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Cisco Aironet 1100 Series

Quick Start Guide Cisco Aironet 1100 Series Access Points

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Read This First

Table Of Contents

Read This First

Default IP Address Behavior

Cisco IOS Release 12.2(15)JA and Earlier

Cisco IOS Release 12.3(2)JA

Cisco IOS Release 12.3(4)JA and Later

Default SSID and Radio Behavior

Enabling the Radio Interfaces

Safety Information

Compliance Information

Overview

Introduction to the Access Point

Unpacking the Access Point

Installing the Access Point

Before You Start

Connecting the Access Point to Your Network

Connecting to an Ethernet Network with an Inline Power Source

Connecting to an Ethernet Network with Local Power

Powering Up the Access Point

Obtaining and Assigning an IP Address

Connecting to the Access Point Locally

Configuring the Access Point

Configuring Security Settings

In Case of Difficulty

Mounting Instructions

Mounting on a Horizontal or Vertical Surface

Mounting Below a Suspended Ceiling

Mounting Above a Suspended Ceiling

Using the Security Hasp Adapter

Mounting on a Cubicle Wall Partition

Mounting to a Desktop or Horizontal Surface

Using the Kensington Lock Feature


Read This First

You should review this table and the instructions for opening the top cover. The table contains important information you need to know so you can successfully configure your access point.

Setting
Default

Login

Cisco (case sensitive).

Password

Cisco (case sensitive).

IP address

Determined by DHCP server. Default IP address Behavior determined by Cisco IOS release. See the "Default IP Address Behavior" section.

Service Set Identifier (SSID)

Determined by Cisco IOS release. See "Default IP Address Behavior" section and "Default SSID and Radio Behavior" section.

Radio status

Determined by Cisco IOS release. See "Default IP Address Behavior" section and "Default SSID and Radio Behavior" section.


Default IP Address Behavior

Recent Cisco IOS releases have changed the way an unconfigured access point behaves when booted for the first time. This section describes this behavior and provides instructions on how to open the access point's configuration pages.

Cisco IOS Release 12.2(15)JA and Earlier

Setting
Default
Remarks

Login/Password

Cisco/Cisco

Case-sensitive.

SSID

tsunami

Radio status

Enabled

IP Address

Assigned by DHCP

If DHCP disabled, the default IP address is 10.0.0.1. See "Connecting to the Access Point Locally" section.


Cisco IOS Release 12.3(2)JA

Setting
Default
Remarks

Login/Password

Cisco/Cisco

Case-sensitive.

SSID

tsunami

Case-sensitive.

Radio status

Enabled

IP Address

Assigned by DHCP

If DHCP disabled, the default IP address is 10.0.0.1. See "Connecting to the Access Point Locally" section.


Cisco IOS Release 12.3(4)JA and Later

Setting
Default
Remarks

Login/Password

Cisco/Cisco

Case-sensitive.

SSID

None assigned

You must create an SSID. See the "Configuring Security Settings" section for additional information.

Radio status

disabled

You must enable the radio interfaces. See the "Enabling the Radio Interfaces" section for additional information.

IP Address

Assigned by DHCP

If DHCP disabled, the access makes several attempts to get an IP address from a DHCP server. If it does not receive an address, it assigns itself an IP address of 10.0.0.1 for 5 minutes and becomes a mini-DHCP server. During this 5 minute window, you can browse to the default IP address and configure a static address. If after 5 minutes the access point is not reconfigured, it discards the IP address and sends DHCP request indefinitely.



Note If you miss the five-minute window for browsing to the access point at 10.0.0.1, you can power-cycle the access point to repeat the process.



Note In the capacity of a mini-DHCP server, the access point provides up to 20 IP addresses between 10.0.0.11 and 10.0.0.30 to Ethernet-capable PC connected to its Ethernet port and wireless client devices configured with no SSID or tsunami as the SSID, and with all security settings disabled. The mini-DHCP server feature is disabled automatically when you assign a static IP address to the access point.



Caution When the access point is connected to your LAN, the access point mini-DHCP server provides an IP address to any DHCP requests it receives.

Default SSID and Radio Behavior

In Cisco IOS Release 12.3(2)JA2 and earlier, the access point radio is enabled by default and the default SSID is tsunami.

In Cisco IOS Release 12.3(4)JA, the access point radio is disabled by default, and there is no default SSID. You must create an SSID and enable the radio before the access point will allow wireless associations from other devices. These changes to the default configuration improve the security of newly installed access points.

Enabling the Radio Interfaces

To enable the radio interface, follow these instructions:

1. Use your web-browser to access your access point.

2. When the Summary Status page displays, click Network Interfaces > Radio0-802.11B or Radio0-802.11G and the radio status page appears.

3. Click Settings and the radio settings page appears.

4. Click Enable in the Enable Radio field.

5. Click Apply.

Safety Information

The FCC with its action in ET Docket 96-8 has adopted a safety standard for human exposure to radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic energy emitted by FCC certified equipment. When used with approved Cisco Aironet antennas, Cisco Aironet products meet the uncontrolled environmental limits found in OET-65 and ANSI C95.1, 1991. Proper installation of this radio according to the instructions found in this manual and the Cisco Aironet 1100 Series Access Point Installation and Configuration Guide will result in user exposure that is substantially below the FCC recommended limits.

Do not touch or move antenna(s) while the unit is transmitting or receiving.

Do not hold any component containing a radio such that the antenna is very close to or touching any exposed parts of the body, especially the face and eyes, while transmitting.

Do not operate the radio or attempt to transmit data unless the antenna is connected; otherwise the radio may be damaged.


Warning Do not operate a portable transmitter near unshielded blasting caps or in an explosive environment unless it is a type especially qualified for such use.



Warning In order to comply with FCC RF exposure limits, dipole antennas should be located at a minimum of 7.9 in. (20 cm) from the body of all persons.


Compliance Information

This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the European Telecommunications Standard ETS 300.328. This standard covers Wideband Data Transmission Systems referred to in CEPT recommendation T/R 10.01.

This type-accepted equipment is designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications.

Overview

This guide is designed to help you install and minimally configure your Cisco Aironet 1100 Series Access Point in a wireless local area network (LAN). The following documents contain detailed installation and configuration information:

Cisco Aironet 1100 Series Access Point Installation and Configuration Guide

Cisco Aironet 1100 Series Access Point Command Reference

These documents are on Cisco.com. Follow these steps to access them:

1. Browse to http://www.cisco.com

2. Click Technical Support & Documentation. A Technical Support and Documentation window appears.

3. Click Technical Support and Documentation. The Technical Support and Documentation page appears.

4. Click Wireless. The Wireless Support Resources page appears.

5. Under Wireless LAN Access, click Cisco Aironet 1100 Series. The Cisco Aironet 1100 Series page appears.

6. Under Configure, click Configuration Guides. A list of configuration guides appears.

7. Choose the configuration guide for the Cisco IOS release you are running.

Introduction to the Access Point

The Cisco Aironet 1100 Series Access Point is a wireless LAN transceiver that serves as the center point of a stand alone wireless network or as the connection point between wireless and wired networks. Designed for the enterprise office environment, the access point is IEEE 802.11b- or g-compliant, depending on the radio installed, and operates in the 2.4-GHz frequency band.

The access point uses the Cisco IOS operating system. Cisco IOS software is a feature-rich, network systems software that provides a common IP fabric, functionality, and command-line interface (CLI) across the entire network.

This guide describes how to set up the access point using its graphical user interface (GUI) through your web browser. You can also set up and configure the access point through its CLI within a Telnet session. For detailed information about the CLI, see the Cisco Aironet 1100 Series Access Point Installation and Configuration Guide.


Note When mounting the access point above or below a suspended ceiling, you should comply with local and national codes, such as the National Electrical Code NFPA 70 or the Canadian Electrical Code, Part 1, C22.1.


Unpacking the Access Point

Each access point is shipped with the following items:

Access point power pack

Access point mounting bracket

Cubical partition mounting bracket assembly

Horizontal surface mounting holster

Mounting hardware kit

This quick start guide

Product registration card

If anything is missing or damaged, contact your Cisco representative for support.

Installing the Access Point

Before you begin the installation process, please refer to the following illustration to familiarize yourself with the access point's layout, features, and connections.

1

48 VDC power port

4

Mode button

2

Ethernet port (RJ-45)

5

Status LEDs

3

Kensington lock slot

6

Antenna



Note See the Cisco Aironet 1100 Series Access Point Installation and Configuration Guide for a detailed description of these connections.


Before You Start

Before you install and configure the access point, make sure you are using a computer connected to the same network as the access point, and obtain the following information:

The MAC address from the label on the bottom of the access point (such as 00164625854c)

The following information from your network system administrator:

A host name (system name)

The case-sensitive wireless service set identifier (SSID) for your radio network

If not connected to a DHCP server, a unique IP address for your access point (such as 172.17.255.115)

If the access point is not on the same subnet as your PC, a default gateway address and subnet mask

A Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) community name and the SNMP file attribute (if SNMP is in use)

Connecting the Access Point to Your Network

The following sections describe the various methods you can use to connect the access point to your network.

Connecting to an Ethernet Network with an Inline Power Source

Follow these steps to connect the access point to the Ethernet LAN when you have an inline power source:

1. Connect the Ethernet cable to the RJ-45 Ethernet connector labeled Ethernet on the access point. Connect the other end of the cable to one of the following:

a. A switch with inline power, such as a Cisco Catalyst 3524-PWR-XL switch.

b. An inline power switch panel, such as a Cisco Catalyst Inline Power Patch Panel.

c. The end of a Cisco Aironet power injector labeled To AP/Bridge. Connect the other end labeled To Network to the 10/100 Ethernet LAN.

Connecting to an Ethernet Network with Local Power

Follow these steps to connect the access point to an Ethernet LAN when you have a local power source:

1. Connect the Ethernet cable to the RJ-45 Ethernet connector labeled Ethernet on the access point.

2. Connect the power pack's power output connector to the 48 VDC power port labeled 48 VDC on the access point.

3. Plug the other end of the power pack into an approved 100 to 250 VAC outlet.

Powering Up the Access Point

When power is applied to the access point, it begins a routine power-up sequence that you can monitor by observing the three LEDs on top of the access point. All three LEDs on the top of the access point (Infrastructure, Status, and Radio) slowly blink amber, red, and green in sequence; the sequence takes a couple of minutes to complete.


Note See the Cisco Aironet 1100 Series Access Point Installation and Configuration Guide for a detailed description of the LED displays.


When the sequence is complete, you are ready to associate an IP address with the access point and perform an initial configuration. The easiest way to initially configure your access point is by browsing to its Express Setup page.

Obtaining and Assigning an IP Address

To browse to the access point's Express Setup page, you must obtain or assign the access point's IP address using one of the following methods:

Use the default IP address (10.0.0.1) (inside the 5 minute time window for release 12.3(4) and later) the first time you power up and configure the access point. To do this, see the "Connecting to the Access Point Locally" section.

Use a DHCP server (if available) to automatically assign an IP address. You can obtain the IP address by one of the following methods:

Provide your organization's network administrator with your access point's Media Access Control (MAC) address. Your network administrator will query the DHCP server using the MAC address to identify the IP address.

Use the Cisco IP Setup Utility (IPSU) to identify the assigned address. IPSU runs on most Microsoft Windows operating systems: Windows 9x, 2000, Me, NT, and XT.


Note IPSU is available for downloading at the Software Center on Cisco.com.


Connecting to the Access Point Locally

If you need to configure the access point locally (without connecting the access point to a wired LAN), you can connect to it wirelessly using a wireless client adapter or through its Ethernet port using a Category 5 Ethernet cable.

If the access point is not connected to a DHCP server or cannot obtain an IP address, it defaults to the IP address of 10.0.0.1. You can browse to the access point using this IP address. If you are running Cisco IOS Release 12.3(4)JA and later and miss the 5-minute time window, reboot the access point and try again.

Follow these steps to connect to the access point locally:

1. To configure the access point through its Ethernet port, connect your PC to the access point using a Category 5 Ethernet cable. Make sure the PC you intend to use is configured to obtain an IP address automatically, or manually assign it an IP address of 10.0.0.2 (or an address in the same subnet).

2. Power up the access point.

3. Follow the steps in the "Configuring the Access Point" section.

4. After configuring the access point, remove the Ethernet cable from your PC and connect the access point to your wired LAN.


Note You may lose connectivity when you connect your PC to the wired LAN because the IP address assigned to the PC remains until you either manually assign a new address or reboot.


Configuring the Access Point

After you have determined or assigned the access point's IP address, you can browse to the access point's Express Setup page and perform an initial configuration. Follow these steps.

1. Open your Internet browser. You must use Microsoft Internet Explorer (version 5.x or later) or Netscape Navigator (version 4.x).

2. Enter the access point's IP address in the browser address line and press Enter. An Enter Network Password screen appears.

3. Press the Tab key to bypass the Username field and advance to the Password field.

4. Enter the case-sensitive password Cisco and press Enter. The Summary Status page appears.

5. Click Express Setup. The Express Setup screen appears.

6. Enter the configuration settings you obtained from your system administrator. The screen's configurable settings are identified and described briefly below.

Host name or System Name—The host or system name provides an identifier for the access point.

Configuration Server Protocol—Click the button that matches the network's method of IP address assignment.

DHCP—IP addresses are automatically assigned by your network's DHCP server.

Static IP—IP addresses are assigned manually.

IP Address—Use this setting to assign or change the access point's IP address.

IP Subnet Mask—Enter the IP subnet mask provided by your network administrator so the IP address can be recognized on the LAN. If DHCP is not enabled for your network, the IP and subnet address you enter is the access point's IP and subnet address. If DHCP is enabled, these two fields provide the IP and subnet mask address only if no server responds to the access point's DHCP request.

Default Gateway—Enter the default gateway IP address provided by your network administrator.

Radio Service Set ID (SSID)—Enter the case-sensitive SSID provided by your network administrator. The SSID is a unique identifier that client devices use to associate with the access point.

Broadcast SSID in Beacon—Use this setting to allow devices that do not specify an SSID to associate with the access point.

Yes—This is the default setting; it allows devices that do not specify an SSID to associate with the access point.

No—Devices must specify an SSID to associate with the access point. With No selected, the SSID used by the client devices must match exactly the access point's SSID.

Role in Radio Network—Click on the button that describes the role of the access point on your network. Select Access Point (Root) if your access point is connected to the wired LAN. Select Repeater (Non-Root) if it is not connected to the wired LAN.

Optimize Radio Network for—Use this setting to select either preconfigured settings for the access point radio or customized settings for the access point radio.

Throughput—Maximizes the data volume handled by the access point but might reduce its range.

Range—Maximizes the access point's range but might reduce throughput.

Custom—The access point uses settings you enter on the Network Interfaces: Radio-802.11x (where x is b or g, depending on the radio installed) Settings page. Clicking Custom takes you to the Network Interfaces: Radio-802.11x Settings page.

Aironet Extensions—This setting enables you to operate non-Cisco Aironet devices on your wireless network.

SNMP Community—If your network is using SNMP, enter the SNMP Community name provided by your network administrator and select the attributes of the SNMP data (also provided by your network administrator).

7. Click Apply to save your settings.

Your access point is now running but will probably require additional configuring to conform with your network's operational and security requirements. Consult the Cisco Aironet 1100 Series Access Point Installation and Configuration Guide or the Cisco Aironet 1100 Series Command Reference to obtain the information you need to complete the configuration. These documents are available on Cisco.com.


Note You can restore the access point to its factory defaults by unplugging it from the power jack and plugging it back in while you hold down the Mode button.


Configuring Security Settings

Cisco IOS Release 12.2 (15)JA and later releases include an Express Security page. After you assign basic settings to your access point, you must configure security settings to prevent unauthorized access to your network. Because it is a radio device, the access point can communicate beyond the physical boundaries of your work site.

Just as you use the Express Setup page to assign basic settings, you can use the Express Security page to create unique SSIDs and assign one of four security types to them. The following illustration shows the Express Security page for Cisco IOS Release 12.3(2)JA.

The following table briefly describes the four security settings you can assign to an SSID using the Express Security page. In Cisco IOS Release 12.3(4)JA or later, you must assign an SSID.

Security Type
Description

No Security

The least secure option. Use this option only for SSIDs used in a public space and assign it to a VLAN that restricts access to your network.

Static WEP Key

More secure than no security. However, static WEP keys are vulnerable to attack.

EAP Authentication

Enables 802.1x authentication. Requires an IP address and shared secret for an authentication server on your network (server authentication port 1645). You do not need to enter a WEP key.

WPA

Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) permits wireless access to users authenticated against a database through the services of an authentication server, then encrypts their IP traffic with stronger algorithms than those used in WEP. As with EAP authentication, you must enter the IP address and shared secret for an authentication server on your network (server authentication port 1645).


Refer to the Aironet 11*00 Series Access Points, Cisco IOS Release xx.x(x) for complete security information and configuration procedures.

In Case of Difficulty

If you followed the instructions in previous sections of this guide, you should have had no trouble getting your access point installed and running. However, if you did experience difficulty, help is available from Cisco. Before contacting Cisco, look for a solution to your problem in the following places:

The troubleshooting section of the Cisco Aironet 1100 Series Access Point Installation and Configuration Guide

The Technical Assistance Center's page on Cisco.com at the following link:

http://www.cisco.com/cisco/web/support/index.html

Mounting Instructions

The mounting brackets and hardware shipped with your access point enables you to mount it on any of the following surfaces:

Horizontal or vertical flat surfaces, such as walls or ceilings

Below a suspended ceiling

Cubical partition walls

Desktop or other suitable horizontal surface

A user-supplied T-bar box hanger kit is available for mounting your access point above a suspended ceiling. "Mounting Above a Suspended Ceiling" section for details.

Security features for each of these mounting methods are also provided. You can use a Kensington lock (Notebook MicroSaver, model number 64068), which you must provide, to make the access point more secure when you mount it using any of the mounting options.

You can use the security hasp adapter, provided by Cisco, to secure the access point with a padlock when you use the access point mounting bracket in most installations except above a suspended ceiling. In this installation, there is not enough clearance between the ceiling tile and access point to accommodate the hasp and padlock.

A mounting hardware kit is provided that contains the hardware and fasteners necessary to mount the access point. The following illustration shows the layout of the mounting holes on the access point mounting bracket.

1

Security hasp

3

Suspended ceiling mount holes

2

Access point mounting rail

4

Wall mount holes


Mounting on a Horizontal or Vertical Surface

Follow these steps to mount the access point on a horizontal or vertical surface, such as a ceiling or wall.

1. Use the access point mounting bracket as a template to mark the locations of the four mounting holes.

a. You can use any of the 10 holes around the periphery (three of which are identified in the illustration) of the bracket to mount it using the supplied #8 fasteners.

2. Drill one of the following sized holes at the locations you marked:

3/16 in. (4.7 mm) if you are using wall anchors

3/32 in. (2.3 mm) if you are not using wall anchors

3. Install the anchors into the wall if you are using them. Otherwise, go to Step 4.

4. Secure the mounting bracket to the surface using the #8 fasteners.


Note On a vertical surface, be sure to mount the bracket with its security hasp facing down.


5. Line up the mounting slots on the access point with the mounting rail on the mounting bracket and slide down the mounting rails until it clicks into place.

Mounting Below a Suspended Ceiling

Follow these steps to mount your access point on a suspended ceiling. It may be helpful to refer to the following illustration before beginning the process.

1

Suspended ceiling T-rail

4

access point mounting bracket

2

T-rail clip

5

1/4-20 nut with built-in washer

3

Plastic spacer

   

1. Determine the location at which to mount the access point.

2. Attach two T-rail clips to the ceiling's T-rail.

3. Use the access point mounting bracket to adjust the distance between the T-rail clips so that they align with the holes.

a. The distance between the T-rail clip studs is 2 in. (5.08 cm)

4. Use a standard screwdriver to tighten the T-rail clip in place on the T-rail. Do not overtighten.

5. Install a plastic spacer on each T-rail clip stud. The spacer's legs should contact the ceiling grid T-rail.

6. Attach the access point mounting bracket to the T-rail clip studs and start 1/4-20 nut with built-in washer on each stud.

7. Use a wrench or pliers to tighten the nuts. Do not overtighten.

8. Line up the mounting slots on the access point with the mounting rail on the access point mounting bracket and slide it down the mounting rails until it clicks into place.

Mounting Above a Suspended Ceiling

The access point mounting bracket is designed to be integrated into the T-bar grid above the tiles of a suspended ceiling. Utilizing a T-bar box hanger (not supplied) such as the Erico Caddy 512 or B-Line BA12, the access point is oriented just above the top surface of a standard 5/8-in. (1.59 cm) ceiling tile. You may need to modify a thicker tile to allow room for the access point.

Follow these steps to mount the access point above a suspended ceiling. It may be helpful to refer to the following illustration before proceeding.

1
Suspended ceiling T-rail
4
Access point mounting bracket
2
T-bar box hanger
5
Access point
3
Bracket mounting clip
6
Rail clip

1. Insert the bracket mounting clip's tab into the large hole on the access point mounting bracket.

2. Place the clip over the T-bar box hanger and secure it to the access point mounting bracket with the 1/4-20 fastener (supplied with the T-bar hanger).


Note The illustration shows the access point mounting bracket mounted perpendicular to the T-bar box hanger. You can also mount the bracket parallel to the T-bar box hanger.


3. Determine the location in the ceiling where you will mount the access point and remove an adjacent ceiling tile.

4. Configure the ends of the T-bar box hanger to allow for maximum clearance above the ceiling tile. See the illustration above.

5. Attach the rail clips on the each end of the T-bar box hanger to the ceiling grid T-rails. Make sure the clips are securely attached to the T-rails.

6. Connect a drop wire to a building structural element and the hole provided in the bracket mounting clip. This additional support is required in order to comply with the U.S. National Electrical Safety Code.

7. Attach the access point to the access point mounting bracket.

8. Connect the Ethernet cables to the access point.


Note The power module and power injector are not rated for mounting above suspended ceilings. Therefore, you must use the Ethernet cable to supply power.


9. If you need additional security, you can secure the access point to a nearby immovable object using a Kensington lock and security cable.

10. Verify that the access point is operating before replacing the ceiling tile.

Using the Security Hasp Adapter

The security hasp on the access point mounting bracket and the security hasp adapter locks the access point to the bracket. After you install the access point on the detachable mounting bracket, follow these steps to secure it with a padlock (such as a Master Lock model 120T, 121T or equivalent).

1. Connect the Ethernet cable and power jack.

2. Insert the T-shaped tab on the security hasp adapter into the Kensington lock slot on the access point. See the following illustration.


Note There is insufficient clearance to use the adapter when you install the access point above a suspended ceiling.


3. Rotate the adapter to engage it with the security hasp. The hole in the adapter should be aligned with the hole in the security hasp.

4. Secure the adapter to the security hasp with a padlock. Your installation will look similar to the following illustration.

Mounting on a Cubicle Wall Partition

Follow these steps to mount the access point on a cubicle wall partition.

1. Select the place on the partition where you want to mount the access point.

2. Determine the width of the partition on which you are going to mount the access point.

3. Assemble the cubicle partition mounting bracket by sliding the two pieces together. You can use either the short or long part of the bracket to obtain the proper fit to the partition wall. See the illustration on the following page.

a. The bracket is adjustable from 2.125 in. (5.39 cm) to 4.25 in.
(10.79 cm).

4. Connect the Ethernet and power cables.

5. Line up the mounting slots on the access point with the mounting rails on the cubicle partition mounting bracket and slide it down the rails until it clicks into place.

6. Position the mounting bracket over the partition wall and adjust it to fit.

Mounting to a Desktop or Horizontal Surface

Follow these steps to mount the access point on a desktop or other horizontal surface using the supplied desktop holster.

1. Select a suitable location to place the holster.

2. Connect the Ethernet and power cables.

a. If you are going to secure the access point with a Kensington lock, attach it now.

3. Position the holster so that its back side is facing you.

4. Insert the access point into the holster while guiding the cables so that they do not interfere with the sides of the holster. You will hear a click when the access point locks into place.

Using the Kensington Lock Feature

You can secure the access point with your own Kensington lock and security cable with any of the mounting methods described in this guide. Follow these steps to install the Kensington lock and security cable.


Note Cisco recommends using a Kensington Notebook MicroSaver (model number 64068) to secure your access point.


1. Loop the security cable around a nearby immovable object.

2. Insert the key into the Kensington lock.

3. Insert the Kensington lock into the Kensington security slot on the access point.

4. Rotate the key right or left to secure the Kensington lock to the access point.

5. Remove the key.