Administration Guide for Cisco Virtualization Experience Client 2112/2212 ICA Firmware Release 7.1_118
Print configuration examples
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Print configuration examples

Print configuration examples

Local USB or parallel printer setup

You can print to locally attached printers through USB or Parallel ports.

Important:

Microsoft Remote Desktop Session Host (RDSH), Microsoft Terminal Services, and Citrix XenApp each have their own printing policies that must be configured properly to allow client side printing. For details on configuring printing in these environments, see your vendor instructions.

Local USB or parallel printer setup using administrative interface

Figure 1. Printer Setup dialog box



In this example we have an HP LaserJet 4000 attached to a zero client USB port. When connecting USB printers, some printers will fill out the Printer Name and Printer Identification fields for you.

Use the Printer Setup dialog box ( System Settings icon > Printer) and the following guidelines for the Ports tab when printing to a local USB printer:
  • Select Port - Select LPT1 or LPT2 port.
  • Printer Name - Enter name you want displayed in your list of printers (most USB direct-connected printers report/fill in their printer name automatically).
  • Printer Identification - Enter the type or model of the printer in the exact text of the Windows printer driver name—including capitalizations and spaces (most USB direct-connected printers report/fill in their printer identifications automatically). In our example case, enter HP LaserJet 4000 Series PCL.
  • Printer Class - (Optional) You can leave this blank.
  • Enable the printer device - Must be selected to enable the directly-connected printer (enables the device so it displays on the remote host).

Local USB or parallel printer setup using INI files

Configuring local printing using WTOS INI parameters is simple and an easy way to configure a printer for all clients in your environment assuming every printer is the same.

Your INI parameters will look similar to the following:

Printer=LPT1 \
    Name="HP LaserJet 4000" \
    PrinterID="HP LaserJet 4000 Series PCL" \
    Enabled=yes

Note


The PrinterID is the exact text of the Windows printer driver name, so if a printer driver is named HP LaserJet 4000 Series PCL in Windows, then it must be exactly the same in the PrinterID field in the INI parameters including capitalizations and spaces.


For example, to find the Windows printer driver name on a Windows 2003 Server:

  1. Click Start > Printers and Faxes.
  2. Right-click in the window and select Server Properties.
  3. Click the Drivers tab to view the printer driver name.

Non-Windows network printer (LPD) setup

WTOS can print to non-Windows network printers as long as the printers can accept LPR print requests. Most workgroup printers and large network printers have this capability (be sure to check with your vendor that the printer can accept Line Printer Request print requests).

Once your zero Client is configured to print to an LPR capable printer, the client will then redirect this printer through an RDP or ICA connection to your back end infrastructure. In this way the client will connect to your back end infrastructure and this network printer will appear as a client local printer.

Non-Windows network printer (LPD) setup using administrative interface

Figure 2. LPDs tab



In this example we have an HP LaserJet 4200n attached to a zero client through LPR.

Use the Printer Setup dialog box (System Settings icon > Printer) and the following guidelines for the LPDs tab when printing to a non-Windows network printer:

  • Select LPD - Select LPD1 or LPD2 port.
  • Printer Name - Enter name you want displayed in your list of printers.
  • Printer Identification - Enter the type or model of the printer in the exact text of the Windows printer driver name—including capitalizations and spaces. In our example case, enter HP LaserJet 4200n PCL6.
  • LPD Hosts - The DNS or WINS name of the server for the network printer. An IP address of the printer on the network can also be entered as we have used in our case example.

    Note


    NOTE: If the printer is attached to another zero client on your network, the entry in the LPD Hosts box is the name or address of that zero client.


  • LPD Queue Name - An LPD host maintains a named queue for each supported printer. Enter the name of the queue associated with the printer to be used. This name can be different for each vendor. This is field is required and must be correct so that the network printer accepts incoming print jobs properly. In our case example, auto can be used for HP LaserJet 4200n PCL6 as per documentation found on the HP Web site.

    Note


    NOTE: If the printer is attached to another zero client on your network, the LPD Queue Name must match the content of the Printer Name box on the zero client with the printer attached.


  • Printer Class - (Optional) You can leave this blank.
  • Enable the printer device - Must be selected to enable the printer (enables the device so it displays on the remote host).

Non-Windows network printer (LPD) setup using INI parameters

Configuring network printing using INI parameters is simple and an easy way to configure a printer for all clients in your environment assuming every printer is the same.

Your INI parameters will look similar to the following:

Printer=LPD1 \
    LocalName="HP LaserJet 4200n" \
    Host=10.10.10.1 \
    Queue=auto \
    PrinterID="HP LaserJet 4200 PCL6" \
    Enabled=yes

Note


The PrinterID is the exact text of the Windows printer driver name, so if a printer driver is named HP LaserJet 4200n PCL6 in Windows, then it must be exactly the same in the PrinterID field in the INI parameters including capitalizations and spaces.


Windows network printer (SMB) setup

WTOS can print to printers that are shared by Microsoft print servers. There are some configuration requirements that need to be considered when configuring SMB printing from WTOS which may require changes to your zero client setup.

Since connecting to a Microsoft Windows Print Server requires domain credentials, you must provide the credentials to WTOS either on demand as the printer is used or by administrator setup providing credentials cached from the login screen (see "Example 3: in Windows network printer (SMB) setup using INI parameters). This section will discuss both methods.


Caution


The printer name shared by Windows must not contain any spaces or WTOS will not be able to use it.


Windows network printer (SMB) setup using administrative interface

Configuring an SMB printer is this manner forces users to enter their credentials before each printing; this means they will be temporarily pulled out of their remote session to enter their credentials (this can be avoided by using an INI file as discussed in Windows network printer (SMB) setup using INI parameters.

Figure 3. SMBs tab



Use the Printer Setup dialog box (System Settings icon > Printer ) and the following guidelines for the SMBs tab when printing to a Windows network printer.


Caution


The printer name shared by Windows must not contain any spaces or WTOS will not be able to use it


  • Select SMB - Select the SMB you want from the list.
  • \\Host\Printer - Click the browse folder icon next to the box to browse your Microsoft Networks and make the printer selection you want from the network printers available (the DNS name or IP address of the Windows print server on the network).
    Figure 4. SMBs tab: browse folder



    Figure 5. Browse Printers dialog box



    Figure 6. Printer selection



    Figure 7. Credential dialog box



After entering required domain credentials, the Printer Setup dialog box will display.

  • Printer Name - Enter name you want displayed in your list of printers.
  • Printer Identification - Enter the type or model of the printer in the exact text of the Windows printer driver name—including capitalizations and spaces. In our example case, enter HP LaserJet 4100 Series PCL.
  • Printer Class - (Optional) You can leave this blank.
  • Enable the printer device - Must be selected to enable the printer (enables the device so it displays on the remote host). Click Test Print and you will be prompted to enter your Windows credentials, these credentials will be used to access the printer share. This is also the same dialog box that will display for a user when they attempt to print to this printer.

Windows network printer (SMB) setup using INI parameters

Configuring SMB printing using WTOS INI parameters is simple and an easy way to configure printers shared by a Windows server for all clients in your environment. The primary advantage of configuring SMB printing using WTOS INI parameters is that you can predefine the domain account to use to authenticate the printer. The following examples discuss how the credentials can be supplied.

Example 1: Define an SMB Printer with Generic User Credentials in Plain Text

Printer=SMB1 \ 
    LocalName="Demo SMB Printer" \
    Host=\\dp-dc-ftp \
    Name="TechSupportPrinter" \
    PrinterID="HP LaserJet 4100 Series PCL" \
    Enabled=yes \
    Username=Username1 \
    Password=Password \
    Domain=contoso

Example 2: Define an SMB Printer with Generic User Credentials that are Encrypted

Printer=SMB1 \
    LocalName="Demo SMB Printer"\
    Host=\\dp-dc-ftp \
    Name="TechSupportPrinter" \
    PrinterID="HP LaserJet 4100 Series PCL"\
    Enabled=yes \
    Username-enc=PACGOGDBPKDOPGDGKC \
    Password-enc=PFDBOHDBODCJPODP \
    Domain=contoso

Note


In order to create the encrypted passwords for use in an INI file you will want to use a program such as ConfGen. This application has built in support for creating the encrypted strings. ConfGen can be downloaded from http:/​/​technicalhelp.de.



Caution


This is a non-supported tool that is linked solely for the purpose of this example.


Example 3: Defining an SMB Printer to Use User Credentials Cached by WTOS (Advanced)


Note


This method requires that the user log in to WTOS so that the credentials can be cached for later use. The example INI section provided below provides the minimum requirements you need.


Signon=NTLM

Connect=RDP \
    Host=1.2.3.4 \
    Username=$UN \
    Password=$PW \
    Domain=$DN \
    AutoConnect=1

Printer=SMB1 \
    LocalName="Demo SMB Printer"\
    Host=\\dp-dc-ftp \
    Name="TechSupportPrinter" \
    PrinterID="HP LaserJet 4100 Series PCL"\
    Enabled=yes \
    Username=$UN \
    Password=$PW \
    Domain=$DN

Note


The PrinterID is the exact text of the Windows printer driver name, so if a printer driver is named HP LaserJet 4100 Series PCL in Windows, then it must be exactly the same in the PrinterID field in the INI parameters including capitalizations and spaces.


Zero client as a print server

A Cisco VXC client can be configured as a basic network print server, to share local printers with other Cisco VXC clients.

Set up LPD services using administrative interface

From the Classic Desktop mode only, a zero client can be configured to provide LPD (Line Printer Daemon) services (making the zero client a printer server on the network).

Set up the zero client that is to provide LPD print services as follows:

Procedure
    Step 1   Open the Network Setup dialog box (Desktop Menu > System Setup > Network Setup ) and enter a static IP address for the zero client.
    Step 2   Open the Printer Setup dialog box (Desktop Menu > System Setup > Printer) and select any of the listed ports.

    Step 3   Select LPT.
    Step 4   Name the printer in the Printer Name box.
    Step 5   Enter the Printer Identification type or model of the printer in the exact text of the Windows printer driver name—including capitalizations and spaces. In our example case, enter HP LaserJet 4000 Series PCL.
    Step 6   You can leave Printer Class blank.
    Step 7   Select Enable the printer device.
    Step 8   Select Enable LPD service for the printer.
    Step 9   Set up the application server (see Set up Windows 2003/​2008 servers).

    Set up Windows 2003/2008 servers

    Procedure
      Step 1   Navigate to Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Services and ensure the Microsoft TCP/IP Printing service is installed. If it is not, install it using the Microsoft installation instructions.
      Step 2   Add the zero client as the LPD printer by completing the following:
      1. Navigate to Control Panel > Printers > Add Printers > Local Printer > Create a new port and select LPR PORT.
        Tip   

        If you do not see LPR Port, ensure that the Microsoft TCP/IP Printing service is installed correctly.

      2. Type the zero client IP address or DNS name in the Name or Address of Host Providing LPD box.
      3. Type the printer name in the Name of Printer on That Machine box.
      4. Click OK, and then click NEXT.
      Step 3   After you have selected the printer, you can perform your normal printer setup for the application server. For example, select the manufacturer printer type and printer name.

      LPD services setup using INI parameters

      Configuring LPD printing using WTOS INI parameters is simple and an easy way to configure a WTOS zero client to be a basic network print server, to share local printers with other Cisco VXC clients.

      Your INI parameters will look something like the following:

      Printer=LPT1 \
      Name="HP LaserJet 4000" \
      PrinterID="HP LaserJet 4000 Series PCL" \
      Enabled=yes \
      EnableLPD=yes

      Note


      The PrinterID is the exact text of the Windows printer driver name, so if a printer driver is named HP LaserJet 4000 Series PCL in Windows, then it must be exactly the same in the PrinterID field in the INI parameters including capitalizations and spaces.


      ThinPrint setup

      No ThinPrint-specific configuration is available on the zero clients. Thus to be able to use ThinPrint, users must first set up their printers according to the user documentation, and then configure ThinPrint on the zero client using the Printer Setup dialog box.

      Use the following guidelines:

      • Use the Printer Identification field to enter a printer class (you can change the printer name as needed).
      • Printer IDs are assigned (depending on the physical port) as follows:
      • COM1 = 1
      • COM2 = 2
      • LPT1 = 3 (USB printers are detected automatically on LPT1)
      • LPT2 = 4
      • LPD0 = 5 (The LPD Queue name is transmitted as the printer name; the Printer Identification as class)
      • LPD1 = 6 (The LPD Queue name is transmitted as the printer name; the Printer Identification as class)
      • LPD2 = 7 (The LPD Queue name is transmitted as the printer name; the Printer Identification as class)
      • LPD3 = 8 (The LPD Queue name is transmitted as the printer name; the Printer Identification as class)
      • SMB1 = 9 (In the form \\host\printershare)
      • SMB2 = 10
      • SMB3 = 11
      • SMB4 = 12

      To install the relevant ThinPrint product on the server, use the following guidelines:

      • Printer Object(s) Created Manually by the Administrator—After you install .print Engine, create a printer object on the server to use the native driver and ThinPort as a printer port. You can use any protocol (TCP, RDP, or ICA) because WTOS has .print clients for all of the protocols. The printer object needs to observe ThinPrint naming conventions (for example, HPLJ5#_:2, in which case print jobs will be sent to the local printer that has ID number .2) by referring to .print client port ID. If no ID number is present, the .print client sends the print job to the printer set as current.
      • Printer Object(s) Created Automatically by ThinPrint AutoConnect—When using ThinPrint AutoConnect, the zero client identifies with the zero client ID number 84 (and thus is recognized as a zero client without a local spooler). You can also set up a template on the server that uses a native driver (for example, HPLJ5) and ThinPort, and then name this template as you want in the form _#AnyName. You can then make sure that the rules (on ThinPrint Autoconnect [1]) have been set to assign the desired local printers to use this server template. The assigned printer will then be shown in the user session using the HPLJ5 driver and ThinPort; it will be named automatically according to ThinPrint naming convention with the printer name from the client side included. Alternatively, you can also define a template name according to the client printer name (replace .AnyName. with printer name 4. and 5. above [for example, _#HP Laserjet 5]) so that the local printer object .HP Laserjet 5. will be mapped to this template without any rules defined on the ThinPrint Autoconnect.