Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Installation and Configuration Guide (Releases 9.1 through 9.6)
HP OpenView Sample SNMP Configuration
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HP OpenView Sample SNMP Configuration

Table Of Contents

HP OpenView Sample SNMP Configuration

Configuring the Cisco MGC to Send Alarms to HP OpenView

Formatting Trap Messages


HP OpenView Sample SNMP Configuration


Configuring the Cisco MGC to Send Alarms to HP OpenView

This sample configuration sets up a Cisco MGC to send alarms to HP OpenView.


Step 1 Load the following MIBs in HP OpenView, in the order shown below. To load MIBs, select the Options menu, and choose Load/Unload MIBs: SNMP.

MIB
Location

CISCO-SMI.my

/opt/TransPath/snmp

tp.my

/opt/TransPath/snmp

measurement.my

/opt/TransPath/snmp

v3-tgt.my

/opt/TransPath/snmp

SNMP-FRAMEWORK-MIB.my

ftp://ftp.cisco.com/pub/mibs/v2/

SNMP-NOTIFICATION-MIB.my

ftp://ftp.cisco.com/pub/mibs/v2/




Note You must also install the generic HP OpenView MIB files SNMP-FRAMEWORK and SNMP-NOTIFICATION. These files are available from your HP OpenView installation medium.


Step 2 Open the MIB browser and select the Tools menu, then choose SNMP MIB Browser.

Step 3 Under Name or IP Address, enter the name or IP address of the Cisco MGC you are configuring.

Step 4 Under Community Name, enter public.

Step 5 Navigate to the SNMP target address table by double-clicking snmpV2 | snmpModules | snmpTargetMIB | snmpTargetObjects | snmpTargetAddrTable | snmpTargetAddrEntry.

Step 6 Select the MIB object snmpTargetAddrRowStatus (see table below).

Step 7 Click Start Query. Two values should appear at the bottom of the window, 49: active and 50: active.

Step 8 Under MIB Instance, enter 51 (see table below).

Step 9 Under SNMP Set Value, enter 5 (see table below).

Step 10 Click Set. You should see a dialog box indicating that the values are entered successfully.

Step 11 Continue this process until all the MIB object IDs in the table below have the correct MIB instance and SNMP set values.

Select MIB Object ID
MIB Instance
SNMP Set Value

snmpTargetAddrRowStatus

51

5

snmpTargetAddrRowStatus

52

5

snmpTargetAddrTDomain

52

.1.3.6.1.6.1.1

snmpTargetAddrTDomain

52

.1.3.6.1.6.1.1

snmpTargetAddrTAddress

51

Hex representation of NMS IP (see note below)

snmpTargetAddrTAddress

52

Hex representation of NMS IP (see note below)

snmpTargetAddrTimeout

51

100

smnpTargetAddrTimeout

52

100

snmpTargetAddrRetryCount

51

3

snmpTargetAddrRetryCount

52

3

snmpTargetAddrTagList

51

Manager1

snmpTargetAddrTagList

52

Manager1

snmpTargetAddrParams

51

v1ExampleParams

snmpTargetAddrParams

52

v2cExampleParams

snmpTargetAddrStorageType

51

3

snmpTargetAddrStorageType

52

3

snmpTargetAddrRowStatus

51

1

snmpTargetAddrRowStatus

52

1




Note When you are configuring snmpTargetAddrTAddress, the address of the network management station running HP OpenView must be entered. This SNMP field is a generic six-byte field designed to accommodate IP and non-IP SNMP implementations. Since the Cisco MGC supports only SNMP over IP, this field always contains the IP address of the network management system. The IP address, however, must be converted into a six-byte hexadecimal value. This is done by converting the IP address to hexadecimal notation, then appending two bytes of zeros as padding. For example, if the IP address of the HP OpenView station is 172.24.236.241, the value entered for snmpTargetAddrTAddress is AC 18 EC F1 00 00.



Tip You can verify the settings by selecting each MIB object ID and clicking Start Query. When you do this for snmpTargetAddrRowStatus, it should show four entries set to active.


Step 12 Navigate to the snmpNotify table by clicking Up Tree four times to return to the snmpModules part of the MIB. Then navigate down the tree by double-clicking snmpNotificationMIB | snmpNotifyObjects | snmpNotifyTable | snmpNotifyEntry.

Step 13 As before, associate the correct MIB instance and SNMP set values with the MIB object IDs.

Select MIB Object ID
MIB Instance
SNMP Set Value

snmpNotifyRowStatus

50

5

snmpNotifyTag

50

Manager1

snmpNotifyStorageType

50

3

snmpNotifyRowStatus

50

1



Tip You can verify the settings by selecting each MIB OID and clicking Start Query. When you do this for snmpNotifyRowStatus, it should show four entries set to active. When you have verified the settings, you can close the MIB browser window.


Step 14 Click Close.

Step 15 At this point, HP OpenView should start receiving alarms from the Cisco MGC. You can verify this by, for example, performing a set-sc-state MML command to take a signaling channel out of service.


Formatting Trap Messages

When HP OpenView receives the traps from the Cisco MGC, HP OpenView does not automatically interpret the trap and display it in a useful manner. The trap is sent with basic information indicating the alarm category, description, and severity. Because many failures require extra detail for troubleshooting, you should refer to the log file on the Cisco MGC for complete alarm information and for determining root causes.

You can, however, configure HP OpenView to format the traps into a more readily understandable format by following the steps below:


Step 1 Open the Event Configuration window by selecting Options | Event Configuration from the HP OpenView menu.

Step 2 Under Enterprise Name, select TransPath. The five alarm types should be displayed under Event Identification.

Step 3 Double-click one of the event names under Event Identification; for example, commAlarm.

Step 4 Under Event Log Message, enter the message that you want logged to the HP OpenView log file when HP OpenView receives this alarm. You can use variables from the following table in your message to provide specific information about the alarm.

Variable
Definition
Explanation

$1

tpAlarmId

Alarm identification

$2

tpAlarmCatId

Alarm category identification number

$3

tpAlarmCatName

Alarm category name

$4

tpAlarmCatDesc

Alarm category description

$5

tpAlarmSet

Alarm set/not set.
2 means the alarm is being set.
1 means the alarm is being cleared

$6

tpAlarmNotify

Alarm notified/not notified

$7

tpAlarmSeverity

Alarm severity

$8

tpAlarmReported

Alarm reported

$9

tpComponentId

Component identification number. This number consists of two parts, the component type and component instance.

The most significant 2 bytes signify the component type.

The least significant 2 bytes are the sequential instance of the type.

$10

tpComponentType

Component type identification number

$11

tpCompMMLName

Short notation of the component name. It is also the MML name that can be used in the MML session.

$12

tpCompDesc

Component description

$13

tpCompParentId

Component parent identification

$14

tpAlarmTime

Time the alarm occurred


Following is an example of an event log message string:

SC2200: ID#: $13  Name: $12  Set: $10  MMLname: $4  CatDesc: $11  CompDesc: $3  
Severity: $8  CompID: $6  CompType: $5  CatID: $14  AlarmNotify: $9  AlarmTime: $1  
ParentID: $2  AlarmReported: $7

Following is another example showing more simple formatting:

MGC $7 alarm $5 -- $12: $4

Step 5 Click OK to set your message.

Step 6 Repeat the procedure for each event name.

Step 7 From the Event Configuration window, select File | Save.

Step 8 Close the window.

Step 9 Verify that alarms are being received and formatted correctly by generating an alarm on the Cisco MGC (for instance, take a signaling channel out of service to see if you get an alarm).