Consolidated Platform Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS XE Release 3.3SE (Cisco WLC 5700 Series)
Performing Controller Setup Configuration
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Performing Controller Setup Configuration

Contents

Performing Controller Setup Configuration

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all of the features documented in this module. For the latest feature information and caveats, see the release notes for your platform and software release.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to http:/​/​www.cisco.com/​go/​cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Information About Performing Controller Setup Configuration

Review the sections in this module before performing your initial controller configuration tasks that include IP address assignments and DHCP autoconfiguration.

Controller Boot Process

To start your controller, you need to follow the procedures in the hardware installation guide for installing and powering on the controller and setting up the initial controller configuration (IP address, subnet mask, default gateway, secret and Telnet passwords, and so forth).

The normal boot process involves the operation of the boot loader software and includes these activities:

  • Locates the bootable (base) package in the bundle or installed package set.
  • Performs low-level CPU initialization. It initializes the CPU registers, which control where physical memory is mapped, its quantity, its speed, and so forth.
  • Performs power-on self-test (POST) for the CPU subsystem and tests the system DRAM.
  • Initializes the file systems on the system board.
  • Loads a default operating system software image into memory and boots up the controller.

The boot loader provides access to the file systems before the operating system is loaded. Normally, the boot loader is used only to load, decompress, and start the operating system. After the boot loader gives the operating system control of the CPU, the boot loader is not active until the next system reset or power-on.

The boot loader also provides trap-door access into the system if the operating system has problems serious enough that it cannot be used. The trap-door mechanism provides enough access to the system so that if it is necessary, you can reinstall the operating system software image by using the emergency-install command and restart the operating system.

Before you can assign controller information, make sure you have connected a PC or terminal to the console port or a PC to the Ethernet management port, and make sure you have configured the PC or terminal-emulation software baud rate and character format to match these of the controller console port:

  • Baud rate default is 9600.
  • Data bits default is 8.

    Note


    If the data bits option is set to 8, set the parity option to none.


  • Stop bits default is 2 (minor).
  • Parity settings default is none.

Software Installer Features

The following software installer features are supported on your switch:

  • Software bundle installation on a standalone switch.
  • In a stack of switches, Cisco recommends all switches in install mode.
  • Software rollback to a previously installed package set.
  • Emergency installation in the event that no valid installed packages reside on the boot flash.

Note


Software installation and rollback must be performed while running only in installed mode. You can use the software expand EXEC command to convert bundle boot mode to install mode.


Software Boot Modes

Your controller supports two modes to boot the software packages:

  • Installed mode
  • Bundle mode

Installed Boot Mode

You can boot your controller in installed mode by booting the software package provisioning file that resides in flash:

controller: boot flash:packages.conf

The provisioning file contains a list of software packages to boot, mount, and run. The ISO file system in each installed package is mounted to the root file system directly from flash.


Note


The packages and provisioning file used to boot in installed mode must reside in flash. Booting in installed mode from usbflash0: or tftp: is not supported.


Bundle Boot Mode

You can boot your controller in bundle boot mode by booting the bundle (.bin) file:

controller:  boot flash:ct5700-ipservicesk9.SSA.03.09.07.EMP.150-9.07.EMP.bin

The provisioning file contained in a bundle is used to decide which packages to boot, mount, and run. Packages are extracted from the bundle and copied to RAM. The ISO file system in each package is mounted to the root file system.

Unlike install boot mode, additional memory that is equivalent to the size of the bundle is used when booting in bundle mode.


Note


Auto install and smart install functionality is not supported in bundle boot mode.



Note


The AP image predownload feature is not supported in bundle boot mode.


Controllers Information Assignment

You can assign IP information through the controller setup program, through a DHCP server, or manually.

Use the controller setup program if you want to be prompted for specific IP information. With this program, you can also configure a hostname and an enable secret password.

Use a DHCP server for centralized control and automatic assignment of IP information after the server is configured.


Note


If you are using DHCP, do not respond to any of the questions in the setup program until the controller receives the dynamically assigned IP address and reads the configuration file.


If you are an experienced user familiar with the controller configuration steps, manually configure the controller. Otherwise, use the setup program described in the Boot Process section.

DHCP-Based Autoconfiguration Overview

DHCP provides configuration information to Internet hosts and internetworking devices. This protocol consists of two components: one for delivering configuration parameters from a DHCP server to a device and an operation for allocating network addresses to devices. DHCP is built on a client-server model, in which designated DHCP servers allocate network addresses and deliver configuration parameters to dynamically configured devices. The controller can act as both a DHCP client and a DHCP server.

During DHCP-based autoconfiguration, your controller (DHCP client) is automatically configured at startup with IP address information and a configuration file.

With DHCP-based autoconfiguration, no DHCP client-side configuration is needed on your controller. However, you need to configure the DHCP server for various lease options associated with IP addresses.

If you want to use DHCP client autoconfiguration, you need to configure a Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server to fetch the configuration file. The DHCP client then applies the new configuration file to its running configuration.


Note


If the new configuration is downloaded to a controller that already has a configuration, the downloaded configuration is appended to the configuration file stored on the controller. (Any existing configuration is not overwritten by the downloaded one.)


The DHCP server for your controller can be on the same LAN or on a different LAN than the controller. If the DHCP server is running on a different LAN, you should configure a DHCP relay device between your controller and the DHCP server. A relay device forwards broadcast traffic between two directly connected LANs. A router does not forward broadcast packets, but it forwards packets based on the destination IP address in the received packet.

DHCP-based autoconfiguration replaces the BOOTP client functionality on your controller.

DHCP Client Request Process

When you boot up your controller, the DHCP client is invoked and requests configuration information from a DHCP server when the configuration file is not present on the controller. If the configuration file is present and the configuration includes the ip address dhcp interface configuration command on specific routed interfaces, the DHCP client is invoked and requests the IP address information for those interfaces.

This is the sequence of messages that are exchanged between the DHCP client and the DHCP server.

Figure 1. DHCP Client and Server Message Exchange

The client, Controller A, broadcasts a DHCPDISCOVER message to locate a DHCP server. The DHCP server offers configuration parameters (such as an IP address, subnet mask, gateway IP address, DNS IP address, a lease for the IP address, and so forth) to the client in a DHCPOFFER unicast message.

In a DHCPREQUEST broadcast message, the client returns a formal request for the offered configuration information to the DHCP server. The formal request is broadcast so that all other DHCP servers that received the DHCPDISCOVER broadcast message from the client can reclaim the IP addresses that they offered to the client.

The DHCP server confirms that the IP address has been allocated to the client by returning a DHCPACK unicast message to the client. With this message, the client and server are bound, and the client uses configuration information received from the server. The amount of information the controller receives depends on how you configure the DHCP server.

If the configuration parameters sent to the client in the DHCPOFFER unicast message are invalid (a configuration error exists), the client returns a DHCPDECLINE broadcast message to the DHCP server.

The DHCP server sends the client a DHCPNAK denial broadcast message, which means that the offered configuration parameters have not been assigned, that an error has occurred during the negotiation of the parameters, or that the client has been slow in responding to the DHCPOFFER message (the DHCP server assigned the parameters to another client).

A DHCP client might receive offers from multiple DHCP or BOOTP servers and can accept any of the offers; however, the client usually accepts the first offer it receives. The offer from the DHCP server is not a guarantee that the IP address is allocated to the client; however, the server usually reserves the address until the client has had a chance to formally request the address. If the controller accepts replies from a BOOTP server and configures itself, the controller broadcasts, instead of unicasts, TFTP requests to obtain the controller configuration file.

The DHCP hostname option allows a group of controllers to obtain hostnames and a standard configuration from the central management DHCP server. A client (controller) includes in its DCHPDISCOVER message an option 12 field used to request a hostname and other configuration parameters from the DHCP server. The configuration files on all clients are identical except for their DHCP-obtained hostnames.

If a client has a default hostname (the hostname name global configuration command is not configured or the no hostname global configuration command is entered to remove the hostname), the DHCP hostname option is not included in the packet when you enter the ip address dhcp interface configuration command. In this case, if the client receives the DCHP hostname option from the DHCP interaction while acquiring an IP address for an interface, the client accepts the DHCP hostname option and sets the flag to show that the system now has a hostname configured.

DHCP Server Configuration Guidelines

Follow these guidelines if you are configuring a device as a DHCP server:

  • You should configure the DHCP server with reserved leases that are bound to each controller by the controller hardware address.
  • If you want the controller to receive IP address information, you must configure the DHCP server with these lease options:
    • IP address of the client (required)
    • Subnet mask of the client (required)
    • DNS server IP address (optional)
    • Router IP address (default gateway address to be used by the controller) (required)
  • If you want the controller to receive the configuration file from a TFTP server, you must configure the DHCP server with these lease options:
    • TFTP server name (required)
    • Boot filename (the name of the configuration file that the client needs) (recommended)
    • Hostname (optional)
  • Depending on the settings of the DHCP server, the controller can receive IP address information, the configuration file, or both.
  • If you do not configure the DHCP server with the lease options described previously, it replies to client requests with only those parameters that are configured. If the IP address and the subnet mask are not in the reply, the controller is not configured. If the router IP address or the TFTP server name are not found, the controller might send broadcast, instead of unicast, TFTP requests. Unavailability of other lease options does not affect autoconfiguration.
  • The controller can act as a DHCP server. By default, the Cisco IOS DHCP server and relay agent features are enabled on your controller but are not configured.

Purpose of the TFTP Server

Based on the DHCP server configuration, the controller attempts to download one or more configuration files from the TFTP server. If you configured the DHCP server to respond to the controller with all the options required for IP connectivity to the TFTP server, and if you configured the DHCP server with a TFTP server name, address, and configuration filename, the controller attempts to download the specified configuration file from the specified TFTP server.

If you did not specify the configuration filename, the TFTP server, or if the configuration file could not be downloaded, the controller attempts to download a configuration file by using various combinations of filenames and TFTP server addresses. The files include the specified configuration filename (if any) and these files: network-config, cisconet.cfg, hostname.config, or hostname.cfg, where hostname is the controller’s current hostname. The TFTP server addresses used include the specified TFTP server address (if any) and the broadcast address (255.255.255.255).

For the controller to successfully download a configuration file, the TFTP server must contain one or more configuration files in its base directory. The files can include these files:

  • The configuration file named in the DHCP reply (the actual controller configuration file).
  • The network-confg or the cisconet.cfg file (known as the default configuration files).
  • The router-confg or the ciscortr.cfg file (These files contain commands common to all controllers. Normally, if the DHCP and TFTP servers are properly configured, these files are not accessed.)

If you specify the TFTP server name in the DHCP server-lease database, you must also configure the TFTP server name-to-IP-address mapping in the DNS-server database.

If the TFTP server to be used is on a different LAN from the controller, or if it is to be accessed by the controller through the broadcast address (which occurs if the DHCP server response does not contain all the required information described previously), a relay must be configured to forward the TFTP packets to the TFTP server. The preferred solution is to configure the DHCP server with all the required information.

Purpose of the DNS Server

The DHCP server uses the DNS server to resolve the TFTP server name to an IP address. You must configure the TFTP server name-to-IP address map on the DNS server. The TFTP server contains the configuration files for the controller.

You can configure the IP addresses of the DNS servers in the lease database of the DHCP server from where the DHCP replies will retrieve them. You can enter up to two DNS server IP addresses in the lease database.

The DNS server can be on the same LAN or on a different LAN from the controller. If it is on a different LAN, the controller must be able to access it through a router.

How to Obtain Configuration Files

Depending on the availability of the IP address and the configuration filename in the DHCP reserved lease, the controller obtains its configuration information in these ways:

  • The IP address and the configuration filename is reserved for the controller and provided in the DHCP reply (one-file read method). The controller receives its IP address, subnet mask, TFTP server address, and the configuration filename from the DHCP server. The controller sends a unicast message to the TFTP server to retrieve the named configuration file from the base directory of the server and upon receipt, it completes its boot up process.
  • The IP address and the configuration filename is reserved for the controller, but the TFTP server address is not provided in the DHCP reply (one-file read method). The controller receives its IP address, subnet mask, and the configuration filename from the DHCP server. The controller sends a broadcast message to a TFTP server to retrieve the named configuration file from the base directory of the server, and upon receipt, it completes its boot-up process.
  • Only the IP address is reserved for the controller and provided in the DHCP reply. The configuration filename is not provided (two-file read method). The controller receives its IP address, subnet mask, and the TFTP server address from the DHCP server. The controller sends a unicast message to the TFTP server to retrieve the network-confg or cisconet.cfg default configuration file. (If the network-confg file cannot be read, the controller reads the cisconet.cfg file.) The default configuration file contains the hostnames-to-IP-address mapping for the controller. The controller fills its host table with the information in the file and obtains its hostname. If the hostname is not found in the file, the controller uses the hostname in the DHCP reply. If the hostname is not specified in the DHCP reply, the controller uses the default Controller as its hostname. After obtaining its hostname from the default configuration file or the DHCP reply, the controller reads the configuration file that has the same name as its hostname (hostname-confg or hostname.cfg, depending on whether network-confg or cisconet.cfg was read earlier) from the TFTP server. If the cisconet.cfg file is read, the filename of the host is truncated to eight characters. If the controller cannot read the network-confg, cisconet.cfg, or the hostname file, it reads the router-confg file. If the controller cannot read the router-confg file, it reads the ciscortr.cfg file.

Note


The controller broadcasts TFTP server requests if the TFTP server is not obtained from the DHCP replies, if all attempts to read the configuration file through unicast transmissions fail, or if the TFTP server name cannot be resolved to an IP address.


How to Control Environment Variables

With a normally operating controller, you enter the boot loader mode only through the console connection configured for 9600 bps. Unplug the controller power cord, and press the Mode button while reconnecting the power cord. You can release the Mode button after all the amber system LEDs turn on and remain solid. The boot loader controller prompt then appears.

The controller boot loader software provides support for nonvolatile environment variables, which can be used to control how the boot loader, or any other software running on the system, operates. Boot loader environment variables are similar to environment variables that can be set on UNIX or DOS systems.

Environment variables that have values are stored in flash memory outside of the flash file system.

Each line in these files contains an environment variable name and an equal sign followed by the value of the variable. A variable has no value if it is not present; it has a value if it is listed even if the value is a null string. A variable that is set to a null string (for example, “ ”) is a variable with a value. Many environment variables are predefined and have default values.

You can change the settings of the environment variables by accessing the boot loader or by using Cisco IOS commands. Under normal circumstances, it is not necessary to alter the setting of the environment variables.

Scheduled Reload of the Software Image

You can schedule a reload of the software image to occur on the controller at a later time (for example, late at night or during the weekend when the controller is used less), or you can synchronize a reload network-wide (for example, to perform a software upgrade on all controllers in the network).

You have these reload options:

  • Reload of the software to take affect in the specified minutes or hours and minutes. The reload must take place within approximately 24 hours. You can specify the reason for the reload in a string up to 255 characters in length.
  • Reload of the software to take place at the specified time (using a 24-hour clock). If you specify the month and day, the reload is scheduled to take place at the specified time and date. If you do not specify the month and day, the reload takes place at the specified time on the current day (if the specified time is later than the current time) or on the next day (if the specified time is earlier than the current time). Specifying 00:00 schedules the reload for midnight.

The reload command halts the system. If the system is not set to manually boot up, it reboots itself.

If your controller is configured for manual booting, do not reload it from a virtual terminal. This restriction prevents the controller from entering the boot loader mode and then taking it from the remote user’s control.

If you modify your configuration file, the controller prompts you to save the configuration before reloading. During the save operation, the system requests whether you want to proceed with the save if the CONFIG_FILE environment variable points to a startup configuration file that no longer exists. If you proceed in this situation, the system enters setup mode upon reload.

To cancel a previously scheduled reload, use the reload cancel privileged EXEC command.

How to Perform Controller Setup Configuration

Using DHCP to download a new image and a new configuration to a controller requires that you configure at least two controllers. One controller acts as a DHCP and TFTP server and the second controller (client) is configured to download either a new configuration file or a new configuration file and a new image file.

Configuring DHCP Autoconfiguration (Only Configuration File)

This task describes how to configure DHCP autoconfiguration of the TFTP and DHCP settings on an existing controller in the network so that it can support the autoconfiguration of a new controller.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    configure terminal

    2.    ip dhcp pool poolname

    3.    boot filename

    4.    network network-number mask prefix-length

    5.    default-router address

    6.    option 150 address

    7.    exit

    8.    tftp-server flash:filename.text

    9.    interface interface-id

    10.    no switchport

    11.    ip address address mask

    12.    end


DETAILED STEPS
      Command or Action Purpose
    Step 1 configure terminal


    Example:
    Controller# configure terminal
    
    
     

    Enters global configuration mode.

     
    Step 2 ip dhcp pool poolname


    Example:
    Controller(config)# ip dhcp pool pool
    
    
     

    Creates a name for the DHCP server address pool, and enters DHCP pool configuration mode.

     
    Step 3 boot filename


    Example:
    Controller(dhcp-config)# boot config-boot.text
    
    
     

    Specifies the name of the configuration file that is used as a boot image.

     
    Step 4 network network-number mask prefix-length


    Example:
    Controller(dhcp-config)# network 10.10.10.0 255.255.255.0
    
    
     

    Specifies the subnet network number and mask of the DHCP address pool.

    Note   

    The prefix length specifies the number of bits that comprise the address prefix. The prefix is an alternative way of specifying the network mask of the client. The prefix length must be preceded by a forward slash (/).

     
    Step 5 default-router address


    Example:
    Controller(dhcp-config)# default-router 10.10.10.1
    
    
     

    Specifies the IP address of the default router for a DHCP client.

     
    Step 6 option 150 address


    Example:
    Controller(dhcp-config)# option 150 10.10.10.1
    
    
     

    Specifies the IP address of the TFTP server.

     
    Step 7 exit


    Example:
    Controller(dhcp-config)# exit
    
    
     

    Returns to global configuration mode.

     
    Step 8 tftp-server flash:filename.text


    Example:
    Controller(config)# tftp-server flash:config-boot.text
    
    
     

    Specifies the configuration file on the TFTP server.

     
    Step 9 interface interface-id


    Example:
    Controller(config)# interface gigabitethernet1/0/4
    
    
     

    Specifies the address of the client that will receive the configuration file.

     
    Step 10 no switchport


    Example:
    Controller(config-if)# no switchport
    
    
     

    Puts the interface into Layer 3 mode.

     
    Step 11 ip address address mask


    Example:
    Controller(config-if)# ip address 10.10.10.1 255.255.255.0
    
    
     

    Specifies the IP address and mask for the interface.

     
    Step 12 end


    Example:
    Controller(config-if)# end
    
    
     

    Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

     

    Manually Assigning IP Information to Multiple SVIs

    This task describes how to manually assign IP information to multiple switched virtual interfaces (SVIs):

    SUMMARY STEPS

      1.    configure terminal

      2.    interface vlan vlan-id

      3.    ip address ip-address subnet-mask

      4.    exit

      5.    ip default-gateway ip-address

      6.    end

      7.    show interfaces vlan vlan-id

      8.    show ip redirects


    DETAILED STEPS
        Command or Action Purpose
      Step 1 configure terminal


      Example:
      Controller# configure terminal
      
      
       

      Enters global configuration mode.

       
      Step 2 interface vlan vlan-id


      Example:
      Controller(config)# interface vlan 99
      
      
       

      Enters interface configuration mode, and enters the VLAN to which the IP information is assigned. The range is 1 to 4094.

       
      Step 3 ip address ip-address subnet-mask


      Example:
      Controller(config-vlan)# ip address 10.10.10.2 255.255.255.0
      
      
       

      Enters the IP address and subnet mask.

       
      Step 4 exit


      Example:
      Controller(config-vlan)# exit
      
      
       

      Returns to global configuration mode.

       
      Step 5 ip default-gateway ip-address


      Example:
      Controller(config)# ip default-gateway 10.10.10.1
      
      
       

      Enters the IP address of the next-hop router interface that is directly connected to the controller where a default gateway is being configured. The default gateway receives IP packets with unresolved destination IP addresses from the controller.

      Once the default gateway is configured, the controller has connectivity to the remote networks with which a host needs to communicate.

      Note   

      When your controller is configured to route with IP, it does not need to have a default gateway set.

      Note   

      The controller capwap relays on default-gateway configuration to support routed access point join the controller.

       
      Step 6 end


      Example:
      Controller(config)# end
      
      
       

      Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

       
      Step 7 show interfaces vlan vlan-id


      Example:
      Controller# show interfaces vlan 99
      
      
       

      Verifies the configured IP address.

       
      Step 8 show ip redirects


      Example:
      Controller# show ip redirects
      
      
       

      Verifies the configured default gateway.

       

      Modifying the Controller Startup Configuration

      Specifying the Filename to Read and Write the System Configuration

      By default, the Cisco IOS software uses the config.text file to read and write a nonvolatile copy of the system configuration. However, you can specify a different filename, which will be loaded during the next boot cycle.

      Before You Begin

      Use a standalone controller for this task.

      SUMMARY STEPS

        1.    configure terminal

        2.    boot flash:/file-url

        3.    end

        4.    show boot

        5.    copy running-config startup-config


      DETAILED STEPS
          Command or Action Purpose
        Step 1 configure terminal


        Example:
        Controller# configure terminal
        
        
         

        Enters global configuration mode.

         
        Step 2 boot flash:/file-url


        Example:
        Controller(config)# boot flash:config.text
        
        
         

        Specifies the configuration file to load during the next boot cycle.

        file-url—The path (directory) and the configuration filename.

        Filenames and directory names are case-sensitive.

         
        Step 3 end


        Example:
        Controller(config)# end
        
        
         

        Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

         
        Step 4 show boot


        Example:
        Controller# show boot
        
        
         

        Verifies your entries.

        The boot global configuration command changes the setting of the CONFIG_FILE environment variable.

         
        Step 5 copy running-config startup-config


        Example:
        Controller# copy running-config startup-config
        
         

        (Optional) Saves your entries in the configuration file.

         

        Booting the Controller in Installed Mode

        SUMMARY STEPS

          1.    cp source_file_path destination_file_path

          2.    software expand file source_file_path

          3.    reload

          4.    boot flash:packages.conf

          5.    show version


        DETAILED STEPS
            Command or Action Purpose
          Step 1 cp source_file_path destination_file_path


          Example:
          Controller# 
          cp tftp://10.0.0.6/ct5700-ipservicesk9.SSA.03.12.02.EZP.150-12.02.EZP.150-12.02.EZP.bin
           

          (Optional) Copies the bin file (image.bin) from the FTP or TFTP server to flash or USB flash.

           
          Step 2 software expand file source_file_path


          Example:
          Expanding the bin file from Flash:
          Controller# software expand file flash:ct5700-ipservicesk9.SSA.03.09.26.EXP.150-9.26.EXP.bin
          Controller# $flash:ct5700-ipservicesk9.SSA.03.09.26.EXP.150-9.26.EXP.bin 
          Preparing expand operation ...
          [1]: Expanding bundle flash:ct5700-ipservicesk9.SSA.03.09.26.EXP.150-9.26.EXP.bin
          [1]: Copying package files
          [1]: Package files copied
          [1]: Finished expanding bundle flash:ct5700-ipservicesk9.SSA.03.09.26.EXP.150-9.26.EXP.bin
          
          138504  -rwx   237922344  Nov 29 2012 14:53:57 +00:00  ct5700-ipservicesk9.SSA.03.09.26.EXP.150-9.26.EXP.bin
          154743  -rwx    78911772   Dec 3 2012 15:18:16 +00:00  ct5700-base.SSA.03.09.26.EXP.pkg
          154744  -rwx     2269876   Dec 3 2012 15:18:20 +00:00  ct5700-drivers.SSA.03.09.26.EXP.pkg
          154745  -rwx    29854608   Dec 3 2012 15:18:16 +00:00  ct5700-infra.SSA.03.09.26.EXP.pkg
          154746  -rwx    43072360   Dec 3 2012 15:18:18 +00:00  ct5700-iosd-ipservicesk9.SSA.150-9.26.EXP.pkg
          154747  -rwx    22020832   Dec 3 2012 15:18:17 +00:00  ct5700-platform.SSA.03.09.26.EXP.pkg
          154742  -rwx        1207   Dec 3 2012 15:18:38 +00:00  packages.conf
          154748  -rwx    61788880   Dec 3 2012 15:18:20 +00:00  ct5700-wcm.SSA.03.09.26.EXP.pkg
           
          Expands the bin file stored in flash, FTP, TFTP, HTTP, or HTTPS server on the booted controller.
          Note   

          Ensure that the packages.conf file is available in the expanded list.

           
          Step 3 reload


          Example:
          Controller: reload
           

          Reloads the controller.

          Note   

          You can boot the controller manually or automatically using the packages.conf file. If you are booting manually, you can proceed to Step 4. Otherwise, the controller boots up automatically.

           
          Step 4 boot flash:packages.conf


          Example:
          switch: boot flash:packages.conf
           

          Boots the controller with the packages.conf file.

           
          Step 5 show version


          Example:
          controller# show version
          
          Switch Ports Model              SW Version        SW Image       Mode   
          ------ ----- -----              ----------        ----------     ----   
               1 6     WS-C5700-6DS-S     03.09.26.EXP      ct5700-k9      INSTALL
           

          Verifies that the controller is in the INSTALL mode.

           

          Booting the Controller in Bundle Mode

          There are several methods by which you can boot the controller—either by copying the bin file from the TFTP server and then boot the controller, or by booting the controller straight from flash or USB flash using the commands boot flash:<image.bin> or boot usbflash0:<image.bin> .

          The following procedure explains how to boot the controller from th TFTP server in the bundle mode.

          SUMMARY STEPS

            1.    cp source_file_path destination_file_path

            2.    controller:BOOT=<source path of .bin file>

            3.    boot

            4.    show version


          DETAILED STEPS
              Command or Action Purpose
            Step 1 cp source_file_path destination_file_path


            Example:
            Controller# cp tftp://10.0.0.2/ct5700-ipservicesk9.SSA.03.09.07.EMP.150-9.07.EMP.bin to flash
             

            (Optional) Copies the bin file (image.bin) from the FTP or TFTP server to flash or USB flash.

             
            Step 2 controller:BOOT=<source path of .bin file>


            Example:
            Controller: controller:BOOT=tftp://10.0.0.2/ct5700-ipservicesk9.SSA.03.09.07.EMP.150-9.07.EMP.bin
             

            Sets the boot parameters.

             
            Step 3 boot


            Example:
            switch: boot
             

            Boots the controller.

             
            Step 4 show version


            Example:
            controller# show version
            Switch Ports Model              SW Version        SW Image            Mode   
            ------ ----- -----              ----------        ----------          ----   
                 1 6     WS-C5700-6DS-S     03.09.40.EXP      ct5700-k9           BUNDLE 
             

            Verifies that the controller is in the BUNDLE mode.

             

            Configuring a Scheduled Software Image Reload

            This task describes how to configure your controller to reload the software image at a later time.

            SUMMARY STEPS

              1.    configure terminal

              2.    copy running-config startup-config

              3.    reload in [hh:]mm [text]

              4.    reload at hh: mm [month day | day month] [text]

              5.    reload cancel

              6.    show reload


            DETAILED STEPS
                Command or Action Purpose
              Step 1 configure terminal


              Example:
              Controller# configure terminal
              
              
               

              Enters global configuration mode.

               
              Step 2 copy running-config startup-config


              Example:
              copy running-config startup-config
               

              Saves your controller configuration information to the startup configuration before you use the reload command.

               
              Step 3 reload in [hh:]mm [text]


              Example:
              Controller(config)# reload in 12
              
               System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: y
              
              
               

              Schedules a reload of the software to take affect in the specified minutes or hours and minutes. The reload must take place within approximately 24 days. You can specify the reason for the reload in a string up to 255 characters in length.

               
              Step 4 reload at hh: mm [month day | day month] [text]


              Example:
              Controller(config)# reload at 14:00
               

              Specifies the time in hours and minutes for the reload to occur.

              Note   

              Use the at keyword only if the controller system clock has been set (through Network Time Protocol (NTP), the hardware calendar, or manually). The time is relative to the configured time zone on the controller. To schedule reloads across several controllers to occur simultaneously, the time on each controller must be synchronized with NTP.

               
              Step 5 reload cancel


              Example:
              Controller(config)# reload cancel
               
              Cancels a previously scheduled reload. 
              Step 6 show reload


              Example:
              show reload
               

              Displays information about a previously scheduled reload or identifies if a reload has been scheduled on the controller.

               

              Monitoring Controller Setup Configuration

              Example: Verifying the Controller Running Configuration

              Controller# show running-config
              Building configuration...
              
              Current configuration: 1363 bytes
              !
              version 12.4
              no service pad
              service timestamps debug uptime
              service timestamps log uptime
              no service password-encryption
              !
              hostname Stack1
              !
              enable secret 5 $1$ej9.$DMUvAUnZOAmvmgqBEzIxE0
              !
              .
              <output truncated>
              .
              interface gigabitethernet6/0/2
              mvr type source
              
              <output truncated>
              
              ...!
              interface VLAN1
               ip address 172.20.137.50 255.255.255.0
               no ip directed-broadcast
              !
              ip default-gateway 172.20.137.1 !
              !
              snmp-server community private RW
              snmp-server community public RO
              snmp-server community private@es0 RW
              snmp-server community public@es0 RO
              snmp-server chassis-id 0x12
              ! 
              end 
              
              

              Examples: Displaying Software Bootup in Install Mode

              This example displays software bootup in install mode:
              switch: boot flash:packages.conf
              
              Getting rest of image
              Reading full image into memory....done
              Reading full base package into memory...: done = 74596432
              Nova Bundle Image
              --------------------------------------
              Kernel Address : 0x6042f354
              Kernel Size : 0x318412/3245074
              Initramfs Address : 0x60747768
              Initramfs Size : 0xdc08e8/14420200
              Compression Format: .mzip
              
              Bootable image at @ ram:0x6042f354
              Bootable image segment 0 address range [0x81100000, 0x81b80000] is in range [0x80180000, 0x90000000].
              @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@boot_system: 377
              Loading Linux kernel with entry point 0x811060f0 ...
              Bootloader: Done loading app on core_mask: 0xf
              
              ### Launching Linux Kernel (flags = 0x5)
              
              All packages are Digitally Signed
              Starting System Services
              Nov 7 09:57:05 %IOSXE-1-PLATFORM: process stack-mgr: %STACKMGR-1-DISC_START: Switch 2 is starting stack discovery
              #######################################################################################################################
              Nov 7 09:59:07 %IOSXE-1-PLATFORM: process stack-mgr: %STACKMGR-1-DISC_DONE: Switch 2 has finished stack discovery
              Nov 7 09:59:07 %IOSXE-1-PLATFORM: process stack-mgr: %STACKMGR-1-SWITCH_ADDED: Switch 2 has been added to the stack
              Nov 7 09:59:14 %IOSXE-1-PLATFORM: process stack-mgr: %STACKMGR-1-ACTIVE_ELECTED: Switch 2 has been elected ACTIVE
              
              Restricted Rights Legend
              
              Use, duplication, or disclosure by the Government is
              subject to restrictions as set forth in subparagraph
              (c) of the Commercial Computer Software - Restricted
              Rights clause at FAR sec. 52.227-19 and subparagraph
              (c) (1) (ii) of the Rights in Technical Data and Computer
              Software clause at DFARS sec. 252.227-7013.
              
              cisco Systems, Inc.
              170 West Tasman Drive
              San Jose, California 95134-1706
              
              
              
              Cisco IOS Software, IOS-XE Software, Catalyst L3 Switch Software (CAT3K_CAA-UNIVERSALK9-M), 
              Version 03.09.12.EMD EARLY DEPLOYMENT ENGINEERING NOVA_WEEKLY BUILD, synced to DSGS_PI2_POSTPC_FLO_DSBU7_NG3K_1105
              Copyright (c) 1986-2012 by Cisco Systems, Inc.
              Compiled Sun 04-Nov-12 22:53 by gereddy
              License level to iosd is ipservices
              
              
              

              Example: Emergency Installation

              This sample output is an example when the emergency-install boot command is initiated:

              switch: emergency-install tftp://172.20.249.254/katana/ct5760.renum.bin
              
              The bootflash will be erased during install operation, continue (y/n)?y
              Starting emergency recovery (tftp://172.20.249.254/katana/ct5760.renum.bin)...
              Loading "sda9:ct5760-recovery.bin"...
              Reading full image into memory....................done
              Verifying image digital signature.
              Nova Bundle Image
              --------------------------------------
              Kernel Address    : 0x8b35b598
              Kernel Size       : 0x367550/3568976
              Initramfs Address : 0x8b6c2ae8
              Initramfs Size    : 0xbfe484/12575876
              Compression Format: unknown
              
              
              File "sda9:ct5760-recovery.bin" uncompressed and installed, entry point: 0x8b35b598
              Image validated
              \ufffd
              
              Initiating Emergency Installation of bundle tftp://172.20.249.254/katana/ct5760.renum.bin
              
              
              Downloading bundle tftp://172.20.249.254/katana/ct5760.renum.bin...
              
              Validating bundle tftp://172.20.249.254/katana/ct5760.renum.bin...
              Installing bundle tftp://172.20.249.254/katana/ct5760.renum.bin... 
              Verifying bundle tftp://172.20.249.254/katana/ct5760.renum.bin...
              Package ct5760-base.SPA.03.02.00.pkg is Digitally Signed
              Package ct5760-drivers.SPA.03.02.00.SE.pkg is Digitally Signed
              Package ct5760-infra.SPA.03.02.00.pkg is Digitally Signed
              Package ct5760-iosd-ipservicesk9.SPA.150-1.EX.pkg is Digitally Signed
              Package ct5760-platform.SPA.03.02.00.SE.pkg is Digitally Signed
              Package ct5760-wcm.SPA.10.0.10.48.pkg is Digitally Signed
              Preparing flash... 
              Syncing device... 
              Emergency Install successful... Rebooting
              Restarting system.
              Xmodem file system is available.
              Base ethernet MAC Address: 20:37:06:4d:64:00
              Verifying bootloader digital signature.
              
              The system is not configured to boot automatically.  The
              following command will finish loading the operating system
              software:
              
                  boot
              

              Configuration Examples for Performing Controller Setup

              Example: Configuring a Controller to Download Configurations from a DHCP Server

              This example uses a Layer 3 SVI interface on VLAN 99 to enable DHCP-based autoconfiguration with a saved configuration:

              Controller# configure terminal 
              Controller(conf)# boot host dhcp
              Controller(conf)# boot host retry timeout 300
              Controller(conf)# banner config-save ^C Caution - Saving Configuration File to NVRAM May Cause You to No longer Automatically Download Configuration Files at Reboot^C
              Controller(config)# vlan 99
              Controller(config-vlan)# interface vlan 99
              Controller(config-if)# no shutdown
              Controller(config-if)# end
              Controller# show boot
              BOOT path-list:
              Config file:          flash:/config.text
              Private Config file:  flash:/private-config.text
              Enable Break:         no
              Manual Boot:          no
              HELPER path-list:
              NVRAM/Config file
                    buffer size:    32768
              Timeout for Config
                        Download:    300 seconds
              Config Download
                     via DHCP:       enabled (next boot: enabled)
              Controller#
              
              

              Examples: Scheduling Software Image Reload

              This example shows how to reload the software on the controller on the current day at 7:30 p.m:

              Controller# reload at 19:30
              Reload scheduled for 19:30:00 UTC Wed Jun 5 2013 (in 2 hours and 25 minutes)
              Proceed with reload? [confirm]
              
              

              This example shows how to reload the software on the controller at a future time:

              Controller# reload at 02:00 jun 20
              Reload scheduled for 02:00:00 UTC Thu Jun 20 2013 (in 344 hours and 53 minutes)
              Proceed with reload? [confirm]
              
              

              Feature History and Information For Performing Controller Setup Configuration

              Command History

              Release

              Modification

              Cisco IOS XE 3.2SE

              This feature was introduced.