points table, click to highlight the column heading in the left column. Click Show to move the heading to the right column. All items in the right column are displayed in the table.

Step 4 To remove a column from the access points table, click to highlight the column heading in the right column. Click Hide to move the heading to the left column. All items in the left column are not displayed in the table.

Step 5 Use the Up/Down buttons to specify the order in which the information appears in the table. Highlight the desired column heading and click Up or Down to move it higher or lower in the current list.

Step 6 Click Reset to restore the default view.

Step 7 Click Submit to confirm the changes.


Note See the "Viewing a List of Access Points" section on page 5-44 for additional access point fields than can be added through Edit View.



Generating a Report for Access Points


Note You cannot customize any report that you create in the Access Points list (Monitor > Access Points).


To generate a report for access points, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Access Points.

Step 2 Click to select the access point(s) for which you want to run a report.

Step 3 Choose the applicable report from the Select a report drop-down list.

Step 4 Click Go.


Table 5-43 lists the available reports.

Table 5-43 Access Point Reports 

Report
Description
Reference

Load

Generates a report with load information.

See the "Monitoring Traffic Load" section on page 5-50 for more information.

Dynamic Power Control

Generates a report with Dynamic Power Control information.

See the "Monitoring Dynamic Power Control" section on page 5-50 for more information.

Noise

Generates a report with Noise information.

See the "Monitoring Access Points Noise" section on page 5-51 for more information.

Interference

Generates a report with Interference information.

See the "Monitoring Access Points Interference" section on page 5-52 for more information.

Coverage (RSSI)

Generates a report with Coverage (RSSI) information.

See the "Monitoring Access Points Coverage (RSSI)" section on page 5-52 for more information.

Coverage (SNR)

Generates a report with Coverage (SNR) information.

See the "Monitoring Access Points Coverage (SNR)" section on page 5-52 for more information.

Up/Down Statistics

Time in days, hours and minutes since the last reboot. Generates a report with Up Time information.

See the "Monitoring Access Points Up/Down Statistics" section on page 5-53 for more information.

Voice Statistics

Generates a report for selected access points showing radio utilization by voice traffic.

See the "Monitoring the Access Points Voice Statistics" section on page 5-53 for more information.

Voice TSM Table

Generates a report for selected access points and radio, organized by client device showing QoS status, PLR, and latency of its voice traffic stream.

See the "Monitoring the Access Points Voice TSM Table" section on page 5-54 for more information.

Voice TSM Reports

Graphical representation of the TSM table except that metrics from the clients are averaged together on the graphs.

See the "Monitoring the Access Points Voice TSM Reports" section on page 5-55 for more information.

802.11 Counters

Displays counters for access points at the MAC layer. Statistics such as error frames, fragment counts, RTS/CTS frame count, and retried frames are generated based on the filtering criteria and can help interpret performance (and problems, if any) at the MAC layer.

See the "Monitoring Access Points 802.11 Counters" section on page 5-56 for more information.

AP Profile Status

Displays access point load, noise, interference, and coverage profile status.

See the "Monitoring Access Points AP Profile Status" section on page 5-56 for more information.

Air Quality vs. Time

Displays the air quality index of the wireless network during the configured time duration.

See the "Monitoring Air Quality" section on page 5-57 for more information.

Traffic Stream Metrics

Useful in determining the current and historical quality of service (QoS) for given clients at the radio level. It also displays uplink and downlink statistics such as packet loss rate, average queuing delay, distribution of delayed packets, and roaming delays.

See the "Monitoring Access Points Traffic Stream Metrics" section on page 5-56 for more information.

Tx Power and Channel

Displays the channel plan assignment and transmit power level trends of devices based on the filtering criteria used when the report was generated. It could help identify unexpected behavior or issues with network performance.

See the "Monitoring Access Points Tx Power and Channel" section on page 5-56 for more information.

VoIP Calls Graph

Helps analyze wireless network usage from a voice perspective by providing details such as the number and duration of VoIP calls (per radio) on the network over time. To be able to gather useful data from this report, VoIP snooping must be enabled on the WLAN. This report displays information in a graph.

See the "Monitoring VoIP Calls" section on page 5-57 for more information.

VoIP Calls Table

Provides the same information as the VoIP Calls Graph report but in table form.

See the "Monitoring VoIP Calls" section on page 5-57 for more information.

Voice Statistics

Helps analyze wireless network usage from a voice perspective by providing details such as percentage of bandwidth used by voice clients, voice calls, roaming calls, and rejected calls (per radio) on the network. To be able to gather useful data from this report, make sure call admission control (CAC) is supported on voice clients.

See the "Monitoring Voice Statistics" section on page 5-57 for more information.

Worst Air Quality APs

Provides a high-level, easy-to- understand metric to facilitate an "at a glance" understanding of where interference problems are impacting the network. Air Quality (AQ) is reported at a channel, floor, and system level and it supports AQ alerts, so that you can be automatically notified when AQ falls below a desired threshold.

See the "Monitoring Air Quality" section on page 5-57 for more information.


Monitoring Traffic Load

Traffic Load is the total amount of bandwidth used for transmitting and receiving traffic. This enables WLAN managers to track network growth and plan network growth ahead of client demand.

To access the access point load report, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Access Points.

Step 2 Select the check box(es) of the applicable access point(s).

Step 3 From the Generate a report for selected APs drop-down list, choose Load.

Step 4 Click Go. The Load report displays for the selected access points.

Table 5-44 lists the fields displayed on this page.

Table 5-44 Traffic Load 

Field
Description

AP Name

Click the access point name to view access point details. See the "Monitoring Access Points Details" section on page 5-57 for more information.

Radio

Protocol of the rogue access point is either 802.11a, 802.11b or 802.11g. Click the radio to view On-Demand Statistics for this access point. See the "Monitoring Access Point Radio Details" section on page 5-71 for more information.

Attached Client Count

Number of clients attached (Actual and Threshold.)

Channel Utilization

802.11a RF utilization threshold between 0 and 100 percent (Actual and Threshold).

Receive Utilization

802.11a or 802.11b/g RF receive utilization threshold between 0 and 100 percent.

Transmit Utilization

802.11a or 802.11b/g RF transmit utilization threshold between 0 and 100 percent.

Status

Status of the client connection.



Monitoring Dynamic Power Control

To access the access point Load report, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Access Points.

Step 2 Select the check box(es) of the applicable access point(s).

Step 3 From the Generate a report for selected APs drop-down list, choose Dynamic Power Control.

Step 4 Click Go. The Dynamic Power Control report displays the selected access points.

Table 5-45 lists the dynamic control fields for access points displayed on this page.

Table 5-45 Dynamic Power Control Page Fields 

Field
Description

AP Name

This is the name assigned to the access point. Click an access point name in the list to access its fields. See the "Monitoring Access Points Details" section on page 5-57 for more information.

Radio

Protocol of the rogue access point is either 802.11a, or 802.11b/g. Click a Cisco Radio in the list to access its fields. See the "Monitoring Access Point Radio Details" section on page 5-71 for more information.

Current Power Level

Displays the operating transmit power level from the transmit power table. Access point transmit power level: 1 = Maximum power allowed per Country Code setting, 2 = 50% power, 3 = 25% power, 4 = 6.25 to 12.5% power, and 5 = 0.195 to 6.25% power.

Note The power levels and available channels are defined by the Country Code Setting, and are regulated on a country by country basis.

Power Assignment Mode

Dynamic transmit power assignment has three modes:

Automatic—The transmit power is periodically updated for all Cisco 1000 Series lightweight access points that permit this operation.

On Demand—Transmit power is updated when the Assign Now button is selected.

Fixed—No dynamic transmit power assignments occur and value are set to their global default. The default is Automatic.

Recommended Power Level.



Monitoring Access Points Noise

To access the access point Noise report, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Access Points.

Step 2 Select the check box(es) of the applicable access point(s).


Note If multiple access points are selected, they must have the same radio type.


Step 3 From the Generate a report selected APs drop-down list, choose Noise.

Step 4 Click Go. The Noise report displays the selected access points.

This page displays a bar graph of noise (RSSI in dBm) for each channel.


Monitoring Access Points Interference

To access the access point Interference report, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Access Points.

Step 2 Select the check box(es) of the applicable access point(s).


Note If multiple access points are selected, they must have the same radio type.


Step 3 From the Generate a report for selected APs drop-down list, choose Interference.

Step 4 Click Go. The Interference report displays the selected access points.

This page displays a bar graph of interference (RSSI in dBm) for each channel:

High interference -40 to 0 dBm.

Marginal interference -100 to -40 dBm.

Low interference -110 to -100 dBm.


Monitoring Access Points Coverage (RSSI)

To access the access point Coverage (RSSI) report, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Access Points.

Step 2 Select the check box(es) of the applicable access point(s).

Step 3 From the Generate a report for selected APs drop-down list, choose Coverage (RSSI).

Step 4 Click Go. The Coverage (RSSI) report displays the selected access points.

This page displays a bar graph of client distribution by received signal strength showing the number of clients versus RSSI in dBm.


Monitoring Access Points Coverage (SNR)

To access the access point Coverage (SNR) report, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Access Points.

Step 2 Select the check box(es) of the applicable access point(s).

Step 3 From the Generate a report for selected APs drop-down list, choose Coverage (SNR).

Step 4 Click Go. The Coverage (SNR) report displays the selected access points.

This page displays a bar graph of client distribution by signal-to-noise ratio showing the number of clients versus SNR.


Monitoring Access Points Up/Down Statistics

To access the access point Up/Down Statistics report, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Access Points.

Step 2 Select the check box of the applicable access point.

Step 3 From the Generate a report for selected APs drop-down list, choose Up/Down Statistics.

Click Go. The Up/Down Statistics report displays the selected access points.


Note Up Time is time in days, hours, and minutes since the last reboot.


This page displays a line graph of access point up time graphed against time.

If you select more than one access point, the following message appears:

Please select only one AP for the Up Time Report.


Monitoring the Access Points Voice Statistics

This generates a report for selected access points showing radio utilization by voice traffic. The report includes the number of current calls.


Note Voice Statistics reports are only applicable for CAC/WMM clients.


To access the access point Voice Statistics report, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Access Points.

Step 2 Select the check box(es) of the applicable access point(s).

Step 3 From the Generate a report for selected APs drop-down list, choose Voice Statistics.

Click Go. The Voice Statistics report displays for the selected access points.

The page displays the following access point voice statistics:

AP Name—Select an item under AP Name. For more information, see the "Monitoring Access Points Details" section on page 5-57.

Radio—Select an item under Radio. For more information, see the "Monitoring Access Point Radio Details" section on page 5-71.

Calls in Progress—Number of calls in progress.

Roaming Calls in Progress—Number of roaming calls in progress.

Bandwidth in Use—Percentage of bandwidth in use.


Monitoring the Access Points Voice TSM Table

This generates a report for selected access points and radio, organized by client device showing QoS status, PLR, and latency of its voice traffic stream.

To access the access point Voice TSM Table report, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Access Points.

Step 2 Select the check box of the applicable access point.

Step 3 From the Generate a report for selected APs drop-down list, choose Voice TSM Table.

Step 4 Click Go. The Voice Traffic Stream Metrics Table report displays the selected access point.

Table 5-46 lists the Voice Traffic Stream Metrics Table page fields.

Table 5-46 Voice Traffic Stream Metrics Table Page Fields 

Field
Description

Time

Time that the statistics were gathered from the access point(s).

Client MAC

MAC address of the client. This shows a list of the clients evaluated during the most recent 90 second interval. The client could be a VoIP phone, laptop, PDA and refers to any client attached to the access point collecting measurements.

QoS

QoS values (packet latency, packet jitter, packet loss, roaming time) which can affect the WLAN are monitored. Access points and clients measure the metrics, access points collect the measurements and send them to the controller. The access points update the controller with traffic stream metric information every 90 seconds and 10 minutes of data is stored at one time.

% PLR (Downlink)

Percentage of packets lost on the downlink (access point to client) during the 90 second interval.

% PLR (Uplink)

Percentage of packets lost on the uplink (client to access point) during the 90 second interval.

Avg Queuing Delay (ms) (Downlink)

Average queuing delay in milliseconds for the downlink. Average packet queuing delay is the average delay of voice packets traversing the voice queue. Packet queue delay is measured beginning when a packet is queued for transmission and ending when the packet is successfully transmitted. It includes time for re-tries, if needed.

Avg Queuing Delay (ms) (Uplink)

Average queuing delay in milliseconds for the uplink. Average packet queuing delay is the average delay of voice packets traversing the voice queue. Packet queue delay is measured beginning when a packet is queued for transmission and ending when the packet is successfully transmitted. It includes time for re-tries, if needed.

% Packets > 40 ms Queuing Delay

Percentage of queuing delay packets greater than 40 ms.

% Packets > 20 ms Queuing Delay

Percentage of queuing delay packets greater than 20 ms.

Roaming Delay

Roaming delay in milliseconds. Roaming delay, which is measured by clients, is measured beginning when the last packet is received from the old access point and ending when the first packet is received from the new access point after a successful roam.



Monitoring the Access Points Voice TSM Reports

This report provides a graphical representation of the Voice Traffic Stream Metrics Table except that metrics from the clients are averaged together on the graphs.

To access the access point Voice Traffic Stream Metrics Table report, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Access Points.

Step 2 Select the check box of the applicable access point.

Step 3 From the Generate a report for selected APs drop-down list, choose Voice TSM Reports.

Click Go. The Voice Traffic Stream Metrics Table report displays for the selected access point.

This page displays line graphs of the following downlink and uplink metric information, including times and dates (see Table 5-47).

Table 5-47 Voice Traffic Stream Metrics Table Reports Page Fields 

Field
Description

Average Queuing Delay (ms)

Average queuing delay in milliseconds. Average packet queuing delay is the average delay of voice packets traversing the voice queue. Packet queue delay is measured beginning when a packet is queued for transmission and ending when the packet is successfully transmitted. It includes time for re-tries, if needed.

% Packet with less than 10 ms delay

Percentage of packets with less than 10 milliseconds delay.

% Packet with more than 10 < 20 ms delay

Percentage of packets with more than 10 milliseconds delay but less than 20 milliseconds delay.

% Packet with more than 20 < 40 ms delay

Percentage of packets with more than 20 milliseconds delay but less than 40 milliseconds delay.

% Packet with more than 40 ms delay

Percentage of packets with more than 40 milliseconds delay.

Packet Loss Ratio

Ratio of lost packets.

Total Packet Count

Number of total packets.

Roaming Count

Number of packets exchanged for roaming negotiations in this 90 seconds metrics page.

Roaming Delay

Roaming delay in milliseconds.



Monitoring Access Points 802.11 Counters

Displays counters for access points at the MAC layer. Statistics such as error frames, fragment counts, RTS/CTS frame count, and retried frames are generated based on the filtering criteria and can help interpret performance (and problems, if any) at the MAC layer.

See the "802.11 Counters" section on page 14-1036 for more information on 802.11 Counters reports.

Monitoring Access Points AP Profile Status

Displays access point load, noise, interference, and coverage profile status.

See the "AP Profile Status" section on page 14-962 for more information on AP Profile Status reports.

Monitoring Access Points Radio Utilization

See the "Network Utilization" section on page 14-1049 for more information on Radio Utilization reports.

Monitoring Access Points Traffic Stream Metrics

Useful in determining the current and historical quality of service (QoS) for given clients at the radio level. It also displays uplink and downlink statistics such as packet loss rate, average queuing delay, distribution of delayed packets, and roaming delays.

See the "Traffic Stream Metrics" section on page 14-1053 for more information on Traffic Stream Metrics reports.

Monitoring Access Points Tx Power and Channel

See the "Tx Power and Channel" section on page 14-1056 for more information on Tx Power and Channel reports.

The Current Tx Power Level setting controls the maximum conducted transmit power. The maximum available transmit power varies according to the configured channel, individual country regulation, and access point capability. See the Product Guide or data sheet at www.cisco.com for each specific model to determine the access point capability.

The Current Tx Power Level setting of 1 represents the maximum conducted power setting for the access point. Each subsequent power level (for example. 2, 3, 4, and so on.) represents approximately a 50% (or 3dBm) reduction in transmit power from the previous power level.


Note The actual power reduction might vary slightly for different models of access points.


Based on the configured antenna gain, the configured channel, and the configured power level, the actual transmit power at the access point can be reduced so that the specific country regulations are not exceeded.


Note Irrespective of whether you choose Global or Custom assignment method, the actual conducted transmit power at the access point is verified such that country specific regulations are not exceeded.


Command Buttons

Save—Save the current settings.

Audit—Discover the present status of this access point.

Monitoring VoIP Calls

VoIP calls reports helps analyze wireless network usage from a voice perspective by providing details such as the number and duration of VoIP calls (per radio) on the network over time. To be able to gather useful data from this report, VoIP snooping must be enabled on the WLAN. This report displays information in a graph.

Click VoIP Calls Graph from the Report Launch Pad to open the VoIP Calls Graph Reports page. From this page, you can enable, disable, delete, or run currently saved report templates. See the "VoIP Calls Graph" section on page 14-1058 for more information.

Monitoring Voice Statistics

Voice Statistics report helps analyze wireless network usage from a voice perspective by providing details such as percentage of bandwidth used by voice clients, voice calls, roaming calls, and rejected calls (per radio) on the network. To be able to gather useful data from this report, make sure Call Admission Control (CAC) is supported on voice clients. See the "Voice Statistics" section on page 14-1060 for more information.

Monitoring Air Quality

To facilitate an "at a glance" understanding of where interference problems are impacting the network, Prime Infrastructure rolls up the detailed information into a high-level, easy-to- understand metric referred to as Air Quality (AQ). AQ is reported at a channel, floor, and system level and it supports AQ alerts, so that you can be automatically notified when AQ falls below a desired threshold. See the "Monitoring CleanAir Air Quality Events" section on page 5-149 for more information.

Monitoring Access Points Details

The Access Points Details page enables you to view access point information for a single AP.

Choose Monitor > Access Points and click an item in the AP Name column to access this page. Depending on the type of access point, the following tabs might be displayed. This section provides the detailed information regarding each Access Points Details page tab and contains the following topics:

General Tab, page 5-58

Interfaces Tab, page 5-67

Mesh Statistics Tab, page 5-83

Mesh Links Tab, page 5-87

CDP Neighbors Tab, page 5-69

Current Associated Clients Tab, page 5-69

SSID Tab, page 5-71

Clients Over Time Tab, page 5-71

General Tab


Note The General tab fields differ between lightweight and autonomous access points.


This section contains the following topics:

General—Lightweight Access Points, page 5-58

General—Autonomous, page 5-65

General—Lightweight Access Points

Table 5-48 lists the General (for Lightweight Access Points) Tab fields.

Table 5-48 General (for Lightweight Access Points) Tab Fields 

Field
Description
General

AP Name

Operator defined name of access point.

AP IP address, Ethernet MAC address, and Base Radio MAC address

IP address, Ethernet MAC address and Radio MAC address.

Country Code

The codes of the supported countries. Up to 20 countries can be supported per controller.

Note Access points might not operate properly if they are not designed for use in your country of operation. For a complete list of country codes supported per product, see the following URL:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/wireless/wcs/4.0/configuration/guide/wcscod.html.

Link Latency Settings

You can configure link latency on the controller to measure the link between an access point and the controller. See the "Configuring Link Latency Settings for Access Points" section on page 9-481 for more information.

Current Link Latency (in msec)—The current round-trip time (in milliseconds) of heartbeat packets from the access point to the controller and back.

Minimum Link Latency (in msec)—Because link latency has been enabled or reset, the minimum round-trip time (in milliseconds) of heartbeat packets from the access point to the controller and back.

Maximum Link Latency (in msec)—Because link latency has been enabled or reset, the maximum round-trip time (in milliseconds) of heartbeat packets from the access point to the controller and back.

LWAPP/CAPWAP Uptime

Displays how long the LWAPP/CAPWAP connection has been active.

LWAPP?CAPWAP Join Taken Time

Displays how long the LWAPP/CAPWAP connection has been joined.

Admin Status

The administration state of the access point as either enabled or disabled.

AP Mode

Local

Default mode. Data clients are serviced while configured channels are scanned for noise and rogues. The access point goes off-channel for 50 ms and listens for rogues. It cycles through each channel for the period specified under the Auto RF configuration.

Note To configure Local or FlexConnect access points for the Cisco Adaptive wIPS feature, choose Local or FlexConnect and select the Enhanced wIPS Engine Enabled check box.

Monitor

Radio receive only mode. The access point scans all configured channels every 12 seconds. Only deauthenticated packets are sent in the air with an access point configured this way. A monitor mode access point can connect as a client to a rogue acceess point.

Note To configure access points for Cisco Adaptive wIPS feature, select Monitor. Select the Enhanced wIPS Engine Enabled check box and choose wIPS from the Monitor Mode Optimization drop-down list.
Before you can enable an access point to be in wIPS mode, you must disable the access point radios. If you do not disable the access point radio, an error message appears.

Note Once you have enabled the access point for wIPS, reenable the radios.

Rogue Detector

The access point radio is turned off and the access point listens to wired traffic only. The controllers that operate in this mode monitor the rogue access points. The controller sends all the rogue access point and client MAC address lists to the rogue detector, and the rogue detector forwards this information to the WLC. The MAC address list is compared to what the WLC access points heard over the network. If the MAC addresses match, you can determine which rogue access points are connected on the wired network.

Sniffer

The access point captures and forwards all the packets on a particular channel to a remote machine that runs AiroPeek. These packets contain information such as timestamp, signal strength, packet size, and so on. This feature can only be enabled if you run AiroPeek, which is a third-party network analyzer software that supports the decoding of data packets.

FlexConnect

Enables FlexConnect for up to six access points. The FlexConnect access points can switch client data traffic locally and perform client authentication locally when their connection to the controller is lost.

Note FlexConnect must be selected to configure an OfficeExtend access point. When the AP mode is FlexConnect, FlexConnect configuration options display including the option to enable OfficeExtend AP and to enable Least Latency Controller Join.

Bridge

This is a special mode where an autonomous access point functions as a wireless client and connects to a lightweight access point. The bridge and its wired clients are listed as client in Prime Infrastructure if the AP mode is set to Bridge, and the access point is bridge capable.

Spectrum Expert

This mode allows a CleanAir-enabled access point to be used extensively for interference detection on all monitored channels. All other functions such as IDS scanning and Wi-Fi are suspended.

Enhanced wIPs Engine

Enabled or Disabled, to enable the monitoring of the security attacks using Cisco Adaptive wIPS feature.

Operational Status

Registered or Not Registered, as determined by the controller.

Registered Controller

The controller to which the access point is registered. Click to display the registered controller details. See the "Monitoring System Summary" section on page 5-4 for more information.

Primary Controller

The name of the primary controller for this access point.

Port Number

The SNMP name of the access point primary controller. The access point attempts to associate with this controller first for all network operations and in the event of a hardware reset.

AP Uptime

Displays how long the access point has been active to receive and transmit.

Map Location

Customer-definable location name for the access point. Click to look at the actual location on a map. Choose Monitor > Access Points > name > Map Location for more information.

Google Earth Location

Indicates whether a Google Earth location is assigned.

Location

The physical location where the access point is placed (or Unassigned).

Statistics Timer

This counter sets the time in seconds that the access point sends its DOT11 statistics to the controller.

PoE Status

The power over ethernet status of the access point. The possible values include the following:

Low—The access point draws low power from the Ethernet.

Lower than 15.4 volts—The access point draws lower than 15.4 volts from the Ethernet.

Lower than 16.8 volts—The access point draws lower than 16.8 volts from the Ethernet.

Normal—The power is high enough for the operation of the access point.

Not Applicable—The power source is not from the Ethernet.

Rogue Detection

Indicates whether or not Rogue Detection is enabled.

Note Rogue detection is disabled automatically for OfficeExtend access points because these access points, which are deployed in a home environment, are likely to detect a large number of rogue devices. For more information regarding OfficeExtend access points, see the Cisco Wireless LAN Controller Configuration Guide.

OfficeExtend AP

Indicates whether or not the access point is enabled as an OfficeExtend access point. The default is Enabled.

Encryption

Indicates whether or not encryption is enabled.

Note Enabling or disabling encryption functionality causes the access point to reboot which then causes a loss of connectivity for clients.

Note DTLS data encryption is enabled automatically for OfficeExtend access points to maintain security. Encryption is only available if the access point is connected to a 5500 series controller with a Plus license.

Least Latency Join

The access point switches from a priority order search (primary, secondary, and then tertiary controller) to a search for the controller with the best latency measurement (least latency). The controller with the least latency provides the best performance.

Telnet Access

Indicates whether or not Telnet Access is enabled.

SSH Access

Indicates whether or not SSH is enabled.

Note An OfficeExtend access point might be connected directly to the WAN which could allow external access if the default password is used by the access point. Because of this, Telnet and SSH access are disabled automatically for OfficeExtend access points.

Versions

Software Version

The operating system release.version.dot.maintenance number of the code currently running on the controller.

Boot Version

The operating system bootloader version number.

Inventory Information

AP Type

Type of Access Point

AP Model

Access point model number.

Cisco IOS Version

The Cisco IOS Release details.

AP Certificate Type

Either Self Signed or Manufacture Installed.

FlexConnect Mode Supported

Indicates if FlexConnect mode is supported or not.

wIPS Profile (when applicable)

Profile Name

Click the user-assigned profile name to view wIPS profile details.

Profile Version

 
Unique Device Identifier (UDI)

Name

Name of the Cisco AP for access points.

Description

Description of the access point.

Product ID

Orderable product identifier.

Version ID

Version of product identifier.

Serial Number

Unique product serial number.

Run Ping Test Link

Click to ping the access point. The results are displayed in a pop-up dialog box.

Alarms Link

Click to display alarms associated with this access point.

Events Link

Click to display events associated with this access point.


General—Autonomous


Note For autonomous clients, Prime Infrastructure only collects client counts. The client counts in the Monitor page and reports have autonomous clients included. Client search, client traffic graphs, or other client reports (such as Unique Clients, Busiest Clients, Client Association) do not include clients from autonomous access points.


Table 5-49 lists the General (for Autonomous Access Points) tab fields.

Table 5-49 General (for Autonomous Access Points) Tab Fields 

Field
Description

AP Name

Operator defined name of access point.

AP IP address and Ethernet MAC address

IP address, Ethernet MAC address of the access point.

AP UpTime

Indicates how long the access point has been up in number of days, hours, minutes, and seconds.

Map Location

Customer-definable location name for the access point. Click to look at the actual location on a map. See the "Monitoring Maps" section on page 6-155 for more information.

WGB Mode

Indicates whether or not the access point is in work group bridge mode.

SNMP Info

SysObjectId

SysDescription


SysLocation


SysContact

System Object ID.

The system device type and current version of firmware.

The physical location of the device, such as a building name or room in which it is installed.

The name of the system administrator responsible for the device.

Versions

Software Version

The operating system release.version.dot.maintenance number of the code currently running on the controller.

CPU Utilization

Displays the maximum, average, and minimum CPU utilization over the specified amount of time.

Memory Utilization

Displays the maximum, average, and minimum memory utilization over the specified amount of time.

Inventory Information

AP Type

Autonomous or lightweight.

AP Model

The Access Point model number.

AP Serial Number

Unique serial number for this access point.

FlexConnect Mode Supported

If FlexConnect mode is supported or not.

Unique Device Identifier (UDI)

Name

Name of Cisco AP for access points.

Description

Description of access point.

Product ID

Orderable product identifier.

Version ID

Version of product identifier.

Serial Number

Unique product serial number.



Note Memory and CPU utilization charts are displayed.



Note Click Alarms to display the alarms associated with the access point.
Click Events to display events associated with the access point.


Interfaces Tab

Table 5-50 lists the Interfaces tab fields.

Table 5-50 Interfaces Tab Fields 

Field
Description
Interface

Admin Status

Indicates whether the Ethernet interface is enabled.

Operational Status

Indicates whether the Ethernet interface is operational.

Rx Unicast Packets

Indicates the number of unicast packets received.

Tx Unicast Packets

Indicates the number of unicast packets sent.

Rx Non-Unicast Packets

Indicates the number of non-unicast packets received.

Tx Non-Unicast Packets

Indicates the number of non-unicast packets sent.

Radio Interface

Protocol

802.11a/n or 802.11b/g/n.

Admin Status

Indicates whether the access point is enabled or disabled.

CleanAir Capable

Indicates whether the access point is able to use CleanAir.

CleanAir Status

Indicates the status of CleanAir.

Channel Number

Indicates the channel on which the Cisco Radio is broadcasting.

Extension Channel

Indicates the secondary channel on which Cisco radio is broadcasting.

Power Level

Access Point transmit power level: 1 = Maximum power allowed per Country Code setting, 2 = 50% power, 3 = 25% power, 4 = 6.25 to 12.5% power, and 5 = 0.195 to 6.25% power.

Channel Width

Indicates the channel bandwidth for this radio interface. See the "Configuring 802.11a/n RRM Dynamic Channel Allocation" section on page 9-394 for more information on configuring channel bandwidth.

Minimum (default) setting is 20 MHz. Maximum setting is the maximum channel width supported by this radio.

Antenna Name

Identifies the type of antenna.


Click an interface name to view its properties (see Table 5-51).

Table 5-51 Interface Properties 

Field
Description

AP Name

Name of the Access Point.

Link speed

Indicates the speed of the interface in Mbps.

RX Bytes

Indicates the total number of bytes in the error-free packets received on the interface.

RX Unicast Packets

Indicates the total number of unicast packets received on the interface.

RX Non-Unicast Packets

Indicates the total number of non-unicast or mulitcast packets received on the interface.

Input CRC

Indicates the total number of CRC error in packets received on the interface.

Input Errors

Indicates the sum of all errors in the packets while receiving on the interface.

Input Overrun

Indicates the number of times the receiver hardware was incapable of handing received data to a hardware buffer because the input rate exceeded the receiver capability to handle the data.

Input Resource

Indicates the total number of resource errors in packets received on the interface.

Runts

Indicates the number of packets that are discarded because they are smaller than the medium minimum packet size.

Throttle

Indicates the total number of times the interface advised a sending NIC that it was overwhelmed by packets being sent and to slow the pace of delivery.

Output Collision

Indicates the total number of packet retransmitted due to an Ethernet collision.

Output Resource

Indicates the total number of resource errors in packets transmitted on the interface.

Output Errors

Indicates the sum of all errors that prevented the final transmission of packets out of the interface.

Operational Status

Indicates the operational state of the physical Ethernet interface on the AP.

Duplex

Indicates the duplex mode of an interface.

TX Bytes

Indicates the total number of bytes in the error-free packets transmitted on the interface.

TX Unicast Packets

Indicates the total number of unicast packets transmitted on the interface.

TX Non-Unicast Packets

Indicates the total number of non-unicast or mulitcast packets transmitted on the interface.

Input Aborts

Indicates the total number of packet aborted while receiving on the interface.

Input Frames

Indicates the total number of packet received incorrectly having a CRC error and a non-integer number of octets on the interface.

Input Drops

Indicates the total number of packets dropped while receiving on the interface because the queue was full.

Unknown Protocol

Indicates the total number of packet discarded on the interface due to an unknown protocol.

Giants

Indicates the number of packets that are discarded because they exceed the maximum packet size of the medium.

Interface Resets

Indicates the number of times that an interface has been completely reset.

Output No Buffer

Indicates the total number of packets discarded because there was no buffer space.

Output Underrun

Indicates the number of times the transmitter has been running faster than the router can handle.

Output Total Drops

Indicates the total number of packets dropped while transmitting from the interface because the queue was full.


CDP Neighbors Tab

Table 5-52 lists the CDP Neighbors tab fields.


Note This tab is visible only when the CDP is enabled.

Table 5-52 CDP Neighbors Tab Fields 

Field
Description

AP Name

The name assigned to the access point.

AP IP Address

IP address of the access point.

Port No

Port number connected or assigned to the access point.

Local Interface

Identifies the local interface.

Neighbor Name

Name of the neighboring Cisco device.

Neighbor Address

Network address of the neighboring Cisco device.

Neighbor Port

Port of the neighboring Cisco device.

Duplex

Indicates Full Duplex or Half Duplex.

Interface Speed

Speed at which the interface operates.



Current Associated Clients Tab

Table 5-53 lists the Current Associated Clients tab fields.


Note This tab is visible only when there are clients associated to the AP (CAPWAP or Autonomous AP).

Table 5-53 Current Associated Clients Tab Fields 

Field
Description

Username

Click the username to view the Monitor Client Details page for this client. See the "Monitoring Clients and Users" section on page 10-533 for more information.

IP Address

IP address of the associated client.

Client MAC Address

Click the client MAC address to view the Monitor Client Details page for this client. See the "Monitoring Clients and Users" section on page 10-533 for more information.

Association Time

Date and time of the association.

UpTime

Time duration of the association.

SSID

User-defined SSID name.

SNR (dB)

Signal to Noise Ratio in dB of the associated client.

RSSI

Received Signal Strength Indicator in dBm.

Bytes Tx

This indicates the total amount of data that has passed through the Ethernet interface either way.

Bytes Rx

This indicate the total amount of data that has been received through the Ethernet interface either way

When the access point is not associated with the controller, then the database is used to retrieve the data (rather than the controller itself). If the access point is not associated, the following fields appear.

User Name

Username of the client.

IP Address

Local IP Address

Client MAC Address

Client MAC Address

Association Time

Timestamp of the client association.

Session Length

Time length of the session

SSID

User-defined SSID name.

Protocol

 

Avg. Session Throughput

 

Traffic (MB) as before

 



Note Click the Edit View link to add, remove or reorder columns in the Current Associated Clients table. See the "Configuring the List of Access Points Display" section on page 5-47 for adding a new field using the Edit View.


SSID Tab

Table 5-54 lists the SSID tab fields.


Note This tab is visible only when the access point is Autonomous AP and there are SSIDs configured on the AP.

Table 5-54 SSID Tab 

Field
Description

SSID

Service Set Identifier being broadcast by the access point radio.

SSID Vlan

SSID on an access point is configured to recognize a specific VLAN ID or name.

SSID Vlan Name

SSID on an access point is configured to recognize a specific VLAN ID or name.

MB SSID Broadcast

SSID broadcast disabled essentially makes your Access Point invisible unless a wireless client already knows the SSID, or is using tools that monitor or 'sniff' traffic from an AP's associated clients.

MB SSID Time Period

Within this specified time period, internal communication within the SSID continues to work.



Clients Over Time Tab

This tab displays the following charts:

Client Count on AP—Displays the total number of clients currently associated with an access point over time.

Client Traffic on AP—Displays the traffic generated by the client connected in the AP distribution over time.


Note The information that appears in the above charts is presented in a time-based graph. For graphs that are time-based, there is a link bar at the top of the graph page that displays 6h, 1d, 1w, 2w, 4w, 3m, 6m, 1y, and Custom. When selected, the data for that time frame is retrieved and the corresponding graph is displayed. See the "Time-Based Graphs" section on page 6-71 for more information.


Monitoring Access Point Radio Details

Choose Monitor > Access Points and click an item in the Radio column to access this page.

Choose Monitor > Maps and click an item in the Name column, then click an access point icon to access this page.

Choose Monitor > Access Points and click an item in the AP Name column, click 802.11a or 802.11b on the AP Interfaces tab to access this page. This page enables you to view access point information for a single 802.11a or 802.11b/g Cisco Radio.

The default is to show On Demand Statistics. Use the View drop-down list to choose a different view:

Choose On Demand Statistics, and click Go to display On Demand Statistics. See the "Monitoring On Demand Statistics" section on page 5-72 for more information.

Choose Operational Parameters, and click Go to display Operational Parameters. See the "Monitoring Operational Parameters" section on page 5-76 for more information.

Choose 802.11 MAC Counters, and click Go to display 802.11 MAC Counters. See the "Monitoring 802.11 MAC Counters" section on page 5-79 for more information.

Choose View Alarms and, click Go to display View Alarms. See the "Monitoring View Alarms" section on page 5-80 for more information.

Choose View Events and, click Go to display View Events. See the "Monitor View Events" section on page 5-81 for more information.

Monitoring On Demand Statistics

To view On Demand Statistics for an access point, click the Radio of the applicable access point in the Monitor > Access Points page. The Radio Details page defaults to On Demand Statistics. See the "Monitoring Access Point Radio Details" section on page 5-71 for more information on radio details.


Note You can also select On Demand Statistics from the View drop-down list located on the Radio Details page.


This page enables you to view the following access point 802.11a or 802.11b Cisco Radio statistics for a single access point.

General

AP Name—Click to view the access point details. See the "Monitoring Access Points Details" section on page 5-57 for more information.

AP MAC Address

Radio

CleanAir Capable—Indicates if the access point is CleanAir Capable.

AP in SE-Connect Mode—Yes or No. Indicates if the access point is connected in SE-Connect mode.

CleanAir Enabled—Indicates if CleanAir is enabled on this access point.

CleanAir Sensor Status—Indicates the operational status of the CleanAir censor (Up or Down).

Admin Status—Enabled or disabled.

Operational Status—Displays the operational status of the Cisco Radios (Up or Down).

Controller—Click to display controller system details. See the "Monitoring System Summary" section on page 5-4 for more information.

Channel—The channel upon which the Cisco Radio is broadcasting.

Extension Channel—Indicates the secondary channel on which Cisco radio is broadcasting.

Channel Width—Indicates the channel bandwidth for this radio interface. See the "Configuring 802.11a/n RRM Dynamic Channel Allocation" section on page 9-394 for more information on configuring channel bandwidth.

Power Level—Access Point transmit power level: 1 = Maximum power allowed per Country Code setting, 2 = 50% power, 3 = 25% power, 4 = 6.25 to 12.5% power, and 5 = 0.195 to 6.25% power.

The power levels and available channels are defined by the Country Code setting, and are regulated on a country by country basis.

Port—(1 to 24) Port to which the access point is connected.

Map Location—Click to display the floor map showing the access point location.

Management Frame Protection

Protection Capability—All Frames

Validation Capability—All Frames

MFP Version Supported—Management Frame Protection version supported and configured.

Profile Information

Noise Profile—Notification sent when Noise Profile state changes between Success and Failure.

Interference Profile—Notification sent when Interference Profile state changes between Success and Failure.

Load Profile—Notification sent when Load Profile state changes between Success and Failure.

Coverage Profile—Notification sent when Coverage Profile state changes between Success and Failure.


Note Click Success or Failure to view associated alarms.


Noise by Channel (dBm)

Graph showing channel and noise.

Interference by Channel (dBm%)

Graph showing the percentage of interference per channel.


Note Channel Utilization is a combination of Receive Power (RX) + Transmit Power (TX) + Interference.
Interference—Access points report on the percentage of the medium taken up by interfering 802.11 transmissions (this can be from overlapping signals from foreign APs, as well as non-neighbors).



Note The channel list (as configured from the RRM page) is scanned completely using the "channel scan duration" field under monitor intervals. For example, if scanning all 11 channels in 2.4 GHz, and using the default duration (180 seconds), you get: 180/11 = 16.36 seconds approximately between each channel that is being scanned.


Load Statistics

RX Utilization—802.11a or 802.11b/g RF receive utilization threshold between 0 and 100 percent.

TX Utilization—802.11a or 802.11b/g RF transmit utilization threshold between 0 and 100 percent.

Channel Utilization—802.11a RF utilization threshold between 0 and 100 percent (Subcolumns for Actual and Threshold).

Attached Client Count—The number of clients attached.

General Tab

This section describes the information that appears on the General tab and contains the following topics:

"% Client Count by RSSI" section on page 5-74

"% Client Count by SNR" section on page 5-74

"Channel Utilization (% Busy)" section on page 5-74

"Noise by Channel(dBm)" section on page 5-74

"Rx Neighbors" section on page 5-74

"Channel Utilization Statistics" section on page 5-74

% Client Count by RSSI

Graph with % and Received Signal Strength Indicator.

% Client Count by SNR

Graph with % and Signal-to-Noise Ratio.

Channel Utilization (% Busy)

Graph displaying the channel number on the x-axis and channel utilization on the y-axis.

Noise by Channel(dBm)

Graph displaying the channel on the x-axis and power in dBm on the y-axis.

Rx Neighbors

Radio MAC Address

AP Name—Click to view access point details.

Map—Click to view the map.

Mobility Group-Leader IP Address

Neighbor Channel

Channel Bandwidth

RSSI (dBm)

Channel Utilization Statistics

Time

Picc—Percentage of time consumed by received frames from co-channel APs and clients.

Pib—Percentage of time consumed by interference on the channel which cannot be correctly demodulated.


Note Picc and Pib values should give a good indication of the percentage of time the access point is busy because of co channel interference.


Client Count Over last 24 Hrs

This graph shows the client count specific to the AP radios (in the last 24 hours).

CleanAir Tab

This section describes the information that appears on the CleanAir tab and contains the following topics:

"Air Quality" section on page 5-75

"Interference Power" section on page 5-75

"Non-WiFi Channel Utilization" section on page 5-75

"Active Interferers" section on page 5-75

"View Drop-Down List" section on page 5-76

Air Quality

This graph displays the air quality index of the wireless network. A value of 100 indicates the air quality is best and a value of 1 indicates maximum interference.

Interference Power

This graph displays the interference power of the interfering devices on the channel number.

Non-WiFi Channel Utilization

This graph displays the non-WiFi channel utilization of the wireless network.

Active Interferers

This section displays the details of the active interferers on the wireless network. The following details are available:

Interferer Name—The name of the interfering device.

Affected Channels—The channel the interfering device is affecting.

Detected Time—The time at which the interference was detected.

Severity—The severity index of the interfering device.

Duty Cycle(%)—The duty cycle (in percentage) of the interfering device.

RSSI(dBm)—The Received Signal Strength Indicator of the interfering device.

View Drop-Down List

Choose On Demand Statistics, and click Go to display On Demand Statistics for this access point radio. See the "Monitoring On Demand Statistics" section on page 5-72 for more information.

Choose Operational Parameters, and click Go to display Operational parameters for this access point radio. See the "Monitoring Operational Parameters" section on page 5-76 for more information.

Choose 802.11 MAC Counters, and click Go to display 802.11 MAC Counters for this access point radio. See the "Monitoring 802.11 MAC Counters" section on page 5-79 for more information.

Choose View Alarms, and click Go to display alarms for this access point radio. See the "Monitoring View Alarms" section on page 5-80 for more information.

Choose View Events, and click Go to display events for this access point radio. See the "Monitor View Events" section on page 5-81 for more information.

Monitoring Operational Parameters

To view Operational Parameters for an access point radio, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Access Points, click the radio for the applicable access point.

Step 2 From the View drop-down list, choose Operational Parameters.

Step 3 Click Go.


This page enables you to view configuration information for a single 802.11a or 802.11b Cisco radio.

General

AP Name—Click to view the access point details. See the "Monitoring Access Points Details" section on page 5-57 for more information.

AP MAC Address

Radio

Admin Status—Enabled or disabled.

Operational Status—Displays the operational status of the Cisco Radios (Up or Down).

Controller—Click to display controller system details. See the "Monitoring System Summary" section on page 5-4 for more information.

Channel—The channel upon which the Cisco Radio is broadcasting.

Extension Channel—Indicates the secondary channel on which Cisco radio is broadcasting.

Channel Width—Indicates the channel bandwidth for this radio interface. See the "Configuring 802.11a/n RRM Dynamic Channel Allocation" section on page 9-394 for more information on configuring channel bandwidth.

Power Level—Access Point transmit power level: 1 = Maximum power allowed per Country Code setting, 2 = 50% power, 3 = 25% power, 4 = 6.25 to 12.5% power, and 5 = 0.195 to 6.25% power.

The power levels and available channels are defined by the Country Code setting, and are regulated on a country by country basis.

Port—(1 to 24) Port to which the access point is connected.

Map Location—Click to display the floor map showing the access point location.

Station Configuration Parameters

Configuration Type—Automatic or Custom.

Number of WLANs—1 (one) is the default.

Medium Occupancy Limit—Indicates the maximum amount of time, in TU, that a point coordinator might control the usage of the wireless medium without relinquishing control for long enough to allow at least one instance of DCF access to the medium. The default value is 100, and the maximum value is 1000.

CFP Period—The number of DTIM intervals between the start of CFPs.

CFP Max. Duration—The maximum duration of the CFP in TU that might be generated by the PCF.

BSSID—MAC address of the access point.

Beacon Period—The rate at which the SSID is broadcast by the access point, from 100 to 600 milliseconds.

DTIM Period—The number of beacon intervals that shall elapse between transmission of Beacon frames containing a TIM element whose DTIM Count field is 0. This value is transmitted in the DTIM Period field of Beacon frames.

Country String—Identifies the country in which the station is operating. The first two octets of this string are the two character country code.

Physical Channel Parameters

Current Channel—Current operating frequency channel.

Configuration—Locally customized or globally controlled.

Current CCA Mode—CCA method in operation. Valid values:

Energy detect only (edonly) = 01.

Carrier sense only (csonly) = 02.

Carrier sense and energy detect (edandcs)= 04.

Carrier sense with timer (cswithtimer)= 08.

High rate carrier sense and energy detect (hrcsanded)=16.

ED/TI Threshold—The Energy Detect and Threshold being used to detect a busy medium (frequency). CCA reports a busy medium upon detecting the RSSI above this threshold.

Physical Antenna Parameters

Antenna Type—Internal or External.

Diversity—Enabled via the internal antennas or via either Connector A or Connector B. (Enabled or Disabled).

RF Recommendation Parameters

Channel—802.11a Low Band, Medium Band, and High Band; 802.11b/g.

Tx Power Level—Zero (0) if Radio Resource Management (RRM) disabled, 1 - 5 if Radio Resource Management (RRM) is enabled.

RTS/CTS Threshold—Zero (0) if Radio Resource Management (RRM) disabled, 1 - 5 if Radio Resource Management (RRM) is enabled.

Fragmentation Threshold—Zero (0) if Radio Resource Management (RRM) is disabled.

MAC Operation Parameters

Configuration Type—Automatic or Custom.

RTS Threshold—This attribute indicates the number of octets in an MPDU, below which an RTS/CTS handshake is not performed.

An RTS/CTS handshake is performed at the beginning of any frame exchange sequence where the MPDU is a Data or Management type, the MPDU has an individual address in the Address1 field, and the length of the MPDU is greater than this threshold. Setting this attribute to be larger than the maximum MSDU size turns off the RTS/CTS handshake for Data or Management type frames transmitted by this STA. Setting this attribute to zero turns on the RTS/CTS handshake for all frames of Data or Management type transmitted by this STA. The default value of this attribute shall be 2347.

Short Retry Limit—The maximum number of transmission attempts of a frame, the length of which is less than or equal to dot11RTSThreshold, that shall be made before a failure condition is indicated. The default value of this attribute is 7.

Long Retry Limit—The maximum number of transmission attempts of a frame, the length of which is greater than dot11RTSThreshold, that shall be made before a failure condition is indicated. The default value of this attribute shall be 4.

Fragmentation Threshold—The current maximum size, in octets, of the MPDU that might be delivered to the PHY. An MSDU shall be broken into fragments if its size exceeds the value of this attribute after adding MAC headers and trailers. An MSDU or MMPDU shall be fragmented when the resulting frame has an individual address in the Address1 field, and the length of the frame is larger than this threshold. The default value for this attribute shall be the lesser of 2346 or the aMPDUMaxLength of the attached PHY and shall never exceed the lesser of 2346 or the aMPDUMaxLength of the attached PHY. The value of this attribute shall never be less than 256.

Max Tx MSDU Lifetime—The elapsed time in TU, after the initial transmission of an MSDU, after which further attempts to transmit the MSDU shall be terminated. The default value of this attribute is 512.

Max Rx Lifetime—The MaxReceiveLifetime shall be the elapsed time in TU, after the initial reception of a fragmented MMPDU or MSDU, after which further attempts to reassemble the MMPDU or MSDU shall be terminated. The default value is 512.

Tx Power

# Supported Power Levels—Five or fewer power levels, depending on operator preference.

Tx Power Level x—Access point transmit power level: 1 = Maximum power allowed per Country Code setting, 2 = 50% power, 3 = 25% power, 4 = 6.25 to 12.5% power, and 5 = 0.195 to 6.25% power.


Note The power levels and available channels are defined by the Country Code setting, and are regulated on a country by country basis.


Tx Power Configuration—Globally controlled or customized for this access point (Custom or Global).

Current Tx Power Level—Displays the operating transmit power level from the transmit power table.

Monitoring 802.11 MAC Counters

To view Operational Parameters for an access point radio, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Access Points, click the radio for the applicable access point.

Step 2 From the View drop-down list, choose 802.11 MAC Counters.

Step 3 Click Go.


This page enables you to view 802.11 MAC Counter information for a single 802.11a or 802.11b Cisco Radio.

General

AP Name—Click to view the access point details. See the "Monitoring Access Points Details" section on page 5-57 for more information.

AP MAC Address

Radio

Admin Status—Enabled or disabled.

Operational Status—Displays the operational status of the Cisco Radios (Up or Down).

Controller—Click to display controller system details. See the "Monitoring System Summary" section on page 5-4 for more information.

Channel—The channel upon which the Cisco Radio is broadcasting.

Extension Channel—Indicates the secondary channel on which Cisco radio is broadcasting.

Channel Width—Indicates the channel bandwidth for this radio interface. See the "Configuring 802.11a/n RRM Dynamic Channel Allocation" section on page 9-394 for more information on configuring channel bandwidth.


Note Minimum (default) setting is 20 MHz. Maximum setting is the maximum channel width supported by this radio.


Power Level—Access Point transmit power level: 1 = Maximum power allowed per Country Code setting, 2 = 50% power, 3 = 25% power, 4 = 6.25 to 12.5% power, and 5 = 0.195 to 6.25% power.

The power levels and available channels are defined by the Country Code setting, and are regulated on a country by country basis.

Port—(1 to 24) Port to which the access point is connected.

Map Location—Click to display the floor map showing the access point location.

RF Counters

Tx Fragment Count—This counter is incremented for each successfully received MPDU Data or Management type.

Multicast Tx Frame Count—This counter increments only when the multicast bit is set in the destination MAC address of a successfully transmitted MSDU. When operating as a STA in an ESS, where these frames are directed to the access point, this implies having received an acknowledgment to all associated MPDUs.

Tx Failed Count—This counter increments when an MSDU is successfully transmitted after one or more retransmissions.

Retry Count—This counter increments when an MSDU is successfully transmitted after one or more retransmissions.

Multiple Retry Count—This counter increments when an MSDU is successfully transmitted after more than one retransmission.

Frame Duplicate Count—This counter increments when a frame is received that the Sequence Control field indicates is a duplicate.

RTS Success Count—This counter increments when a CTS is received in response to an RTS.

RTS Failure Count—This counter increments when a CTS is not received in response to an RTS.

ACK Failure Count—This counter increments when an ACK is not received when expected.

Rx Fragment Count—The total number of packets received that were less than 64 octets in length (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets).

Multicast Rx Framed Count—This counter increments when a MSDU is received with the multicast bit set in the destination MAC address.

FCS Error Count—This counter increments when an FCS error is detected in a received MPDU.

Tx Frame Count—This counter increments for each successfully transmitted MSDU.

WEP Undecryptable Count—This counter increments when a frame is received with the WEP subfield of the Frame Control field set to one and the WEP On value for the key mapped to the AT MAC address indicates that the frame should not have been encrypted or that frame is discarded due to the receiving STA not implementing the privacy option.

Monitoring View Alarms

To access the View Alarms page from the Monitor Access Points page, follow these steps:


Note When the AP is disassociated, in the Monitor > Access Points page, the radio status has a critical status. There is only one alarm, AP disassociated. This is because radio alarms are correlated to AP disassociated alarm.



Note When the controller goes down, the controller inventory dashlet shows the controller status as critical. But the radio inventory dashlet retains the last known status. In the Monitor > Access Point page, the AP alarm status is shown as "Unknown".



Step 1 Choose Monitor > Access Points.

Step 2 Select the Radio Type in the Radio Type column of the applicable access point.

Step 3 From the View drop-down list, choose View Alarms.

Step 4 Click Go.

For more information on Viewing Alarms, see the "Monitoring Alarms" section on page 5-129.


Monitor View Events

To access the View Events page from the Monitor Access Points page, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Access Points.

Step 2 Select the Radio Type in the Radio Type column of the applicable access point.

Step 3 From the View drop-down list, select View Events.

Step 4 Click Go.

For more information on viewing events, see the "Monitoring Events" section on page 5-144.


Monitoring Third Party Access Points

Prime Infrastructure supports the monitoring of certain third party access points.

For third-party access points, the following parameters are monitored:

Current configuration of SSID

Mode

Current Channel

Tx-Power

RTS Threshold

Retry Limit

Preamble

Beacon Interval

Power management

Load balance

Rates

DTIM Period

LMS address

Encryption

Status

Ageout

MTU

Location

Hide SSID

Deny Broadcast

BG mode

Radio Chipset

Regulatory Domain

Country Code

Tx Rates


To view third party access point details, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Third Party Access Points.

Step 2 In the Third Party Access Point page, click the access point's name. The information in the General tab appears.


Monitoring Mesh Access Points

Mesh Health monitors the overall health of Cisco Aironet 1500 and 1520 series outdoor access points as well as Cisco Aironet 1130 and 1240 series indoor access points when configured as mesh access points, except as noted. Tracking this environmental information is particularly critical for access points that are deployed outdoors. The following factors are monitored:

Temperature: Displays the internal temperature of the access point in Fahrenheit and Celsius (Cisco Aironet 1510 and 1520 outdoor access points only).

Heater status: Displays the heater as on or off (Cisco Aironet 1510 and 1520 outdoor access points only)

AP Up time: Displays how long the access point has been active to receive and transmit.

LWAPP Join Taken Time: Displays how long it took to establish the LWAPP connection (excluding Cisco Aironet 1505 access points).

LWAPP Up Time: Displays how long the LWAPP connection has been active (excluding Cisco Aironet 1505 access points).

Mesh Health information is displayed in the General Properties page for mesh access points.


Note The wIPS mode is not supported in the Cisco Aironet 1500 series mesh access points.


To view the mesh health details for a specific mesh access point, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Access Points. A listing of radios belonging to access points appears.


Note The radio status (not an access point status) is displayed when you choose Monitor > Access Points. The given status is updated frequently from traps and wireless status polling and takes several minutes to reflect actual radio status. The overall status of an access point can be found by viewing the access point on a map.



Note You can also use the New Search button to display the mesh access point summary. With the New Search option, you can further define the criteria of the access points that appear. Search criteria include AP Type, AP Mode, Radio Type, and 802.11n Support.


Step 2 Click the AP Name link to display details for that mesh access point. The General tab for that mesh access point appears.


Note You can also access the General tab for a mesh access point from an Prime Infrastructure map page. To display the page, double-click the mesh access point label. A tabbed page appears and displays the General tab for the selected access point.



To add, remove, or reorder columns in the table, click the Edit View link in the Monitor > Access Points page.

Mesh Statistics Tab

Mesh Statistics are reported when a child mesh access point authenticates or associates with a parent mesh access point.

Security entries are removed and no longer displayed when the child mesh access point disassociates from the controller.

The following mesh security statistics are displayed for mesh access points:

Bridging

Queue

Security

To view the mesh statistics for a specific mesh access point, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Access Points. A listing of radios belonging to access points appears.


Note The radio status (not an access point status) is displayed when you choose Monitor > Access Points. The given status is updated frequently from traps and wireless status polling and takes several minutes to reflect actual radio status. The overall status of an access point can be found by viewing the access point on a map.



Note You can also use the New Search button to display the access point summary. With the New Search option, you can further define the criteria of the access points that display. Search criteria includes AP Name, IP address, MAC address, Controller IP or Name, Radio type, and Outdoor area.


Step 2 Click the AP Name link of the target mesh access point.

A tabbed page appears and displays the General Properties page for the selected access point.

Step 3 Click the Mesh Statistics tab. A three-tabbed Mesh Statistics page appears.


Note The Mesh Statistics tab and its subordinate tabs (Bridging, Queue and Security) only appear for mesh access points. The Mesh Link Alarms and Mesh Link Events links are accessible from each of the three tabbed panels. You can click these links to view the relevant alarms and events.



Note You can also access the Mesh Securities page for a mesh access point from an Prime Infrastructure map. To display the page, double-click the mesh access point label.


Summaries of the Bridging, Queue and Security Statistics and their definitions are provided in Table 5-55, Table 5-56 and Table 5-57 respectively.

Table 5-55 Bridging Mesh Statistics 

Field
Description

Role

The role of the mesh access point. Options are mesh access point (MAP) and root access point (RAP).

Bridge Group Name

The name of the bridge group to which the MAP or RAP is a member. We recommend assigning membership in a bridge group name. If one is not assigned, a MAP is by default assigned to a default bridge group name.

Backhaul Interface

The radio backhaul for the mesh access point.

Routing State

The state of parent selection. Values that display are seek, scan and maint. Maint appears when parent selection is complete.

Malformed Neighbor Packets

The number of malformed packets received from the neighbor. Examples of malformed packets include malicious floods of traffic such as malformed or short DNS packets and malformed DNS replies.

Poor Neighbor SNR

The number of times the signal-to-noise ratio falls below 12 dB on the backhaul link.

Excluded Packets

The number of packets received from excluded neighbor mesh access points.

Insufficient Memory

The number of insufficient memory conditions.

RX Neighbor Requests

The number of broadcast and unicast requests received from the neighbor mesh access points.

RX Neighbor Responses

The number of responses received from the neighbor mesh access points.

TX Neighbor Requests

The number of unicast and broadcast requests sent to the neighbor mesh access points.

TX Neighbor Responses

The number of responses sent to the neighbor mesh

access points.

Parent Changes

The number of times a mesh access point (child) moves to another parent.

Neighbor Timeouts

The number of neighbor timeouts.

Node Hops

The number of hops between the MAP and the RAP. Click the value link to display a dialog box which enables you to configure details of what is reported, how often the node hop value is updated, and view a graphical representation of the report.


Table 5-56 Queue Mesh Statistics 

Field
Description

Silver Queue

The average and peak number of packets waiting in the silver (best effort) queue during the defined statistics time interval. Packets dropped and queue size is also summarized.

Gold Queue

The average and peak number of packets waiting in the gold (video) queue during the defined statistics time interval. Packets dropped and queue size is also summarized.

Platinum Queue

The average and peak number of packets waiting in the platinum (voice) queue during the defined statistics time interval. Packets dropped and queue size is also summarized.

Bronze Queue

The average and peak number of packets waiting in the bronze (background) queue during the defined statistics time interval. Packets dropped and queue size is also summarized.

Management Queue

The average and peak number of packets waiting in the management queue during the defined statistics time interval. Packets dropped and queue size is also summarized.


Table 5-57 Security Mesh Statistics 

Field
Description

Packets Transmitted

Summarizes the total number of packets transmitted during security negotiations by the selected mesh access point.

Packets Received

Summarizes the total number of packets received during security negotiations by the selected mesh access point.

Association Request Failures

Summarizes the total number of association request failures that occur between the selected mesh access point and its parent.

Association Request Timeouts

Summarizes the total number of association request time outs that occur between the selected mesh access point and its parent.

Association Request Success

Summaries the total number of successful association requests that occur between the selected mesh access point and its parent.

Authentication Request Failures

Summarizes the total number of failed authentication requests that occur between the selected mesh access point and its parent.

Authentication Request Timeouts

Summarizes the total number of authentication request timeouts that occur between the selected mesh access point and its parent.

Authentication Request Success

Summarizes the total number of successful authentication requests between the selected mesh access point and its parent mesh node.

Reassociation Request Failures

Summarizes the total number of failed reassociation requests between the selected mesh access point and its parent.

Reassociation Request Timeouts

Summarizes the total number of reassociation request timeouts between the selected mesh access point and its parent.

Reassociation Request Success

Summarizes the total number of successful reassociation requests between the selected mesh access point and its parent.

Reauthentication Request Failures

Summarizes the total number of failed reauthentication requests between the selected mesh access point and its parent.

Reauthentication Request Timeouts

Summarizes the total number of reauthentication request timeouts that occurred between the selected mesh access point and its parent.

Reauthentication Request Success

Summarizes the total number of successful reauthentication requests that occurred between the selected mesh access point and its parent.

Invalid Association Request

Summarizes the total number of invalid association requests received by the parent mesh access point from the selected child mesh access point. This state might occur when the selected child is a valid neighbor but is not in a state that allows association.

Unknown Association Requests

Summarizes the total number of unknown association requests received by the parent mesh access point from its child. The unknown association requests often occur when a child is an unknown neighbor mesh access point.

Invalid Reassociation Request

Summarizes the total number of invalid reassociation requests received by the parent mesh access point from a child. This might happen when a child is a valid neighbor but is not in a proper state for reassociation.

Unknown Reassociation Request

Summarizes the total number of unknown reassociation requests received by the parent mesh access point from a child. This might happen when a child mesh access point is an unknown neighbor.

Invalid Reauthentication Request

Summarizes the total number of invalid reauthentication requests that occurred between the selected mesh access point and its parent.This state might occur when the selected mesh access point is a valid neighbor but is not in a state that allows reauthentication.


Mesh Links Tab

Table 5-58 lists the Mesh Links tab fields.


Note This tab is visible only for mesh access points. You can click the Mesh Link Alarms and Mesh Link Events links to view the relevant alarms and events.

Table 5-58 Mesh Links Tab Fields 

Field
Description

Type

The type of the access point.

AP Name

The name assigned to the access point.

AP MAC Address

The MAC address of the access point.

PER

The Packet Error Rate measured from the total packets that are transmitted in the link test.

Link Detail

Click to view the details of the mesh link alarms, mesh link events, and link metrics.

Link Test

The test used to measure the air link quality between the AP and the neighbor AP.

Channel

The channel number of the mesh access point.

Link SNR (dB)

The air link SNR measured between the AP and the neighbor AP.

SNR Down

The Signal Noise Ratio measured on the air link from the AP to the neighbor AP.

SNR Up

The Signal Noise Ratio measured on the air link from the neighbor AP to the AP.




Note Click the Edit View link to add, remove or reorder columns in the Mesh Links table. See the "Configuring the List of Access Points Display" section on page 5-47 for adding a new field using the Edit View.


Retrieving the Unique Device Identifier on Controllers and Access Points

The unique device identifier (UDI) standard uniquely identifies products across all Cisco hardware product families, enabling customers to identify and track Cisco products throughout their business and network operations and to automate their asset management systems. The standard is consistent across all electronic, physical, and standard business communications. The UDI consists of five data elements:

The orderable product identifier (PID)

The version of the product identifier (VID)

The serial number (SN)

The entity name

The product description

The UDI is burned into the EEPROM of controllers and lightweight access points at the factory and can be retrieved through the GUI.

To retrieve the UDI on controllers and access points, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Controllers/Access Points. The Controllers/Access Points page appears.

Step 2 Click the IP address of the controller/access point whose UDI information you want to retrieve. Data elements of the controller/access point UDI display. These elements are described in Table 5-58..

Maximum Number of Crypto Cards That can be Installed on a Cisco Wireless LAN Controller

Type of Controller
Maximum Number of Crypto Cards

Cisco 2000 Series

None

Cisco 4100 Series

One

Cisco 4400 Series

Two



Monitoring Coverage Holes

Coverage holes are areas where clients cannot receive a signal from the wireless network. The Cisco Unified Network Solution, radio resource management (RRM) identifies these coverage hole areas and reports them to Prime Infrastructure, enabling the IT manager to fill holes based on user demand.

Prime Infrastructure is informed about the reliability-detected coverage holes by the controllers. Prime Infrastructure alerts the user about these coverage holes. For more information on finding coverage holes, refer to Cisco Context-Aware Services documentation at this location:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/wireless/mse/3350/5.2/CAS/configuration/guide/msecg_ch7_CAS.html


Note Coverage holes are displayed as alarms. Pre-coverage holes are displayed as events.


Monitoring Pre-Coverage Holes

To view pre-coverage hole events, perform these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Events to display all current events.

Step 2 To view pre-coverage hole events only, click the Advanced Search link.

Step 3 In the New Search page, change the Search Category drop-down to Events.

Step 4 From the Event Category drop-down list, choose Pre Coverage Hole, and click Go.

The Pre-Coverage Hole Events page provides the information described in Table 5-59.

Table 5-59 Pre-Coverage Hole Fields 

Field
Description

Severity

Pre-coverage hole events are always considered informational (Info).

Client MAC Address

MAC address of the client affected by the pre-coverage hole.

AP MAC Address

MAC address of the applicable access point.

AP Name

The name of the applicable access point.

Radio Type

The radio type (802.11b/g or 802.11a) of the applicable access point.

Power Level

Access point transmit power level: 1 = Maximum power allowed per country code setting, 2 = 50% power, 3 = 25% power, 4 = 6.25 to 12.5% power, and 5 = 0.195 to 6.25% power.

Client Type

Client type can be any of the following:

laptop(0)

pc(1)

pda(2)

dot11mobilephone(3)

dualmodephone(4)

wgb(5)

scanner(6)

tabletpc(7)

printer(8)

projector(9)

videoconfsystem(10)

camera(11)

gamingsystem(12)

dot11deskphone(13)

cashregister(14)

radiotag(15)

rfidsensor(16)

server(17)

WLAN Coverage Hole Status

Determines if the current coverage hole state is enabled or disabled.

WLAN

The name for this WLAN.

Date/Time

The date and time the event occurred. Click the title to toggle between ascending and descending order.


Step 5 Choose a Client MAC Address to view pre-coverage hole details.

General—Provides the following information:

Client MAC Address

AP MAC Address

AP Name

Radio Type

Power Level

Client Type

Category

Created

Generated By

Device AP Address

Severity

Neighbor AP's—Indicates the MAC addresses of nearby access points, their RSSI values, and their radio types.

Message—Describes what device reported the pre-coverage hole and on which controller it was detected.

Help—Provides additional information, if available, for handling the event.


Monitoring Rogue Access Points

This section describes security solutions for rogue devices. A rogue device is an unknown access point or client that is detected by managed access points in your network.

Rogue access points can disrupt wireless LAN operations by hijacking legitimate clients and using plain-text or other denial of service or man-in-the-middle attacks. That is, a hacker can use a rogue access point to capture sensitive information, such as usernames and passwords. The hacker can then transmit a series of clear-to-send (CTS) frames. This action mimics an access point informing a particular client to transmit and instructing all others to wait, which results in legitimate clients being unable to access network resources. Therefore, wireless LAN service providers have a strong interest in banning rogue access points from the air space.

Because rogue access points are inexpensive and readily available, employees sometimes plug unauthorized rogue access points into existing LANs and build ad-hoc wireless networks without IT department knowledge or consent. These rogue access points can be a serious breach of network security as they can be plugged into a network port behind the corporate firewall. Because employees generally do not enable any security settings on the rogue access point, it is easy for unauthorized users to use the access point to intercept network traffic and hijack client sessions. Even more alarming, wireless users frequently publish insecure access point locations, increasing the odds of having enterprise security breached.

Detecting Rogue Devices

The controllers continuously monitor all nearby access points and automatically discover and collect information on rogue access points and clients. When a controller discovers a rogue access point, it uses the Rogue Location Discovery Protocol (RLDP) to determine if the rogue is attached to your network.


Note Prime Infrastructure consolidates all of the controllers rogue access point data.


You can configure controllers to use RLDP on all access points or only on access points configured for monitor (listen-only) mode. The latter option facilitates automated rogue access point detection in a crowded RF space, allowing monitoring without creating unnecessary interference and without affecting regular data access point functionality. If you configure a controller to use RLDP on all access points, the controller always chooses the monitor access point for RLDP operation if a monitor access point and a local (data) access point are both nearby. If RLDP determines that the rogue is on your network, you can choose to either manually or automatically contain the detected rogue. See the "Configuring Rogue Policies" section on page 9-374 for information on enabling RLDP.


Note Rogue access point partitions are associated with one of the detecting access points (the one with the latest or strongest RSSI value). If there is detecting access point information, Prime Infrastructure uses the detecting controller. If the rogue access point is detected by two controllers which are in different partitions, the rogue access point partition might be changed at any time.


This section contains the following topics:

Viewing Rogue AP Alarm Details, page 5-99

Monitoring Rogue AP Alarms, page 5-95

Viewing Rogue AP Alarm Details, page 5-99

Viewing Rogue Client Details, page 5-103

Viewing Rogue AP History Details, page 5-104

Viewing Rogue AP Event History Details, page 5-105

Monitoring Ad hoc Rogue Alarms, page 5-106

Classifying Rogue Access Points

Classification and reporting of rogue access points occurs through the use of rogue states and user-defined classification rules that enable rogues to automatically move between states. You can create rules that enable the controller to organize and display rogue access points as Friendly, Malicious, or Unclassified.


Note Prime Infrastructure consolidates all of the controllers rogue access point data.


By default, none of the classification rules are enabled. Therefore, all unknown access points are categorized as Unclassified. When you create a rule, configure conditions for it, and enable the rule, the unclassified access points are reclassified. Whenever you change a rule, it is applied to all access points (friendly, malicious, and unclassified) in the Alert state only.


Note Rule-based rogue classification does not apply to ad-hoc rogues and rogue clients.



Note The 5500 series controllers support up to 2000 rogues (including acknowledged rogues); the 4400 series controllers, Cisco WiSM, and Catalyst 3750G Integrated Wireless LAN Controller Switch support up to 625 rogues; and the 2100 series controllers and Controller Network Module for Integrated Services Routers support up to 125 rogues. Each controller limits the number of rogue containments to three per radio (or six per radio for access points in monitor mode).


When the controller receives a rogue report from one of its managed access points, it responds as follows:

1. The controller verifies that the unknown access point is in the friendly MAC address list. If it is, the controller classifies the access point as Friendly.

2. If the unknown access point is not in the friendly MAC address list, the controller starts applying rogue classification rules.

3. If the rogue is already classified as Malicious, Alert or Friendly, Internal or External, the controller does not reclassify it automatically. If the rogue is classified differently, the controller reclassifies it automatically only if the rogue is in the Alert state.

4. The controller applies the first rule based on priority. If the rogue access point matches the criteria specified by the rule, the controller classifies the rogue according to the classification type configured for the rule.

5. If the rogue access point does not match any of the configured rules, the controller classifies the rogue as Unclassified.

6. The controller repeats the previous steps for all rogue access points.

7. If RLDP determines that the rogue access point is on the network, the controller marks the rogue state as Threat and classifies it as Malicious automatically, even if no rules are configured. You can then manually contain the rogue (unless you have configured RLDP to automatically contain the rogue), which would change the rogue state to Contained. If the rogue access point is not on the network, the controller marks the rogue state as Alert, and you can manually contain the rogue.

8. If desired, you can manually move the access point to a different classification type and rogue state.

As mentioned previously, the controller can automatically change the classification type and rogue state of an unknown access point based on user-defined rules, or you can manually move the unknown access point to a different classification type and rogue state. Table 5-60 shows the allowable classification types and rogue states from and to which an unknown access point can be configured.

Table 5-60 Allowable Classification Type and Rogue State Transitions 

From
To

Friendly (Internal, External, Alert)

Malicious (Alert)

Friendly (Internal, External, Alert)

Unclassified (Alert)

Friendly (Alert)

Friendly (Internal, External)

Malicious (Alert, Threat)

Friendly (Internal, External)

Malicious (Contained, Contained Pending)

Malicious (Alert)

Unclassified (Alert, Threat)

Friendly (Internal, External)

Unclassified (Contained, Contained Pending)

Unclassified (Alert)

Unclassified (Alert)

Malicious (Alert)


If the rogue state is Contained, you have to uncontain the rogue access point before you can change the classification type. If you want to move a rogue access point from Malicious to Unclassified, you must delete the access point and allow the controller to reclassify it.

Rogue access points classification types include:

Malicious—Detected but untrusted or unknown access points with a malicious intent within the system. They also refer to access points that fit the user-defined malicious rules or have been manually moved from the friendly access point classification. See the "Malicious Rogue APs" section on page 5-93 for more information.

Friendly—Known, acknowledged, or trusted access points. They also refer to access points that fit the user-defined friendly rogue access point rules. Friendly rogue access points cannot be contained. See the "Friendly Rogue APs" section on page 5-94 for more information. For more information on configuring friendly access point rules, see the "Configuring a Friendly Access Point Template" section on page 11-639.

Unclassified—Rogue access point that are not classified as either malicious or friendly. These access points can be contained and can be moved manually to the friendly rogue access point list. See for more information. See the "Unclassified Rogue APs" section on page 5-94 for more information.

Malicious Rogue APs

Malicious rogue access points are detected but untrusted or unknown access points with a malicious intent within the system. They also refer to access points that fit the user-defined malicious rules or have been manually moved from the friendly access point classification.

The Security dashboard of Prime Infrastructure home page displays the number of malicious rogue access points for each applicable state for the past hour, the past 24 hours, and the total number of active malicious rogue access points.

Malicious rogue access point states include:

Alert—Indicates that the access point is not on the neighbor list or part of the user-configured Friendly AP list.

Contained—The unknown access point is contained.

Threat—The unknown access point is found to be on the network and poses a threat to WLAN security.

Contained Pending—Indicates that the containment action is delayed due to unavailable resources.

Removed—This unknown access point was seen earlier but is not seen now.

Click an underlined number in any of the time period categories for detailed information regarding the malicious rogue access points. See the "Monitoring Rogue Access Points" section on page 5-90 for more information.

Friendly Rogue APs

Friendly rogue access points are known, acknowledged or trusted access points. They also refer to access points that fit the user-defined friendly rogue access point rules. Friendly rogue access points cannot be contained.


Note Only Prime Infrastructure users can add a rogue access point MAC address to the Friendly AP list. Prime Infrastructure does not apply the Friendly AP MAC address to controllers.


The Security dashboard of Prime Infrastructure home page displays the number of friendly rogue access points for each applicable state for the past hour, the past 24 hours, and the total number of active friendly rogue access points.

Friendly rogue access point states include the following:

Internal—If the unknown access point is inside the network and poses no threat to WLAN security, you would manually configure it as Friendly, Internal. For example, the access points in your lab network.

External—If the unknown access point is outside the network and poses no threat to WLAN security, you would manually configure it as Friendly, External. For example, the access points belonging to a neighboring coffee shop.

Alert—The unknown access point is not on the neighbor list or part of the user-configured Friendly AP list.

Click an underlined number in any of the time period categories for detailed information regarding the friendly rogue access points. See the "Monitoring Rogue Access Points" section on page 5-90 for more information.

To delete a rogue access point from the Friendly AP list, ensure that both Prime Infrastructure and controller remove the rogue access point from the Friendly AP list. Change the rogue access point from Friendly AP Internal or External to Unclassified or Malicious Alert.

Unclassified Rogue APs

An unclassified rogue access point refers to a rogue access point that is not classified as either malicious or friendly. These access points can be contained and can be moved manually to the friendly rogue access point list.

The Security dashboard of Prime Infrastructure home page displays the number of unclassified rogue access points for each applicable state for the past hour, the past 24 hours, and the total number of active unclassified rogue access points.

Unclassified rogue access point states include:

Pending—On first detection, the unknown access point is put in the Pending state for 3 minutes. During this time, the managed access points determine if the unknown access point is a neighbor access point.

Alert—The unknown access point is not on the neighbor list or part of the user-configured Friendly AP list.

Contained—The unknown access point is contained.

Contained Pending—The unknown access point is marked Contained, but the action is delayed due to unavailable resources.

Click an underlined number in any of the time period categories for further information. See the "Monitoring Rogue Access Points" section on page 5-90.

Monitoring Rogue AP Alarms

Rogue access point radios are unauthorized access points detected by one or more Cisco 1000 series lightweight access points. To open the Rogue AP Alarms page, do one of the following:

Search for rogue APs. See the "Using the Search Feature" section on page 2-54 for more information about the search feature.

From Prime Infrastructure home page, click the Security dashboard. This page displays all the rogue access points detected in the past hour and the past 24 hours. Click the rogue access point number to view the rogue access point alarms.

Click the Malicious AP number link in the Alarm Summary.


Note If there are multiple alarm pages, the page numbers are displayed at the top of the page with a scroll arrow on each side. Use it to view additional alarms.



Note Rogue access point partitions are associated with one of the detecting access points (the one with the latest or strongest RSSI value). If there is detecting access point information, Prime Infrastructure uses the detecting controller. If the rogue access point is detected by two controllers which are in different partitions, the rogue access point partition might be changed at any time.


The Rogue AP Alarms page contains the following fields:


Note When Prime Infrastructure polls, some data might change or get updated. Because of this, some of the displayed rogue data (including Strongest AP RSSI, No. of Rogue Clients, Channel, SSID, and Radio Types) can change during the life of the rogue.


Severity—Indicates the severity of the alarm including the following icons:

Table 5-61 Alarm Severity Indicator Icons 

Icon
Meaning

Critical

Major

Minor

Warning

Info

Unknown

Note When the controller goes down, the controller inventory dashlet shown the controller status as critical. But the radio inventory dashlet, retains the last known status. In Monitor > AP page, the AP alarm status is shown as "Unknown".

Clear—Appears if the rogue is no longer detected by any access point.

Note Rogues can be detected by multiple access points. If one access point no longer detects the rogue but the other access point does, Clear is not sent.

Note Once the severity of a rogue is Clear, the alarm is deleted from Prime Infrastructure after 30 days.


You can use the Severity Configuration feature to determine the level of severity for the following rogue access point alarm types:

Rogue detected

Rogue detected contained

Rogue detected on network

See the "Configuring Alarm Severities" section on page 15-1160 for more information.

Rogue MAC Address—Indicates the MAC address of the rogue access points. See the "Viewing Rogue AP Alarm Details" section on page 5-99.

Vendor—Rogue access point vendor name or Unknown.

Classification Type—Pending, Malicious, Friendly, or Unclassified.

Radio Type—Lists all radio types applicable to this rogue access point.

Strongest AP RSSI—Displays the strongest AP RSSI for this rogue access point across the life of the rogue. The strongest AP RSSI over the life of the rogue displays to indicate the nearest distance that existed between the rogue access point and your building or location. The higher the RSSI, the closer the location.

No. of Rogue Clients—Indicates the number of rogue clients associated to this rogue access point.


Note This number comes from Prime Infrastructure database It is updated every two hours. From the Monitor > Alarms > Alarm Details page, this number is a real-time number. It is updated each time you open the Alarm Details page for this rogue access point.


Owner—Name of person to which this alarm is assigned, or (blank).

Last Seen Time—Indicates the date and time that the rogue access point was last seen.

State—Indicates the state of the alarm. Possible states vary depending on the classification type of rogue access point. See the "Classifying Rogue Access Points" section on page 5-91 for additional information.

Malicious rogue states include: Alert, Contained, Threat, Contained Pending, and Removed. See the "Malicious Rogue APs" section on page 5-93 for more information.

Friendly rogue states include: Internal, External, and Alert. See the "Friendly Rogue APs" section on page 5-94 for more information.

Unclassified rogue states include: Pending, Alert, Contained, and Contained Pending. See the "Unclassified Rogue APs" section on page 5-94 for more information.

SSID—Indicates the service set identifier being broadcast by the rogue access point radio. It is blank if the SSID is not being broadcast.

Map Location—Indicates the map location for this rogue access point.

Acknowledged—Displays whether or not the alarm is acknowledged by the user.

You can acknowledge the alarm to prevent it from showing up in the Alarm Summary page. The alarm remains in Prime Infrastructure and you can search for all Acknowledged alarms using the alarm search functionality. See the "Acknowledging Alarms" section on page 5-138 for more information.


Note The alarm remains in Prime Infrastructure, and you can search for all Acknowledged alarms using the alarm search functionality.



Caution When you choose to contain a rogue device, the following warning appears: "There may be legal issues following this containment. Are you sure you want to continue?" The 2.4- and 5-GHz frequencies in the Industrial, Scientific, and Medical (ISM) band are open to the public and can be used without a license. As such, containing devices on another network could have legal consequences.

Select a command Menu

Select one or more alarms by selecting their respective check boxes, choose one of the following commands from the Select a command drop-down list, and click Go.

Assign to me—Assign the selected alarm(s) to the current user.

Unassign—Unassign the selected alarm(s).

Delete—Delete the selected alarm(s).

Clear—Clear the selected alarm(s). Indicates that the alarm is no longer detected by any access point.


Note Once the severity is Clear, the alarm is deleted from Prime Infrastructure after 30 days.


Acknowledge Alarm—Acknowledge the alarm to prevent it from showing up in the Alarm Summary page. See the "Acknowledging Alarms" section on page 5-138 for more information.


Note The alarm remains in Prime Infrastructure and you can search for all Acknowledged alarms using the alarm search functionality.


Unacknowledge Alarm—Unacknowledge an already acknowledged alarm.

Email Notification—Takes you to the All Alarms > Email Notification page to view and configure email notifications. See the "Monitoring RFID Tags" section on page 5-115 for more information.

Severity Configuration—Allows you to change the severity level for newly-generated alarms. See the "Configuring Alarm Severities" section on page 15-1160 for more information.

Detecting APs—View the Cisco 1000 Series lightweight access points that are currently detecting the rogue access point. See the "Detecting Access Points" section on page 5-110 for more information.

Map (High Resolution)—Click to display a high-resolution map of the rogue access point location.

Rogue Clients—Click to view a list of rogue clients associated with this rogue access point. The Rogue Clients page displays the Client MAC Address, when it was last heard, its current status, its controller, and the Rogue access point. See the "Viewing Rogue Client Details" section on page 5-103 for more information. This information can also be accessed by using Prime Infrastructure Search feature. See the "Using the Search Feature" section on page 2-54 or the "Advanced Search" section on page 2-55 for more information.

Set State to `Unclassified - Alert'—Choose this command to tag the rogue access point as the lowest threat, continue monitoring the rogue access point, and to turn off Containment. See the "Unclassified Rogue APs" section on page 5-94 for more information on Unclassified rogues.

Set State to `Malicious - Alert'—Choose this command to tag the rogue access point as `Malicious'. See the "Malicious Rogue APs" section on page 5-93 for more information on Malicious rogues.

Set State to `Friendly - Internal'—Choose this command to tag the rogue access point as internal, add it to the Known Rogue APs list, and to turn off Containment. See the "Friendly Rogue APs" section on page 5-94 for more information on Friendly rogues.

Set State to `Friendly - External'—Choose this command to tag the rogue access point as external, add it to the Known Rogue APs list, and to turn off Containment. See the "Friendly Rogue APs" section on page 5-94 for more information on Friendly rogues.

1 AP Containment—Target the rogue access point for containment by one access point. (Lowest containment level.)

2 AP Containment—Target the rogue access point for containment by two Cisco 1000 Series lightweight access points.

3 AP Containment—Target the rogue access point for containment by three Cisco 1000 Series lightweight access points.

4 AP Containment—Target the rogue access point for containment by four Cisco 1000 Series lightweight access points. (Highest containment level.)


Note The higher the threat of the rogue access point, the higher the containment required.



Caution Attempting to contain a rogue access point might lead to legal consequences. When you select any of the AP Containment commands and click Go, a message "Containing a Rogue AP may have legal consequences. Do you want to continue?" appears. Click OK if you are sure or click Cancel if you do not wish to contain any access points.


Viewing Rogue AP Alarm Details

Rogue access point radios are unauthorized access points detected by Cisco 1000 Series lightweight access points. Alarm event details for each rogue access point are available in the Rogue AP Alarms list page.

To view alarm events for a rogue access point radio, click the rogue MAC address for the applicable alarm from the Monitor > Alarms page for rogue access point alarms.


Note All Alarm Details page fields (except No. of Rogue Clients) are populated through polling and are updated every two hours.
The number of rogue clients is a real-time number and is updated each time you access the Alarm Details page for a rogue access point alarm.



Note When Prime Infrastructure polls, some data might change or get updated. Because of this, some of the displayed rogue data (including Strongest AP RSSI, No. of Rogue Clients, Channel, SSID, and Radio Types) can change during the life of the rogue.


The Alarm Details page displays the following information:

General

Rogue MAC Address—MAC address of the rogue access points.

Vendor—Rogue access point vendor name or Unknown.


Note When a rogue access point alarm displays for Airlink, the vendor displays as Alpha instead of Airlink.


Rogue Type—Indicates the rogue type such as AP.

On Network—Indicates how the rogue detection occurred.

Controller—The controller detected the rogue (Yes or No).

Switch Port Trace—The rogue was detected by a switch port trace. Indicated by one of the following: Traced but not found, Traced and found, Not traced.

Owner—Indicates the owner or is left blank.

Acknowledged—Indicates whether or not the alarm is acknowledged by the user.

You can acknowledge the alarm to prevent it from showing up in the Alarm Summary page. The alarm remains in Prime Infrastructure and you can search for all Acknowledged alarms using the alarm search functionality. See the "Acknowledging Alarms" section on page 5-138 for more information.

Classification Type—Malicious, Friendly, or Unclassified.

State—Indicates the state of the alarm. Possible states vary depending on the classification type of rogue access point.

SSID—Service Set Identifier being broadcast by the rogue access point radio. (Blank if SSID is not broadcast.)

Channel Number—Indicates the channel of the rogue access point.

Containment Level—Indicates the containment level of the rogue access point or Unassigned (not contained).

Radio Type—Lists all radio types applicable to this rogue access point.

Strongest AP RSSI—Displays the strongest AP RSSI for this rogue access point across the life of the rogue. The strongest AP RSSI over the life of the rogue displays to indicate the nearest distance that existed between the rogue access point and your building or location. The higher the RSSI, the closer the location.

No. of Rogue Clients—Indicates the number of rogue clients associated to this rogue access point.


Note The number of rogue clients is the only real-time field in the Monitor > Alarm > Alarm Details page. It updates each time you open the Alarm Details page for this rogue access point.
All other fields on the Alarm Details page are populated through polling and are updated every two hours.


First Seen Time—Indicates the date and time when the rogue access point was first detected. This information is populated from the controller.

Last Seen Time—Indicates the date and time when the rogue access point was last detected. This information is populated from the controller.

Modified—Indicates when the alarm event was modified.

Generated By—Indicates how the alarm event was generated (either NMS or from a trap).

NMS (Network Management System - Prime Infrastructure)—Generated through polling. Prime Infrastructure periodically polls the controllers and generates events. Prime Infrastructure generates events when the traps are disabled or when the traps are lost for those events. In this case, "Generated by" is NMS.

Trap—Generated by the controller. Prime Infrastructure process these traps and raises corresponding events for them. In this case, "Generated by" is Controller.

Severity—The severity of the alarm including the following icons:

Icon
Meaning

Critical

Major

Minor

Warning

Info

Clear—Displays if the rogue is no longer detected by any access point.

Note Rogues can be detected by multiple access points. If one access point no longer detects the rogue but the other access point does, Clear is not sent.

Note Once the severity of a rogue is Clear, the alarm is deleted from Prime Infrastructure after 30 days.


You can use the Severity Configuration feature to determine the level of severity for rogue access points. See the "Configuring Alarm Severities" section on page 15-1160 for more information.

Previous Severity—The previous severity of the alarm: Critical, Major, Minor, Clear.

Event Details—Click the Event History link to view the event details.

Rogue AP History—Click the Rogue AP History link to view the Rogue Alarm details.

Switch Port Trace Status—Indicates the switch port trace status. Switch port trace status might include: Traced, but not found, Traced and found, Not traced, Failed. See the "Configuring Switch Port Tracing" section on page 15-1165 for more information.

Switch Port Tracing Details—Provides the most recent switch port tracing details. To view additional trace details, click the Click here for more details link. See the "Configuring Switch Port Tracing" section on page 15-1165 for more information.

Rogue Clients—Lists rogue clients for this access point including the client MAC address, the last date and time the client was heard, and the current client status. See the "Viewing Rogue Client Details" section on page 5-103 for more information.


Note The number of rogue clients is the only real-time field in the Monitor > Alarm > Alarm Details page. It updates each time you open the Alarm Details page for this rogue access point.
All other fields in the Alarm Details page are populated through polling and are updated every two hours.


Message—Displays the most recent message regarding this rogue access point. A message is sent for the following: When the rogue access point is first detected, for any trap sent, and for any changed state.

Annotations—Lists current notes regarding this rogue access point. To add a new note, click New Annotation. Type the note and click Post to save and display the note or Cancel to close the page without saving the note.

Location Notifications—Displays the number of location notifications logged against the client. Clicking a link displays the notifications.

Location—Provides location information, if available.


Note The switch port tracing does not update any of the rogue attributes such as severity, state, and so on. As the rogue attributes are not updated by switch port tracing, alarms would not be triggered if a rogue is discovered to be 'on network' using switch port tracing.


Select a command Menu

The Select a command drop-down list located in the Rogue AP Alarm Details page provides the following options. Choose an option from the drop-down list, and click Go.

Assign to me—Assign the selected alarm(s) to the current user.

Unassign—Unassign the selected alarm(s).

Delete—Delete the selected alarm(s).

Clear—Clear the selected alarm(s).

Acknowledge Alarm—Acknowledge the alarm to prevent it from showing up in the Alarm Summary page. See the "Acknowledging Alarms" section on page 5-138 for more information.


Note The alarm remains in Prime Infrastructure and you can search for all Acknowledged alarms using the alarm search functionality.


Unacknowledge—Unacknowledge an already acknowledged alarm.

Trace Switch Port—Click to run a switch port trace for this rogue access point. See the "Configuring Switch Port Tracing" section on page 15-1165 for more information.

Event History—Click to view a list of events for this rogue access point. See the "Monitoring Rogue Alarm Events" section on page 5-111 for more information.

Refresh from Network—Click to sync up the rogue APs from the network.

View Detecting AP on Network—View the Cisco 1000 Series lightweight access points that are currently detecting the rogue access point. See the "Detecting Access Points" section on page 5-110 for more information.


Note Detecting AP Name, Radio, SSID information might be empty as the information is not available on controller. Refresh the page after the rogue AP task is completed to see the AP details.


View Details by Controller—View the classification type and state of the rogue APs reported by the controller.

Map (High Resolution)—Click to display a high-resolution map of the rogue access point location.

Rogue Clients—Click to view a list of rogue clients associated with this rogue access point. The Rogue Clients page displays the Client MAC address, when it was last heard, its current status, its controller, and the Rogue access point. See the "Viewing Rogue Client Details" section on page 5-103 for more information. This information can also be accessed by using Prime Infrastructure Search feature. See the "Using the Search Feature" section on page 2-54 or the "Advanced Search" section on page 2-55 for more information.

Set State to `Unclassified - Alert'—Choose this command to tag the rogue access point as the lowest threat, continue monitoring the rogue access point, and to turn off Containment. See the "Unclassified Rogue APs" section on page 5-94 for more information on Unclassified rogues.

Set State to `Malicious - Alert'—Choose this command to tag the rogue access point as `Malicious'. See the "Malicious Rogue APs" section on page 5-93 for more information on Malicious rogues.

Set State to `Friendly - Internal'—Choose this command to tag the rogue access point as internal, add it to the Known Rogue APs list, and to turn off Containment. See the "Friendly Rogue APs" section on page 5-94 for more information on Friendly rogues.

Set State to `Friendly - External'—Choose this command to tag the rogue access point as external, add it to the Known Rogue APs list, and to turn off Containment. See the "Friendly Rogue APs" section on page 5-94 for more information on Friendly rogues.

1 AP Containment—Target the rogue access point for containment by one access point. (Lowest containment level.)

2 AP Containment—Target the rogue access point for containment by two Cisco 1000 series lightweight access points.

3 AP Containment—Target the rogue access point for containment by three Cisco 1000 series lightweight access points.

4 AP Containment—Target the rogue access point for containment by four Cisco 1000 series lightweight access points. (Highest containment level.)


Note The higher the threat of the rogue access point, the higher the containment required.


Viewing Rogue Client Details

You can view a list of rogue clients in several ways:

Perform a search for rogue clients using Prime Infrastructure Search feature. See the "Using the Search Feature" section on page 2-54 for more information.

View the list of rogue clients for a specific rogue access point from the Alarm Details page for the applicable rogue access point. Click the Rogue MAC address for the applicable rogue client to view the Rogue Client details page.

In the Alarms Details page of a rogue access point, choose Rogue Clients from the Select a command drop-down list.

The Rogue Clients page displays the Client MAC address, when it was last heard, its current status, its controller, and the associated rogue access point.


Note Rogue client statuses include: Contained (the controller contains the offending device so that its signals no longer interfere with authorized clients); Alert (the controller forwards an immediate alert to the system administrator for further action); and Threat (the rogue is a known threat).


Click the Client MAC Address for the rogue client to view the Rogue Client details page. The Rogue Client details page displays the following information:

General—Information includes: client MAC address, number of access points that detected this client, when the client was first and last heard, the rogue access point MAC address, and the client current status.

Location Notifications—Indicates the number of notifications for this rogue client including: absence, containment, distance, and all. Click the notification number to open the applicable Monitor > Alarms page.

APs that detected the rogue client—Provides the following information for all access points that detected this rogue client: base radio MAC address, access point name, channel number, radio type, RSSI, SNR, and the date/time that the rogue client was last heard.

Location—Provides location information, if available.


Note The higher the threat of the rogue access point, the higher the containment required.


Select a command

The Select a command drop-down list in the Rogue Client details page includes the following options:

Set State to `Unknown - Alert'—Choose this command to tag the rogue client as the lowest threat, continue monitoring the rogue client, and to turn off Containment.

1 AP Containment—Target the rogue client for containment by one access point. (Lowest containment level.)

2 AP Containment—Target the rogue client for containment by two access points.

3 AP Containment—Target the rogue client for containment by three access points.

4 AP Containment—Target the rogue client for containment by four access points. (Highest containment level.)

Map (High Resolution)—Click to display a high-resolution map of the rogue client location.

Location History—Click to display the history of the rogue client location based on RF fingerprinting.

Viewing Rogue AP History Details

To view the history of a rogue AP alarms, click the Rogue AP History link in the Rogue AP Alarm page.

The Rogue AP History page displays the following information:

Severity—The severity of the alarm.

Rogue MAC Address—MAC address of the rogue access points.

Classification Type—Malicious, Friendly, or Unclassified.

Radio Type—Lists all radio types applicable to this rogue access point.

Strongest AP RSSI—Displays the strongest AP RSSI for this rogue access point across the life of the rogue. The strongest AP RSSI over the life of the rogue displays to indicate the nearest distance that existed between the rogue access point and your building or location. The higher the RSSI, the closer the location.

No. of Rogue Clients—Indicates the number of rogue clients associated to this rogue access point.


Note The number of rogue clients is the only real-time field in the Monitor > Alarm > Alarm Details page. It updates each time you open the Alarm Details page for this rogue access point. All other fields on the Alarm Details page are populated through polling and are updated every two hours.


First Seen Time—Indicates the date and time when the rogue access point was first detected. This information is populated from the controller.

Last Seen Time—Indicates the date and time when the rogue access point was last detected. This information is populated from the controller.

State—Indicates the state of the alarm. Possible states vary depending on the classification type of rogue access point.

SSID—Service Set Identifier being broadcast by the rogue access point radio. (Blank if SSID is not broadcast.)

Category—Indicates the category of this alarm such as Security or Prime Infrastructure.

On Network—Indicates how the rogue detection occurred.

Controller—The controller detected the rogue (Yes or No).

Switch Port Trace—The rogue was detected by a switch port trace. Indicated by one of the following: Traced but not found, Traced and found, Not traced.

Channel Number—Indicates the channel of the ad hoc rogue.

Containment Level—Indicates the containment level of the ad hoc rogue or Unassigned.

Switch Port Trace Status—Indicates the switch port trace status. Switch port trace status might include: Traced, but not found, Traced and found, Not traced, Failed.

Click the Rogue MAC address to view the specific rogue AP history details page. The rogue AP history details page displays the above details and also displays the actual alarm message.

Viewing Rogue AP Event History Details

To view the event details of a rogue AP, click the Event History link in the Rogue AP Alarm page.

The Rogue AP Event History page displays the following information:

Severity—The severity of the alarm.

Rogue MAC Address—MAC address of the rogue access points.

Vendor—Rogue access point vendor name or Unknown.

Classification Type—Malicious, Friendly, or Unclassified.

On Network—Indicates whether the rogue detection occurred.The controller detected the rogue (Yes or No).

Date/Time—The date and time that the event was generated.

Radio Type—Lists all radio types applicable to this rogue access point.

State—Indicates the state of the alarm. Possible states vary depending on the classification type of rogue access point.

SSID—Service Set Identifier being broadcast by the rogue access point radio. (Blank if SSID is not broadcast.)

Monitoring Ad hoc Rogues

If the MAC address of a mobile client operating in a ad hoc network is not in the authorized MAC address list, then it is identified as an ad hoc rogue. This section contains the following topics:

Monitoring Ad hoc Rogue Alarms, page 5-106

Viewing Ad hoc Rogue Alarm Details, page 5-108

Monitoring Ad hoc Rogue Alarms

The Adhoc Rogue Alarms page displays alarm events for ad hoc rogues.To access the Adhoc Rogue Alarms page, do one of the following:

Perform a search for ad hoc rogue alarms. See the "Using the Search Feature" section on page 2-54 for more information.

From Prime Infrastructure home page, click the Security dashboard. This page displays all the ad hoc rogues detected in the past hour and the past 24 hours. Click the ad hoc rogue number to view the ad hoc rogue alarms.

If there are multiple alarm pages, the page numbers are displayed at the top of the page with a scroll arrow on each side. Use this to view additional alarms.

The Adhoc Rogue Alarms page contains the following fields:


Note When Prime Infrastructure polls, some data might change or get updated. Because of this, some of the displayed rogue data (including Strongest AP RSSI, No. of Rogue Clients, Channel, SSID, and Radio Types) can change during the life of the rogue.


Severity—Indicates the severity of the alarm. See Table 5-61 for a list of severity indicator icons.

You can use the Severity Configuration feature to determine the level of severity for the following ad hoc rogue alarm types:

Adhoc Rogue auto contained

Adhoc Rogue detected

Adhoc Rogue detected on network

Adhoc Rogue detected on network

See the "Configuring Alarm Severities" section on page 15-1160 for more information.

Rogue MAC Address—Indicates the MAC address of the rogue. See the "Viewing Ad hoc Rogue Alarm Details" section on page 5-108 for more information.

Vendor—Indicates the ad hoc rogue vendor name, or Unknown.

Radio Type—Lists all radio types applicable to this rogue access point.

Strongest AP RSSI—Displays the strongest AP RSSI for this rogue across the life of the rogue. The strongest AP RSSI over the life of the rogue displays to indicate the nearest distance that existed between the rogue and your building or location. The higher the RSSI, the closer the location.

No. of Rogue Clients—Indicates the number of rogue clients associated to this rogue access point.


Note The number of rogue clients is the only real-time field in the Monitor > Alarm > Alarm Details page. It updates each time you open the Alarm Details page for this rogue access point.
All other fields in the Alarm Details page are populated through polling and are updated every two hours.


Owner—Indicates the owner or is left blank.

Last Seen Time—Indicates the date and time that the alarm was last viewed.

State—Indicates the state of the alarm. Possible states for ad hoc rogues include Threat, Alert, Internal, External, Contained, Contained Pending, and Removed.

SSID—The Service Set Identifier that is being broadcast by the rogue ad hoc radio. It is blank if there is no broadcast.

Map Location—Indicates the map location for this ad hoc rogue.

Acknowledged—Displays whether or not the alarm is acknowledged by the user.

You can acknowledge the alarm to prevent it from showing up in the Alarm Summary page. The alarm remains in Prime Infrastructure and you can search for all Acknowledged alarms using the alarm search functionality. See the "Acknowledging Alarms" section on page 5-138 for more information.

Select a command Menu

Select one or more alarms by selecting their respective check boxes, choose one of the following commands from the Select a command drop-down list, and click Go.

Assign to me—Assign the selected alarm(s) to the current user.

Unassign—Unassign the selected alarm(s).

Delete—Delete the selected alarm(s).

Clear—Clear the selected alarm(s).

Acknowledge—Acknowledge the alarm to prevent it from showing up in the Alarm Summary page. See the "Acknowledging Alarms" section on page 5-138 for more information.


Note The alarm remains in Prime Infrastructure and you can search for all Acknowledged alarms using the alarm search functionality.


Unacknowledge—Unacknowledge an already acknowledged alarm.

Email Notification—Takes you to the All Alarms > Email Notification page to view and configure email notifications. See the "Monitoring RFID Tags" section on page 5-115 for more information.

Detecting APs—View the access points that are currently detecting the rogue ad hoc. See the Detecting Access Points, page 110 for more information.

Map (High Resolution)—Click to display a high-resolution map of the ad hoc rogue location.

Rogue Clients—Click to view a list of rogue clients associated with this ad hoc rogue. The Rogue Clients page displays the Client MAC Address, when it was last heard, its current status, its controller, and the ad hoc rogue.

Set State to `Alert'—Choose this command to tag the ad hoc rogue as the lowest threat, continue monitoring the rogue access point, and to turn off Containment.

Set State to `Internal'—Choose this command to tag the ad hoc rogue as internal, add it to the Known Rogue APs list, and to turn off Containment.

Set State to `External'—Choose this command to tag the ad hoc rogue as external, add it to the Known Rogue APs list, and to turn off Containment.

1 AP Containment—Target the ad hoc rogue for containment by one access point. (Lowest containment level.)

2 AP Containment—Target the ad hoc rogue for containment by two access points.

3 AP Containment—Target the ad hoc rogue for containment by three access points.

4 AP Containment—Target the ad hoc rogue for containment by four access points. (Highest containment level.)


Caution Attempting to contain an ad hoc rogue might lead to legal consequences. When you select any of the AP Containment commands and click Go, a message "Containing a Rogue AP may have legal consequences. Do you want to continue?" appears. Click OK if you are sure, or click Cancel if you do not want to contain any access points.

Viewing Ad hoc Rogue Alarm Details

Alarm event details for each ad hoc rogue are available from the Adhoc Rogue Alarms page.

To view alarm events for an ad hoc rogue radio, click the applicable Rogue MAC address in the Adhoc Rogue Alarms page.

This page displays alarm events for a rogue access point radio. Rogue access point radios are unauthorized access points detected by Cisco 1000 Series lightweight access points.


Note When Prime Infrastructure polls, some data might change or get updated. Because of this, some of the displayed rogue data (including Strongest AP RSSI, No. of Rogue Clients, Channel, SSID, and Radio Types) can change during the life of the rogue.


General

Rogue MAC Address—Media Access Control address of the ad hoc rogue.

Vendor—Ad hoc rogue vendor name or Unknown.

On Network—Indicates how the rogue detection occurred.

Controller—The controller detected the rogue (Yes or No).

Switch Port Trace—The rogue was detected by a switch port trace. Indicated by one of the following: Traced but not found, Traced and found, Not traced.

Owner—Indicates the owner or left blank.

Acknowledged—Indicates whether or not the alarm is acknowledged by the user.

You can acknowledge the alarm to prevent it from showing up in the Alarm Summary page. The alarm remains in Prime Infrastructure and you can search for all Acknowledged alarms using the alarm search functionality. See the "Acknowledging Alarms" section on page 5-138 for more information.

State—Indicates the state of the alarm. Possible states for ad hoc rogues include Threat, Alert, Internal, External, Contained, Contained Pending, and Removed.

SSID—Service Set Identifier being broadcast by the ad hoc rogue radio. (Blank if SSID is not broadcast.)

Channel Number—Indicates the channel of the ad hoc rogue.

Containment Level—Indicates the containment level of the ad hoc rogue or Unassigned.

Radio Type—Lists all radio types applicable to this ad hoc rogue.

Strongest AP RSSI—Indicates the strongest received signal strength indicator for this Prime Infrastructure (including all detecting access points for all controllers and across all detection times).

No. of Rogue Clients—Indicates the number of rogue clients associated to this ad hoc.


Note This number comes from Prime Infrastructure database. It is updated every two hours. In the Monitor > Alarms > Alarm Details page, this number is a real-time number. It is updated each time you open the Alarm Details page for this rogue access point.


Created—Indicates when the alarm event was created.

Modified—Indicates when the alarm event was modified.

Generated By—Indicates how the alarm event was generated (either NMS or from a trap).

NMS (Network Management System - Prime Infrastructure)—Generated through polling. Prime Infrastructure periodically polls the controllers and generates events. Prime Infrastructure generates events when the traps are disabled or when the traps are lost for those events. In this case, "Generated by" is NMS.

Trap—Generated by the controller. Prime Infrastructure process these traps and raises corresponding events for them. In this case, "Generated by" is Controller.

Severity—Indicates the severity of the alarm. See Table 5-61 for a list of severity indicator icons.

Previous Severity—The previous severity of the alarm: Critical, Major, Minor, Clear. Color coded.

Annotations—Enter any new notes in this box and click Add to update the alarm.

Message—Displays descriptive information about the alarm.

Help—Displays the latest information about the alarm.

Event History—Click to access the Monitor > Events page. See the "Monitoring Events" section on page 5-144 for more information.

Annotations—Lists existing notes for this alarm.

Searching Rogue Clients Using Advanced Search

When the access points on your wireless LAN are powered up and associated with controllers, Prime Infrastructure immediately starts listening for rogue access points. When a controller detects a rogue access point, it immediately notifies Prime Infrastructure, which creates a rogue access point alarm.

To find rogue access point alarms using Advanced Search, follow these steps:


Step 1 Click Advanced Search in the top right-hand corner of Prime Infrastructure main page.

Step 2 Choose Rogue Client from the Search Category drop-down list.

Step 3 (Optional) You can filter the search even further with the other search criteria if desired.

Step 4 Click Search. The list of rogue clients appears.

Step 5 Choose a rogue client by clicking a client MAC address. The Rogue Client detail page appears.

Step 6 To modify the alarm, choose one of these commands from the Select a command drop-down list, and click Go.

Set State to `Unknown-Alert'—Tags the ad hoc rogue as the lowest threat, continues to monitor the ad hoc rogue, and turns off containment.

1 AP Containment through 4 AP Containment—Indicates the number of access points (1-4) in the vicinity of the rogue unit that send dauthenticate and disassociate messages to the client devices that are associated to the rogue unit.

Map (High Resolution)—Displays the current calculated rogue location in the Maps > Building Name > Floor Name page.

Location History—Displays the history of the rogue client location based on RF fingerprinting.


Note The client must be detected by an MSE for the location history to appear.



Monitoring Rogue Access Point Location, Tagging, and Containment

When the Cisco Unified Network Solution is monitored using Prime Infrastructure, Prime Infrastructure generates the flags as rogue access point traps and displays the known rogue access points by MAC address. The operator can then display a map showing the location of the access points closest to each rogue access point. The next step is to mark them as Known or Acknowledged rogue access points (no further action), Alert rogue access points (watch for and notify when active), or Contained rogue access points (have between one and four access points discourage rogue access point clients by sending the clients deauthenticate and disassociate messages whenever they associate with the rogue access point).

This built-in detection, tagging, monitoring, and containment capability enables system administrators to take appropriate action:

Locate rogue access points

Receive new rogue access point notifications, eliminating hallway scans

Monitor unknown rogue access points until they are eliminated or acknowledged

Determine the closest authorized access point, making directed scans faster and more effective

Contain rogue access points by sending their clients deauthenticate and disassociate messages from one to four access points. This containment can be done for individual rogue access points by MAC address or can be mandated for all rogue access points connected to the enterprise subnet.

Tag rogue access points:

Acknowledge rogue access points when they are outside of the LAN and do not compromise the LAN or wireless LAN security

Accept rogue access points when they do not compromise the LAN or wireless LAN security

Tag rogue access points as unknown until they are eliminated or acknowledged

Tag rogue access points as contained and discourage clients from associating with the rogue access points by having between one and four access points transmit deauthenticate and disassociate messages to all rogue access point clients. This function applies to all active channels on the same rogue access point.

Detecting Access Points

Use the Detecting Access Points feature to view information about the Cisco lightweight access points that are detecting a rogue access point.

To access the Rogue AP Alarms details page, follow these steps:


Step 1 To display the Rogue AP Alarms page, do one of the following:

Perform a search for rogue APs. See the "Using the Search Feature" section on page 2-54 for more information about the search feature.

In Prime Infrastructure home page, click the Security dashboard. This dashboard displays all the rogue access points detected in the past hour and the past 24 hours. Click the rogue access point number to view the rogue access point alarms.

Click the Malicious AP number link in the Alarm Summary box.

Step 2 In the Rogue AP Alarms page, click the Rogue MAC Address for the applicable rogue access point. The Rogue AP Alarms details page appears.

Step 3 From the Select a command drop-down list, choose Detecting APs.

Step 4 Click Go.

Click a list item to display data about that item:

AP Name

Radio

Map Location

SSID—Service Set Identifier being broadcast by the rogue access point radio.

Channel Number—Which channel the rogue access point is broadcasting on.

WEP—Enabled or disabled.

WPA—Enabled or disabled.

Pre-Amble—Long or short.

RSSI—Received signal strength indicator in dBm.

SNR—Signal-to-noise ratio.

Containment Type—Type of containment applied from this access point.

Containment Channels—Channels that this access point is currently containing.


Monitoring Rogue Alarm Events

The Events page enables you to review information about rogue alarm events. Prime Infrastructure generates an event when a rogue access point is detected or if you make manual changes to a rogue access point (such as changing its state). The Rogue AP Events list page displays all rogue access point events.

To access the Rogue AP Events list page, follow these steps:


Step 1 Do one of the following:

Perform a search for rogue access point events using the Advanced Search feature of Prime Infrastructure. See the "Advanced Search" section on page 2-55 for more information.

In the Rogue AP Alarms details page, click Event History from the Select a command drop-down list. See the "Viewing Rogue AP Alarm Details" section on page 5-99 for more information.

Step 2 The Rogue AP Events list page displays the following event information.

Severity—Indicates the severity of the alarm. See Table 5-61 for a list of severity indicator icons.

Rogue MAC Address—Click the rogue MAC address to view the Rogue AP Event Details page. See the "Viewing Rogue AP Event Details" section on page 5-112 for more information.

Vendor—Rogue access point vendor name or Unknown.

Classification Type—Malicious, Friendly, or Unclassified.

On Network—Indicates how the rogue detection occurred.

Controller—The controller detected the rogue (Yes or No).

Switch Port Trace—The rogue was detected by a switch port trace. Indicated by one of the following: Traced but not found, Traced and found, Not traced.

Radio Type—Lists all radio types applicable to this rogue access point.

Date/Time—The date and time that the event was generated.

State—Indicates the state of the alarm. Possible states vary depending on the classification type of rogue access point.

SSID—Service Set Identifier being broadcast by the rogue access point radio. (Blank if SSID is not broadcast.)


Viewing Rogue AP Event Details

To view rogue access point event details, follow these steps:


Step 1 In the Rogue AP Events list page, click the Rogue MAC Address link.

Step 2 The Rogue AP Events Details page displays the following information:

Rogue MAC address

Vendor—Rogue access point vendor name or Unknown.

On Network—Indicates how the rogue detection occurred.

Controller—The controller detected the rogue (Yes or No).

Switch Port Trace—The rogue was detected by a switch port trace. Indicated by one of the following: Traced but not found, Traced and found, Not traced.

Classification Type—Malicious, Friendly, or Unclassified.

State—Indicates the state of the alarm. Possible states vary depending on the classification type of rogue access point.

SSID—Service Set Identifier being broadcast by the rogue access point radio. (Blank if SSID is not broadcast.)

Channel Number—The channel on which the rogue access point is broadcasting.

Containment Level—Indicates the containment level of the rogue access point or Unassigned.

Radio Type—Lists all radio types applicable to this rogue access point.

Created—The date and time that the event was generated.

Generated By—Indicates how the alarm event was generated (either NMS or from a trap).

NMS (Network Management System - Prime Infrastructure)—Generated through polling. Prime Infrastructure periodically polls the controllers and generates events. Prime Infrastructure generates events when the traps are disabled or when the traps are lost for those events. In this case, "Generated by" is NMS.

Trap—Generated by the controller. Prime Infrastructure process these traps and raises corresponding events for them. In this case, "Generated by" is Controller.

Device IP Address

Severity—Indicates the severity of the alarm. See Table 5-61 for a list of severity indicator icons.

Message—Provides details of the current event.


Monitoring Ad hoc Rogue Events

The Events page enables you to review information about ad hoc rogue events. Prime Infrastructure generates an event when an ad hoc rogue is detected or if you make manual changes to an ad hoc rogue (such as changing its state). The Adhoc Rogue Events list page displays all ad hoc rogue events.

To access the Rogue AP Events list page, follow these steps:


Step 1 Do one of the following:

Perform a search for ad hoc rogues events using the Advanced Search feature of Prime Infrastructure. See the "Advanced Search" section on page 2-55 for more information.

In the Adhoc Rogue Alarms details page, click Event History from the Select a command drop-down list. See the "Viewing Ad hoc Rogue Alarm Details" section on page 5-108 for more information.

Step 2 The Rogue AP Events list page displays the following event information.

Severity—Indicates the severity of the alarm. See Table 5-61 for a list of severity indicator icons.

Rogue MAC Address—Click the rogue MAC address to view the Rogue AP Event Details page. See the "Viewing Ad hoc Rogue Event Details" section on page 5-114 for more information.

Vendor—Rogue access point vendor name or Unknown.

On Network—Indicates how the rogue detection occurred.

Controller—The controller detected the rogue (Yes or No).

Switch Port Trace—The rogue was detected by a switch port trace. Indicated by one of the following: Traced but not found, Traced and found, Not traced.

Radio Type—Lists all radio types applicable to this rogue access point.

Date/Time—The date and time that the event was generated.

State—Indicates the state of the alarm. Possible states for ad hoc rogues include Threat, Alert, Internal, External, Contained, Contained Pending, and Removed.

SSID—Service Set Identifier being broadcast by the rogue access point radio. (Blank if SSID is not broadcast.)


Viewing Ad hoc Rogue Event Details

To view rogue access point event details, follow these steps:


Step 1 In the Rogue AP Events list page, click the Rogue MAC Address link.

Step 2 The Rogue AP Events Details page displays the following information:

Rogue MAC Address

Vendor—Rogue access point vendor name or Unknown.

On Network—Indicates how the rogue detection occurred.

Controller—The controller detected the rogue (Yes or No).

Switch Port Trace—The rogue was detected by a switch port trace. Indicated by one of the following: Traced but not found, Traced and found, Not traced.

State—Indicates the state of the alarm. Possible states for ad hoc rogues include Threat, Alert, Internal, External, Contained, Contained Pending, and Removed.

SSID—Service Set Identifier being broadcast by the rogue access point radio. (Blank if SSID is not broadcast.)

Channel Number—The channel on which the rogue access point is broadcasting.

Containment Level—Indicates the containment level of the rogue access point or Unassigned.

Radio Type—Lists all radio types applicable to this rogue access point.

Created—The date and time that the event was generated.

Generated By—Indicates how the alarm event was generated (either NMS or from a trap).

NMS (Network Management System - Prime Infrastructure)—Generated through polling. Prime Infrastructure periodically polls the controllers and generates events. Prime Infrastructure generates events when the traps are disabled or when the traps are lost for those events. In this case, "Generated by" is NMS.

Trap—Generated by the controller. Prime Infrastructure process these traps and raises corresponding events for them. In this case, "Generated by" is Controller.

Device IP Address

Severity—Indicates the severity of the alarm. See Table 5-61 for a list of severity indicator icons.

Message—Provides details of the current event.


Troubleshooting Unjoined Access Points

When a lightweight access point initially starts up, it attempts to discover and join a wireless LAN controller. After joining the wireless controller, the access point updates its software image if needed and receives all the configuration details for the device and network. After successfully joining the wireless controller, the access point can be discovered and managed by Prime Infrastructure. Until the access point successfully joins a wireless controller the access point cannot be managed by Prime Infrastructure and does not contain the proper configuration settings to allow client access.

Prime Infrastructure provides you with a tool that diagnoses why an access point cannot join a controller and lists corrective actions.

The Unjoined AP page displays a list of access points that have not joined any wireless controllers. All gathered information about the unjoined access point is included in the page. This includes name, MAC address, IP address, controller name and IP address, switch and port that the access point is attached to, and any join failure reason if known.

To troubleshoot unjoined access points, do the following:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Unjoined APs. The Unjoined APs page appears containing a list of access points that have not been able to join a wireless controller.

Step 2 Select the access point that you wish to diagnose, then click Troubleshoot. An analysis is run on the access point to determine the reason why the access point was not able to join a wireless controller. After performing the analysis, the Unjoined APs page displays the results.

Step 3 If the access point has tried to join multiple wireless controllers and has been unsuccessful, the controllers are listed in the left pane. Select a controller.

Step 4 In the middle pane, you can view what the problem is. It will also list error messages and controller log information.

Step 5 In the right pane, recommendations for solving the problems are listed. Perform the recommended action.

Step 6 If you need to further diagnose a problem, you can run RTTS through the Unjoined AP page. This allows you to see the debug messages from all the wireless controllers that the access point tried to join at one time.

To run RTTS, click the RTTS icon () located to the right of the table. The debug messages appear in the table. You can then examine the messages to see if you can determine a cause for the access point not being able to join the controllers.


Monitoring RFID Tags

The Monitor > RFID Tags page allows you to monitor tag status and location on Prime Infrastructure maps as well as review tag details.


Note This page is only available in the Location version of Prime Infrastructure.


This section provides information on the tags detected by the location appliance.

Choose Monitor > RFID Tags to access this section. By default, the Tag Summary page is displayed.

This section contains the following topics:

Tag Summary, page 5-116

Searching Tags, page 5-116

Viewing RFID Tag Search Results, page 5-116

Viewing Tag List, page 5-117

Tag Summary

Choose Monitor > RFID Tags to access this page.

This page provides information on the number of tags that are detected by MSE. The following fields are displayed in the main data area:

Device Name—Name of the MSE device.

Total Tags—Click the number to view tag details. Clicking the number shows the list of tags located by the MSE. Clicking a MAC address shows the tag details pertaining to that MAC address.

Searching Tags

Use Prime Infrastructure Advanced Search feature to find specific or all tags.

To search for tags in Prime Infrastructure, follow these steps:


Step 1 Click Advanced Search.

Step 2 Choose Tags from the Search Category drop-down list.

Step 3 Identify the applicable tag search fields including:

Search By—Choose All Tags, Asset Name, Asset Category, Asset Group, MAC Address, Controller, MSE, Floor Area, or Outdoor Area.


Note Search fields might change depending on the selected category. When applicable, enter the additional field or filter information to help identify the Search By category.


Search In—Choose MSEs or Prime Infrastructure Controllers.

Last detected within—Choose a time increment from 5 minutes to 24 hours. The default is 15 minutes.

Tag Vendor—Select the check box, and choose Aeroscout, G2, PanGo, or WhereNet.

Telemetry Tags only—Select the Telemetry Tags only check box to search tags accordingly.

Step 4 Click Go.


Viewing RFID Tag Search Results

Use Prime Infrastructure Advanced Search feature located in the top right of Prime Infrastructure page to search for tags by asset type (name, category and group), by MAC address, by system (controller or location appliance), and by area (floor area and outdoor area).


Note Search fields might change depending on the selected category. When applicable, enter the additional field or filter information to help identify the Search By category.


You can further refine your search using the Advanced search fields and save the search criteria for future use. Saved search criteria can be retrieved from the Saved Searches located in the navigation bar.

See the "Advanced Search" section on page 2-55 or the "Saved Searches" section on page 2-67 for additional information.

When you click the MAC address of a tag location in a search results page, the following details appear for the tag:

Tag vendor


Note This option does not appear when Asset Name, Asset Category, Asset Group or MAC Address are the search criteria for tags.


Controller to which the tag is associated

Telemetry data (CCX v1 compliant tags only)

Telemetry data displayed is vendor-specific; however, some commonly reported details are GPS location, battery extended information, pressure, temperature, humidity, motion, status, and emergency code.


Note The Telemetry data option only appears when MSE (select for location servers), Floor Area, or Outdoor Area are selected as the Search for tags by option.



Note Only those vendor tags that support telemetry appear.


Asset Information (Name, Category, Group)

Statistics (bytes and packets received)

Location (Floor, Last Located, MSE, map)

Location Notification (Absence, Containment, Distance, All)


Note Telemetry data displayed is vendor-specific; however, some commonly reported details are GPS location, battery extended information, pressure, temperature, humidity, motion, status, and emergency code.


Emergency Data (CCX v1 compliant tags only)

Viewing Tag List

Click the Total Tags number link to view the Tags List for the applicable device name. The Tag List contains the following information:

MAC Address

Asset Name

Asset Group

Asset Category

Vendor Name

Mobility Services Engine

Controller

Battery Status

Map Location

Monitoring Chokepoints

Chokepoints are installed and configured as recommended by the Chokepoint vendor. After the chokepoint installation is complete and operational, the chokepoint can be added to Prime Infrastructure and placed on Floor Maps. They are pushed to the Location Server during synchronization.

Choose Monitor > Chokepoints. A page appears displaying a list of found chokepoints. Clicking a link in the Map Location column for a particular chokepoint displays a map that shows the location of the chokepoint.

The following fields are displayed:

MAC Address—The MAC address of the chokepoint.

Chokepoint Name—The user-defined name of the chokepoint.

Entry/Exit Chokepoint—Indicates whether or not the chokepoint is an entry/exit chokepoint.

Range—The range of the chokepoint in feet.

Static IP—The static IP address of the chokepoint.

Map Location—A link to a map showing the location of the chokepoint.

Performing a Chokepoint Search

An advanced search allows you to search for chokepoints.

To perform an advanced search for a chokepoint in Prime Infrastructure, follow these steps:


Step 1 Click Advanced Search located in the top right corner of Prime Infrastructure.

Step 2 From the New Search page, choose Chokepoint from the Search Category drop-down list.

Step 3 Choose the method by which you want to search (by MAC address or chokepoint name) from the Search for Chokepoint by drop-down list.

Step 4 Enter the MAC address or chokepoint name, depending on the search method selected.

Step 5 Click Search.


Monitoring Interferers

The Monitor > Interferer page allows you to monitor interference devices detected by the CleanAir enabled access points.

This section provides information on the interferers detected by the CleanAir enabled access points. By default, the Monitoring AP Detected Interferers page is displayed.

This section contains the following topics:

Monitoring AP Detected Interferers, page 5-119

Monitoring AP Detected Interferer Details, page 5-120

Monitoring AP Detected Interferer Details Location History, page 5-121

Configuring the Search Results Display, page 5-121

Monitoring AP Detected Interferers

Choose Monitor > Interferers to view all the interfering devices detected by the CleanAir enabled access points on your wireless network. This page enables you to view a summary of the interfering devices including the following default information:

Interferer ID—A unique identifier for the interferer. This is a pseudo-randomly generated ID. Though it is similar to a to a MAC address, it is not a real address, such as the one used by a Bluetooth headset.

Type—Indicates the category of the interferer. Click to read more about the type of device. A pop-up window appears displaying more details. The categories include the following:

Bluetooth link—A Bluetooth link (802.11b/g/n only)

Microwave Oven—A microwave oven (802.11b/g/n only)

802.11 FH—An 802.11 frequency-hopping device (802.11b/g/n only)

Bluetooth Discovery—A Bluetooth discovery (802.11b/g/n only)

TDD Transmitter—A time division duplex (TDD) transmitter

Jammer—A jamming device

Continuous Transmitter—A continuous transmitter

DECT-like Phone—A digital enhanced cordless communication (DECT)-compatible phone

Video Camera—A video camera

802.15.4—An 802.15.4 device (802.11b/g/n only)

WiFi Inverted—A device using spectrally inverted Wi-Fi signals

WiFi Invalid Channel—A device using non-standard Wi-Fi channels

SuperAG—An 802.11 SuperAG device

Canopy—A Motorola Canopy device

Radar—A radar device (802.11a/n only)

XBox—A Microsoft Xbox (802.11b/g/n only)

WiMAX Mobile—A WiMAX mobile device (802.11a/n only)

WiMAX Fixed—A WiMAX fixed device (802.11a/n only)

WiFi AOCI—A WiFi device with AOCI

Unclassified

Status—Indicates the status of the interfering device.

Active—Indicates that the interferer is currently being detected by the CleanAir capable access point.

Inactive—Indicates that the interferer is no longer being detected by the CleanAir capable access point or no longer reacheable by Prime Infrastructure.

Severity—Displays the severity ranking of the interfering device.

Affected Band—Displays the band in which this device is interfering.

Affected Channels—Displays the affected channels.

Duty Cycle (%)—The duty cycle of interfering device in percentage.

Discovered—Displays the time at which it was discovered.

Last Updated—The last time the interference was detected.

Floor—The location where the interfering device is present.

Monitoring AP Detected Interferer Details

Choose Monitor > Interferers > Interferer ID to view this page. This page enables you to view the details of the interfering devices detected by the access points. This page provides the following details about the interfering device.

Interferer Properties

Type—Displays the type of the interfering device detected by the AP.

Status—The status of the interfering device. Indicates the status of the interfering device.

Active—Indicates that the interferer is currently being detected by the CleanAir capable access point.

Inactive—Indicates that the interferer is no longer being detected by the CleanAir capable access point or no longer reachable by Prime Infrastructure.

Severity—Displays the severity ranking of the interfering device.

Duty Cycle (%)—The duty cycle of interfering device in percentage.

Affected Band—Displays the band in which this device is interfering.

Affected Channels—Displays the affected channels.

Discovered—Displays the time at which it was discovered.

Last Updated—The last time the interference was detected.

Location

Floor—The location where this interfering device was detected.

Last Located At—The last time where the interfering device was located.

On MSE—The mobility server engine on which this interference device was located.

Clustering Information

Clustered By—Displays the IP address of the controller or the MSE that clustered the interferer information from the access point.

Detecting APs—Displays the details of the access point that has detected the interfering device. The details include: Access Point Name (Mac), Severity, and Duty Cycle(%).

Details—Displays a short description about the interfering type.

Select a command

The Select a command drop-down list provides access to the location history of the interfering device detected by the access point. See the "Monitoring AP Detected Interferer Details Location History" section on page 5-121.

Monitoring AP Detected Interferer Details Location History

Choose Monitor > Interferers > Interference Device ID, then choose Location History from the Select a command drop-down list, and click Go to view this page.

Interferer Information—Displays the basic information about the interfering device.

Data Collected At—The time stamp at which the data was collected.

Type—The type of the interfering device.

Severity—The severity index of the interfering device.

Duty Cycle—The duty cycle (in percentage) of the interfering device.

Affected Channels—A comma separated list of the channels affected.

Interferer Location History—Displays the location history of the interfering devices.

Time Stamp

Floor

Clustering Information

Clustered By

Detecting APs

AP Name—The access point that detected the interfering device.

Severity—The severity index of the interfering device.

Duty Cycle(%)—The duty cycle (in percentage) of the interfering device.

Location

Location Calculated At—Displays the time stamp at which this information was generated.

Floor—Displays location information of the interfering device.

A graphical view of the location of the interfering device is displayed in a map. Click the Enlarge link to view an enlarged image.

Configuring the Search Results Display

The Edit View page allows you to add, remove, or reorder columns in the AP Detected Interferers Summary page.

To edit the columns in the AP Detected Interferers page, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Interferers. The AP Detected Interferers page appears showing details of the interferers detected by the CleanAir enabled access points.

Step 2 Click the Edit View link.

Step 3 To add an additional column to the access points table, click to highlight the column heading in the left column. Click Show to move the heading to the right column. All items in the right column are displayed in the table.

Step 4 To remove a column from the access points table, click to highlight the column heading in the right column. Click Hide to move the heading to the left column. All items in the left column are not displayed in the table.

Step 5 Use the Up/Down buttons to specify the order in which the information appears in the table. Highlight the desired column heading and click Up or Down to move it higher or lower in the current list.

Step 6 Click Reset to restore the default view.

Step 7 Click Submit to confirm the changes.


Monitoring Spectrum Experts

A Spectrum Expert client acts as a remote interference sensor and sends dynamic interference data to Prime Infrastructure. This feature allows Prime Infrastructure to collect and archive and monitor detailed interferer and air quality data from Spectrum Experts in the network.

To access the Monitor Spectrum Experts page, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Spectrum Experts.

Step 2 From the left sidebar menu, you can access the Spectrum Experts Summary page and the Interferers Summary page.


Spectrum Experts Summary

The Spectrum Experts > Summary page is the default page and provides a table of the Spectrum Experts added to the system. The table provides the following Spectrum Expert information:

Hostname—Displays the hostname or IP Address depending on how it was added. Click the hostname to access the Spectrum Experts Details page.

Active Interferers—Indicates the current number of interferes being detected by the Spectrum Experts.

Affected APs—The number of access points seen by the Spectrum Expert that are potentially affected by detected interferers.

Alarms—The number of active interference traps sent by the Spectrum Expert. Click to access the Alarm page that is filtered to the active alarms for this Spectrum Expert.

Reachability Status—Indicates "Reachable" in green if the Spectrum Expert is running and sending data to Prime Infrastructure; otherwise indicates "Unreachable" in red.

Location—When the Spectrum is a wireless client, a link is available that displays the location of the Spectrum Expert. A red box around the Spectrum Expert indicates the effective range. Click to access the nearest mapped access point.

Interferers Summary

The Interferers > Summary page displays a list of all the Interferers detected over a 30 day interval. The table provides the following Interferers information:

Interferer ID—An identifier that is unique across different spectrum experts. This is a pseudo-randomly generated ID. Though it is similar to a MAC address, it is not a real address, which you can use to find the interfering device.

Category—Indicates the category of the interferer. Categories include: Bluetooth, Cordless Phones, Microwave Ovens, 802.11 FH, Generic - Fixed-Frequency, Jammers, Generic - Frequency-Hopped, Generic - Continuous.

Type—Indicates the type of Interferer. Click to access a pop-up description of the type.

Status—Indicates Active or Inactive.

Active—Indicates that the interferer is currently being detected by a spectrum expert.

Inactive—Indicates that the interferer is no longer detected by a spectrum expert or the spectrum expert that saw the interferer is no longer reachable by Prime Infrastructure.

Discover Time—Indicates the time of discovery.

Affected Channels—Identifies affected channels.

Number of APs Affected—An access point is listed as Affected if the following conditions are met:

The access point is managed by Prime Infrastructure.

The spectrum expert detects the access point.

The spectrum expert detects an interferer on the serving channel of the access point.

Power—Indicated in dBm.

Duty Cycle—Indicated in percentage.


Note 100% indicates the worst value.


Severity—Indicates the severity ranking of the Interferer.


Note 100% indicates the worst value where 0 indicates no interference.


Interferers Search

Use Prime Infrastructure Search feature to find specific Interferers or to create and save custom searches. See one of the following topics for additional information:

Using the Search Feature, page 2-54

Quick Search, page 2-54

Advanced Search, page 2-55

Saved Searches, page 2-67

Spectrum Experts Details

The Spectrum Expert Details page provides all interference details from a single Spectrum Expert. This page updates every 20 seconds providing a real-time look at what is happening on the remote Spectrum Expert and includes the following items:

Total Interferer Count—As seen by the specific Spectrum Expert.

Active Interferers Count Chart—Displays a pie chart that groups interferes by category.

Active Interferer Count Per Channel—Displays the number of interferes grouped by category on different channels.

AP List—Provides a list of access points detected by the Spectrum Expert that are on channels that have active interferers detected by the Spectrum Expert on those channels.

Affected Clients List—Provides a list of clients that are currently authenticated/associated to the radio of one of the access points listed in the access point list.

Monitoring WiFi TDOA Receivers

To monitor Wi-Fi TDOA receivers, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > WiFi TDOA Receivers. The WiFi TDOA Receiver summary page appears showing all mapped WiFI TDOA receivers.

Step 2 To refine the search criteria when an extensive lists appears, you can search by MAC address or location sensor name.

a. To initiate a search for a TDOA receiver by its MAC address, click the Advanced Search link in Prime Infrastructure. Choose WiFi TDOA Receiver from the Search Category drop-down list and MAC Address from the Search by drop-down list. Enter the MAC address of the TDOA receiver in the available text box, and click Search.

b. To initiate a search for a TDOA receiver by its name, click the Advanced Search link in Prime Infrastructure. Choose WiFi TDOA Receiver from the Search Category drop-down list and WiFi TDOA Receivers from the Search by drop-down list. Enter the name of the TDOA receiver in the available text box, and click Search.

If no match exists, then a message indicating that appears in the page. Otherwise the search result displays.


Note See the "Using the Search Feature" section on page 2-54 or the "Advanced Search" section on page 2-55 for more information on Prime Infrastructure Search feature.


The WiFi TDOA Receivers page displays the following information:

MAC Address

WiFi TDOA Receiver Name

Static IP—Static IP address of the WiFi TDOA receiver.

Oper Status—Up or down.

Map Location—Click the Map Location link to view the floor map for this WiFi TDOA receiver. See "Monitoring Floor Area" for more information on Prime Infrastructure floor maps.


Note See the "Configuring Wi-Fi TDOA Receivers" section on page 6-184 for more information on adding, configuring, and editing WiFi TDOA receivers.



Monitoring Media Streams

To monitor the media streams configurations, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Media Streams. The Media Streams page appears showing the list of media streams configured across controllers.

The Media Streams page contains a table with the following columns:

Stream Name—Media Stream name.

Start IP—Starting IP address of the media stream for which the multicast direct feature is enabled.

End IP—Ending IP address of the media stream for which the multicast direct feature is enabled.

State—Operational state of the media stream.

Max Bandwidth—Indicates the maximum bandwidth that is assigned to the media stream.

Priority—Indicates the priority bit set in the media stream. The priority can be any number from 1 to 8. A lower value indicates a higher priority. For example, a priority of 1 is highest and a value of 8 is the lowest.

Violation—Indicates the action to performed in case of a violation. The possible values are as follows:

Drop—Indicates that a stream is dropped on periodic revaluation.

Best Effort—Indicates that a stream is demoted to best-effort class on periodic reevaluations.

Policy—Indicates the media stream policy. The possible values are Admit or Deny.

Controllers—Indicates the number of controllers that use the specified media stream.

Clients—Indicates the number of clients that use the specified media stream.

Step 2 To view the media stream details, click a media stream name in the Stream column. The Media Streams page appears.

The Media Streams page displays the following group boxes:

Media Stream Details—Displays the media stream configuration information. This includes the Name, Start Address, End Address, Maximum Bandwidth, Operational Status, Average Packet Size, RRC Updates, Priority, and Violation.

Statistics—Displays the number of controllers and number of clients that use the selected media stream. Click the controller count to access the list of controllers that use the selected media stream.

Error—Displays the error, Worst AP, and corresponding floor map for that AP.

Client Counts—Displays the number of clients for each period.

Failed Client Counts—Displays the number of clients that failed for each period.


Note The client information is presented in a time-based graph. For graphs that are time-based, there is a link bar at the top of the graph page that displays 6h, 1d, 1w, 2w, 4w, 3m, 6m, 1y, and Custom. When selected, the data for that time frame is retrieved and the corresponding graph is displayed.



Monitoring Radio Resource Management (RRM)

The operating system security solution uses the Radio Resource Management (RRM) function to continuously monitor all nearby access points, automatically discover rogue access points.

Radio Resource Management (RRM), built into the Cisco Unified Wireless Network, monitors and dynamically corrects performance issues found in the RF environment.

Prime Infrastructure would receive traps whenever a change in the transmit power of the access point or channel occurred. These trap events or similar events such as RF regrouping were logged into Prime Infrastructure events as informational and were maintained by the event dispatcher. The reason behind the transmit power or channel changes (such as signals from neighboring access points, interference, noise, load, and the like) were not evident. You could not view these events and statistics to then perform troubleshooting practices.

Radio Resource Management (RRM) statistics helps to identify trouble spots and provides possible reasons for channel or power level changes. The dashboard provides network-wide RRM performance statistics and predicts reasons for channel changes based on grouping the events together (worst performing access points, configuration mismatch between controllers in the same RF group, coverage holes that were detected by access points based on threshold, pre-coverage holes that were detected by controllers, ratios of access points operating at maximum power, and so on).


Note The RRM dashboard information is only available for lightweight access points.


This section contains the following topics:

Channel Change Notifications, page 5-126

Transmission Power Change Notifications, page 5-127

RF Grouping Notifications, page 5-127

Viewing the RRM Dashboard, page 5-127

Channel Change Notifications

Notifications are sent to Prime Infrastructure RRM dashboard when a channel change occurs. Channel changes depend on the Dynamic Channel Assignment (DCA) configuration where the mode can be set to auto or on demand. When the mode is auto, channel assignment is periodically updated for all lightweight access points which permit this operation. When the mode is set to on demand, channel assignments are updated based on request. If the DCA is static, no dynamic channel assignments occur, and values are set to their global default.

When a channel change trap is received and a channel change had occurred earlier, the event is marked as Channel Revised; otherwise, the event is marked as Channel Changed. Each event for channel change can be caused by multiple reasons. The reason code is factored and equated to one irrespective of the number of reasons for the event to occur. For example, suppose a channel change is caused by signal, interference, or noise. When the reason code is received in the notification, the reason code is refactored across the reasons. If three reasons caused the event to occur, the reason code is refactored to 1/3 or 0.33 per reason. If ten channel change events are received with the same reason code, all of the three reasons are equally factored to determine the cause of the channel change.

Transmission Power Change Notifications

Notifications are sent to Prime Infrastructure RRM dashboard when transmission power changes occur. Each event for transmit power changes is caused by multiple reasons. The reason code is factored and equated to one irrespective of the number of reasons for the event to occur.

RF Grouping Notifications

When RRM is run on the controller, dynamic grouping is done, and a new group leader is chosen. Dynamic grouping has three modes: Automatic, Off and Leader. When the grouping is Off, no dynamic grouping occurs, and each switch optimizes only its own lightweight access point parameters. When the grouping is Automatic, switches form groups and elect leaders to perform better dynamic parameter optimization. With grouping automatic, configured intervals (in seconds) represent the period with which the grouping algorithm is run. (Grouping algorithms also run when the group contents change and automatic grouping is enabled.)

Viewing the RRM Dashboard

Choose Monitor > Radio Resource Management to access the RRM dashboard.

The dashboard is made up of the following parts:

The RRM RF Group Summary shows the number of different RF groups.


Note To get the latest number of RF Groups, you have to run the configuration sync background task.


The RRM Statistics portion shows network-wide statistics

The Channel Change Reason portion shows why channels changed for all 802.11a/b/g/n radios.

Signal—The channel changed because it improved the channel quality for some other neighbor radio(s). Improving the channel quality for some other neighbor radio(s) improved the channel plan of the system as evaluated by the algorithm.

Wifi Interference

Load

Radar

Noise

Persistent Non-Wifi Interference

Major Air Quality Event

Other

The Channel Change shows all events complete with causes and reasons.

The Configuration Mismatch portion shows comparisons between leaders and members.

The Coverage Hole portion rates how severe the coverage holes are and gives their location.

The Percent Time at Maximum Power shows what percent of time the access points were at maximum power and gives the location of those access points.

The following statistics are displayed:

Total Channel Changes—The sum total of channel changes across 802.11a/b/g/n radios, irrespective of whether the channel was updated or revised. The count is split over a 24-hour and 7-day period. If you click the percentages link or the link under the 24-hour column, a page with details for that access point only appears.

Total Configuration Mismatches—The total number of configuration mismatches detected over a 24-hour period.

Total Coverage Hole Events—The total number of coverage hole events over a 24-hour and 7-day period.

Number of RF Groups—The total number of RF groups (derived from all the controllers which are currently managed by Prime Infrastructure).

Configuration Mismatch—The configuration mismatch over a 24-hour period by RF group with details on the group leader.

APs at MAX Power—The percentage of access points with 802.11a/n radios as a total percentage across all access points which are at maximum power. The maximum power levels are preset and are derived with reference to the preset value.


Note Maximum power is shown in three areas of the RRM dashboard. This maximum power portion shows the current value and is poll driven.


Channel Change Causes—A graphical bar chart for 802.11a/n radios. The chart is factored based on the reason for channel change. The chart is divided into two parts, each depicting the percentage of weighted reasons causing the event to occur over a 24-hour and 7-day period. Each event for channel change can be caused by multiple reasons, and the weight is equally divided across these reasons. The net reason code is factored and equated to one irrespective of the number of reasons for the event to occur.

Channel Change - APs with channel changes—Each event for channel change includes the MAC address of the lightweight access point. For each reason code, you are given the most channel changes that occurred for the 802.11a/n access point based on the weighted reason for channel events. This count is split over a 24-hour and 7-day period.

Coverage Hole - APs reporting coverage holes—The top five access points filtered by IF Type 11 a/n which triggered a coverage hole event (threshold based) are displayed.

Aggregated Percent Max Power APs—A graphical progressive chart of the total percentage of 802.11a/n lightweight access points which are operating at maximum power to accommodate coverage holes events. The count is split over a 24-hour and 7-day period.


Note This maximum power portion shows the values from the last 24 hours and is poll driven. This occurs every 15 minutes or as configured for radio performance.


Percent Time at Maximum Power—A list of the top five 802.11a/n lightweight access points which have been operating at maximum power.


Note This maximum power portion shows the value from the last 24 hours and is only event driven.


Monitoring Clients and Users

The Monitor Clients and Users information assists in identifying, diagnosing, and resolving client issues. Using the Monitor Clients and Users feature, you can view a client association history and statistical information. You can also troubleshoot client historical issues. These tools are useful when users complain of network performance as they move throughout a building with their laptop computers. The information might help you assess what areas experience inconsistent coverage and which areas have the potential to drop coverage. See the "Managing Clients" section on page 10-525 for more information.

Monitoring Alarms

This section contains the following topics:

Alarms and Events Overview, page 5-130

Viewing List of Alarms, page 5-130

Filtering Alarms, page 5-131

Viewing Alarm Details, page 5-132

Viewing Events Related to Alarms, page 5-133

Modifying Alarms, page 5-133

Modifying the Alarm Browser, page 5-134

Viewing the Alarm Summary, page 5-135

Modifying Alarm Settings, page 5-136

Working with Alarms, page 5-137

Monitoring Access Point Alarms, page 5-138

Monitoring Air Quality Alarms, page 5-139

Monitoring CleanAir Security Alarms, page 5-139

Monitoring Email Notifications, page 5-140

Monitoring Severity Configurations, page 5-141

Monitoring Cisco Adaptive wIPS Alarms, page 5-141

Monitoring Cisco Adaptive wIPS Alarm Details, page 5-142

Alarms and Events Overview

An event is an occurrence or detection of some condition in and around the network. For example, it can be a report about radio interference crossing a threshold, the detection of a new rogue access point, or a controller rebooting.

Events are not generated by a controller for each and every occurrence of a pattern match. Some pattern matches must occur a certain number of times per reporting interval before they are considered a potential attack. The threshold of these pattern matches is set in the signature file. Events can then generate alarms which further can generate e-mail notifications if configured as such.

An alarm is a Prime Infrastructure response to one or more related events. If an event is considered of high enough severity (critical, major, minor, or warning), Prime Infrastructure raises an alarm until the resulting condition no longer occurs. For example, an alarm might be raised while a rogue access point is detected, but the alarm terminates after the rogue has not been detected for several hours.

One or more events can result in a single alarm being raised. The mapping of events to alarms is their correlation function. For example, some IDS events are considered to be network wide so all events of that type (regardless of which access point the event is reported from) map to a single alarm. On the other hand, other IDS events are client-specific. For these, all events of that type for a specific client MAC address map to an alarm which is also specific for that client MAC address, regardless of whether multiple access points report the same IDS violation. If the same kind of IDS violation takes place for a different client, then a different alarm is raised.

An Prime Infrastructure administrator currently has no control over which events generate alarms or when they time out. On the controller, individual types of events can be enabled or disabled (such as management, SNMP, trap controls, and so on).

Viewing List of Alarms

Choose Monitor > Alarms to access the Alarm Browser page which provides a list of alarms. You can also hover your mouse cursor over Alarm Browser on the toolbar at the bottom of Prime Infrastructure page to view the Alarm Browser page.

The Alarm Browser lists the following information for each alarm:

Severity—Severity of the alarm which can be:

Critical

Major

Minor

Warning

Informational

Status—Status of the alarm.

Timestamp—Date and time that the alarm occurred.

Category—Category assigned to the alarm such as rogue AP, controller, switch, and security.

Condition—Condition that caused the alarm.

Owner—Name of the person to whom this alarm is assigned, if one was entered.

Message—Messages about the alarm.

Failure Source—Indicates the source of the event (including name and/or MAC address).


Note By default, acknowledged alarms are not shown in the Alarm Browser page. To change this, choose Administration > Settings > Alarms, then unselect the Hide Acknowledged Alarms check box. You must unselect the preference of hiding acknowledged alarms if you want acknowledged alarms to show in Prime Infrastructure Alarm Summary and alarms lists page.


Use the check box to select one or more alarms. To select all alarms displayed in the Alarm Browser, click the topmost box. See the "Modifying Alarms" section on page 5-133 for more information.

Filtering Alarms

In the Monitor > Alarms page, you can filter the alarms that are displayed in the Alarm Browser.

Choose Monitor > Alarms, then from the Show drop-down list, select one of the following filters:

Quick Filter—Enter text in any of the boxes to display alarms that contain the text you enter. For example, if you enter AP in the Category field, AP and Rogue AP alarms are displayed. It provides an optional filtered view of alarms for wired and wireless alarms.

Advance Filter—This filter provides an advanced alarm search capability. It provides ability to search on specific fields with various conditions like contains, does not contain, starts with, ends with and so on. Additionally advanced filters allows nesting of AND/OR conditions. Select the category and operator, enter criteria in the text field to compare against, then do the following:

Click + to add an additional filter or - to remove a filter you specified.

Click Go to apply your filter.

Click Clear Filter to clear the entries you entered.

Click the disc icon to save your filter. Enter a name for the filter you want to save, then click Save.


Note When you select a preset filter and click the filter button, the filter criteria is dimmed. You can only see the filter criteria but you can not change it. When All is selected to view all the entries, clicking the filter button shows the Quick Filter options, where you can filter the data using the filterable fields. You can also use the free-form box to enter text to filter the table.


All—Displays all alarms.

Manage Preset Filter—Displays any previously saved filters and allows you to edit and delete previously saved filters.

Assigned to Me—Displays all alarms assigned to you.

Unassigned Alarms—Displays all unassigned alarms.

Alarms in Last 5 Minutes

Alarms in Last 15 Minutes

Alarms in Last 30 Minutes

Alarms in the last hour

Alarms in the last 8 hours

Alarms in the last 24 hours

Alarms in last 7 days

All wired alarms—Displays all alarms for wired devices.

All wireless alarms—Displays all alarms for wireless devices.

Exporting Alarms

You can quickly export the list of alarms into a CSV file (a spreadsheet format with comma-separated values).


Note The columns that are shown in the alarms table are only exported to the CSV file.


To export the list of alarms, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Alarms.

Step 2 Click the icon on the toolbar. A pop-up window appears.

Step 3 In the File Download window, click Save to save the file.


Viewing Alarm Details

You can view alarm details in the Monitor > Alarms page by clicking the expand icon to the far left of the Monitor > Alarms page for the alarm for which you want to see details. The details that are displayed depend on the alarm type you selected (see Table 5-62).

Table 5-62 Viewing Alarm Details 

Section
Field
Description
General Info 1

Failure Source

Indicates the source of the event (including name and/or MAC address).

Owner

Name of person to which this alarm is assigned, or blank.

Acknowledged

Displays whether or not the alarm is acknowledged by the user.

Category

The category of the alarm (for example, AP, Rogue AP, or Security).

Created

Month, day, year, hour, minute, second, AM or PM alarm created.

Modified

Month, day, year, hour, minute, second, AM or PM alarm last modified.

Generated By

Device that generated the alarm.

Severity

Level of security: Critical, Major, Minor, Warning, Clear, Info.

Previous Severity

The severity of the alarm the after the most recent polling cycle.

Device Info

Device Name

Name of the device.

Device Address

IP address of the device.

Device Contact

Contact information for the device.

Device Location

Location of the device.

Device Status

Status of the device.

Messages

Device information retrieved from log messages.

Annotation

Lists current notes regarding this rogue access point. To add a new note, click New Annotation. Type the note and click Post to save and display the note or Cancel to close the page without saving the note.

1 The General information might vary depending on the type of alarm. For example, some alarm details might include location and switch port tracing information.

In the Alarms list page, you can also view the events for the alarm you selected as explained in the "Viewing Events Related to Alarms" section on page 5-133.

Viewing Events Related to Alarms

When you select Monitor > Alarms page, you can view alarm summary information by hovering your mouse cursor over an alarm severity in the Severity column and clicking the icon that appears.

A dialog appears displaying the top 5 events related to the alarm you selected.

Click Events to display all events associated with the selected alarm.

Modifying Alarms

In the Monitor > Alarms page, you can modify the alarms by selecting the check box next to an alarm and then clicking one of the tasks at the top of the Alarm Browser page:


Note The alarms that appear in the Monitor > Alarms page depend on the settings you specify on the Administration > Settings page. See the "Modifying Alarm Settings" section on page 5-136 for more information.


Change Status—Change the alarm status to one of the following:

Acknowledge—You can acknowledge the alarm. By default, acknowledged alarms are not displayed in the Alarm Browser page. Acknowledged alarms remain in Prime Infrastructure and you can search for all acknowledged alarms using the alarm search functionality. See the "Acknowledging Alarms" section on page 5-138 for more information.

Unacknowledge—You can choose to unacknowledge an already acknowledged alarm.

Clear—Clear the selected alarm(s). The alarm is removed from the Alarm Browser. Cleared alarms remain in Prime Infrastructure and you can search for all cleared alarms using the alarm search functionality


Note Once the severity is Clear, the alarm is deleted from Prime Infrastructure after 30 days by default. You can modify this setting in the Administration > Settings page.


Assign—For the selected alarm, you can do the following:

Assign to me—Assigns the alarm to the specified user.

Unassign—Removes the specified owner from the alarm.

Annotation—Enter an annotation for the selected alarm, then click Post. The annotation you entered appears when you view the alarm details.

Delete—Delete the selected alarm(s). Indicates that the alarm is no longer detected by any device.

Specifying Email Notifications for Alarms

In the Monitor > Alarms page, you can set up e-mail notifications for alarms based on the alarm category and severity level.


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Alarms, then click Email Notification.

Step 2 Select the Enable check box next to the alarm category for which you want to set up e-mail notifications, then click Save.

Prime Infrastructure sends e-mail notifications when alarms for the categories you specified occur.


Modifying the Alarm Browser

Choose Monitor > Alarms to view a list of alarms. You can also click Alarm Browser on the toolbar at the bottom of Prime Infrastructure home page. You can modify the following information displayed in the Alarm Browser:

To reorder the columns, drag and drop the column headings into any position.

Click a column heading to sort the information by that column. By default, the column is sorted in descending order. Click the column heading again to change the sort the column in ascending order.


Note Not every column is sortable. Hover your mouse cursor over a column heading, and Prime Infrastructure displays whether the column is sortable.


To customize which columns are displayed, click the Settings icon, then click Columns. Select the check box next to columns you want to appear, and unselect the boxes for the columns you do not want to appear in the Alarm Browser page.

Viewing the Alarm Summary

When Prime Infrastructure receives an alarm message from a controller, switch, or Prime Infrastructure, it displays an alarm indicator in the Alarm Summary. The Alarm Summary is at the bottom of Prime Infrastructure home page and displays the total count of critical, major, and minor alarms currently detected by Prime Infrastructure. Hover your mouse cursor over the Alarm Summary, and the alarm details are displayed.


Note The alarms that appear in the Alarm Summary and Monitor > Alarms pages depend on the settings you specify in the Administration > Settings page. By default, acknowledged alarms are not shown. See the "Modifying Alarm Settings" section on page 5-136 for more information.


Alarms are color coded as follows:

Red—Critical Alarm

Orange—Major Alarm

Yellow—Minor Alarm

Alarms indicate the current fault or state of an element, and alarms are usually generated by one or more events. The alarm can be cleared but the event remains. See the "Alarms and Events Overview" section on page 5-130 for more information about alarms.


Note By default, alarm counts refresh every minute. You can modify when alarms are refreshed in the Administration > User Preferences page.


When you hover your mouse cursor over the Alarm Summary, a pop-up page appears listing the number of critical, major, and minor alarms for each of alarm category. You can specify which alarm categories are displayed in the Alarm Summary on the Administration > User Preferences page. By default, all categories are displayed:

Alarm Summary—Displays a summary of the total alarms for all alarm categories.

AP—Display counts for AP alarms such as AP Disassociated from controller, Thresholds violation for Load, Noise or Interference, AP Contained as Rogue, AP Authorization Failure, AP regulatory domain mismatch, or Radio card Failure.

Context Aware Notifications

Controller—Displays counts for controller alarms, such as reachability problems from Prime Infrastructure and other controller failures (fan failure, POE controller failure, AP license expired, link down, temperature sensor failure, and low temperature sensed).

Coverage Hole—Displays counts for coverage hole alarms generated for access points whose clients are not having enough coverage set by thresholds. See the "Monitoring Maps" section on page 6-155 for more information.

Mesh Links—Displays counts for mesh link alarms, such as poor SNR, console login, excessive parent change, authorization failure, or excessive association failure.

Mobility Services—Displays counts for location alarms such as reachability problems from Prime Infrastructure and location notifications (In/Out Area, Movement from Marker, or Battery Level).

Prime Infrastructure—Displays counts for Prime Infrastructure alarms.

Performance—Displays counts for performance alarms.

Rogue AP—Displays counts for malicious rogue access points alarms.

Rogue Adhoc—Displays counts for unclassified rogue access point alarms.

Security—Displays counts for security alarms such as Signature Attacks, AP Threats/Attacks, and Client Security Events.

Switch—Displays counts for switch alarms such as authentication errors.

Modifying Alarm Settings

You can modify the following settings for alarms:

Alarm count refresh rate—See the "Modifying Alarm Count Refresh Rate" section on page 5-136.

Alarm severity levels—See the "Configuring Alarm Severity Levels" section on page 5-136.

Modifying Alarm Count Refresh Rate

By default, alarm counts refresh every minute. You can modify the refresh rate by selecting Administration > User Preferences, and then choosing a new value for the Refresh Alarm Count from the Alarm Summary Every menu.

Configuring Alarm Severity Levels

The Administration > Settings > Severity Configuration page allows you to change the severity level for newly generated alarms.


Note Existing alarms remain unchanged.


To reconfigure the severity level for a newly generated alarm, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Administration > Settings.

Step 2 From the left sidebar menu, choose Severity Configuration.

Step 3 Select the check box of the alarm condition whose severity level you want to change.

Step 4 From the Configure Security Level drop-down list, choose from the following severity levels:

Critical

Major

Minor

Warning

Informational

Reset to Default

Step 5 Click Go.

Step 6 Click OK to confirm the change or Cancel to leave the security level unchanged.


Working with Alarms

You can view, assign, and clear alarms and events on access points and mobility services engine using Prime Infrastructure.

This section also describes how to have e-mail notifications of alarms sent to you and contains the following topics:

Assigning and Unassigning Alarms, page 5-137

Deleting and Clearing Alarms, page 5-137

Acknowledging Alarms, page 5-138

Assigning and Unassigning Alarms

To assign and unassign an alarm to yourself, follow these steps:


Step 1 Perform an advanced search for access point alarms. See the "Advanced Search" section on page 2-55 for more information.

Step 2 Select the alarms that you want to assign to yourself by selecting their corresponding check boxes.


Note To unassign an alarm assigned to you, Unselect the check box next to the appropriate alarm. You cannot unassign alarms assigned to others.


Step 3 From the Select a command drop-down list, choose Assign to Me (or Unassign), and click Go.

If you choose Assign to Me, your username appears in the Owner column. If you choose Unassign, the username column is empty.


Deleting and Clearing Alarms

To delete or clear an alarm from a mobility services engine, follow these steps:


Step 1 In the Monitor > Alarms page, select the alarms that you want to delete or clear by selecting their corresponding check boxes.


Note If you delete an alarm, Prime Infrastructure removes it from its database. If you clear an alarm, it remains in the Prime Infrastructure database, but in the Clear state. You clear an alarm when the condition that caused it no longer exists.


Step 2 From the Select a command drop-down list, choose Delete or Clear, and click Go.


Note To set up cleanup of old alarms and cleared alarms, choose Administration > Settings > Alarms. See the "Configuring Alarms and Events" section on page 15-1140 for more information.



Acknowledging Alarms

You might want certain alarms to be removed from the Alarms List. For example, if you are continuously receiving an interference alarm from a certain access point on the 802.11g interface, you might want to stop that access point from being counted as an active alarm on the Alarm Summary page or any alarms list. In this scenario, you can find the alarm for the 802.11g interface in the Alarms list, select the check box, and choose Acknowledge from the Select a command drop-down list.

Now if the access point generates a new violation on the same interface, Prime Infrastructure does not create a new alarm, and the Alarm Summary page shows no new alarms. However, if the interference violation is created on another interface, such as 802.11a, a new alarm is created.

By default, acknowledged alarms are not displayed in either the Alarm Summary page or any alarm list page. Also, no e-mail messages generated for these alarms after you have marked them as acknowledged. By default, acknowledged alarms are not included for any search criteria. To change this default, choose to the Administration > Settings > Alarms page and unselect the Hide Acknowledged Alarms check box.

When you acknowledge an alarm, the following warning appears as a reminder that a recurrence of the problem does not generate another alarm unless this functionality is disabled.


Note When you acknowledge an alarm, a warning displays as a reminder that a recurrence of the problem does not generate another alarm unless this functionality is disabled. Choose Administration > User Preferences page to disable this warning message.


You can also search for all previously acknowledged alarms to reveal the alarms that were acknowledged during the last seven days. Prime Infrastructure automatically deletes cleared alerts that are more than seven days old so your results can only show activity for the last seven days. Until an existing alarm is deleted, a new alarm cannot be generated for any managed entity for which Prime Infrastructure has already generated an alarm.

Monitoring Access Point Alarms

The Access Point Alarms page displays the access point based alarms on your network.

To access the AP alarms page, do one of the following:

Perform a search for AP alarms. See the "Using the Search Feature" section on page 2-54 for more information.

Click the Access Point number link in the Alarm Summary box.

The Monitor AP Alarms page contains the following fields:

Severity—Indicates the severity of the alarm. See Table 5-61 for a list of severity indicator icons.

Failure Source—Device that generated the alarm.

Owner—Name of the person to which this alarm is assigned, or blank.

Date/Time—The time at which the alarm was generated.

Message—The associated message displayed in Prime Infrastructure alarm browser.

Category—Indicates the category assigned to the alarm such as rogue AP, controller, switch, and security.

Condition—Condition that caused the alarm.

Acknowledged—Displays whether or not the alarm is acknowledged by the user. See the "Acknowledging Alarms" section on page 5-138 for more information.

Monitoring Air Quality Alarms

The Air Quality Alarms page displays air quality alarms on your network.

To access the air quality alarms page, do one of the following:

Perform a search for Performance alarms. See the "Using the Search Feature" section on page 2-54 for more information.

Click the Performance number link in the Alarm Summary box.

The Monitor Air Quality Alarms page contains the following fields:

Severity—Indicates the severity of the alarm. See Table 5-61 for a list of severity indicator icons.

Failure Source—Device that generated the alarm.

Owner—Name of the person to which this alarm is assigned, or blank.

Date/Time—The time at which the alarm was generated.

Message—The associated message displayed in Prime Infrastructure alarm browser.

Acknowledged—Displays whether or not the alarm is acknowledged by the user. See the "Acknowledging Alarms" section on page 5-138 for more information.

Select a command Menu

Select one or more alarms by selecting their respective check boxes, choose one of the following commands from the Select a command drop-down list, and click Go.

Assign to me—Assign the selected alarm(s) to the current user.

Unassign—Unassign the selected alarm(s).

Clear—Clear the selected alarm(s).

Delete—Delete the selected alarm(s).

Acknowledge—Acknowledge the alarm to prevent it from showing up in the Alarm Summary page. See the "Acknowledging Alarms" section on page 5-138 for more information.


Note The alarm remains in Prime Infrastructure and you can search for all Acknowledged alarms using the alarm search functionality.


Unacknowledge—Unacknowledge an already acknowledged alarm.

Email Notification—Takes you to the All Alarms > Email Notification page to view and configure e-mail notifications. See the "Monitoring RFID Tags" section on page 5-115 for more information.

Monitoring CleanAir Security Alarms

The CleanAir Security Alarms page displays security alarms on your network.

To access the security alarms page, do one of the following:

Perform a search for Security alarms. See the "Using the Search Feature" section on page 2-54 for more information.

Click the Security number link in the Alarm Summary box.

The Monitor CleanAir Security Alarms page contains the following fields:

Severity—Indicates the severity of the alarm. See Table 5-61 for a list of severity indicator icons.

Failure Source—Device that generated the alarm.

Owner—Name of the person to which this alarm is assigned, or blank.

Date/Time—The time at which the alarm was generated.

Message—The associated message displayed in Prime Infrastructure alarm browser.

Acknowledged—Displays whether or not the alarm is acknowledged by the user. See the "Acknowledging Alarms" section on page 5-138 for more information.

Select a command Menu

Select one or more alarms by selecting their respective check boxes, choose one of the following commands from the Select a command drop-down list, and click Go.

Assign to me—Assign the selected alarm(s) to the current user.

Unassign—Unassign the selected alarm(s).

Clear—Clear the selected alarm(s).

Delete—Delete the selected alarm(s).

Acknowledge—Acknowledge the alarm to prevent it from showing up in the Alarm Summary page. See the "Acknowledging Alarms" section on page 5-138 for more information.


Note The alarm remains in Prime Infrastructure and you can search for all Acknowledged alarms using the alarm search functionality.


Unacknowledge—Unacknowledge an already acknowledged alarm.

Email Notification—Takes you to the All Alarms > Email Notification page to view and configure e-mail notifications. See the "Monitoring RFID Tags" section on page 5-115 for more information.

Monitoring Email Notifications

Prime Infrastructure includes a built-in e-mail notification function which can notify the network operator when critical alarms occur.

The Email Notification page allows you to add a filter for each alert category. The severity level is set to critical by default when the alert category is enabled, but you can choose a different severity level for different categories. E-mail notifications are generated only for the severity levels that are configured.

To configure e-mail notifications, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Alarms.

Step 2 From the Select a command drop-down list, choose Email Notification.

Step 3 Click Go.

Step 4 Click an Alarm Category to edit severity level and e-mail recipients for its e-mail notifications.

Step 5 Select the severity level check box(es) (Critical, Major, Minor, or Warning) for which you want a notification sent.

Step 6 Enter the notification recipient e-mail addresses in the To text box.


Note Separate multiple e-mail addresses with a comma.


Step 7 Click OK.

Step 8 Select the Enabled check box for applicable alarm categories to activate the delivery of e-mail notifications.

Step 9 Click OK.


Monitoring Severity Configurations

You can change the severity level for newly generated alarms.


Note Existing alarms remain unchanged.


To change the severity level of newly-generated alarms, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Administration > Setting.

Step 2 Choose Severity Configuration from the left sidebar menu.

Step 3 Select the check box of the alarm condition for which you want to change the severity level.

Step 4 From the Configure Severity Level drop-down list, choose the new severity level (Critical, Major, Minor, Warning, Informational, Reset to Default).

Step 5 Click Go.

Step 6 Click OK to confirm the change.


Monitoring Cisco Adaptive wIPS Alarms

Alarms from Cisco Adaptive wIPS DoS (denial of service) and security penetration attacks are classified as security alarms. You can view these wIPS alarms and their details in the Monitor > Alarms page.

To view a list of wIPS DoS and security penetration attack alarms, follow these steps:


Step 1 Perform a search for Security alarms using the Advanced Search feature. See the "Advanced Search" section on page 2-55 for more information on performing an advanced search.

The following information is provided for wIPS alarms:

Severity—Severity levels include critical, major, info, warning, and clear.

Failure Object—Displays the name and IP or MAC address of the object for which the alarm was generated. Click the Failure Object to view alarm details. See the "Monitoring Cisco Adaptive wIPS Alarm Details" section on page 5-142 for more information on viewing wIPS alarm details.

Date/Time—Displays the date and time that the alarm occurred.

Message—Displays a message explaining why the alarm occurred (such as the applicable wIPS policy).

Acknowledged—Displays whether or not the alarm is acknowledged by the user.

Category—Indicates the category of this alarm such as Security.

Condition—Displays a description of what caused this alarm to be triggered.

When there are multiple alarm pages, the page numbers are displayed at the top of the page with a scroll arrow on each side. Use this to view additional alarms.

To add, remove, or reorder columns in the table, click the Edit View link to go to the Edit View page.


Select a command

Using the Select a command drop-down list, you can perform the following actions on the selected alarms:

Assign to me—Assign the selected alarm(s) to the current user.

Unassign—Unassign the selected alarm(s).

Delete—Delete the selected alarm(s).

Clear—Clear the selected alarm(s).

Acknowledge—You can acknowledge the alarm to prevent it from showing up in the Alarm Summary page. The alarm remains in Prime Infrastructure and you can search for all Acknowledged alarms using the alarm search functionality.

Unacknowledge—You can choose to unacknowledge an already acknowledged alarm.

Email Notification—Takes you to the All Alarms > Email Notification page to view and configure e-mail notifications.

To perform an action on the selected alarm, follow these steps:


Step 1 Select an alarm by selecting its check box.

Step 2 From the Select a command drop-down list, select the applicable command.

Step 3 Click Go.


Monitoring Cisco Adaptive wIPS Alarm Details

Choose Monitor > Alarms > failure object to view details of the selected Cisco wIPS alarm. The following Alarm details are provided for Cisco Adaptive wIPS alarms:

General

Detected By wIPS AP—The access point that detected the alarm.

wIPS AP IP Address—The IP address of the wIPS access point.

Owner—Name of person to which this alarm is assigned or left blank.

Acknowledged—Displays whether or not the alarm is acknowledged by the user.

Category—For wIPS, the alarm category is Security.

Created—Month, day, year, hour, minute, second, AM or PM that the alarm was created.

Modified—Month, day, year, hour, minute, second, AM or PM that the alarm was last modified.

Generated By—Indicates how the alarm event was generated (either NMS or from a trap).

NMS (Network Management System - Prime Infrastructure)—Generated through polling. Prime Infrastructure periodically polls the controllers and generates events. Prime Infrastructure generates events when the traps are disabled or when the traps are lost for those events. In this case, "Generated by" is NMS.

Trap—Generated by the controller. Prime Infrastructure process these traps and raises corresponding events for them. In this case, "Generated by" is Controller.

Severity—Level of severity including critical, major, info, warning, and clear.

Last Disappeared—The date and time that the potential attack last disappeared.

Channel—The channel on which the potential attack occurred.

Attacker Client/AP MAC—The MAC address of the client or access point that initiated the attack.

Attacker Client/AP IP Address—The IP address of the client or access point that initiated the attack.

Target Client/AP IP Address—The IP address of the client or access point targeted by the attacker.

Controller IP Address—The IP address of the controller to which the access point is associated.

MSE—The IP address of the associated mobility services engine.

Controller MAC address—The MAC address of the controller to which the access point is associated.

wIPS access point MAC address

Forensic File

Event History—Takes you to the "Monitoring Alarms" page to view all events for this alarm.

Annotations—Enter any new notes in this text box, and click Add to update the alarm. Notes are displayed in the "Annotations" display area.

Messages—Displays information about the alarm.

Audit Report—Click to view config audit alarms details. This report is only available for Config Audit alarms.

Configuration audit alarms are generated when audit discrepancies are enforced on config groups.


Note If enforcement fails, a critical alarm is generated on the config group. If enforcement succeeds, a minor alarm is generated on the config group.
The alarms have links to the audit report where you can view a list of discrepancies for each controller.


Rogue Clients—If the failure object is a rogue access point, information about rogue clients is displayed.

Select a command

Select one or more alarms by selecting their respective check boxes, and click Go.

Assign to me—Assign the selected alarm(s) to the current user.

Unassign—Unassign the selected alarm(s).

Delete—Delete the selected alarm(s).

Clear—Clear the selected alarm(s).

Acknowledge—You can acknowledge the alarm to prevent it from showing up in the Alarm Summary page. The alarm remains in Prime Infrastructure and you can search for all Acknowledged alarms using the alarm search functionality.

Unacknowledge—You can choose to unacknowledge an already acknowledged alarm.

Email Notification—Takes you to the All Alarms > Email Notification page to view and configure e-mail notifications.

Event History—Takes you to the Monitor Alarms > Events page to view events for Rogue Alarms.

Monitoring Events

One or more events might generate an abnormal state or alarm. The alarm can be cleared, but the event remains. Choose Monitor > Events to access the Events page, which displays the following information:

Description—Describes the event details.

Time—Indicates the date and time the event was generated.

Severity—Event severities include: Critical, Major, Minor, Warning, Cleared, or Information.

Failure Source—Indicates the source of the event (including name and/or MAC address).

Category—Type of event such as Rogue AP, Security, or AP.

Click any column heading to sort by that column.

Use the quickview icon to disclose more information on the event. The additional information for the event is divided into general information and the message. In the general information, the failure source, the category, severity, generated time and IP address. The message of the event is also displayed.


Note Events also has preset, quick and advanced filters similar to alarms. These filters work in same way as the filters in alarms.


When you filter the table using the Search feature, the Events page might display the additional information. See the "Advanced Search" section on page 2-55(Advanced Search results for Events) for more information on performing a search. The additional information includes the following:

Coverage Hole Events

Access Point Name

Failed Clients—Number of clients that failed due to the coverage hole.

Total Clients—Total number of clients affected by the coverage hole.

Radio Type—The radio type (802.11b/g or 802.11a) of the applicable access point.

Coverage Threshold

Rogue AP Events

Vendor—Rogue access point vendor name or Unknown.

Classification Type—Indicates the type of rogue access point including Malicious, Friendly, or Unclassified.

On Network—Indicates how the rogue detection occurred.

Controller—The controller detected the rogue (Yes or No).

Switch Port Trace—The rogue was detected by a switch port trace. Indicated by one of the following: Traced but not found, Traced and found, Not traced.

Radio Type—Lists all radio types applicable to this rogue access point.

State—Indicates the state of the alarm. Possible states for ad hoc rogues include Threat, Alert, Internal, External, Contained, Contained Pending, and Removed.

SSID—Service Set Identifier being broadcast by the rogue access point radio. (Blank if SSID is not broadcast.)


Note See the "Monitoring Rogue Alarm Events" section on page 5-111 or the "Viewing Rogue AP Event Details" section on page 5-112 for more information on rogue access points events.


Adhoc Rogue Events

Vendor—Rogue access point vendor name or Unknown.

On Network—Indicates how the rogue detection occurred.

Controller—The controller detected the rogue (Yes or No).

Switch Port Trace—The rogue was detected by a switch port trace. Indicated by one of the following: Traced but not found, Traced and found, Not traced.

Radio Type—Lists all radio types applicable to this rogue access point.

State—Indicates the state of the alarm. Possible states for ad hoc rogues include Threat, Alert, Internal, External, Contained, Contained Pending, and Removed.

SSID—Service Set Identifier being broadcast by the rogue access point radio. (Blank if SSID is not broadcast.)

Interference

Detected By—IP address of the device that detected the interference.

ID—ID of the device that detected the interference.

Mesh Links

Client

Context Aware Notification

Pre Coverage Hole

Client MAC Address—MAC address of the client affected by the Pre Coverage Hole.

AP MAC Address—MAC address of the applicable access point.

Radio Type—The radio type (802.11b/g or 802.11a) of the applicable access point.

Power Level—Access Point transmit power level (1 = Maximum power allowed per Country Code setting, 2 = 50% power, 3 = 25% power, 4 = 6.25 to 12.5% power, 5 = 0.195 to 6.25% power).

Client Type—Client type can be laptop(0), pc(1), pda(2), dot11mobilephone(3), dualmodephone(4), wgb(5), scanner(6), tabletpc(7), printer(8), projector(9), videoconfsystem(10), camera(11), gamingsystem(12), dot11deskphone(13), cashregister(14), radiotag(15), rfidsensor(16), server(17)

WLAN Coverage Hole Status

If there is more than one page of events, the number of pages is displayed with a scroll arrow on each side. Use this to view additional events.

This section contains the following topics:

Searching Events, page 5-146

Monitoring Failure Objects, page 5-147

Monitoring Events for Rogue APs, page 5-147

Viewing Ad hoc Rogue Event Details, page 5-114

Monitoring Cisco Adaptive wIPS Events, page 5-149

Working with Events, page 5-152

Searching Events

Use Prime Infrastructure Search feature to find specific events or to create and save custom searches. See one of the following topics for additional information:

Using the Search Feature, page 2-54

Quick Search, page 2-54

Advanced Search, page 2-55

Saved Searches, page 2-67

Exporting Events

You can quickly export the list of events into a CSV file (a spreadsheet format with comma-separated values).


Note The columns that are shown in the events table are only exported to the CSV file.


To export the list of events, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Events.

Step 2 Click the icon on the toolbar. A pop-up window appears.

Step 3 In the File Download window, click Save to save the file.


Monitoring Failure Objects


Note The event categories Location Servers and Location Notifications appear only in the Cisco NCS Location version.


Choose Monitor > Events, then click the expand icon to the far left of the Monitor > Events page for the event for which you want to see details. Details about the event are displayed. Depending on the type of event you selected, the associated details vary.

General Info

Failure Source—Indicates the source of the event (including name and/or MAC address).

Category—Type of alarm such as Security or AP.

Generated—Date and time that the event was generated.

Generated By—Indicates how the alarm event was generated (either NMS or from a trap).

NMS (Network Management System - Prime Infrastructure)—Generated through polling. Prime Infrastructure periodically polls the controllers and generates events. Prime Infrastructure generates events when the traps are disabled or when the traps are lost for those events. In this case, "Generated by" is NMS.

Trap—Generated by the controller. Prime Infrastructure process these traps and raises corresponding events for them. In this case, "Generated by" is Controller.

Device IP Address—IP address of the alarm-generating device.

Severity—Level of severity including critical, major, info, warning, and clear.

Messages—Message explaining why the event occurred.

Monitoring Events for Rogue APs

Choose Monitor > Events. Click an item in the Description column to display the alarm events for a rogue access point radio. Rogue access point radios are unauthorized access points detected by controllers. The following fields appear:

General

Rogue MAC Address

Vendor

On Network—Indicates how the rogue detection occurred.

Controller—The controller detected the rogue (Yes or No).

Switch Port Trace—The rogue was detected by a switch port trace. Indicated by one of the following: Traced but not found, Traced and found, Not traced.

Owner—Name of person to which this alarm is assigned, or (blank).

State—State of this radio relative to the network or Port. Rogue access point radios appear as "Alert" when first scanned by the Port, or as "Pending" when operating system identification is still underway.

SSID—Service Set Identifier being broadcast by the rogue access point radio. (Blank if SSID is not broadcast.)

Containment Level—An access point which is being contained is either unable to provide service at all, or provides exceedingly slow service. There is a level associated with the containment activity which indicates how many Cisco 1000 series lightweight access points to use in containing the threat. This service must be initiated and halted by the administrator. Containment Type - Contained if the rogue access point clients have been contained at Level 1 through Level 4 under Update Status, otherwise Unassigned.

Channel—Indicates the band at which the ad hoc rogue is broadcasting.

Radio Type—Lists all radio types applicable to this rogue access point.

Created—Date and time that the event occurred.

Generated By—Indicates how the alarm event was generated (either NMS or from a trap).

NMS (Network Management System - Prime Infrastructure)—Generated through polling. Prime Infrastructure periodically polls the controllers and generates events. Prime Infrastructure generates events when the traps are disabled or when the traps are lost for those events. In this case, "Generated by" is NMS.

Trap—Generated by the controller. Prime Infrastructure process these traps and raises corresponding events for them. In this case, "Generated by" is Controller.

Device IP Address—IP address of the alarm-generating device.

Severity—Level of severity, Critical, Major, Minor, Warning, Clear, Info. Color coded.

Message—Displays descriptive information about the alarm.

Help—Displays information about the alarm.


Note Use the Advance Search feature to find specific events. See the "Advanced Search" section on page 2-55 for more information.


Monitoring Events for Ad hoc Rogues

Choose Monitor > Events. Click an item in the Description column to display ad hoc rogue event details.

General

Rogue MAC Address

Vendor

On Network—Indicates how the rogue detection occurred.

Controller—The controller detected the rogue (Yes or No).

Switch Port Trace—The rogue was detected by a switch port trace. Indicated by one of the following: Traced but not found, Traced and found, Not traced.

Owner—Name of person to which this alarm is assigned, or (blank).

State—State of this radio relative to the network or Port. Rogue access point radios appear as "Alert" when first scanned by the Port, or as "Pending" when operating system identification is still underway.

SSID—Service Set Identifier being broadcast by the rogue access point radio. (Blank if SSID is not broadcast.)

Containment Level—An access point which is being contained is either unable to provide service at all, or provides exceedingly slow service. There is a level associated with the containment activity which indicates how many Cisco 1000 series lightweight access points to use in containing the threat. This service must be initiated and halted by the administrator. Containment Type - Contained if the rogue access point clients have been contained at Level 1 through Level 4 under Update Status, otherwise Unassigned.

Channel—Indicates the band at which the ad hoc rogue is broadcasting.

Created—Date and time that the event occurred.

Generated By—Indicates how the alarm event was generated (either NMS or from a trap).

NMS (Network Management System - Prime Infrastructure)—Generated through polling. Prime Infrastructure periodically polls the controllers and generates events. Prime Infrastructure generates events when the traps are disabled or when the traps are lost for those events. In this case, "Generated by" is NMS.

Trap—Generated by the controller. Prime Infrastructure process these traps and raises corresponding events for them. In this case, "Generated by" is Controller.

Device IP Address—IP address of the alarm-generating device.

Severity—Level of severity, Critical, Major, Minor, Warning, Clear, Info. Color coded.

Message—Displays descriptive information about the alarm.

Help—Displays information about the alarm.

Monitoring Cisco Adaptive wIPS Events

Choose Monitor > Events to view wIPS events. One or more events might generate an abnormal state or alarm. The alarm can be cleared, but the event remains. For more information regarding monitoring events, see the "Monitoring Events" section on page 5-144.

The following sections provide additional information regarding Cisco Adaptive wIPS:

Configuring wIPS Profiles

Prime Infrastructure Services

wIPS Policy Alarm Encyclopedia

Perform an events search to narrow the results to mobility services engine or Security events only. To view mobility services engine or Security events, choose Monitor > Events.


Note If there is more than one page of events, the number of pages is displayed with a scroll arrow on each side. Use this to view additional events.


Monitoring CleanAir Air Quality Events

You can use Prime Infrastructure to view the events generated on the air quality of the wireless network.

To view air quality events, follow these steps:


Step 1 Click Advanced Search in Prime Infrastructure.

The New Search page appears.

Step 2 In the New Search page, choose Events from the Search Category drop-down list.

Step 3 From the Severity drop-down list, choose the type of severity you want to search the air quality events.

Step 4 From the Event Category drop-down list, choose Performance.

Step 5 Click Go.

The air quality events page displays the following information:

Severity—Indicates the severity of the alarm. See Table 5-61 for a list of severity indicator icons.

Failure Source—Device that generated the alarm.

Date/Time—The time at which the alarm was generated.

Viewing Air Quality Event Details

To view air quality event details, follow these steps:


Step 1 From the Air Quality Events page, click an item under Failure Source to access the alarm details page. See the "Monitoring CleanAir Air Quality Events" section on page 5-149.

Step 2 The air quality event page displays the following information:

Failure Source—Device that generated the alarm.

Category—The category this event comes under. In this case, Performance.

Created—The time stamp at which the event was generated.

Generated by—The device that generated the event.

Device IP Address—The IP address of the device that generated the event.

Severity—The severity of the event.

Alarm Details—A link to the related alarms associated with this event. Click the link to learn more about the alarm details.

Message—Describes the air quality index on this access point.

Monitoring Interferer Security Risk Events

You can use Prime Infrastructure to view the security events generated on your wireless network.

To view interferer security events, follow these steps:


Step 1 Click Advanced Search in Prime Infrastructure.

The New Search page appears.

Step 2 In the New Search page, choose Events from the Search Category drop-down list.

Step 3 From the Severity drop-down list, choose the type of severity you want to search the air quality events.

Step 4 From the Event Category drop-down list, choose Security.

Step 5 Click Go.

The interferer security events page displays the following information:

Severity—Indicates the severity of the alarm. See Table 5-61 for a list of severity indicator icons.

Failure Source—Device that generated the alarm.

Date/Time—The time at which the alarm was generated.


Viewing Interferer Security Risk Event Details

To view interferer security event details, follow these steps:


Step 1 In the Interferer Security Event details page, click an item under Failure Source to access the alarm details page. See the "Monitoring Interferer Security Risk Events" section on page 5-150.

Step 2 The air quality event page displays the following information:

Failure Source—Device that generated the alarm.

Category—The category this event comes under. In this case, Security.

Created—The time stamp at which the event was generated.

Generated by—The device that generated the event.

Device IP Address—The IP address of the device that generated the event.

Severity—The severity of the event.

Alarm Details—A link to the related alarms associated with this event. Click the link to know more about the alarm details.

Message—Describes the interferer device affecting the access point.


Monitoring Health Monitor Events

You can use Prime Infrastructure to view the events generated by the Health Monitor.

To view the health monitor events, follow these steps:


Step 1 Click Advanced Search in Prime Infrastructure.

The New Search page appears.

Step 2 In the New Search page, choose Events from the Search Category drop-down list.

Step 3 From the Severity drop-down list, choose the type of severity you want to search the health monitor events.

Step 4 From the Event Category drop-down list, choose Prime Infrastructure.

Step 5 Click Go.

The Health Monitor Events page displays the following information:

Severity—Indicates the severity of the alarm. See Table 5-61 for a list of severity indicator icons.

Failure Source—Device that generated the alarm.

Date/Time—The time at which the alarm was generated.

Message—Describes the health details.


Viewing Health Monitor Event Details

To view health monitor event details, follow these steps:


Step 1 In the Health Monitor Events page, click an item under Failure Source to access the alarm details page. See the "Monitoring Health Monitor Events" section on page 5-151.

Step 2 The Health Monitor Events page displays the following information:

Failure Source—Device that generated the alarm.

Category—The category this event comes under. In this case, Prime Infrastructure.

Created—The time stamp at which the event was generated.

Generated by—The device that generated the event.

Device IP Address—The IP address of the device that generated the event.

Severity—The severity of the event.

Alarm Details—A link to the related alarms associated with this event. Click the link to know more about the alarm details.

Message—Describes the event through a message.


Working with Events

You can use Prime Infrastructure to view mobility services engine and access point events. You can search and display events based on their severity (critical, major, minor, warning, clear, info) and event category or you can search for a mobility services engine and access point by its IP address, MAC address or name.

A successful event search displays the event severity, failure object, date and time of the event, and any messages for each event.

To display events, follow these steps:


Step 1 In Prime Infrastructure, click Monitor > Events.

Step 2 In the Events page:

If you want to display the events for a specific element and you know its IP address, MAC address, or Name, enter that value in the Quick Search text box (left pane). Click Go.

To display events by severity and category, choose the appropriate options from the Severity and Event Category drop-down lists (left pane). Click Search.

Step 3 If Prime Infrastructure finds events that match the search criteria, it displays a list of these events.


Note For more information about an event, click the failure object associated with the event. Additionally, you can sort the events summary by each of the column headings.



Monitoring Site Maps

Maps provide a summary view of all your managed systems on campuses, buildings, outdoor areas, and floors. With Prime Infrastructure database, you can add maps and view your managed system on realistic campus, building, and floor maps. See the "Monitoring Maps" section on page 6-155 for more information.

Monitoring Google Earth Maps

You can enable location presence by mobility server to provide expanded Civic (city, state, postal code, country) and GEO (longitude, latitude) location information beyond the Cisco default setting (campus, building, floor, and X, Y coordinates). This information can then be requested by clients on a demand basis for use by location-based services and applications. Location Presence can be configured when a new campus, building, floor, or outdoor area is being added or configured at a later date. See the "Monitoring Google Earth Maps" section on page 6-220 for more information.