Cisco MWR 1941-DC Hardware Installation Guide
Installing the Router
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Installing the Router

Table Of Contents

Installing the Router

Installing Network Modules and Interface Cards

Rack Mounting the Chassis

Attaching the Brackets

Installing the Router in the Rack

Connecting the Console Terminal and Modem

Identifying a Rollover Cable

Console Port

Auxiliary Port

Connecting the Network Cables

Connecting the Fixed FE Interface Cables

Connecting the VWIC Interface Cables

Y-Cable Specifications

Connecting the WIC-2A/S Interface Cables

Connecting the Network Module Interface Cables

Connecting the MWR 1941-DC Router to a DC-Input Power Supply

Required Tools and Equipment

Grounding the Router

Wiring the DC-Input Power Source

Powering On the Router

Replacing or Upgrading the CF

Removing a CF Memory Card from an External Slot

Installing a CF Memory Card in an External Slot

Formatting Procedures for CF Memory Cards

Formatting CF Memory as a DOS File System

File and Directory Procedures

Copy Files

Display the Contents of a CF Card

Display Geometry and Format Information

Delete Files from Flash

Rename a File in Flash

Display File Content

Create a New Directory

Remove a Directory

Enter a Directory and Determine the Current Directory

What to Do After Installing the Hardware


Installing the Router


This chapter describes how to install your Cisco MWR 1941-DC router and connect it to networks and external devices. It contains the following sections:

Installing Network Modules and Interface Cards

Rack Mounting the Chassis

Connecting the Console Terminal and Modem

Connecting the Network Cables

Connecting the MWR 1941-DC Router to a DC-Input Power Supply

Replacing or Upgrading the CF

What to Do After Installing the Hardware


Warning Only trained and qualified personnel should be allowed to install, replace, or service this equipment.


Installing Network Modules and Interface Cards

Cisco routers are normally shipped with network modules, voice and WAN interface cards (VWICs), and WAN interface cards (WICs) already installed. If you need to remove or install any of these items, refer to the applicable documents online.

For network modules:

Quick Start Guide: Network Modules for Cisco 2600 Series, Cisco 3600 Series, Cisco 3700 Series, and Cisco MWR 1941-DC Routers

Cisco Network Modules Hardware Installation Guide

For VWICs:

VWIC-2MFT-T1-DIR, VWIC-2MFT-E1-DIR Installation Instructions

For WICs:

Quick Start Guide: Interface Cards for Cisco 1600, 1700, 2600, 3600, 3700 Series, and Cisco MWR 1941-DC Routers

Cisco Interface Cards Hardware Installation Guide

If there are modules, interface cards, or power supplies to be removed or installed, Cisco suggests that you perform the installation or removal before you install the chassis. If a chassis cover needs to be removed, the chassis may have to be removed from the rack to permit cover removal.

Rack Mounting the Chassis

You can mount the Cisco MWR 1941-DC router in a 19-inch rack that conforms to EIA-310-D specification (the inside width of the rack should be 17.72 to 17.80 inches per the EIA-310-D specification). The MWR 1941-DC router requires this minimum width and occupies 1U (1.75 inches) of vertical space.


Warning To prevent bodily injury when mounting or servicing this unit in a rack, you must take special precautions to ensure that the system remains stable. The following guidelines are provided to ensure your safety:


This unit should be mounted at the bottom of the rack if it is the only unit in the rack.

When mounting this unit in a partially filled rack, load the rack from the bottom to the top with the heaviest component at the bottom of the rack.

If the rack is provided with stabilizing devices, install the stabilizers before mounting or servicing the unit in the rack


Attaching the Brackets

Attach the mounting brackets to the chassis as shown, using the screws provided in the bracket kit. Attach the second bracket to the opposite side of the chassis. Use a number 2 Phillips screwdriver to install the bracket screws.

Three screws are required on each side. Figure 3-1 shows how the bracket is attached.

Figure 3-1 Attaching the Bracket

Installing the Router in the Rack

Install the chassis in the rack. Rack-mounting screws are not provided with the router. Use three screws for each side (supplied with the rack).

Connecting the Console Terminal and Modem

This section describes how to connect a console terminal and a modem to the router. You can connect only a terminal to the console port. Use the auxiliary port with a terminal or a modem for remote access to the router.

These ports provide administrative access to your router either locally (with a console terminal) or remotely (with a modem).

Identifying a Rollover Cable

Use a rollover cable to connect to the asynchronous serial console and auxiliary ports. You can identify a rollover cable by comparing the two modular ends of the cable. Holding the cables side-by-side, with the tab at the back, the wire connected to the pin on the outside of the left plug should be the same color as the wire connected to the pin on the outside of the right plug. (See Figure 3-2.) If your cable came from Cisco, pin 1 will be white on one connector, and pin 8 will be white on the other (a rollover cable reverses pins 1 and 8, 2 and 7, 3 and 6, and 4 and 5).

Figure 3-2 Identifying a Rollover Cable

Console Port

Take the following steps to connect a terminal or a PC running terminal emulation software to the console port on the router:


Step 1 Connect the terminal using an RJ-45 rollover cable and an RJ-45-to-DB-25 or RJ-45-to-DB-9 adapter (labeled TERMINAL).


Note The RJ-45-to-DB-25 adapter (Cisco part number 29-0810-01) can be purchased from Cisco.


Step 2 Configure your terminal or terminal emulation software for 9600 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, and 2 stop bits.


Note Because hardware flow control is not possible on the console port, Cisco does not recommend that modems be connected to the console port. Modems should always be connected to the auxiliary port.



Auxiliary Port

Take the following steps to connect a modem to the auxiliary port on the router:


Step 1 Connect a modem to the auxiliary port using an RJ-45 rollover cable with an RJ-45-to-DB-25 adapter. The provided adapter is labeled MODEM. For cable pinouts, see the online publication Cisco Modular Access Router Cable Specifications available both on the Documentation CD-ROM and CCO.

Step 2 Make sure that your modem and the router auxiliary port are configured for the same transmission speed (up to 115200 bps is supported) and hardware flow control with Data Carrier Detect (DCD) and Data Terminal Ready (DTR) operations.


Connecting the Network Cables

This section describes connecting the following support MWR 1941-DC router interfaces:

Connecting the Fixed FE Interface Cables

Connecting the VWIC Interface Cables

Connecting the WIC-2A/S Interface Cables

Connecting the Network Module Interface Cables

Connecting the Fixed FE Interface Cables

The RJ-45 port supports standard straight-through and crossover Category 5 unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) cables (refer to Figure 3-15). Cisco Systems does not supply Category 5 UTP cables; these cables are available commercially.


Step 1 Confirm that the router is turned off.

Step 2 Connect one end of the cable to the FE port on the router.

Step 3 Connect the other end to the BTS patch or demarcation panel at your site.


Figure 3-3 shows the RJ-45 port and connector.

Figure 3-3 RJ-45 Port and Plug

Table 3-1 lists the pinouts and signals for the RJ-45 port.

Table 3-1 RJ-45 Pinout

Pin
Description

1

Receive Data + (RxD+)

2

RxD-

3

Transmit Data + (TxD+)

6

TxD-


Connecting the VWIC Interface Cables

How you connect the ports of the T1/E1 Multiflex VWIC depends on whether you are using the MWR 1941-DC router in a redundant (IP-RAN implementations only) or a non-redundant configuration.

For redundant configurations, use a Y-cable (as described in Y-Cable Specifications).


Note HSRP and the Y-cable mode must be configured for redundancy to allow one router to become active (CD LED on, AL LED off) and the other to become the standby CD LED off, AL LED on due to no framing). For more information, see the MWR 1941-DC Software Configuration Guide.



Step 1 Confirm that both routers are turned off.

Step 2 Connect the end of one of the Y-cable stubs to the T1 or E1 port on the card on the first router.

Step 3 Connect the end of the other Y-cable stub to the T1 or E1 port (using the same type of port as in Step 2) on the card in the second router.

Step 4 Connect the other end of the Y-cable to the BTS patch or demarcation panel at your site.

Step 5 Turn on power to the routers.

Step 6 Check that the CD LEDs goes on, which means that the cards' internal CSU/DSU is communicating with the CSU/DSU at the T1 or E1 service provider central office.


For non-redundant configurations, use a straight-through, shielded RJ-48C-to-RJ-48C cable.


Note If you choose to use the T1/E1 Multiflex VWIC in a non-redundant configuration, you must close the relays on the card using the standalone subcommand. For more information, see the Cisco MWR 1941-DC Software Configuration Guide.



Step 1 Confirm that the router is turned off.

Step 2 Connect one end of the cable to the T1 or E1 port on the card.

Step 3 Connect the other end to the BTS patch or demarcation panel at your site.

Step 4 Turn on power to the router.

Step 5 Check that the CD LED goes on, which means that the card's internal CSU/DSU is communicating with the CSU/DSU at the T1 or E1 service provider central office.


The T1/E1 Multiflex VWIC uses an RJ-48C connection, as shown in Figure 3-4.

Figure 3-4 RJ-48C Connection

Table 3-2 shows the pinout configuration of the RJ-48C connectors on the T1/E1 Multiflex VWIC.

Table 3-2 RJ-48C Pinout

Pin
Description

1

receive tip

2

receive ring

3

receive shield

4

transmit tip

5

transmit ring

6

transmit shield

7

not used

8

not used


Y-Cable Specifications

Although it can be used in a standalone MWR 1941-DC router, the T1/E1 Multiflex VWIC is designed to be used in redundant configurations in an IP-RAN implementation. Such configurations require a special Y-cable for connecting the active and standby routers. The Y-cable provides a dual E1 or T1 PRI connection.

This section describes the specifications of the Y-cable used in redundant configurations in an IP-RAN implementation.

T1/E1 Multiflex VWIC Y-cables should be made with 4 twisted-pair, shielded, 28-gauge cables.

The cable length of each stub (from the RJ-48C connector to the junction point) should not exceed 3 inches (76 mm).

The cable length from junction point to the patch panel is determined by the customer.

All signals that propagate in the same direction must share the same twisted pair. For example, RX TIP and RX RING must form a single twisted pair.

All unused twisted pairs should be cut flush on both ends of the cable. Any unused wire in a twisted pair where one wire is in use should be cut flush at both ends.

Connecting the WIC-2A/S Interface Cables

This section describes how to connect the 2-port asynchronous/synchronous (A/S) serial modules (WIC-2A/S) when using with the MWR 1941-DC router in a Cell Site DCN implementation.

The 2-port A/S serial module has "smart" serial ports. The serial cable attached to one of the module's ports can determine the electrical interface type and mode (DTE or DCE).

Six types of serial cables (also called serial adapter cables or serial transition cables) are available from Cisco Systems for use with the 2-port A/S serial module:

EIA/TIA-232 serial cable assembly

EIA/TIA-449 serial cable assembly

V.35 serial cable assembly

X.21 serial cable assembly

EIA/TIA-530 serial cable assembly

EIA/TIA-530A serial cable assembly

All serial cables have a universal plug at the interface module end. The network end of each cable provides the physical connectors that are most commonly used for the interface. For example, the network end of the EIA/TIA-232 serial cable is a DB-25 connector, which is the most widely used EIA/TIA-232 connector.

All serial interface types, except EIA-530, are available in DTE or DCE mode: DTE with a plug connector at the network end and DCE with a receptacle at the network end. The V.35 assembly is available in either mode with either gender at the network end. The EIA/TIA-530 assembly is available in DTE only.

After you install the 2-port A/S serial module, use the appropriate serial cable to connect the serial port on the module to one of the following types of equipment (see Figure 3-5):

Synchronous modem

DSU/CSU

Other DCE, if connecting to a digital WAN line

To connect the 2-port A/S serial module, perform these steps:


Step 1 Power off the MWR 1941-DC router.

Step 2 Connect one end of the appropriate serial cable to a DB-60 port on the module, as shown in Figure 3-5.

Step 3 Connect the other end of the cable to the appropriate type of equipment, as shown in Figure 3-5.

Step 4 Power on the Cisco MWR 1941-DC router.

Step 5 Verify that the CONN LED turns green, indicating that the serial port on the module detects the WAN serial connection.


Figure 3-5 Connecting a 2-Port A/S Serial Module (WIC-2A/S)

Connecting the Network Module Interface Cables

With Cisco IOS Release 12.2(15)MC1a and later, the MWR 1941-DC router supports certain Cisco network modules for implementation in a Cell-Site DCN.

For a list of supported network modules, see the "Cisco Network Modules" section on page 1-7.

For information on connecting the interface cables for the Cisco network modules supported on the Cisco MWR 1941-DC router, see the Quick Start Guide, Network Modules for Cisco 2600 Series, Cisco 3600 Series, Cisco 3700 Series and Cisco MWR 1941-DC Routers and the Cisco Network Modules Hardware Installation Guide.

Connecting the MWR 1941-DC Router to a DC-Input Power Supply

This section contains instructions for:

Required Tools and Equipment

Grounding the Router

Wiring the DC-Input Power Source

Powering On the Router

Required Tools and Equipment

You need the following tools and equipment:

Black terminal block connector (Phoenix part number 1756272; located in the accessory kit that shipped with the router).

Ratcheting torque screwdriver with a Phillips head that exerts up to 15 pound-force inches (lbf-in) of pressure.

Crimping tool as specified by the ground lug manufacturer.

10-AWG copper ground wire (insulated or noninsulated).

18-AWG copper wire for the power cord.

Wire-stripping tool(s) for stripping both 10- and 18-AWG wire.

Grounding the Router

Follow these steps to ground the router to earth ground. Make sure to follow any grounding requirements at your site.


Warning This equipment must be grounded. Never defeat the ground conductor or operate the equipment in the absence of a suitably installed ground conductor. Contact the appropriate electrical inspection authority or an electrician if you are uncertain that suitable grounding is available.



Warning When installing the unit, the ground connection must always be made first and disconnected last.



Step 1 Remove the ground-lug screw from the rear panel of the router (shown in Figure 1-4 on page 1-4). Use a standard Phillips screwdriver or a ratcheting torque screwdriver with a Phillips head.

Step 2 Set the screw aside.

Step 3 If your ground wire is insulated, use a wire-stripping tool to strip the 10-AWG ground wire to 0.5 inch ± 0.02 inch (as shown below).

Step 4 Slide the open end of your ground lug over the exposed area of the 10-AWG wire.

Step 5 Using a crimping tool (as specified by the ground lug manufacturer), crimp the ground lug to the 10-AWG wire (as shown below).

Step 6 Use the screw to attach the ground lug and wire assembly to the rear panel of the switch.

Step 7 Using a ratcheting torque screwdriver, torque the ground-lug screw to 15 1bf-in (or 240 ounce-force inches [240 ozf-in]).


Wiring the DC-Input Power Source


Warning This product relies on the building's installation for short-circuit (overcurrent) protection. Ensure that the protective device is rated not greater than:
10A minimum, 60VDC



Caution A readily accessible listed circuit breaker (rated 60VDC, 10A) should be available as the primary disconnect device.


Note The installation must comply with the 1996 National Electric Code (NEC) and other applicable codes.


To connect the DC power supply to the Cisco MWR 1941-DC router, do the following:


Step 1 Turn OFF the DC power source at the circuit breaker and tape the circuit breaker in the OFF position.

Step 2 Plug the black terminal block connector (Phoenix part number 1756272; located in the accessory kit that shipped with the router) into the power connector located on the right-hand side of the back of the MWR 1941-DC router.

Step 3 Connect one end of the customer-supplied power cord (18-AWG copper wire) to the DC power source.

Step 4 Plug the connector on the power supply cord into the connector that you plugged into the back of the MWR 1941-DC router in Step 2.



Warning An exposed wire lead from a DC-input power source can conduct harmful levels of electricity. Be sure that no exposed portion of the DC-input power source wire extends from the terminal block plug.



Warning Secure all power cabling when installing this unit to avoid disturbing field-wiring connections.


Powering On the Router


Warning After wiring the DC power supply, remove the tape from the circuit breaker switch handle and reinstate power by moving the handle of the circuit breaker to the ON position.



Warning Do not touch the power supply when the power cord is connected. For systems with a power switch, line voltages are present within the power supply even when the power switch is off and the power cord is connected. For systems without a power switch, line voltages are present within the power supply when the power cord is connected.



Warning This equipment is intended to be grounded. Ensure that the host is connected to earth ground during normal use.


To power on the router, do the following:


Step 1 Turn on the power supply at the circuit breaker.

Step 2 The LED labeled PWR on the front panel should go on.


If you encounter problems when you power on the router, see Appendix A, "Troubleshooting."

Replacing or Upgrading the CF

This section describes how to remove, install, and format the external Compact Flash (CF).

The MWR 1941-DC router is shipped with a 32MB CF included (64MB CF separately orderable for Cell Site DCN implementations). The CF contains the appropriate IOS software image. However, you may need to replace or upgrade the CF at some point. If you do, follow the steps outlined below. This procedure can also be used to make copies of the CF.


Step 1 Copy the desired IOS image to a remote TFTP server.

Step 2 Power up the MWR 1941-DC router to the ROMMON prompt.

Step 3 Boot the router with the existing IOS image.

Step 4 Remove the CF cover.

Step 5 Remove the current CF from the CF Slot. See Removing a CF Memory Card from an External Slot for more information.

Step 6 Place a new CF into the CF Slot.

Step 7 Format the CF using the format slot0: command. See Formatting Procedures for CF Memory Cards for more information.

Step 8 Issue a copy tftp slot0: command to copy the customer-ordered IOS image from the remote TFTP server back to the CF.


Note Ensure that the IOS image is the first file on the CF. Otherwise, the router will not boot. To avoid naming conflicts, we recommend that you copy the file as mwr1941-i-mz.boot.


Step 9 Reboot the system to the ROMMON prompt.

Step 10 Boot the customer-ordered IOS image from the new CF.

Step 11 Upon successful booting of the image, replace the CF cover. If the boot process is unsuccessful, repeat Step 6 through Step 10.


Removing a CF Memory Card from an External Slot

Complete the following steps to remove a CF memory card from an external slot:


Caution Do not remove the CF memory card while it is performing a read or write operation, because the router will shut down and the file system will be damaged.


Step 1 Locate the CF memory card in its slot in the front panel of the chassis. See Figure 1-3 on page 1-4.

Step 2 Move the release button, located next to the slot, to its fully extended position, and press the button to unseat the card.

Step 3 Carefully pull the card out of the slot.

Step 4 Place the removed CF memory card on an antistatic surface or in a static shielding bag.


Installing a CF Memory Card in an External Slot

Complete the following steps to install a CF memory card:


Step 1 Locate the CF memory-card slot in the front panel of the chassis.See Figure 1-3 on page 1-4.

Step 2 With the label facing up, insert the connector end of the CF memory card into the slot until the card is seated in the connector and the release button is pushed out. The card is keyed so that it cannot be inserted wrong.

Step 3 Pull the release button out and move it to the left, to latch the card in the slot.

Step 4 Refer to the "Formatting Procedures for CF Memory Cards" section for instructions on formatting the CF memory card.


Formatting Procedures for CF Memory Cards

For the Cisco MWR 1941-DC router, Cisco recommends that you format/erase new CF memory cards to initialize them with a Class C Flash file system. This ensures proper formatting and enables the ROM monitor to recognize and boot the Flash.

The Class C Flash file system is similar to the standard DOS file system; however, a CF memory card formatted with the standard DOS file system does not support booting from the ROM monitor.

Formatting CF Memory as a DOS File System

To format a new external CF memory card, or to remove the files from a previously installed external CF memory card, enter the format slot0: command.

The following example shows output for formatting a CF memory card formatted with a Class C Flash file system:

Router# format slot0:

Format operation may take a while. Continue? [confirm]
Format operation will destroy all data in "slot0:".  Continue? [confirm]
Enter volume ID (up to 64 chars)[default slot0]:
Current Low End File System flash card in flash will be formatted into DOS
File System flash card!  Continue? [confirm]
Format:Drive communication & 1st Sector Write OK...
Writing Monlib sectors ...................................................................
Monlib write complete
..
Format:All system sectors written. OK...
 
Format:Total sectors in formatted partition:250592
Format:Total bytes in formatted partition:128303104
Format:Operation completed successfully.
 
Format of flash complete

File and Directory Procedures

The following sections describe file and directory procedures for external CF memory cards formatted with a Class C Flash file system.

Copy Files

To copy the files to another location, use the copy slot0: source-filename { slot0: | tfp: | lex: | null: | nvram: | pram: | rcp: | system: | tftp: | xmodem: | ymodem: | running-config | startup-config} destination-filename command.

The following example shows output for copying a Cisco IOS file from an external CF memory card to a TFTP server:

Router# copy slot0:mwr1900-i-mz.tmp tftp:

Destination filename [mwr1941-i-mz.tmp]?
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
6458584 bytes copied in 202.940 secs (31973 bytes/sec)

Display the Contents of a CF Card

To display the contents (directories and files) of a CF memory card formatted with a Class C Flash file system, use the dir slot0: command.

The following example shows output for displaying the contents of an external CF memory card with a Class C Flash file system:

Router# dir slot0:

Directory of slot0:/
 
   3  -rw-     6455048   Mar 01 2001 00:04:06  mwr1900-i-mz
1579  -rw-     6458584   Mar 01 2001 00:24:38  mwr1900-i-mz.new
 
15912960 bytes total (2998272 bytes free)

Display Geometry and Format Information

To display the geometry and format information of a CF memory card formatted with a Class C Flash file system, use the show slot0: command.

The following example shows output for displaying the geometry and format information of an external CF memory card formatted with a Class C Flash file system:

Router# show slot0:

******** ATA Flash Card Geometry/Format Info ********
 
ATA CARD GEOMETRY
  Number of Heads:      2
  Number of Cylinders    490
  Sectors per Cylinder   32
  Sector Size            512
Total Sectors          31360
  
ATA CARD FORMAT
  Number of FAT Sectors  12
  Sectors Per Cluster    8
  Number of Clusters     3885
  Number of Data Sectors 31264
  Base Root Sector       152
  Base FAT Sector        128
  Base Data Sector       184
 
Please use "dir" command to display the contents of the card.

Delete Files from Flash

To delete a file from a CF memory card, use the delete slot0: filename command.

The following example shows output for deleting a Cisco IOS file from an external CF card:

Router# delete slot0:mwr1900-i-mz.tmp

Delete filename [mwr1941-i-mz.tmp]?
Delete slot0:mwr1941-i-mz.tmp? [confirm]
Router# dir slot0:
Directory of slot0:/
 
No files in directory
 
128094208 bytes total (128094208 bytes free)

Rename a File in Flash

To rename a file in a CF memory card, use the rename slot0: original-filename slot0: new-filename command.

The following example shows output for renaming a Cisco IOS file in an external CF card:

Router# rename slot0:mwr1900-i-mz.tmp slot0:mwr1900-i-mz

Destination filename [mwr1900-i-mz]?
Router# dir slot0:

Directory of slot0:/
 
 1580  -rw-     6462268   Mar 06 1993 06:14:02  mwr1900-i-mz.1941ata
    3  -rw-     6458388   Mar 01 1993 00:01:24  mwr1900-i-mz
 
63930368 bytes total (51007488 bytes free)

Display File Content

To display the content of a file in a CF memory card, use the more slot0: filename command.

The following example shows output from the more command on an external CF card:

Router# more slot0:mwr1900-i-mz.tmp

00000000: 7F454C46 01020100 00000000 00000000    .ELF .... .... ....
00000010: 00020061 00000001 80008000 00000034    ...a .... .... ...4
00000020: 00000054 20000001 00340020 00010028    ...T  ... .4.  ...(
00000030: 00050008 00000001 0000011C 80008000    .... .... .... ....
00000040: 80008000 00628A44 00650EEC 00000007    .... .b.D .e.l ....
00000050: 0000011C 0000001B 00000001 00000006    .... .... .... ....
00000060: 80008000 0000011C 00004000 00000000    .... .... ..@. ....
00000070: 00000000 00000008 00000000 00000021    .... .... .... ...!
00000080: 00000001 00000002 8000C000 0000411C    .... .... ..@. ..A.
00000090: 00000700 00000000 00000000 00000004    .... .... .... ....
000000A0: 00000000 00000029 00000001 00000003    .... ...) .... ....
000000B0: 8000C700 0000481C 00000380 00000000    ..G. ..H. .... ....
000000C0: 00000000 00000004 00000000 0000002F    .... .... .... .../
000000D0: 00000001 10000003 8000CA80 00004B9C    .... .... ..J. ..K.
000000E0: 00000020 00000000 00000000 00000008    ...  .... .... ....
000000F0: 00000000 0000002F 00000001 10000003    .... .../ .... ....
00000100: 8000CAA0 00004BBC 00623FA4 00000000    ..J  ..K< .b?$ ....
00000110: 00000000 00000008 00000000 3C1C8001    .... .... .... <...
00000120: 679C4A80 3C018001 AC3DC70C 3C018001    g.J. <... ,=G. <...
00000130: AC3FC710 3C018001 AC24C714 3C018001    ,?G. <... ,$G. <...
00000140: AC25C718 3C018001 AC26C71C 3C018001    ,%G. <... ,&G. <...
00000150: AC27C720 3C018001 AC30C724 3C018001    ,'G  <... ,0G$ <...
00000160: AC31C728 3C018001 AC32C72C 3C018001    ,1G( <... ,2G, <...
--More-- q

Create a New Directory

To create a directory in CF memory, use the mkdir slot0: directory-name command.

The following example shows output for first displaying the contents of an external CF card, and then creating a directory named config and a subdirectory named test-config:

Router# dir slot0:

Directory of slot0:/
 
  3  -rw-     6458208   Mar 01 1993 00:04:08  mwr1941-i-mz.tmp
 
128094208 bytes total (121634816 bytes free)
Router# mkdir slot0:/config

Create directory filename [config]?
Created dir slot0:/config
Router# mkdir slot0:/config/test-config

Create directory filename [/config/test-config]?
Created dir slot0:/config/test-config
Router# dir slot0:

Directory of slot0:/
 
  3  -rw-     6458208   Mar 01 1993 00:04:08  mwr1941-i-mz.tmp
 1580  drw-           0   Mar 01 1993 23:48:36  config
 
128094208 bytes total (121626624 bytes free)
Router# cd slot0:/config

Router# dir slot0:

Directory of slot0:/config/
 
 1581  drw-           0   Mar 01 1993 23:50:08  test-config
 
128094208 bytes total (121626624 bytes free)

Remove a Directory

To remove a directory from CF memory, use the rmdir slot0:/directory-name command.

Before you can remove a directory, all files and subdirectories must be removed from the directory.

The following example shows output for displaying the contents of an external CF card, then removing the subdirectory named test-config:

Router# dir slot0:

Directory of slot0:/config/
 
  1581  drw-           0   Mar 01 1993 23:50:08  test-config
 
128094208 bytes total (121626624 bytes free)
Router# rmdir slot0:/config/test-config

Remove directory filename [/config/test-config]?
Delete slot0:/config/test-config? [confirm]
Removed dir slot0:/config/test-config
Router# dir slot0:

Directory of slot0:/config/
 
No files in directory
 
128094208 bytes total (121630720 bytes free)

Enter a Directory and Determine the Current Directory

To enter a directory in CF memory, use the cd slot0:/directory-name command. To determine which directory you are in, use the pwd command.

The following example shows output for the following actions:

Entering the home directory of a CF memory card in an external slot (slot0:/)

Verifying that you are in the slot0:/ directory

Router# cd slot0:

Router# pwd

slot0:/

What to Do After Installing the Hardware

When you have installed the router hardware, see the Cisco MWR 1941-DC Software Configuration Guide for initial software configuration information.