Cisco MWR 1941-DC Hardware Installation Guide
Preparing to Install the Cisco MWR 1941-DC Router
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Preparing to Install the Router

Table Of Contents

Preparing to Install the Router

Safety Recommendations

Safety with Electricity

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

General Site Requirements

Required Tools and Equipment for Installation and Maintenance

Inspecting the Router

Creating a Site Log

Installation Checklist

Console and Auxiliary Port Considerations

Console Port Connections

Auxiliary Port Connections

Preparing to Connect to a Network

Ethernet Connections

Serial Connections

Configuring Serial Connections

Serial DTE or DCE Devices

Signaling Standards Supported

Distance Limitations

Asynchronous/Synchronous Serial Module Baud Rates


Preparing to Install the Router


This chapter describes site requirements and equipment needed to install your Cisco MWR 1941-DC router. It includes the following sections:

Safety Recommendations

General Site Requirements

Installation Checklist

Console and Auxiliary Port Considerations

Inspecting the Router

Required Tools and Equipment for Installation and Maintenance

Console and Auxiliary Port Considerations

Preparing to Connect to a Network

Safety Recommendations

Follow these guidelines to ensure general safety:

Keep the chassis area clear and dust-free during and after installation.

Keep tools away from walk areas where you or others could fall over them.

Do not wear loose clothing that may get caught in the chassis. Fasten your tie or scarf and roll up your sleeves.

Wear safety glasses when working under conditions that may be hazardous to your eyes.

Do not perform any action that creates a potential hazard to people or makes the equipment unsafe.


Warning Only trained and qualified personnel should be allowed to install or replace this equipment.


Safety with Electricity


Warning Before performing any of the following procedures, ensure that power is removed from the DC circuit.



Warning This unit is intended for installation in restricted access areas. A restricted access area can be accessed only through the use of a special tool, lock and key, or other means of security.



Warning To avoid electric shock, do not connect safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits to telephone-network voltage (TNV) circuits. LAN ports contain SELV circuits, and WAN ports contain TNV circuits. Some LAN and WAN ports both use RJ-45 connectors. Use caution when connecting cables.



Warning Before working on equipment that is connected to power lines, remove jewelry (including rings, necklaces, and watches). Metal objects will heat up when connected to power and ground and can cause serious burns or weld the metal object to the terminals.



Warning Before working on a chassis or working near power supplies, unplug the power cord on AC units; disconnect the power at the circuit breaker on DC units.


Follow these guidelines when working on equipment powered by electricity:

Locate the room's emergency power-OFF switch. Then, if an electrical accident occurs, you can quickly shut the power OFF.

Before working on the system, turn the DC main circuit breaker off and disconnect the power cord/terminal block cable.

Disconnect all power before doing the following:

Working on or near power supplies

Installing or removing a router chassis or network processor module

Performing most hardware upgrades

Do not work alone if potentially hazardous conditions exist.

Look carefully for possible hazards in your work area, such as moist floors, ungrounded power extension cables, and missing safety grounds.

Never assume that power is disconnected from a circuit. Always check.

If an electrical accident occurs, proceed as follows:

Use caution, and do not become a victim yourself.

Turn OFF power to the system.

If possible, send another person to get medical aid. Otherwise, determine the condition of the victim and then call for help.

Determine if the person needs rescue breathing or external cardiac compressions; then take appropriate action.

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

Electrostatic discharge (ESD) can damage equipment and impair electrical circuitry. It can occur if electronic printed circuit cards are improperly handled and can cause complete or intermittent failures. Always follow ESD prevention procedures when removing and replacing modules:

Ensure that the router chassis is electrically connected to earth ground.

Wear an ESD-preventive wrist strap, ensuring that it makes good skin contact. Connect the clip to an unpainted surface of the chassis frame to channel unwanted ESD voltages safely to ground. To guard against ESD damage and shocks, the wrist strap and cord must operate effectively.

If no wrist strap is available, ground yourself by touching a metal part of the chassis.


Caution For the safety of your equipment, periodically check the resistance value of the antistatic strap. It should be between 1 and 10 megohms (Mohm).

General Site Requirements

You can mount the Cisco MWR 1941-DC router in a 19-inch rack (with a 17.5- or 17.75-inch opening).

The following information will help you plan your equipment rack configuration:

Allow clearance around the rack for maintenance.

Enclosed racks must have adequate ventilation. Ensure that the rack is not congested, because each router generates heat. An enclosed rack should have louvered sides and a fan to provide cooling air. Heat generated by equipment near the bottom of the rack can be drawn upward into the intake ports of the equipment above.

When mounting a chassis in an open rack, ensure that the rack frame does not block the intake or exhaust ports. If the chassis is installed on slides, check the position of the chassis when it is seated into the rack.

Baffles can help to isolate exhaust air from intake air, which also helps to draw cooling air through the chassis. The best placement of the baffles depends on the airflow patterns in the rack, which can be found by experimenting with different configurations.

When equipment installed in a rack (particularly in an enclosed rack) fails, try operating the equipment by itself, if possible. Power OFF other equipment in the rack (and in adjacent racks) to allow the router under test a maximum of cooling air and clean power.

Required Tools and Equipment for Installation and Maintenance

You need the following tools and equipment to install and upgrade the router and its components:

ESD-preventive cord and wrist strap

Number 2 Phillips screwdriver

Flat-blade screwdrivers: small, 3/16-inch (0.476 cm) and medium, 1/4-inch (0.625 cm)

Screws to fit your rack

Cables for connection to the WAN and LAN ports (dependent on configuration)

Ethernet hub or PC with a network interface card for connection to the Ethernet (LAN) port(s).

Console terminal (an ASCII terminal or a PC running terminal emulation software) configured for 9600 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, and 2 stop bits.

Modem for connection to the auxiliary port for remote administrative access (optional).

Console cable for connection to the console port. You can supply this cable yourself or order one from Cisco (PN ACS-1900ASYN=).

Ratcheting torque screwdriver with a Phillips head that exerts up to 15 pound-force inches (lbf-in) of pressure.

Crimping tool as specified by the ground lug manufacturer.

10-AWG copper ground wire (insulated or noninsulated).

#6, ring-style ground lug.

18-AWG copper wire for the power cord.

Wire-stripping tool(s) for stripping both 10- and 18-AWG wire.

In addition, depending on the type of modules you plan to use, you might need the following equipment to connect a port to an external network:

Cables for connection to the WAN and LAN ports (dependent on configuration).


Note For more information on cable specifications, refer to the Appendix B, "Cable Specifications."


Ethernet hub or PC with a network interface card for connection to Ethernet (LAN) ports.

Console terminal (an ASCII terminal or a PC running terminal emulation software) configured for 9600 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, and 2 stop bits.

Modem for connection to the auxiliary port for remote administrative access (optional).

Serial interfaces may require a data service unit (DSU) or channel service unit/data service unit (CSU/DSU).

Inspecting the Router

Do not unpack the router until you are ready to install it. If the final installation site will not be ready for some time, keep the chassis in its shipping container to prevent accidental damage. When you are ready to install the router, proceed with unpacking it.

The router, cables, publications, and any optional equipment you ordered may be shipped in more than one container. When you unpack the containers, check the packing list to ensure that you received all the following items:

Router

Black 3-pin terminal block connector (Phoenix part number 1756272) located in the accessory kit that shipped with your router

Rack-mount brackets

This publication, the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information document, optional companion publications, or Documentation CD-ROM, as specified in your order

Cisco Information Packet publication

Inspect all items for shipping damage. If anything appears to be damaged, or if you encounter problems installing or configuring your router, contact customer service. Warranty, service, and support information is in the Cisco Information Packet that shipped with your router.

Creating a Site Log

The Site Log provides a record of all actions related to the router. Keep it in an accessible place near the chassis where anyone who performs tasks has access to it. Use the Installation Checklist (a sample is included in the following section) to verify steps in the installation and maintenance of the router. Site Log entries might include the following:

Installation progress—Make a copy of the Installation Checklist and insert it into the Site Log. Make entries as each procedure is completed.

Upgrade and maintenance procedures—Use the Site Log as a record of ongoing router maintenance and expansion history. A Site Log might include the following events:

Installation of network modules

Removal or replacement of network modules and other upgrades

Configuration changes

Maintenance schedules and requirements

Maintenance procedures performed

Intermittent problems

Comments and notes

Installation Checklist

The sample Installation Checklist lists items and procedures for installing a new router. Make a copy of this checklist and mark the entries when completed. Include a copy of the checklist for each router in your Site Log (described in the next section, "Console and Auxiliary Port Considerations").

Installation Checklist for site
Router name

Task
Verified by
Date

Installation Checklist copied

   

Background information placed in Site Log

   

Site power voltages verified

   

Installation site power check completed

   

Required tools available

   

Additional equipment available

   

Router received

   

This publication and the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information document received

   

Optional printed documentation or CD-ROM documentation received

   

Cisco Information Packet publication received

   

Chassis components verified

   

Initial electrical connections established

   

ASCII terminal (for local configuration) or modem (for remote configuration)

   

Signal distance limits verified

   

Startup sequence steps completed

   

Initial operation verified

   

Software image verified

   

Console and Auxiliary Port Considerations

The router includes an asynchronous serial console port and an auxiliary port. The console and auxiliary ports provide access to the router either locally using a console terminal, or remotely using a modem connected to the auxiliary port. This section discusses important cabling information to consider before connecting a console terminal, which can be either an ASCII terminal or a PC running terminal emulation software, to the console port or modem to the auxiliary port.

The main difference between the console and auxiliary ports is that the auxiliary port supports hardware flow control and the console port does not. Flow control paces the transmission of data between a sending device and a receiving device. Flow control ensures that the receiving device can absorb the data sent to it before the sending device sends more. When the buffers on the receiving device are full, a message is sent to the sending device to suspend transmission until the data in the buffers has been processed. Because the auxiliary port supports flow control, it is ideally suited for use with the high-speed transmissions of a modem. Console terminals transmit at slower speeds than modems; therefore, the console port is ideally suited for use with console terminals.


Note Console and rollover cables are not included with the MWR 1941-DC router. You can order the console cable from Cisco Systems (PN ACS-1900ASYN=). You must supply your own rollover cable.


Console Port Connections

The router includes an EIA/TIA-232 asynchronous serial console port (RJ-45). Depending on the cable and the adapter used, this port will appear as a data terminal equipment (DTE) or data communications equipment (DCE) device at the end of the cable.

To connect an ASCII terminal to the console port, use the RJ-45 rollover cable with the female RJ-45-to-DB-25 adapter (labeled TERMINAL). To connect a PC running terminal emulation software to the console port, use the RJ-45 rollover cable with the female RJ-45-to-DB-9 adapter (labeled TERMINAL). The default parameters for the console port are 9600 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, and 2 stop bits. The console port does not support hardware flow control. For detailed information about installing a console terminal, see the "Connecting the Console Terminal and Modem" section.

For cable and port pinouts, see the online document Cisco Modular Access Router Cable Specifications. This document is located on the Documentation CD-ROM that accompanied your router, and on Cisco.com.

Auxiliary Port Connections

The router includes an EIA/TIA-232 asynchronous serial auxiliary port (RJ-45) that supports flow control. Depending on the cable and the adapter used, this port will appear as a DTE or DCE device at the end of the cable.

To connect a modem to the auxiliary port, use the RJ-45 rollover cable with the male RJ-45-to-DB-25 adapter (labeled MODEM). For detailed information about connecting devices to the auxiliary port, see the "Connecting the Console Terminal and Modem" section.

For cable and port pinouts, see the online document Cisco Modular Access Router Cable Specifications. This document is located on the Documentation CD-ROM that accompanied your router, and Cisco.com.

Preparing to Connect to a Network

When setting up your router, consider distance limitations and potential electromagnetic interference (EMI) as defined by the applicable local and international regulations.

Network connection considerations are provided for several types of network interfaces and are described in the following sections:

Ethernet Connections

Serial Connections

Refer to the following online documents for more information about network connections and interfaces:

Cisco Network Modules Hardware Installation Guide

Cisco Interface Cards Installation Guide

Appendix B, "Cable Specifications."


Warning To avoid electric shock, do not connect safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits to telephone-network voltage (TNV) circuits. LAN ports contain SELV circuits, and WAN ports contain TNV circuits. Some LAN and WAN ports both use RJ-45 connectors. To see translations of the warnings that appear in this publication, refer to the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information document that accompanied this device.


Ethernet Connections

The IEEE has established Ethernet as standard IEEE 802.3. The most common Ethernet implementations are as follows:

100BASE-T—2-pair Category 5 or unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) straight-through RJ-45 cable.

10BASE-2—Ethernet on thin coaxial cable, also known as thin Ethernet. The maximum segment distance is 607 feet (186 meters).

10BASE-5—Ethernet on thick coaxial cable, also known as thick Ethernet. The maximum segment distance is 1,640 feet (500 meters).

10BASE-T—Ethernet on unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) cable. The maximum segment distance is 328 feet (100 meters). UTP cables look like the wiring used for ordinary telephones; however, UTP cables meet certain electrical standards that telephone cables do not meet.

Refer to theAppendix B, "Cable Specifications" for information about Ethernet cables, connectors, and pinouts.

Serial Connections

Serial connections are provided by WAN interface cards and network modules. For more information on WAN interface cards, refer to the Cisco Interface Cards Installation Guide. For more information on network modules, refer to the Cisco Network Modules Hardware Installation Guide. These documents are accessible online and on the Cisco Documentation CD-ROM.

Before you connect a device to a serial port, you need to know the following:

Type of device, data terminal equipment (DTE) or data communications equipment (DCE), you are connecting to the synchronous serial interface

Type of connector, male or female, required to connect to the device

Signaling standard required by the device

Configuring Serial Connections

The serial ports on the asynchronous/synchronous serial network modules and the serial WAN interface card use DB-60 connectors. Serial ports can be configured as DTE or DCE, depending on the serial cable used.

Serial DTE or DCE Devices

A device that communicates over a synchronous serial interface is either a DTE or DCE device. A DCE device provides a clock signal that paces the communications between the device and the router. A DTE device does not provide a clock signal. DTE devices usually connect to DCE devices. The documentation that accompanied the device should indicate whether it is a DTE or DCE device. (Some devices have a jumper to select either DTE or DCE mode.) Table 2-1 lists typical DTW and DCE devices.

Table 2-1 Typical DTE and DCE Devices

Device Type
Gender
Typical Devices

DTE

Male1

Terminal

PC

DCE

Female2

Modem

CSU/DSU

Multiplexer

1 If pins protrude from the base of the connector, the connector is male.

2 If the connector has holes to accept pins, the connector is female.


Signaling Standards Supported

The synchronous serial ports available for the router support the following signaling standards: EIA/TIA-232, EIA/TIA-449, V.35, X.21, and EIA-530. You can order a Cisco DB-60 shielded serial transition cable that has the appropriate connector for the standard you specify. The documentation for the device you want to connect should indicate the standard used for that device. The router end of the shielded serial transition cable has a DB-60 connector, which connects to the DB-60 port on a serial WAN interface card. The other end of the serial transition cable is available with a connector appropriate for the standard you specify.

The synchronous serial port can be configured as DTE or DCE, depending on the attached cable (except EIA-530, which is DTE only). To order a shielded cable, contact customer service. See the "Obtaining Technical Assistance" section on page xiii.


Note All serial ports configured as DTE require external clocking from a CSU/DSU or other DCE device.


Although manufacturing your own serial cables is not recommended (because of the small size of the pins on the DB-60 serial connector), cable pinouts are provided in Appendix B, "Cable Specifications."

Distance Limitations

Serial signals can travel a limited distance at any given bit rate; generally, the slower the data rate, the greater the distance. All serial signals are subject to distance limits, beyond which a signal significantly degrades or is completely lost.


Note Only the serial WAN interface card supports bit rates above 128 Kbps.


Table 2-2 lists the recommended maximum speeds and distances for each serial interface type; however, you might get good results at speeds and distances greater than those listed, if you understand the electrical problems that might arise and can compensate for them. For instance, the recommended maximum rate for V.35 is 2 Mbps, but 4 Mbps is commonly used.

Table 2-2 Serial Signal Transmission Speeds and Distances 

 
EIA/TIA-232 Distance
EIA/TIA-449, X.21, V.35, EIA-530 Distance
Rate (bps)
Feet
Meters
Feet
Meters

2400

200

60

4100

1250

4800

100

30

2050

625

9600

50

15

1025

312

19200

25

7.6

513

156

38400

12

3.7

256

78

56000

8.6

2.6

102

31

1544000 (T1)

50

15


Balanced drivers allow EIA/TIA-449 signals to travel greater distances than EIA/TIA-232 signals. The recommended distance limits for EIA/TIA-449 shown in Table 2-2 are also valid for V.35, X.21, and EIA-530. Typically, EIA/TIA-449 and EIA-530 can support 2-Mbps rates, and V.35 can support 4-Mbps rates.

Asynchronous/Synchronous Serial Module Baud Rates

The following baud-rate limitations apply to the slow-speed serial interfaces found in the asynchronous/synchronous serial modules:

Asynchronous interface—Maximum baud rate is 115.2 kbps.

Synchronous interface—Maximum baud rate is 128-kbps full duplex.