Cisco Adaptive Wireless Intrusion Prevention Service Configuration Guide, Release 5.2
Rogue Management
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Rogue Management

Table Of Contents

Rogue Management

Rogue Access Point Challenges

Rogue Access Point Location, Tagging, and Containment

Detecting and Locating Rogue Access Points

Monitoring Alarms

Monitoring Rogue Access Point Alarms

Monitoring Rogue Access Point Details

Detecting Access Points

Monitoring Rogue Adhoc Alarms

Monitoring Rogue Adhoc Details

Monitoring Events

Monitoring Rogue Clients

Configuring Controllers

Configuring Rogue Policies

Configuring Rogue AP Rules

Configuring Controller Templates

Configuring Rogue Policies

Configuring Rogue AP Rules

Configuring Rogue AP Rule Groups


Rogue Management


This section describes security issues and solutions for rogue access points.

"Rogue Access Point Challenges" section

"Rogue Access Point Location, Tagging, and Containment" section

"Monitoring Alarms" section

"Configuring Controllers" section

"Configuring Controller Templates" section

Rogue Access Point Challenges

Rogue access points can disrupt wireless LAN operations by hijacking legitimate clients and using plain text or other denial-of-service or man-in-the-middle attacks. That is, a hacker can use a rogue access point to capture sensitive information, such as passwords and usernames. The hacker can then transmit a series of clear-to-send (CTS) frames, which mimics an access point informing a particular wireless LAN client adapter to transmit and instructing all others to wait. This scenario results in legitimate clients being unable to access the wireless LAN resources. Thus, wireless LAN service providers have a strong interest in banning rogue access points from the air space.

The operating system security solution uses the radio resource management (RRM) function to continuously monitor all nearby access points, automatically discover rogue access points, and locate them as described in the "Rogue Access Point Location, Tagging, and Containment" section.


Rogue Access Point Location, Tagging, and Containment

When the Cisco Unified Wireless Network Solution is monitored using WCS, WCS generates the flags as rogue access point traps and displays the known rogue access points by MAC address. The operator can then display a map showing the location of the access points closest to each rogue access point. The next step is to mark them as Known or Acknowledged rogue access points (no further action), Alert rogue access points (watch for and notify when active), or Contained rogue access points (have between one and four access points discourage rogue access point clients by sending the clients deauthenticate and disassociate messages whenever they associate with the rogue access point).

This built-in detection, tagging, monitoring, and containment capability enables system administrators to take appropriate action:

Locate rogue access points

Receive new rogue access point notifications, eliminating hallway scans

Monitor unknown rogue access points until they are eliminated or acknowledged

Determine the closest authorized access point, making directed scans faster and more effective

Contain rogue access points by sending their clients deauthenticate and disassociate messages from one to four access points. This containment can be done for individual rogue access points by MAC address or can be mandated for all rogue access points connected to the enterprise subnet.

Tag rogue access points:

Acknowledge rogue access points when they are outside of the LAN and do not compromise the LAN or wireless LAN security

Accept rogue access points when they do not compromise the LAN or wireless LAN security

Tag rogue access points as unknown until they are eliminated or acknowledged

Tag rogue access points as contained and discourage clients from associating with the rogue access points by having between one and four access points transmit deauthenticate and disassociate messages to all rogue access point clients. This function applies to all active channels on the same rogue access point.

Detecting and Locating Rogue Access Points

When the access points on your wireless LAN are powered up and associated with controllers, WCS immediately starts listening for rogue access points. When a controller detects a rogue access point, it immediately notifies WCS, which creates a rogue access point alarm.

When WCS receives a rogue access point message from a controller, an alarm monitor appears in the lower left corner of all WCS user interface pages.

To detect and locate rogue access points, follow these steps:


Step 1 Click the Rogues indicator to display the Rogue AP Alarms page. This page lists the severity of the alarms, the rogue access point MAC addresses, the rogue access point types, the date and time when the rogue access points were first detected, and their SSIDs.

Step 2 Click any Rogue MAC Address link to display the associated Alarms > Rogue - AP MAC Address page. This page shows detailed information about the rogue access point alarm.

Step 3 To modify the alarm, choose one of these commands from the Select a Command drop-down menu and click GO.

Assign to me—Assigns the selected alarm to the current user.

Unassign—Unassigns the selected alarm.

Delete—Deletes the selected alarm.

Clear—Clears the selected alarm.

Event History—Enables you to view events for rogue alarms.

Detecting APs (with radio band, location, SSID, channel number, WEP state, short or long preamble, RSSI, and SNR)—Enables you to view the access points that are currently detecting the rogue access point.

Rogue Clients—Enables you to view the clients associated with this rogue access point.

Set State to `Unknown - Alert'—Tags the rogue access point as the lowest threat, continues to monitor the rogue access point, and turns off containment.

Set State to `Known - Internal'—Tags the rogue access point as internal, adds it to the known rogue access points list, and turns off containment.

Set State to `Known - External'—Tags the rogue access point as external, adds it to the known rogue access points list, and turns off containment.

1 AP Containment through 4 AP Containment—When you select level 1 containment, one access point in the vicinity of the rogue unit sends deauthenticate and disassociate messages to the client devices that are associated to the rogue unit. When you select level 2 containment, two access points in the vicinity of the rogue unit send deauthenticate and disassociate messages to the rogue's clients and so on up to level 4.

Step 4 From the Select a Command drop-down menu, choose Map (High Resolution) and click GO to display the current calculated rogue access point location on the Maps > Building Name > Floor Name page.

If you are using WCS Location, WCS compares RSSI signal strength from two or more access points to find the most probable location of the rogue access point and places a small skull-and-crossbones indicator at its most likely location. In the case of an underdeployed network for location with only one access point and an omni antenna, the most likely location is somewhere on a ring around the access point, but the center of likelihood is at the access point. If you are using WCS Base, WCS relies on RSSI signal strength from the rogue access point and places a small skull-and-crossbones indicator next to the access point receiving the strongest RSSI signal from the rogue unit.


Monitoring Alarms

Monitoring Rogue Access Point Alarms

Monitoring Rogue Access Point Details

Detecting Access Points

Monitoring Events

Monitoring Rogue Clients

Monitoring Rogue Access Point Alarms

Rogue access point radios are unauthorized access points detected by one or more Cisco lightweight access points. This page displays rogue access point alarms based on the severity you clicked in the Alarm Monitor.

To access the Rogue AP Alarms page, do one of the following:

Choose Monitor > Alarms. From the left sidebar, click New Search and choose Rogue AP from the Alarm Category drop-down menu. Click GO to display the matching alarms.

Choose Monitor > Security. From the left sidebar, click Rogue APs.

Click the Malicious AP number link in the Alarm Summary box at the bottom of the left sidebar.


Note If there are multiple alarm pages, the page numbers are displayed at the top of the page with a scroll arrow on each side. Use the scroll arrows to view additional alarms.


Table B-1 describes the parameters found on the rogue access point alarms page.

Table B-1 Alarm Parameters  

Parameter
Description

Check box

Select the alarms on which you want to take action.

Severity

The severity of the alarm: Critical, Major, Minor, Clear. Color coded.

Rogue MAC Address

Media Access Control address of the rogue access points. See Monitor Alarms > Rogue AP Details.

Vendor

Rogue access point vendor name, or Unknown.

Classification Type

Malicious, Friendly, or Unclassified.

Radio Type

Indicates the radio type for this rogue access point.

Strongest AP RSSI

Indicates the strongest received signal strength indicator in dBm.

No. of Rogue Clients

Indicates the number of rogue clients associated to this access point.

Owner

Indicates the `owner' of the rogue access point.

Date/Time

Date and time the alarm occurred.

State

State of the alarm: Alert, Known or Removed.

SSID

Service Set Identifier being broadcast by the rogue access point radio. (Blank if SSID is not broadcast.)

Map Location

Indicates the map location for this rogue access point.

Acknowledged

Displays whether or not the alarm is acknowledged by the user.



Note The alarm remains in WCS, and you can search for all Acknowledged alarms using the alarm search functionality.


The other sections on the Rogue AP Alarms page include the following:

Unacknowledge—Unacknowledge an already acknowledged alarm.

E-mail Notification—Takes you to the All Alarms > E-mail Notification page to view and configure e-mail notifications. See Monitor Alarms > E-mail Notification for more information.

Severity Configuration—Change the severity level for newly-generated alarms. See Monitor Alarms > Severity Configuration for more information.

Detecting APs—View the Cisco lightweight access points that are currently detecting the rogue access point.

Map (High Resolution)—Click to display a high-resolution map of the rogue access point location.

Rogue Clients—Click to view a list of rogue clients associated with this rogue access point. The Rogue Clients page displays the Client MAC Address, when it was last heard, its current status, its controller, and the rogue access point.

Set State to `Unclassified - Alert'—Choose this command to tag the rogue access point as the lowest threat, continue monitoring the rogue access point, and to turn off containment.

Set State to `Malicious - Alert'—Choose this command to tag the rogue access point as Malicious.

Set State to `Friendly - Internal'—Choose this command to tag the rogue access point as internal, add it to the Known Rogue APs list, and to turn off containment.

1 AP Containment—Target the rogue access point for containment by one access point. (Lowest containment level.)

2 AP Containment—Target the rogue access point for containment by two Cisco lightweight access points.

3 AP Containment—Target the rogue access point for containment by three Cisco lightweight access points.

4 AP Containment—Target the rogue access point for containment by four Cisco lightweight access points. (Highest containment level.)


Caution Attempting to contain a rogue access point may lead to legal consequences. When you select any of the AP Containment commands and click GO, a message "Containing a Rogue AP may have legal consequences. Do you want to continue?" appears. Click OK if you are sure or click Cancel if you do not wish to contain any access points.

Monitoring Rogue Access Point Details

Alarm event details for each rogue access point are available from the Rogue AP Alarms page.

To view alarm events for a rogue access point radio, follow these steps:


Step 1 From the Rogue AP Alarms page, click an item under Rogue MAC Address.

This page displays alarm events for a rogue access point radio. Rogue access point radios are unauthorized access points detected by Cisco lightweight access points. The following information is available:

General-

Rogue MAC Address—Media Access Control address of the rogue access points.

Vendor—Rogue access point vendor name or Unknown.

On Network—Indicates whether or not the rogue access point is located on the network.

Owner—Indicates the owner or left blank.

Acknowledged—Indicates whether or not the alarm is acknowledged by the user.

Classification Type—Malicious, Friendly, or Unclassified.

State—Indicates the state of the alarm: Alert, Known, or Removed.

SSID—Service Set Identifier being broadcast by the rogue access point radio. (Blank if SSID is not broadcast.)

Channel Number—Indicates the channel of the rogue access point.

Containment Level—Indicates the containment level of the rogue access point or Unassigned.

Radio Type—Indicates the radio type for this rogue access point.

Strongest AP RSSI—Indicates the strongest received signal strength indicator in dBm.

No. of Rogue Clients—Indicates the number of rogue clients associated to this access point.

Created—Indicates when the alarm event was created.

Modified—Indicates when the alarm event was modified.

Generated By—Indicates how the alarm event was generated.

Severity—The severity of the alarm: Critical, Major, Minor, Clear. Color coded.

Previous Severity—The previous severity of the alarm: Critical, Major, Minor, Clear. Color coded

Annotations—Enter any new notes in this box and click Add to update the alarm.

Message—Displays descriptive information about the alarm.

Help—Displays the latest information about the alarm.

Event History—Click to access the Monitor Alarms > Events page.

Annotations—Lists existing notes for this alarm.


Detecting Access Points

Click a Rogues alarm square in the Alarm Monitor (lower left-hand side of the screen) to access the Monitor Alarms > failure object page. In the Monitor Rogue AP Alarms page, click an item under Rogue MAC Address to access the Monitor Alarms > Rogue AP Details page, from the Select a command drop-down list choose Detecting APs, and click GO to access this page.

Choose Monitor > Alarms, then click New Search in the left sidebar. Choose Severity > All Severities and Alarm Category > Rogue AP, and click Go to access Monitor Alarms > failure object.

In the Monitor Rogue AP Alarms page, click an item under Rogue MAC Address to access Monitor Alarms > Rogue AP Details. In the Monitor Alarms > Rogue vendor:MACaddr page, from the Select a command drop-down list, choose Detecting APs to access this page.

This page enables you to view information about the Cisco lightweight access points that are detecting a rogue access point.

Click a list item to display data about that item:

AP Name

Radio

Map Location

SSID—Service Set Identifier being broadcast by the rogue access point radio.

Channel Number—Which channel the rogue access point is broadcasting on.

WEP—Enabled or disabled.

WPA—Enabled or disabled.

Pre-Amble—Long or short.

RSSI—Received signal strength indicator in dBm.

SNR—Signal-to-noise ratio.

Containment Type—Type of containment applied from this access point.

Containment Channels—Channels that this access point is currently containing.


Monitoring Rogue Adhoc Alarms

The Rogue Adhoc Alarms page displays alarm events for rogue adhocs.

To access the Rogue Adhoc Alarms page, do one of the following:

Choose Monitor > Alarms. From the left sidebar, click New Search and select Rogue Adhoc from the Alarm Category drop-down menu. Click GO to display the matching alarms.

Choose Monitor > Security. From the left sidebar, click Rogue Adhocs.


Note If there are multiple alarm pages, the page numbers are displayed at the top of the page with a scroll arrow on each side. Use this to view additional alarms.


Table B-2 describes the parameters found on the rogue adhoc alarms page.

Table B-2 Rogue Adhoc Alarms

Parameter
Description

Check box

Select the alarms on which you want to take action.

Severity

The severity of the alarm: Critical, Major, Minor, Clear. Color coded.

Rogue Adhoc MAC Address

Media Access Control address of the rogue adhoc.

Vendor

Rogue adhoc vendor name, or Unknown.

Classification Type

Malicious, Friendly, or Unclassified.

Radio Type

Indicates the radio type for this rogue adhoc.

Strongest AP RSSI

Indicates the strongest received signal strength indicator in dBm.

No. of Rogue Clients

Indicates the number of rogue clients associated to this rogue adhoc.

Owner

Indicates the `owner' of the rogue adhoc.

Date/Time

Date and time the alarm occurred.

State

State of the alarm: Alert, Known or Removed.

SSID

Service Set Identifier being broadcast by the rogue adhoc radio. (Blank if SSID is not broadcast.)

Map Location

Indicates the map location for this rogue adhoc.

Acknowledged

Displays whether or not the alarm is acknowledged by the user.


Select a Command

Select one or more alarms by checking their respective check boxes, select one of the following commands from the Select a Command drop-down menu, and click GO.

Assign to me—Assign the selected alarm(s) to the current user.

Unassign—Unassign the selected alarm(s).

Delete—Delete the selected alarm(s).

Clear—Clear the selected alarm(s).

Clear—Clear the selected alarm.

Acknowledge—Acknowledge the alarm to prevent it from showing up in the Alarm Summary window.


Note The alarm remains in WCS and you can search for all Acknowledged alarms using the alarm search functionality.


Unacknowledge—Unacknowledge an already acknowledged alarm.

Email Notification—Takes you to the All Alarms > Email Notification page to view and configure email notifications.

Detecting APs—View the Cisco Aironet 1000 Series lightweight access points that are currently detecting the rogue adhoc. See Detecting Access Points for more information.

Map (High Resolution)—Click to display a high-resolution map of the rogue adhoc location.

Rogue Clients—Click to view a list of rogue clients associated with this rogue adhoc. The Rogue Clients page displays the Client MAC Address, when it was last heard, its current status, its controller, and the Rogue adhoc.

Set State to `Alert'—Choose this command to tag the rogue adhoc as the lowest threat, continue monitoring the rogue access point, and to turn off Containment.

Set State to `Internal'—Choose this command to tag the rogue adhoc as internal, add it to the Known Rogue APs list, and to turn off Containment.

Set State to `External'—Choose this command to tag the rogue adhoc as external, add it to the Known Rogue APs list, and to turn off Containment.

1 AP Containment—Target the rogue adhoc for containment by one access point. (Lowest containment level.)

2 AP Containment—Target the rogue adhoc for containment by two Cisco Aironet 1000 Series lightweight access points.

3 AP Containment—Target the rogue adhoc for containment by three Cisco Aironet 1000 Series lightweight access points.

4 AP Containment—Target the rogue adhoc for containment by four Cisco Aironet 1000 Series lightweight access points. (Highest containment level.)


Caution Attempting to contain a rogue adhoc may lead to legal consequences. When you select any of the AP Containment commands and click GO, a message "Containing a Rogue AP may have legal consequences. Do you want to continue?" appears. Click OK if you are sure or click Cancel if you do not wish to contain any access points.

Monitoring Rogue Adhoc Details

Alarm event details for each Rogue adhoc are available from the Rogue Adhoc Alarms page.

To view alarm events for a rogue adhoc radio, follow these steps:


Step 1 From the Rogue Adhoc Alarms page, click an item under Rogue MAC Address.

This page displays alarm events for a rogue access point radio. Rogue access point radios are unauthorized access points detected by Cisco Aironet 1000 Series lightweight access points. The following information is available:

General—

Rogue MAC Address—Media Access Control address of the rogue adhoc.

Vendor—Rogue adhoc vendor name or Unknown.

On Network—Indicates whether or not the rogue adhoc is located on the network.

Owner—Indicates the owner or left blank.

Acknowledged—Indicates whether or not the alarm is acknowledged by the user.

Classification Type—Malicious, Friendly, or Unclassified.

State—Indicates the state of the alarm: Alert, Known, or Removed.

SSID—Service Set Identifier being broadcast by the rogue adhoc radio. (Blank if SSID is not broadcast.)

Channel Number—Indicates the channel of the rogue adhoc.

Containment Level—Indicates the containment level of the rogue adhoc or Unassigned.

Radio Type—Indicates the radio type for this rogue adhoc.

Strongest AP RSSI—Indicates the strongest received signal strength indicator in dBm.

No. of Rogue Clients—Indicates the number of rogue clients associated to this adhoc.

Created—Indicates when the alarm event was created.

Modified—Indicates when the alarm event was modified.

Generated By—Indicates how the alarm event was generated.

Severity—The severity of the alarm: Critical, Major, Minor, Clear. Color coded.

Previous Severity—The previous severity of the alarm: Critical, Major, Minor, Clear. Color coded.

Annotations—Enter any new notes in this box and click Add to update the alarm.

Message—Displays descriptive information about the alarm.

Help—Displays the latest information about the alarm.

Event History—Click to access the Monitoring Events page.

Annotations—Lists existing notes for this alarm.


Select a Command

Select one or more alarms by checking their respective check boxes, selecting one of the following commands, and clicking GO.

Assign to me—Assign the selected alarm to the current user.

Unassign—Unassign the selected alarm.

Delete—Delete the selected alarm.

Clear—Clear the selected alarm.

Acknowledge—You can acknowledge the alarm to prevent it from showing up in the Alarm Summary window. The alarm remains in WCS and you can search for all Acknowledged alarms using the alarm search functionality.

Unacknowledge—You can choose to unacknowledge an already acknowledged alarm.

Email Notification—Takes you to the All Alarms > Email Notification page to view and configure email notifications.

Detecting APs—View the Cisco Aironet 1000 Series lightweight access points that are currently detecting the rogue adhoc. See Detecting Access Points for more information.

Map (High Resolution)—Click to display a high-resolution map of the rogue adhoc location.

Rogue Clients—Click to view a list of rogue clients associated with this rogue adhoc. The Rogue Clients page displays the Client MAC Address, when it was last heard, its current status, its controller, and the Rogue adhoc.

Set State to `Alert'—Choose this command to tag the rogue adhoc as the lowest threat, continue monitoring the rogue adhoc, and to turn off Containment.

Set State to `Internal'—Choose this command to tag the rogue adhoc as internal, add it to the Known Rogue APs list, and to turn off Containment.

Set State to `External'—Choose this command to tag the rogue access point as external, add it to the Known Rogue APs list, and to turn off Containment.

1 AP Containment—Target the rogue adhoc for containment by one access point. (Lowest containment level.)

2 AP Containment—Target the rogue adhoc for containment by two Cisco Aironet 1000 Series lightweight access points.

3 AP Containment—Target the rogue adhoc for containment by three Cisco Aironet 1000 Series lightweight access points.

4 AP Containment—Target the rogue adhoc for containment by four Cisco Aironet 1000 Series lightweight access points. (Highest containment level.)


Monitoring Events

Click a Rogues alarm square in the Alarm Monitor (lower left-hand side of the screen), click a list item under Rogue MAC Addresses, from the Select a command drop-down list choose Event History, and click GO to access this page.

Choose Monitor > Alarms and then click New Search in the left sidebar. Choose Severity > All Severities and Alarm Category > Rogue AP, and click Go to access the Monitor Alarms > failure object page. Click an item under the Rogue MAC Address to display the Monitor Alarms > Rogue AP Details page. From the Select a command drop-down list choose Event History, and click GO to access this page.

This page enables you to review information about rogue alarm events. Events list the sequence of occurrences for an element(s) over a period of time.

Click the title of each column to reorder the listings:

Severity—Color coded display of the severity of the event.

Rogue MAC Address—Click a list item to display information about the entry.

Vendor—Name of rogue access point manufacturer.

Type—AP or AD-HOC.

On Network—Whether or not the rogue access point is on the same subnet as the associated Port.

On 802.11a—Whether or not the rogue access point is broadcasting on the 802.11a band.

On 802.11b—Whether or not the rogue access point is broadcasting on the 802.11b/802.11g band.

Date/Time—Date and time of the alarm.

Classification Type—Malicious, Friendly, or Unclassified

State—State of the alarm, such as Alert and Removed.

SSID—Service Set Identifier being broadcast by the rogue access point radio.

Monitoring Rogue Clients

Choose Monitor > Alarms and then click New Search in the left sidebar. Choose Severity > All Severities and Alarm Category > Rogue AP, and click GO to access the Monitor Alarms > failure object page. Click an item under the Rogue MAC Address to display the Monitor Alarms > Rogue AP Details page. From the Select a command drop-down list, choose Rogue Clients to access this page.

This page enables you to view information about clients that have associated with the rogue access point.

Client MAC Address—Media Access Control address of the rogue access point client.

Last Heard—The last time a Cisco access point detected the rogue access point client.

Status—Status of the rogue access point client.


Configuring Controllers

Configuring Rogue Policies

Configuring Rogue AP Rules

Configuring Rogue Policies

This page enables you to set up policies for rogue access points.

To access the Rogue Policies page, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Configure > Controllers.

Step 2 Click an IP address under the IP Address column.

Step 3 From the left sidebar menu, select Security > Rogue Policies.

Rogue Location Discovery Protocol—Enabled, Disabled.

Rogue APs

Expiration Timeout for Rogue AP Entries (seconds)—1 - 3600 seconds (1200 default).

Rogue Clients

Validate rogue clients against AAA (check box)—Enabled, Disabled.

Detect and report Adhoc networks (check box)—Enabled, Disabled.


Command Buttons

Save—Save the changes made to the client exclusion policies and return to the previous window.

Audit—Compare the WCS values with those used on the controller.


Configuring Rogue AP Rules

This page enables you to view and edit current Rogue AP Rules.

To access the Rogue AP Rules page, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Configure > Controllers.

Step 2 Click an IP address under the IP Address column.

Step 3 From the left sidebar menu, select Security > Rogue AP Rules. The Rogue AP Rules displays the Rogue AP Rules, the rule types (Malicious or Friendly), and the rule sequence.

Step 4 Select a Rogue AP Rule to view or edit its details. See Configuring Rogue AP Rules for more information.


Configuring Controller Templates

Configuring Rogue Policies

Configuring Rogue AP Rules

Configuring Rogue AP Rule Groups

Configuring Rogue Policies

This window enables you to configure the rogue policy template (for access points and clients) applied to the controller.

To view current templates and the number of controllers to which they are applied, choose Configure > Controller Templates > Security > Rogue Policies.

To create a new rogue policy template, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Configure > Controller Templates.

Step 2 From the left sidebar menu, choose Security > Rogue Policies.

Step 3 From the Select a command drop-down menu, click Add Template.

Step 4 Click GO.


Note To make modifications to an existing rogue policy template or to apply a current template to controllers, choose Configure > Controller Templates > Security > Rogue Policies and click a template name in the Template Name column. Make the necessary changes to the template and click Save or Apply to Controllers.


Step 5 Select the Rogue Location Discovery Protocol check box to enable it. Rogue Location Discovery Protocol (RLDP) determines whether or not the rogue is connected to the enterprise wired network.


Note With RLDP, the controller instructs a managed access point to associate with the rogue access point and send a special packet to the controller. If the controller receives the packet, the rogue access point is connected to the enterprise network. This method works for rogue access points that do not have encryption enabled.


Step 6 Set the expiration timeout (in seconds) for rogue access point entries.

Step 7 Check the Validate rogue clients against AAA check box to enable the AAA validation of rogue clients.

Step 8 Check the Detect and report Adhoc networks check box to enable detection and reporting of rogue clients participating in adhoc networking.

Step 9 Click Save.


Command Buttons

Save—Click to save the current template.

Apply to Controllers—Click to apply the current template to controllers. From the Apply to Controllers screen, select the applicable controllers and click OK.

Delete—Click to delete the current template. If the template is currently applied to controllers, click OK to confirm that you want to remove the template from the selected controllers to which it is applied.

Cancel—Click to cancel the current template creation or changes to the current template.


Configuring Rogue AP Rules

Rogue AP Rules allow you to define rules to automatically classify rogue access points. WCS applies the rogue access point classification rules to the controllers. These rules can limit a rogue's appearance on maps based on RSSI level (weaker rogue access points are ignored) and time limit (a rogue access point is not flagged unless it is seen for the indicated period of time).


Note Rogue AP Rules also help reduce false alarms.


To view current classification rule templates, rule type, and the number of controllers to which they are applied, choose Configure > Controller Templates > Security > Rogue AP Rules.


Note Rogue classes include the following types:
Malicious Rogue—A detected access point that matches the user-defined Malicious rules or has been manually moved from the Friendly AP category.
Friendly Rogue—Known, acknowledged, or trusted access point or a detected access point that matches user-defined Friendly rules.
Unclassified Rogue—A detected access point that does not match the Malicious or Friendly rules.


To create a new classification rule template for rogue access points, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Configure > Controller Templates.

Step 2 From the left sidebar menu, choose Security > Rogue AP Rules

Step 3 From the Select a command drop-down menu, click Add Classification Rule.

Step 4 Click GO.


Note To make modifications to an existing Rogue AP Rules template or to apply a current template to controllers, choose Configure > Controller Templates > Security > Rogue AP Rules and click a template name in the Template Name column. Make the necessary changes to the template and click Save or Apply to Controllers.


Step 5 Enter the following parameters:

General-

Rule Name—Enter a name for the rule in the text box.

Rule Type—Select Malicious or Friendly from the drop-down menu.


Note Malicious Rogue—A detected access point that matches the user-defined Malicious rules or has been manually moved from the Friendly AP category.
Friendly Rogue—Known, acknowledged, or trusted access point or a detected access point that matches user-defined Friendly rules.


Match Type—Select Match All Conditions or Match Any Condition from the drop-down menu.

Malicious Rogue Classification Rule

Open Authentication—Select the check box to enable Open Authentication.

Match Managed AP SSID—Select the check box to enable the matching of Managed AP SSID.


Note Managed SSID are the SSIDs configured for the WLAN and is known to the system.


Match User Configured SSID—Select the check box to enable the matching of User Configured SSID.


Note User Configured SSID are the SSIDs that are manually added. Enter the User Configured SSIDs (one per line) in the text box below Match User Configured SSID.


Minimum RSSI—Select the check box to enable the Minimum RSSI threshold limit.


Note Enter the minimum RSSI threshold level (dB) in the text box. The detected access point is classified as malicious if it is detected above the indicated RSSI threshold.


Time Duration—Select the check box to enable the Time Duration limit.


Note Enter the time duration limit (in seconds) in the text box. The detected access point is classified as malicious if it is viewed for a longer period of time than the indicated time limit.


Minimum Number Rogue Clients—Select the check box to enable the Minimum Number Rogue Clients limit.


Note Enter the minimum number of rogue clients allowed. The detected access point is classified as malicious if the number of clients associated to the detected access point is greater than or equal to the indicated value.


Step 6 Click Save to save the Rogue AP Rules template or Cancel to exit the screen without saving the template.


Command Buttons

Save—Click to save the current template.

Apply to Controllers—Click to apply the current template to controllers. From the Apply to Controllers screen, select the applicable controllers and click OK.

Delete—Click to delete the current template. If the template is currently applied to controllers, click OK to confirm that you want to remove the template from the selected controllers to which it is applied.

Cancel—Click to cancel the current template creation or changes to the current template.


Configuring Rogue AP Rule Groups

A Rogue AP Rule Group template allows you to combine more than one rogue AP rule to apply to controllers.

To view current Rogue AP Rule Group templates, choose Configure > Controller Templates > Security > Rogue AP Rule Groups.

To create a new Rogue AP Rule Groups template, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Configure > Controller Templates.

Step 2 From the left sidebar menu, choose Security > Rogue AP Rule Groups.

Step 3 From the Select a command drop-down menu, click Add Rogue Rule Group.

Step 4 Click GO.


Note To make modifications to an existing rogue policy template or to apply a current template to controllers, choose Configure > Controller Templates > Security > Rogue AP Rule Groups and click a template name in the Template Name column. Make the necessary changes to the template and click Save or Apply to Controllers.


Step 5 Enter the following parameters:

General

Rule Group Name—Enter a name for the rule group in the text box.

Step 6 To add a Rogue AP rule, click to highlight the rule in the left column. Click Add to move the rule to the right column.


Note Rogue AP rules can be added from the Rogue AP Rules section. See Configuring Rogue AP Rules for more information.


Step 7 To remove a Rogue AP rule, click to highlight the rule in the right column. Click Remove to move the rule to the left column.

Step 8 Use the Move Up/Move Down buttons to specify the order in which the rules apply. Highlight the desired rule and click Move Up or Move Down to move it higher or lower in the current list.

Step 9 Click Save to confirm the Rogue AP rule list.

Step 10 Click Cancel to close the window without making any changes to the current list.


Note To view and edit the rules applied to a controller, choose Configure > Controller and click the controller name to open the controller.