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DPNSS Service Interworking with Cisco CallManager Over QSIG Tunneling

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DPNSS Service Interworking with Cisco CallManager Using QSIG Tunneling

Table Of Contents

DPNSS Service Interworking with Cisco CallManager Using QSIG Tunneling

Feature Overview

Overview of DPNSS Feature Interworking with CCM

Route Optimization or Path Replacement Transit Calls

Route Optimization and Path Replacement Interworking as Service Responder or Requestor

Call Back Services and Call Completion

Message Waiting Indicator

Call Transfer and Call Diversion

Call ID Services

Overview of QSIG Features Interworking with CCM

Path Replacement

Call Completion

Message Waiting Indicator

Call Transfer

Call Diversion

Call ID Services

QSIG, DPNSS, and EISUP to HSI Feature Transparency Mode

Benefits

Requirements

Restrictions

Limitations

Related Features and Technologies

Related Documents

Supported Platforms

Supported Standards, MIBs, and RFCs

Prerequisites for Using this Feature

XECfgParm.dat Configuration Tasks

Verifying the XECfgParm.dat Changes

Provisioning This Feature

Provisioning Basics

Starting a Provisioning Session

Saving and Activating Your Provisioning Changes

Ending a Provisioning Session Without Activating Your Changes

Retrieving Provisioning Data

Provisioning Examples

Enabling Annex M1 (QSIG Tunneling) on the PGW

Enabling Annex M1 (QSIG Tunneling) on the HSI

Disabling Annex M1 (QSIG Tunneling) on the PGW

Disabling Annex M1 (QSIG Tunneling) on the HSI

PGW Provisioning Examples

Billing Interface

Service Data (Tag: 4239)

Command Reference

New MML Commands

Properties

Software Changes for this Feature

Alarms

New Alarms

Measurements

Properties

Result Type Definitions

Result Type Definitions

XECfgParm.dat Parameters

Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines

Glossary


DPNSS Service Interworking with Cisco CallManager Using QSIG Tunneling


Document Release History

Publication Date
Comments

March 12, 2007

Initial version of the document.


Feature History

Release
Modification

Release 9.4(1)

QSIG Feature Transparency was introduced.

Release 9.6(1)

DPNSS Supplementary Service Interworking with Cisco CallManager (CCM), DPNSS Call Back and Extension Status, and DPNSS Route Optimization.

Release 9.7(3)

The DPNSS Service Interworking with Cisco CallManager Using QSIG Tunneling feature was introduced on the Cisco MGC software.


This document describes the DPNSS Service Interworking with Cisco CallManager Using QSIG Tunneling feature to provide the ability to interwork DPNSS and QSIG with and without H.323 QSIG encapsulation that enables deployment of the PGW 2200 in hybrid DPNSS and QSIG networks. With the DPNSS Service Interworking with Cisco CallManager Using QSIG Tunneling, the PGW can now support mapping Path Replacement messages into Route Optimization messages and vice versa. This feature provides optimized call paths for the call transfer feature on the Cisco PGW 2200 by using H.323 Annex M1 (QSIG tunneling) to supply DPNSS to CCM services interworking.

This feature is described in the following sections:

Feature Overview

Supported Platforms

Supported Standards, MIBs, and RFCs

Prerequisites for Using this Feature

XECfgParm.dat Configuration Tasks

Command Reference

Software Changes for this Feature

Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines

Glossary

Feature Overview

This feature is an enhancement to the QSIG Feature Transparency introduced in the Cisco MGC software Release 9.4(1). The enhancement is a new interface for the DPNSS Service Interworking with Cisco CallManager Using QSIG Tunneling feature. It also enhances signaling interworking and feature transparency between Cisco CallManagers (CCM) and TDM-based PBXs over DPNSS and QSIG interfaces. The Cisco PGW 2200 in this application works with single or multiple clusters of Cisco CallManagers over H.323 interface by using the H.323 Signaling Interface (HSI) and TDM-based private branch exchanges (PBXs) over DPNSS and QSIG. The Feature Transparency mode enables full end-to-end Route Optimization for mixed CCM and DPNSS PBX networks and also provides significant benefits by enabling call back services through QSIG tunneling.

Table 1 Feature Services Names for QSIG and DPNSS 

QSIG Service
DPNSS Supplementary Service

Call Completion

Call Back

—Call Completion on Busy Service (CCBS)

—Call Back When Free (CBWF)

—Call Completion No Reply (CCNR)

—Call Back When Not Used (CBWNU)

Path Replacement

Route Optimization (RO)

Call Transfer

Three Party

Call Diversion

Diversion

Message Waiting Indicator (MWI)

Non-specified Information

Identification / Name Identification

-no corresponding DPNSS service—Use TEXT(100) string to indicate the name


The DPNSS Service Interworking with Cisco CallManager Using QSIG Tunneling feature consists of the following major sections:

QSIG, DPNSS, and EISUP to HSI Feature Transparency Mode

Overview of DPNSS Feature Interworking with CCM

Overview of QSIG Features Interworking with CCM

Overview of DPNSS Feature Interworking with CCM

This feature enhances signaling interworking and feature transparency between CCM and DPNSS services to QSIG and vice versa. The ability to interwork QSIG Path Replacement and DPNSS Route Optimization enables DPNSS mapping to and from QSIG. It also allows interoperability of the features as mixed protocols in a single call. For example, the Cisco PGW may issue a Route Optimization request over a DPNSS interface that is subsequently returned as a Path replacement request on an incoming QSIG interface.

The DPNSS-to-QSIG interworking feature enhances the functionality of the following areas:

Route Optimization or Path Replacement Transit Calls

Route Optimization and Path Replacement Interworking as Service Responder or Requestor

Call Back Services and Call Completion

Message Waiting Indicator

Call Transfer and Call Diversion

Call ID Services

Route Optimization or Path Replacement Transit Calls

Cisco PGW supports the mapping of Path Replacement messages to Route Optimization messages, and vice versa. The following points should be noted while interworking these two services:

QSIG passes Call ID and routing number as separate parameters, while DPNSS combines these two fields.

Release of the old connection is performed by the invoker of Route Optimization as opposed to Path Replacement, which is initiated by the recipient of Path Replacement. Both services are tolerant of an overlapping release sequence received from the remote side of the connection.

Receipt of path retention is treated as a normal Path Replacement invocation request.

Route Optimization and Path Replacement Interworking as Service Responder or Requestor

The following examples explain how the Route Optimization logic handles and interoperates QSIG and Route Optimization within the same call:

Example 1: PSTN Originated Call to a DPNSS PBX, then Transferred to CCM

Figure 1 illustrates the Cisco PGW interworking Route Optimization with Path Replacement for a PSTN-originated call to a DPNSS PBX that is then transferred to the CCM. The call instance SS7-to-DPNSS triggers the sending of an End-to-End Message (EEM) Route Optimization Path Replacement request forward. The call has been transferred through the Cisco PGW to the CCM. Therefore, the PBX transits the Route Optimization Path Replacement request and it is received by another call instance related to the second call leg where it is converted into a Path Replacement message in accordance with the Route Optimization/Path Replacement interworking support. On receiving this message, CCM initiates a new call setup over H.323 with a tunneled QSIG setup containing a Path Replacement setup invoke request. This message is received in the Cisco PGW and, after identifying its own routing number, is associated with an existing call instance that invoked Route Optimization.

Figure 1 Cisco PGW Interworking Route Optimization with Path Replacement (Example1)

Example 2: A PSTN Originated Call to CCM Transferred Through Cisco PGW to a DPNSS PBX

Figure 2 illustrates a PSTN-originated call to the CCM that is transferred by the PGW to a DPNSS PBX. For this call, the Cisco PGW transfer trigger sends a Facility Path Replacement propose request to the CCM. The CCM transits this request back to Cisco PGW over the second call leg to a call instance that is interworking H.323 and DPNSS (CCM transferred the call to a DPNSS PBX line). The Path Replacement request is translated into a Route Optimization Path Replacement request and an EEM message is sent on to the DPNSS PBX. The PBX will initiate a new call towards Cisco PGW with a Route Optimization setup service request. The routing number contained within the message identifies Cisco PGW and the call reference identifies the call instance that initiated the Path Replacement request.

Figure 2 Cisco PGW Interworking Route Optimization with Path Replacement (Example2)

These examples illustrate an interworking capability and a transparent handling of Route Optimization and Path Replacement interchangeable within the same service logic. The Route Optimization service logic therefore includes Path Replacement call flows options and in addition, support for the tunneled QSIG variations which alter the responsibilities of the service logics operating in each half call with respect to media negotiation.

Call Back Services and Call Completion

In the PGW 2200 software Release 9.6(1), the Call Back service required use of the CTI and the AXL interfaces to CCM. With the introduction of this feature, these interfaces are no longer needed. Further, this also eliminates the necessity to run and own the call back service even when the caller and called parties reside wholly on CCM.


Note If you use the QBE interface on the PGW 2200 software Release 9.6(1), you can only interwork with CCM 4.xx.


The QSIG Call Completion service maps directly to the equivalent call back services on DPNSS. In other words, the QSIG Call Completion Busy Subscriber (CCBS) maps to the DPNSS Call Back When Free (CBWF) and the QSIG Call Completion No Reply (CCNR) maps to the DPNSS Call Back When Next Used (CBWNU).

The functionality of this feature is explained in detail below:

Booking

The Cisco PGW interworks an incoming DPNSS (virtual call) Call Back request to an outbound or tunneled QSIG CCBS or CCNR request using call independent signaling. The subsequent booking acknowledgement is mapped back into DPNSS. QSIG and EISUP are now considered valid destinations for call back in addition to DPNSS and QBE.


Note For destinations that retain the QBE call back method, tunneled call back is disabled by the DisableCCBSoverTunneledQSIG property in the XECfgParm.dat file


The Cisco PGW interworks an incoming or tunneled QSIG CCBS or CCNR request to an outbound DPNSS callback request. The subsequent booking acknowledgement is mapped back into QSIG.

The Cisco PGW does not advertise signaling connection retention when interworking an inbound DPNSS Call Back service with QSIG CCBS. If the signaling connection is retained, Cisco PGW initiates a forward release.


Note If the DPNSS phone status is free when the QSIG booking call back service occurs, the PGW sends the QSIG reject message. Because the DPNSS SOD-F cannot map to the QSIG parameter of the RELEASE message. If the DPNSS phone status is free, the DPNSS does not send out the free notification any longer. While the QSIG does not know the status of the DPNSS phone since there is no mapping between the SOD-F and QSIG parameter. The QSIG always waits for free notification. As a result, the PGW 2200 rejects the booking request for this case.


The Cisco PGW does not support the request for signaling connection retention when interworking an inbound QSIG Call Completion service with DPNSS Call Back service. The signaling connection is released by the Cisco PGW.

The Cisco PGW maps any failure responses between DPNSS and QSIG accordingly.

The Cisco PGW acknowledges a Path Reservation request when responding to a QSIG CCBS or CCNR request that terminates on a DPNSS PBX.

The Cisco PGW indicates a Path Reservation request when making a QSIG CCBS or CCNR request dependent upon a QSIG or EISUP trunk group property.

Cancellation

Cisco PGW maps a cancellation request and its corresponding response between QSIG (or tunneled QSIG) and DPNSS in each direction.

Notification

Cisco PGW maps a Free Notification request and its corresponding response between QSIG (or tunneled QSIG) and DPNSS in each direction.

Recall Call Set Up

Cisco PGW maps a DPNSS Callback set up request into a QSIG ringout request if Path Reservation is not enabled on the outbound QSIG or EISUP trunk group. The setup message is inhibited by the Cisco PGW and a Number Acknowledge Message (NAM) is returned over the DPNSS interface. When the PBX responds with an EEM (ringout), then the "setup" message is sent out over the QSIG or H.323 interface.

Cisco PGW maps a DPNSS Callback set up request into a QSIG path reservation request if Path Reservation is enabled on the outbound QSIG or EISUP trunk group. When the QSIG destination responds with a "progress" message indicating that the path has been reserved, a NAM is returned over the DPNSS interface.

When Path Reservation is enabled, the EEM ringout message is mapped into a Facility ringout request.

An Alerting message received from the QSIG destination is mapped into an EEM callback complete message.

A QSIG "setup" message with a ringout request is mapped into a DPNSS ISRM callback request. When the NAM is returned, the Cisco PGW automatically responds with an EEM ringout message. When the DPNSS PBX returns an EEM with callback complete, the Cisco PGW maps this into an "alerting" message back to the incoming or tunneled QSIG.

A QSIG SETUP message with a Path Reservation request is mapped into a DPNSS ISRM callback request. When the NAM is returned, the Cisco PGW responds over the QSIG interface with a "progress" message indicating successful path reservation.

Cisco PGW maps a Facility ringout request message into an EEM ringout message.

Cisco PGW maps an EEM call back complete message into a QSIG "alerting" message.

Message Waiting Indicator

Support for MWI already exists in both DPNSS and QSIG. This feature continues the support using QSIG tunneling as well.

Call Transfer and Call Diversion

Call diversion by reroute is supported on CCM when using tunneled QSIG. This is interworked with DPNSS originations and destinations according to service behavior data provisioned in the dial plan. In the case of call diversion by onward routing, the diverting leg info data is mapped to and from tunneled QSIG as appropriate.


Note Call Transfer by reroute is not supported on CCM or over DPNSS.


Call ID Services

Calling and Connected Line and Name is supported in the DPNSS and QSIG interworking.

Overview of QSIG Features Interworking with CCM

For the PGW 2200 to support QSIG messages tunneled over H.323, the HSI first maps the Annex M1 QSIG message into an equivalent tunneled message within EISUP.

The DPNSS Service Interworking with Cisco CallManager Using QSIG Tunneling feature enables the integration of CCM into the legacy TDM PBX networks across the QSIG tunnel and will support the following features:

Path Replacement

Call Completion

Message Waiting Indicator

Call Transfer

Call Diversion

Call ID Services

Path Replacement

In various call transfer scenarios, an established call through a QSIG network might not follow the optimum route between two end PBXs. The QSIG Path Replacement feature enables a QSIG PBX to obtain a new connection using a preferred route, its purpose being to replace a connection that passes through the network components that are no longer involved in the call. Either the originating or terminating PBX can be responsible for establishing the new optimized connection. The Cisco PGW 2200 enables the DPNSS Service Interworking with Cisco CallManager Using QSIG Tunneling feature to function between QSIG PBXs in call transfer scenarios.

Whenever there is a possibility that a call follows a non-optimum route (for example, when the controlling user is notified of transfer by join completion), the originating PBX may initiate path replacement. An attempt is made to obtain a new path from the terminating PBX to the originating PBX using the optimum route. When a new path has been obtained, the unwanted parts of the original path are released. The whole of the existing path is retained if it already follows the optimum route or if the optimum route is congested.


Note Currently the PGW 2200 supports only Path Replacement when call transfer by join completion.


There are a number of use cases in which the DPNSS Service Interworking with Cisco CallManager Using QSIG Tunneling functionality is invoked (Tunneled and Backhaul):

1. Invocation of Path Replacement—The Path Replacement invoker is normally the call agent where the original inbound non-QSIG point of interworking occurs (for example, a PSTN-to-QSIG call). It is the earliest point in the network connection that is capable of generating a Path Replacement invocation request.

2. Response to Path Replacement invocation—The Path Replacement responder is normally the call agent in control of where the QSIG call goes off-network or terminates on a line. It is the last point of control in the network connection that is capable of responding to a Path Replacement request.

3. Loopback (combined Invoke and Response)—This is a special case where the call agent (PGW) that invokes Path Replacement is also the call agent that receives the Path Replacement request. An example might be a PSTN-to-CCM call that is transferred to a SIP endpoint or back out into the PSTN again. In this scenario, the Cisco PGW reconfigures itself to remove the CCM connections.

4. Path Replacement transit calls—A transit call case where QSIG or tunneled QSIG protocols co-operate in a Path replacement call scenario uses either the QSIG transparency capability already available and extended to support the QSIG tunnelling, or the generic feature data using the route optimization operations if feature transparency is not active.

5. Inter-PGW cases—Path Replacement may occur across multiple PGWs. In thus case, a combination of Path Replacement invocation and Response with QSIG transparency and remote media call leg manipulation can occur. Inter-PGW is also supported for DPNSS.

Call Completion

The PGW 2200 supports call completion across EISUP. Call completion cannot interwork, by a PGW, to protocols other than DPNSS and QSIG. As a result, the PGW rejects Call Completion requests for non QSIG/EISUP/DPNSS destinations. QSIG Call completion services are mapped into generic feature containers, as well as feature transparency (FT) data to offer both modes of operation across PGWs.

Message Waiting Indicator

The MWI feature enables a QSIG-based voicemail system the ability to light the MWI lamp on a Cisco IP Phone connected to a Cisco CallManager (CCM). The Cisco PGW 2200 interworks the signal from QSIG to CCM.

Call Transfer

The Call transfer service supports call transfers between QSIG PBXs and the Cisco CallManager. It supports transfers between an IP phone connected to a CCM and a phone connected to a QSIG PBX. Call transfer comprises two different types of call flow:

Transfer by join—It transfers the switch node that effectively joins the two call legs (A-to-B and B-to-C) locally.

Transfer by reroute—The transferring switching node requests that the other two switching nodes establish a direct connection with each other that bypasses the transferring node.

Depending on the protocol, support for each type of call transfer varies as follows:

DPNSS—Supports only transfer by join.

QSIG—Supports both forms of transfer (However, CCM only supports Transfer by join).

SIP—Supports both types of transfer (transfer by reroute using the REFER method and transfer by join using Re-invites).

H.323—Supports both types of call transfer, although the only widely available support without the use of H.450 is performed using empty capability set procedures.

Call Diversion

Call Diversion (also known as Call Forward) offers users who are absent or busy the capability of having their calls forwarded to a third party.

Call Diversion has the following modes of operation:

Call Diversion by reroute

Call Diversion by onward routing

Call ID Services

This feature allows QSIG Calling Name Display to be interworked in both directions with CCM. When Cisco IP phone users receive a call from a user on the PBX, the name and number of the caller are displayed on the receiving phone. Also, when a user on the PBX receives a call from a user on the Cisco IP phone, the name and number of the person calling is also displayed on the receiving phone.


Note The QSIG name and number identification replaces the existing H.323 notification messages for midcall transfer of call ID name and number when interworking with CCM. EISUP inhibits the onward transfer of the ID name and number information when QSIG tunneling is used.


QSIG, DPNSS, and EISUP to HSI Feature Transparency Mode

The DPNSS Service Interworking with Cisco CallManager Using QSIG Tunneling feature module enables end-to-end Route optimization for networks with mixed Cisco CallManager and DPNSS PBX networks. uses profile tables that have been extended to support both feature transparency and feature interworking scenarios.

The following are the possible element values in the profile tables are as follow:

Feature_Required—The feature needs feature transparency functionality and the call is released unless one is established

Feature_Preferred—The feature is passed, if available otherwise it is ignored

Feature_Notify—The feature is removed and the sending node is informed

Feature_Remove—The feature is simply removed

Feature_Reject—The call is rejected and the PGW initiates release and the sending node is informed of service unavailability

The value (1-8) for the off net table number (CustomerVPNOffNetTblNum) and the on net table number (CustomerVPNOnNetTblNum) selects one of the following tables with the associated profile table element values.

;-//***********************************************************************
;-//*                          TABLE 1                                    *
;-//***********************************************************************
    FEATURE_PREFERRED,            -- FEATURE_CALL_COMPLETION,           
    FEATURE_REQUIRED,            -- FEATURE_MESSAGE_WAITING_INDICATION
    FEATURE_REQUIRED,            -- FEATURE_PATH_REPLACE,              
    FEATURE_REQUIRED,            -- FEATURE_DIVERSION,                 
    FEATURE_REQUIRED,            -- FEATURE_CALL_TRANSFER,             
    FEATURE_PREFERRED,            -- FEATURE_CALL_NAMING,

;-//***********************************************************************
;-//*                          TABLE 2                                    *
;-//***********************************************************************
    FEATURE_PREFERRED,            -- FEATURE_CALL_COMPLETION,           
    FEATURE_PREFERRED,            -- FEATURE_MESSAGE_WAITING_INDICATION,
    FEATURE_PREFERRED,            -- FEATURE_PATH_REPLACE,              
    FEATURE_REQUIRED,            -- FEATURE_DIVERSION,                 
    FEATURE_REQUIRED,            -- FEATURE_CALL_TRANSFER,             
    FEATURE_PREFERRED,            -- FEATURE_CALL_NAMING,

;-//***********************************************************************
;-//*                          TABLE 3                                    *
;-//***********************************************************************

    FEATURE_PREFERRED,            -- FEATURE_CALL_COMPLETION,           
    FEATURE_PREFERRED,            -- FEATURE_MESSAGE_WAITING_INDICATION,
    FEATURE_REJECT,            -- FEATURE_PATH_REPLACE,              
    FEATURE_REQUIRED,            -- FEATURE_DIVERSION,                 
    FEATURE_REQUIRED,            -- FEATURE_CALL_TRANSFER,             
    FEATURE_PREFERRED,            -- FEATURE_CALL_NAMING,

;-//***********************************************************************
;-//*                          TABLE 4                                    *
;-//***********************************************************************

    FEATURE_REQUIRED,            -- FEATURE_CALL_COMPLETION,           
    FEATURE_REJECT,            -- FEATURE_MESSAGE_WAITING_INDICATION,
    FEATURE_REJECT,            -- FEATURE_PATH_REPLACE,              
    FEATURE_REQUIRED,            -- FEATURE_DIVERSION,                 
    FEATURE_REQUIRED,            -- FEATURE_CALL_TRANSFER,             
    FEATURE_PREFERRED,            -- FEATURE_CALL_NAMING,

;-//***********************************************************************
;-//*                          TABLE 5                                    *
;-//***********************************************************************

    FEATURE_PREFERRED,            -- FEATURE_CALL_COMPLETION,           
    FEATURE_PREFERRED,            -- FEATURE_MESSAGE_WAITING_INDICATION,
    FEATURE_PREFERRED,            -- FEATURE_PATH_REPLACE,              
    FEATURE_PREFERRED,            -- FEATURE_DIVERSION,                 
    FEATURE_PREFERRED,            -- FEATURE_CALL_TRANSFER,             
    FEATURE_PREFERRED,            -- FEATURE_CALL_NAMING,

;-//***********************************************************************
;-//*                          TABLE 6                                    *
;-//***********************************************************************

    FEATURE_REJECT,            -- FEATURE_CALL_COMPLETION,           
    FEATURE_REJECT,            -- FEATURE_MESSAGE_WAITING_INDICATION,
    FEATURE_REMOVE,            -- FEATURE_PATH_REPLACE,              
    FEATURE_PREFERRED,            -- FEATURE_DIVERSION,                 
    FEATURE_NOTIFY,            -- FEATURE_CALL_TRANSFER,             
    FEATURE_PREFERRED,            -- FEATURE_CALL_NAMING,

;-//***********************************************************************
;-//*                          TABLE 7                                    *
;-//***********************************************************************

    FEATURE_REJECT,            -- FEATURE_CALL_COMPLETION,           
    FEATURE_REJECT,            -- FEATURE_MESSAGE_WAITING_INDICATION,
    FEATURE_REMOVE,            -- FEATURE_PATH_REPLACE,              
    FEATURE_REJECT,            -- FEATURE_DIVERSION,                 
    FEATURE_NOTIFY,            -- FEATURE_CALL_TRANSFER,             
    FEATURE_PREFERRED,            -- FEATURE_CALL_NAMING,

;-//***********************************************************************
;-//*                          TABLE 8                                    *
;-//***********************************************************************

    FEATURE_REJECT,            -- FEATURE_CALL_COMPLETION,           
    FEATURE_REJECT,            -- FEATURE_MESSAGE_WAITING_INDICATION,
    FEATURE_REMOVE,            -- FEATURE_PATH_REPLACE,              
    FEATURE_REJECT,            -- FEATURE_DIVERSION,                 
    FEATURE_NOTIFY,            -- FEATURE_CALL_TRANSFER,             
    FEATURE_REMOVE,            -- FEATURE_CALL_NAMING,


Note Where Feature refers to the following supplementary services: call completion, message waiting indication, path replacement, diversion, call transfer, and call naming.


The operator must assign the Virtual Private Network (VPN) ID and profile preferences on QSIG, DPNSS, and CCM (Annex M1 enabled) networks to determine how the call can continue when feature-specific information is present. Therefore VPN ID can be configurable for QSIG, DPNSS, and EISUP (HSI connected) trunk groups or sigPaths. Also, the VPN ID may be configurable in the dial plan, which can overwrite the configured VPN ID in the incoming trunk groups or sigPaths.

The VPN ID is available for QSIG, DPNSS, and EISUP (HSI connected) protocols.

VPN ID can be configured as NULL (that is, not configured) for both feature transparency enabled and disabled scenarios. If VPNID is configured as NULL, it indicates there is no restriction for the incoming or outgoing service.

If the VPN ID matches the originating side and the terminating side, the on net table is used to determine whether or not the service is allowed. This scenario is valid for feature transparency and interworking.

If the VPN ID does not match the originating side and the terminating side, the off net table is used to determine whether or not the service is allowed. This scenario is valid for feature transparency and interworking.

The on/off net table is valid for both feature transparency enabled and disabled scenarios.

The on/off net table is the same for feature transparency and interworking scenarios. However, for interworking scenario, the on/off net table only affects the services noted before.

If QSIG/DPNSS interworking with SIP, SS7, then the interworking table is used to determine whether or not the feature is allowed.


Note If the CTI/QBE interface is used for call back status service, CCM version 4.1 is required.


Benefits

The Cisco PGW currently supports CCM interworking with DPNSS by the CTI and QBE interfaces. The DPNSS and QSIG features interworking also overcomes some of the limitations that existed in the DPNSS Route Optimization and the Call Back When Free and Call Back When Next Used features.

Route Optimization and Path Replacement interworking provides the opportunity for end-to-end service operability with the following advantages:

Removes anomalous behavior

Provides consistency in service support

Enhances easier maintainability

Provides service interoperability

Provides greater scalability

Enhances the flexibility of Cisco PGW to be deployed in mixed protocol networks


Note While this feature makes the Call Back service consistent with the CCM implementation, it does limit some of the functionality of the existing Call Back service provided through the CTI and QBE interfaces. If desired, the CTI and QBE interfaces can be provisioned along with H.323 QSIG Tunneling in order to use the PGW software Release 9.6(1) Call Back mechanism.


Requirements

A call that has been identified as requiring feature transparency is rejected if the EISUP destination is to an HSI that does not support QSIG tunneling.

The following requirements apply to the DPNSS Service Interworking with Cisco CallManager Using QSIG Tunneling feature:

The own routing number must be provisioned to support RO services.

The interworking with DPNSS requires the own routing number length provisioned by the DPNSS trunk property.

Restrictions

Calls that originate and terminate on an H.323 destination cannot currently, which is before this feature was introduced, be Route Optimized. With the introduction of QSIG tunneling, as described in ITU-T Recommendation H.323, Annex M1, this restriction is lifted if both endpoints support QSIG tunneling but still exists if either or both of the H.323 endpoints do not support Annex M1.

Two examples of call types that are excluded from Route Optimization on these grounds are:

1. An H.323 (no Annex M1 support) call to a CCM that transfers the call to another CCM destination.

2. A CCM call that is transferred to an H.323 destination that does not support Annex M1.


Note QBE and Tunneled QSIG cannot be used together.


Limitations

For CCM to participate in path replacement service, both HSI and CCM must work in fast start mode.

Route Optimization Limitations

A call that has undergone route optimization cannot be re-optimized. Therefore, a call that has undergone Route Optimization or Path Replacement rejects attempts to be executed a second time on the Cisco PGW.

This limitation relates to call instances that are essentially half calls or operating as half calls. This applies only to cases where route optimization or path replacement has been invoked directly by Cisco PGW and does not apply to route optimization or path replacement, such as interworking Route Optimization or Path Replacement with CCM.

Call Back and Call Completion Limitation

Cisco PGW does not currently support Signaling Connection Retention. It means that the Cisco PGW always advertises a connection release; and in the event of a call flow continuation indicating connection retention, the Cisco PGW initiates a forward signaling release.

Call Transfer Limitation

Call Transfer by reroute is not supported on CCM or over DPNSS.

Related Features and Technologies

The following features and technologies are related to this feature:

QSIG Feature Transparency

DPNSS Feature Transparency

DPNSS Supplementary Services Interworking with Cisco CallManager

DPNSS Route Optimization

DPNSS Call Back and Extension Status Interworking with Cisco CallManager'

Related Documents

This document contains information that is related to this feature. The documents that contain additional information related to the Cisco Media Gateway Controller (MGC) are at the following url:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/vcallcon/ps2027/tsd_products_support_series_home.html

Supported Platforms

The hardware platforms supported for the Cisco MGC software are described in the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Hardware Installation Guide.

Supported Standards, MIBs, and RFCs

Standards

The DPNSS Service Interworking with Cisco CallManager Using QSIG Tunneling feature supports the following standards:

ITU-T Recommendation H.323, Annex M1

QSIG ETSI 300-172

QSIG ECMA 185/186

QSIG ECMA 175/176

DPNSS BTNR 188 issue 6

No new or modified standards are supported by this feature.

MIBs

No new or modified MIBs are supported by this feature.

For more information on the MIBs used in the Cisco MGC software, refer to the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Release 9 Management Information Base Guide.

RFCs

No new or modified RFCs are supported by this feature.

Prerequisites for Using this Feature

The Cisco PGW 2200 must be running Cisco MGC software Release 9.7(3). Prerequisites for this release can be found in the Release Notes for the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9.7(3) at:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/access/sc/rel9/relnote/rn973.htm.

For tunneled QSIG interworking with CCM, Release 4.1.3 and, or later, and HSI release 4.3, or later is required.

XECfgParm.dat Configuration Tasks

This section contains the steps necessary for configuration of the Cisco MGC software to support this feature. If you are installing and configuring the Cisco MGC software on your system for the first time, use the procedures in the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Installation and Configuration Guide, coming back to this section once you encounter the *.DisableCCBSoverTunneledQSIG parameter in the XECfgParm.dat file.


Caution Configuration of the Cisco MGC software requires that the system software be shut down. In a simplex system, calls cannot be processed during system shutdown. In a continuous service system, your system loses the ability to maintain calls during a critical event if the system software on one of the PGW hosts is shut down.

To configure the DisableCCBSoverTunneledQSIG value, perform the following steps:


Step 1 If you have not already done so, open the /opt/CiscoMGC/etc/XECfgParm.dat file on the active and standby Cisco PGW hosts using a text editor, such as vi.

Step 2 If you have not already done so, ensure that the pom.dataSync parameter is set to false on the active and standby Cisco PGW hosts.

Step 3 Search for the *.DisableCCBSoverTunneledQSIG parameter and enter the desired value (0-CCBS with QSIG tunneling is enabled or 1-Callback using tunneled QSIG is disabled) on the active and standby Cisco PGW hosts.

Step 4 Save your changes, close the text editor.


Verifying the XECfgParm.dat Changes

To verify the XECfgParm.dat settings for this feature, perform the following steps:


Caution Do not modify the other XECfgParm.dat parameters associated with this feature.


Step 1 Log in to the standby Cisco MGC as root and change directories to the etc subdirectory by entering the following UNIX command:

cd /opt/CiscoMGC/etc 

Step 2 Open the XECfgParm.dat using a text editor, such as vi.

Step 3 Search for the *.DisableCCBSoverTunneledQSIG parameter and verify that the displayed value (0-CCBS with QSIG tunneling is enabled or 1-Callback using tunneled QSIG is disabled) is correct.

If the value is correct, proceed to Step 4. Otherwise, correct the value and then proceed to Step 4.

Step 4 Save your changes and close the text editor.

Step 5 Manually stop the Cisco MGC software on the standby Cisco MGC by entering the following UNIX command:

/etc/init.d/CiscoMGC stop

Step 6 Once the software shutdown is complete, manually start the Cisco MGC software on the standby Cisco MGC by entering the following command:

/etc/init.d/CiscoMGC start

Step 7 Log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

mml> sw-over::confirm

Site alarms are automatically set until the out-of-service (OOS) Cisco MGC host is returned to an in-service (IS) state.

Step 8 Repeat steps 2 through 7 for the newly standby Cisco MGC host. Once you have verified the settings on both hosts, the procedure is complete.


Provisioning This Feature

You must start a provisioning session to enable this feature. See the Cisco MGCP Provisioning Guide for details on how to start a provisioning session.

Provisioning Basics

The procedures in this section describe how to start a provisioning session and how to save and activate the changes you have made.

Starting a Provisioning Session

Saving and Activating Your Provisioning Changes

Ending a Provisioning Session Without Activating Your Changes

Retrieving Provisioning Data

For more detailed information about provisioning your Cisco MGC, refer to the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide.

Starting a Provisioning Session

You may need to start a provisioning session as part of your system operations. To do this, log into the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

prov-sta::srcver="curr_ver",dstver="mod_ver"

Where:

curr_ver—The name of the current configuration version. In place of the name of the current configuration version, you can also enter:

new—A new default session configuration; no existing source configuration is available.

active—Selects the active configuration as the source for configuration changes.


Note If you do not know the name of your current configuration session, you can use the procedure described in the "Retrieving Data on the Current Provisioning Session" section on page 7.


mod_ver—A new configuration version name that contains your provisioning changes.

For example, to use a configuration version called ver1 as the basis for a version to be called ver2, you would enter the following command:

prov-sta::srcver="ver1",dstver="ver2"

Once a provisioning session is underway, you may use the prov-add, prov-ed, or prov-dlt MML commands to add, modify, and delete components on your system. This document describes how to provision this feature. For more information on provisioning other components on your Cisco MGC, refer to the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide.

There are two ways to close your provisioning session: saving and activating your provisioning changes, as described in the "Saving and Activating Your Provisioning Changes" section or ending your provisioning session without saving and activating your changes, as described in the "Ending a Provisioning Session Without Activating Your Changes" section.

Saving and Activating Your Provisioning Changes

When you have completed making provisioning changes in your session, you must enter a command to save and activate your changes. There are two different provisioning MML commands that do this: prov-cpy and prov-dply.


Caution Using the prov-cpy and prov-dply MML commands can severely impact your system's call processing performance, depending on the extent of your provisioning changes. We recommend that these commands be issued during a maintenance window when traffic is minimal.

The prov-cpy MML command is used to save and activate your changes on simplex Cisco MGC (single host) systems.


Note When you enter the prov-cpy command, your provisioning session is also automatically ended. If you want to make additional provisioning changes, you must start a new provisioning session as described in the "Provisioning Basics" section.



Caution Do not use the prov-cpy command to save and activate your changes on a continuous-service Cisco MGC (active and standby hosts) system. Saving and activating using prov-cpy on such a system would require using the prov-sync MML command to synchronize the provisioning data on the active and standby hosts. The system does not indicate when the synchronization process fails, which would create problems when a switchover operation occurs.

The prov-dply MML command is used to save and activate your changes on the active and standby
Cisco MGCs in a continuous-service system. This command should not be used on a Cisco MGC in a simplex configuration.


Note When you enter the prov-dply command, your provisioning session is also automatically ended, unless an error occurs during execution. If you want to make additional provisioning changes, you must start a new provisioning session, as described in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section.


Ending a Provisioning Session Without Activating Your Changes

If you want to end a provisioning session without saving and activating the changes you have entered, enter the prov-stp MML command. This command ends your current provisioning session and your changes are not committed.

Retrieving Provisioning Data

You can use the prov-rtrv MML command to retrieve information about your current provisioning settings. The ways you can use this command to retrieve provisioning data are described in the following sections:

Retrieving Data for an Individual Component

Retrieving Data for All Components

Retrieving Data for All Components of a Particular Type

Retrieving Data on the Current Provisioning Session

Retrieving Data on Supported Signaling Protocols

Retrieving Data for an Individual Component

You can retrieve provisioning data on any individual component on your system. To do this, log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

prov-rtrv:component:name=MML_name

Where:

component—The MML component type associated with the desired component. You can find a complete list of MML component types in the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide.

MML_name—The MML name for the desired component. You can determine the MML names for the various components using the prov-rtrv:all MML command.

For example, to view the provisioning data for a SS7 signaling service called ss7svc1, you would enter the following command:

prov-rtrv:ss7path:name="ss7svc1"

The response to the command is dependent upon the component type associated with the desired component. For example, to view the properties for an SUA routing key called suakey1, you would enter the following command:

prov-rtrv:suakey:name="suakey1"

Retrieving Data for All Components

You can retrieve data on all of the components provisioned on your system. To do this, log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

prov-rtrv:all

Retrieving Data for All Components of a Particular Type

You can retrieve provisioning data on all components of a particular type on your system. To do this, log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

prov-rtrv:component:"all"

Where: component is the MML component type associated with the desired component group. You can find a complete list of MML component types in the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide.

For example, to view the provisioning data for all SS7 signaling services, you would enter the following command:

prov-rtrv:ss7path:"all"

Retrieving Data on the Current Provisioning Session

You can retrieve provisioning data on the current provisioning session. To do this, log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

prov-rtrv:session

The system returns a response similar to the following:

MGC-02 - Media Gateway Controller 2003-01-13 13:39:19
M  RTRV
   "session=jtest:session"
   /*
Session ID = mml1
SRCVER = active
DSTVER = jtest
   */

Retrieving Data on Supported Signaling Protocols

You can retrieve protocol data for the current provisioning session. To do this, log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

prov-rtrv:variants

Provisioning Examples

This section lists the provisioning examples for the H.323 Tunneled QSIG and DPNSS Interworking feature.

Enabling Annex M1 (QSIG Tunneling) on the PGW

In an open provisioning session, enter the following command to enable H.323 Annex M1, QSIG tunneling, on the Cisco PGW 2200.

mml> prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="1100",qsigtunnelVariant="1" 

Enabling Annex M1 (QSIG Tunneling) on the HSI

In an open provisioning session, enter the following commands to enable H.323 Annex M1, QSIG tunneling, on the Cisco HSI.

Enable outbound QSIG tunneling:

mml> prov-add:name=sys_config_dynamic,EnableOutboundAnnexM1=1 

Enable reception of inbound tunneled QSIG:

mml> prov-add:name=sys_config_dynamic,EnableInboundAnnexM1=1 

Advertise Annex M1 support to the gatekeeper:

mml> prov-add:name=sys_config_dynamic,IncludeAnnexM1inRRQ=1 

Allow QSIG tunneled preference requests in ARQ to the gatekeeper:

mml> prov-add:name=sys_config_dynamic,IncludeAnnexM1in ARQ=1 

Disabling Annex M1 (QSIG Tunneling) on the PGW

In an open provisioning session, enter the following command to disable H.323 Annex M1, QSIG tunneling, on the Cisco PGW 2200.

mml> prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="1100",qsigtunnelVariant="0" 

Disabling Annex M1 (QSIG Tunneling) on the HSI

In an open provisioning session, enter the following commands to disable H.323 Annex M1, QSIG tunneling, on the Cisco HSI.

Disable outbound QSIG tunneling:

mml> prov-add:name=sys_config_dynamic,EnableOutboundAnnexM1="" 

Disable reception of inbound tunneled QSIG:

mml> prov-add:name=sys_config_dynamic,EnableInboundAnnexM1="" 

PGW Provisioning Examples

The following examples are for provisioning the Cisco PGW 2200.

Provisioning Route Optimization Transit

Provisioning Route Optimization Initiated by the PGW 2200

Provisioning Route Optimization Responded by the PGW 2200

Provisioning Call Completion

Provisioning Message Waiting Indicator (with no QSIG Tunneling)

Provisioning Message Waiting Indicator (with QSIG Tunneling)

Provisioning a Customer VPN ID in a Trunk Group

Provisioning a Customer VPN ID in the Dial Plan

Provisioning a QSIG Trunk Group or sigPath

Provisioning an H.323 EISUP Trunk Group or sigPaths for Transparent Annex M1 (Tunneled QSIG)

Provisioning Route Optimization Transit

Figure 3 shows a sample diagram for DPNSS route optimization transit.

Figure 3 DPNSS Route Optimization Example Diagram

When provisioning Route Optimization, perform the following tasks:

Collect the routing number of each device, for example, CCM, PGW 2200, and PBX.

Be sure the first and second transferred basic call can be made successfully

Configure the dial plan according to the device routing numbers

The Route Optimization service invokes a third new call (except for Route Optimization loopback), the PGW 2200 needs a dialplan for the new invoked call. The B-number of the new invoked call is a device's routing number.

The following MML commands are an example of route optimization transit provisioning.

prov-sta::srcver="ro1",dstver="ROPR001"

;dpnss-to-Siemens 3745
prov-add:extnode:name="va-3745-2",desc="MGW for dpnss",type="3745", 
isdnsigtype="IUA",group=0

prov-add:association:name="assoc-dpnss-gw",desc="siemens pbx",extnode="va-3745-2",sgp="", 
type="IUA",ipaddr1="IP_Addr1",ipaddr2="N/A",port=9904,peeraddr1="10.0.5.255", 
peeraddr2="0.0.0.0",peerport=9904,iproute1="",iproute2="",rcvwin=18000, 
maxinitretrans=10,maxinitrto=2000,maxretrans=5,cumsackto=300,bundleto=100,minrto=300, 
maxrto=3000,hbto=2000,ipprecedence="routine",dscp="AF31",maxretransdest=3

prov-add:dpnsspath:name="dpnss-path-1",desc="dpnss sigpath to Siemens PBX", 
extnode="va-3745-2",mdo="DPNSS_BTNR188",custgrpid="1111",sigslot=2,sigport=0,origlabel="",
termlabel="",subunit=0

prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="dpnss-path-1",DpnssRORoutingNumberLength="3"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="dpnss-path-1",FeatureTransparencyDisabled="1"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="dpnss-path-1",OwnRoutingNumber="488"

prov-add:MGCPPATH:name="dpnss-mgcp1",DESC="Nothing defined",extnode="va-3745-2"

prov-add:IPLNK:name="dpnss-1",DESC="mgcp link to 3745",SVC="dpnss-mgcp1", 
ipaddr="IP_Addr1",port=2427,peeraddr="10.0.5.255",peerport=2427,pri=1,IPROUTE=""

prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="dpnss-mgcp1",mgcpDomainNameRemote="S2/DS1-0/1@10.0.5.255"

prov-add:TRNKGRP:name="3100",clli="dpnss",svc="dpnss-path-1",type="TDM_DPNSS", 
SELseq="LIDL"

prov-add:SWITCHTRNK:name="1",trnkgrpnum="3100",span="ffff",cic=1,cu="va-3745-2", 
spansize=31,endpoint="s2/ds1-0/1@10.0.5.255"
prov-add:RTTRNKGRP:name="3100",type=6
prov-add:RTTRNK:name="rt-dpnss-3725",trnkgrpnum=3100
prov-add:RTLIST:name="rtlist-dpnss-3745",rtname="rt-dpnss-3725",distrib="OFF"
prov-ed:TRNKGRPPROP:name="3100",custgrpid="1111",MGCdomain="10.0.5.42"

;hsi-bighead
prov-add:EXTNODE:name="sh-bighead",desc="HSI sh-bighead",type="H323", 
isdnsigtype="N/A",GROUP=0

prov-add:EISUPPATH:name="eisup-bighead",desc="EISUP to HSI sh-bighead", 
extnode="sh-bighead",custgrpid="1111",origlabel="",termlabel=""

prov-add:IPLNK:name="ip-bighead",desc="IP lnk to HSI sh-bighead",svc="eisup-bighead", 
ipaddr="IP_Addr1",port=8003,peeraddr="10.0.5.48",peerport=8003,pri=1,IPROUTE=""

prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="eisup-bighead",AllowH323Hairpin="1"
prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="eisup-bighead",FeatureTransparencyDisabled="1"
prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="eisup-bighead",H323AdjunctLink="1"
prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="eisup-bighead",OOverlap="1"
prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="eisup-bighead",OwnRoutingNumber="488"
prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="eisup-bighead",QSIGTunnelVariant="1"
prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="eisup-bighead",TOverlap="0"

prov-add:TRNKGRP:name="9300",clli="EISUP2B",svc="eisup-bighead",type="IP"
prov-add:RTTRNKGRP:name="9300",type=4
prov-add:RTTRNK:weightedtg="OFF",name="eisup-bighead",trnkgrpnum=9300
prov-add:RTLIST:name="rtlist-bighead",rtname="eisup-bighead"

prov-add:TRNKGRPPROP:name="9300",QSIGTunnelVariant="1"
prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="9300",OwnRoutingNumber="488"

;dialplan
numan-add:DIALPLAN:custgrpid="1111",overdec="NO"

;4* - eisup-bighead
numan-add:RESULTSET:custgrpid="1111",name="eisup-set4"
numan-add:RESULTTABLE:custgrpid="1111",name="eisup-result4",resulttype="ROUTE", 
dw1="rtlist-bighead",setname="eisup-set4"
numan-add:BDIGTREE:custgrpid="1111",callside="originating",digitstring="4", 
setname="eisup-set4"

;3
numan-add:RESULTSET:custgrpid="1111",name="dpnss-rs-1"
numan-add:RESULTTABLE:custgrpid="1111",name="dpnss-route1",resulttype="ROUTE", 
dw1="rtlist-dpnss-3745",setname="dpnss-rs-1"
numan-add:BDIGTREE:custgrpid="1111",callside="originating",digitstring="3", 
setname="dpnss-rs-1"

;02- eisup-suzhou--self
numan-add:RESULTSET:custgrpid="1111",name="self-set02"
numan-add:RESULTTABLE:custgrpid="1111",name="self-result02",resulttype="RTRN_START_ANAL", 
dw1="2",setname="self-set02"
numan-add:BDIGTREE:custgrpid="1111",callside="originating",digitstring="02", 
setname="self-set02"

;----- routing dial plan

;CCM routing number is 446
numan-add:RESULTSET:custgrpid="1111",name="446"
numan-add:RESULTTABLE:custgrpid="1111",name="446",resulttype="ROUTE",dw1="rtlist-bighead",
setname="446"
numan-add:BDIGTREE:custgrpid="1111",callside="originating",digitstring="446",setname="446"

Provisioning Route Optimization Initiated by the PGW 2200

When provisioning Route Optimization, perform the following tasks:

Collect the routing number of each device, for example, CCM, PGW 2200, and PBX.

Be sure the first and second transferred basic call can be made successfully

Configure the dial plan according to the device routing numbers

The Route Optimization service invokes a third new call (except for Route Optimization loopback), the PGW 2200 needs a dialplan for the new invoked call. The B-number of the new invoked call is a device's routing number.

The following MML commands are an example of route optimization originating provisioning.

prov-sta::srcver="roo1",dstver="ROPR001"
;ss7
prov-add:OPC:name="opc",desc="PGW point code",netaddr="2.5.5",netind=2,type="TRUEOPC"

prov-add:DPC:name="dpc1",desc="INET point code 2.4.4",NETADDR="2.4.4",netind=2

prov-add:SS7PATH:name="ss7svc1",desc="SS7 service to DPC 
2.4.4",mdo="ISUPV3",custgrpid="1111",side="network",dpc="dpc1",opc="opc",m3uakey="", 
origlabel="",termlabel=""

prov-add:EXTNODE:name="slt7",desc="sh-2600-7",type="SLT",isdnsigtype="N/A",group=0

prov-add:LNKSET:name="linkset1",desc="Linkset 1 to INET",apc="dpc1", 
proto="SS7-ITU",type="IP"

prov-add:SS7ROUTE:name="ss7route1",desc="Route to DPC-2-4-4",opc="opc", 
dpc="dpc1",lnkset="linkset1",PRI=1

prov-add:SESSIONSET:name="c7sset7",extnode="slt7",ipaddr1="IP_Addr1",peeraddr1="10.0.4.2",
port=7000,peerport=7000,type="BSMV0"
prov-add:C7IPLNK:name="ss7link1",desc="Signal link",lnkset="linkset1", 
slc=0,pri=1,timeslot=2,sessionset="c7sset7"


prov-add:EXTNODE:name="sh-5300-5",desc="mgw 
sh-5300-5",type="AS5300",isdnsigtype="N/A",group=0
prov-add:MGCPPATH:name="mgcppath5300-5",desc="MGCP service to AS-5300-5", 
extnode="sh-5300-5"

prov-add:IPLNK:name="mgcplink-5",desc="MGCP link to AS-5300-5",SVC="mgcppath5300-5", 
ipaddr="IP_Addr1",port=2427,peeraddr="10.0.5.12",peerport=2427,PRI=1,iproute=""

prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="mgcppath5300-5",mgcpDomainNameRemote="s0/ds1-1/1@sh-5300-5"

prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="mgcppath5300-5",srcpIpPortLocal="2428"

;--trunks&rtlist
prov-add:TRNKGRP:name="1100",clli="INET-DPC1",svc="ss7svc1",type="TDM_ISUP",SELseq="LIDL"

prov-add:SWITCHTRNK:name="1",trnkgrpnum="1100",span="ffff",cic=1,cu="sh-5300-5", 
spansize=31,endpoint=s0/ds1-1/1@10.0.5.12

prov-add:RTTRNKGRP:name="1100",type=1

prov-add:RTTRNK:name="rt-ss7-1",trnkgrpnum=1100

prov-add:RTLIST:name="rtlist-ss7-1",rtname="rt-ss7-1",distrib="OFF"

prov-ed:TRNKGRPPROP:name="1100",custgrpid="1111",MGCdomain="10.0.5.42"
;****************************ss7*********************************************

;**************************** hsi-bighead*************************************
prov-add:EXTNODE:name="sh-bighead",desc="HSI 
sh-bighead",type="H323",isdnsigtype="N/A",group=0

prov-add:EISUPPATH:name="eisup-bighead",desc="EISUP to HSI sh-bighead", 
extnode="sh-bighead",custgrpid="1111",origlabel="",termlabel=""

prov-add:IPLNK:name="ip-bighead",desc="IP lnk to HSI sh-bighead",svc="eisup-bighead", 
ipaddr="IP_Addr1",port=8003,peeraddr="10.0.5.48",peerport=8003,pri=1,iproute=""

prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="eisup-bighead",AllowH323Hairpin="1"
prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="eisup-bighead",FeatureTransparencyDisabled="1"
prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="eisup-bighead",H323AdjunctLink="1"
prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="eisup-bighead",OOverlap="1"
prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="eisup-bighead",OwnRoutingNumber="545"
prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="eisup-bighead",QSIGTunnelVariant="1"
prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="eisup-bighead",TOverlap="0"

prov-add:TRNKGRP:name="9300",clli="EISUP2B",svc="eisup-bighead",type="IP"
prov-add:RTTRNKGRP:name="9300",type=4
prov-add:RTTRNK:weightedtg="OFF",name="eisup-bighead",trnkgrpnum=9300
prov-add:RTLIST:name="rtlist-bighead",rtname="eisup-bighead"

prov-add:TRNKGRPPROP:NAME="9300",QSIGTunnelVariant="1"
prov-add:TRNKGRPPROP:NAME="9300",OwnRoutingNumber="545"
;**************************** hsi-bighead*************************************

;dialplan
numan-add:DIALPLAN:custgrpid="1111",overdec="NO"

numan-add:DIGMODSTRING:custgrpid="1111",name="ccm02",digstring="6"
numan-add:DIGMODSTRING:custgrpid="1111",name="ccm3003",digstring="02"
numan-add:DIGMODSTRING:custgrpid="1111",name="a6",digstring="6"

;1* ss7svc1
numan-add:RESULTSET:custgrpid="1111",name="ss7-set1"
numan-add:RESULTTABLE:custgrpid="1111",name="ss7-result1",resulttype="ROUTE", 
dw1="rtlist-ss7-1",setname="ss7-set1"
numan-add:BDIGTREE:custgrpid="1111",callside="originating",digitstring="1", 
setname="ss7-set1"

;4* - eisup-bighead
numan-add:RESULTSET:custgrpid="1111",name="eisup-set4"
numan-add:RESULTTABLE:custgrpid="1111",name="eisup-result4",resulttype="ROUTE", 
dw1="rtlist-bighead",setname="eisup-set4"
numan-add:BDIGTREE:custgrpid="1111",callside="originating",digitstring="4", 
setname="eisup-set4"

;02- eisup-suzhou--self
numan-add:RESULTSET:custgrpid="1111",name="self-set02"
numan-add:RESULTTABLE:custgrpid="1111",name="self-result02",resulttype="RTRN_START_ANAL", 
dw1="02",setname="self-set02"
numan-add:BDIGTREE:custgrpid="1111",callside="originating",digitstring="02", 
setname="self-set02"

;*********************PGW own routing number **************************
;545
numan-add:RESULTSET:custgrpid="1111",name="545"
numan-add:RESULTTABLE:custgrpid="1111",name="545",resulttype="RTRN_START_ANAL",dw1="3", 
setname="545"
numan-add:BDIGTREE:custgrpid="1111",callside="originating",digitstring="545",setname="545"

Provisioning Route Optimization Responded by the PGW 2200

When provisioning Route Optimization, perform the following tasks:

Collect the routing number of each device, for example, CCM, PGW 2200, and PBX.

Be sure the first and second transferred basic call can be made successfully

Configure the dial plan according to the device routing numbers

The Route Optimization service invokes a third new call (except for Route Optimization loopback), the PGW 2200 needs a dialplan for the new invoked call. The B-number of the new invoked call is a device's routing number.

The following MML commands are an example of route optimization terminating provisioning.

prov-sta::srcver="rot1",dstver="ROPR001"
;ss7
prov-add:OPC:name="opc",desc="PGW point code",netaddr="2.5.5",netind=2,type="TRUEOPC"

prov-add:DPC:name="dpc1",desc="INET point code 2.4.4",netaddr="2.4.4",netind=2

prov-add:SS7PATH:name="ss7svc1",desc="SS7 service to DPC 2.4.4",mdo="ISUPV3", 
custgrpid="1111",side="network",dpc="dpc1",opc="opc",m3uakey="",origlabel="",termlabel=""

prov-add:EXTNODE:name="slt7",desc="sh-2600-7",type="SLT",isdnsigtype="N/A",group=0

prov-add:LNKSET:name="linkset1",desc="Linkset 1 to INET",apc="dpc1", 
proto="SS7-ITU",type="IP"

prov-add:SS7ROUTE:name="ss7route1",desc="Route to DPC-2-4-4",opc="opc", 
dpc="dpc1",lnkset="linkset1",PRI=1

prov-add:SESSIONSET:name="c7sset7",extnode="slt7",ipaddr1="IP_Addr1",peeraddr1="10.0.4.2",
port=7000,peerport=7000,type="BSMV0"
prov-add:C7IPLNK:name="ss7link1",desc="Signal link",lnkset="linkset1", 
slc=0,pri=1,timeslot=2,sessionset="c7sset7"

prov-add:EXTNODE:name="sh-5300-5",desc="mgw sh-5300-5",type="AS5300", 
isdnsigtype="N/A",group=0

prov-add:MGCPPATH:NAME="mgcppath5300-5",desc="MGCP service to AS-5300-5", 
extnode="sh-5300-5"

prov-add:IPLNK:name="mgcplink-5",desc="MGCP link to AS-5300-5",svc="mgcppath5300-5", 
ipaddr="IP_Addr1",port=2427,peeraddr="10.0.5.12",peerport=2427,pri=1,iproute=""

prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="mgcppath5300-5",mgcpDomainNameRemote="s0/ds1-1/1@sh-5300-5"

prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:NAME="mgcppath5300-5",srcpIpPortLocal="2428"


;--trunks&rtlist
prov-add:TRNKGRP:name="1100",clli="INET-DPC1",svc="ss7svc1",type="TDM_ISUP",SELseq="LIDL"
prov-add:SWITCHTRNK:name="1",trnkgrpnum="1100",span="ffff",cic=1,cu="sh-5300-5", 
spansize=31,endpoint="s0/ds1-1/1@10.0.5.12"
prov-add:RTTRNKGRP:name="1100",type=1
prov-add:RTTRNK:name="rt-ss7-1",trnkgrpnum=1100
prov-add:RTLIST:name="rtlist-ss7-1",rtname="rt-ss7-1",distrib="OFF"
prov-ed:TRNKGRPPROP:name="1100",custgrpid="1111",MGCdomain="10.0.5.42"

;**************************ss7***********************************************

;hsi-bighead
prov-add:EXTNODE:name="sh-bighead",desc="HSI 
sh-bighead",type="H323",isdnsigtype="N/A",group=0

prov-add:EISUPPATH:name="eisup-bighead",desc="EISUP to HSI sh-bighead", 
extnode="sh-bighead",custgrpid="1111",origlabel="",termlabel=""

prov-add:IPLNK:name="ip-bighead",desc="IP lnk to HSI sh-bighead",svc="eisup-bighead", 
ipaddr="IP_Addr1",port=8003,peeraddr="10.0.5.48",peerport=8003,pri=1,iproute=""

prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="eisup-bighead",AllowH323Hairpin="1"
prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="eisup-bighead",FeatureTransparencyDisabled="1"
prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="eisup-bighead",H323AdjunctLink="1"
prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="eisup-bighead",OOverlap="1"
prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="eisup-bighead",OwnRoutingNumber="545"
prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="eisup-bighead",QSIGTunnelVariant="1"
prov-add:SIGSVCPROP:name="eisup-bighead",TOverlap="0"

prov-add:TRNKGRP:name="9300",clli="EISUP2B",svc="eisup-bighead",type="IP"
prov-add:RTTRNKGRP:name="9300",type=4
prov-add:RTTRNK:weightedtg="OFF",name="eisup-bighead",trnkgrpnum=9300
prov-add:RTLIST:name="rtlist-bighead",rtname="eisup-bighead"

prov-add:TRNKGRPPROP:name="9300",QSIGTunnelVariant="1"
prov-add:TRNKGRPPROP:name="9300",OwnRoutingNumber="545"

;dialplan
numan-add:DIALPLAN:custgrpid="1111",overdec="NO"

;1* ss7svc1
numan-add:RESULTSET:custgrpid="1111",name="ss7-set1"
numan-add:RESULTTABLE:custgrpid="1111",name="ss7-result1",resulttype="ROUTE", 
dw1="rtlist-ss7-1",setname="ss7-set1"
numan-add:BDIGTREE:custgrpid="1111",callside="originating",digitstring="1", 
setname="ss7-set1"

;4* - eisup-bighead
numan-add:RESULTSET:custgrpid="1111",name="eisup-set4"
numan-add:RESULTTABLE:custgrpid="1111",name="eisup-result4",resulttype="ROUTE", 
dw1="rtlist-bighead",setname="eisup-set4"
numan-add:BDIGTREE:custgrpid="1111",callside="originating",digitstring="4", 
setname="eisup-set4"

;************CCM routing number is 446 ******************************
numan-add:RESULTSET:custgrpid="1111",name="446"
numan-add:RESULTTABLE:custgrpid="1111",name="446",resulttype="ROUTE",dw1="rtlist-bighead",
setname="446"
numan-add:BDIGTREE:custgrpid="1111",callside="originating",digitstring="446",setname="446"

Provisioning Call Completion

The following MML commands are an example of call completion provisioning.

prov-sta::srcver="ccb1",dstver="CCBS-DPNSS-TQSIG"
;dpnss-3745 siemens
prov-add:extnode:name="va-3745-2",desc="MGW for dpnss",type="3745", 
isdnsigtype="IUA",group=0
prov-add:association:name="assoc-dpnss-gw",desc="siemens pbx",extnode="va-3745-2", 
sgp="",type="IUA",ipaddr1="IP_Addr1",ipaddr2="N/A",port=9904,peeraddr1="10.0.5.255", 
peeraddr2="0.0.0.0",peerport=9904,iproute1="",iproute2="",rcvwin=18000,maxinitretrans=10, 
maxinitrto=2000,maxretrans=5,cumsackto=300,bundleto=100,minrto=300,maxrto=3000,hbto=2000, 
ipprecedence="ROUTINE",dscp="AF31",maxretransdest=3
prov-add:dpnsspath:name="dpnss-path-1",desc="dpnss sigpath to Siemens 
PBX",extnode="va-3745-2",mdo="DPNSS_BTNR188",custgrpid="1111",sigslot=2,sigport=0, 
origlabel="",termlabel="",subunit=0
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="dpnss-path-1",FeatureTransparencyDisabled="1"

prov-add:mgcppath:name="dpnss-mgcp1",desc="Nothing defined",extnode="va-3745-2"
prov-add:iplnk:name="dpnss-1",desc="mgcp link to 3745",svc="dpnss-mgcp1", 
ipaddr="IP_Addr1",PORT=2427,peeraddr="10.0.5.255",peerport=2427,pri=1,iproute=""
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="dpnss-mgcp1",mgcpDomainNameRemote="S2/DS1-0/1@10.0.5.255"

prov-add:trnkgrp:name="3100",clli="dpnss",svc="dpnss-path-1",type="TDM_DPNSS", 
SELseq="LIDL"
prov-add:switchtrnk:name="1",trnkgrpnum="3100",span="ffff",cic=1,cu="va-3745-2", 
spansize=31,endpoint="s2/ds1-0/1@10.0.5.255"
prov-add:rttrnkgrp:name="3100",type=6
prov-add:rttrnk:name="rt-dpnss-3725",trnkgrpnum=3100
prov-add:rtlist:name="rtlist-dpnss-3745",rtname="rt-dpnss-3725",distrib="OFF"
prov-ed:trnkgrpprop:name="3100",custgrpid="1111",MGCdomain="10.0.5.42"

;hsi-bighead
prov-add:extnode:name="sh-bighead",desc="HSI 
sh-bighead",type="H323",isdnsigtype="N/A",group=0
prov-add:eisuppath:name="eisup-bighead",desc="EISUP to HSI sh-bighead", 
extnode="sh-bighead",custgrpid="1111",origlabel="",termlabel=""
prov-add:iplnk:name="ip-bighead",desc="IP lnk to HSI 
sh-bighead",svc="eisup-bighead",ipaddr="IP_Addr1",port=8003,peeraddr="10.0.5.48", 
peerport=8003,pri=1,iproute=""

prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="eisup-bighead",AllowH323Hairpin="1"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="eisup-bighead",FeatureTransparencyDisabled="0"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="eisup-bighead",H323AdjunctLink="1"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="eisup-bighead",OOverlap="1"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="eisup-bighead",QSIGTunnelVariant="1"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="eisup-bighead",TOverlap="0"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="eisup-bighead",EnableCCBSpathReservation="1"

prov-add:trnkgrp:name="9300",clli="EISUP2B",svc="eisup-bighead",type="IP"
prov-add:rttrnkgrp:name="9300",type=4
prov-add:rttrnk:weightedtg="OFF",name="eisup-bighead",trnkgrpnum=9300
prov-add:rtlist:name="rtlist-bighead",rtname="eisup-bighead"

prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="9300",FeatureTransparencyDisabled="0"
prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="9300",CustomerVPNid="longan"
prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="9300",customervpnoffnettblnum="5"
prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="9300",customervpnonnettblnum="5"
prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="9300",EnableCCBSpathReservation="1"

;dialplan
numan-add:dialplan:custgrpid="1111",overdec="NO"

;4* - eisup-bighead
numan-add:resultset:custgrpid="1111",name="eisup-set4"
numan-add:resulttable:custgrpid="1111",name="eisup-result4",resulttype="ROUTE", 
dw1="rtlist-bighead",setname="eisup-set4"
numan-add:bdigtree:custgrpid="1111",callside="originating",digitstring="4", 
setname="eisup-set4"

;3
numan-add:resultset:custgrpid="1111",name="dpnss-rs-1"
numan-add:resulttable:custgrpid="1111",name="dpnss-route1",resulttype="ROUTE", 
dw1="rtlist-dpnss-3745",setname="dpnss-rs-1"
numan-add:bdigtree:custgrpid="1111",callside="originating",digitstring="3", 
setname="dpnss-rs-1"

Provisioning Message Waiting Indicator (with no QSIG Tunneling)

The following MML commands are an example of message waiting indicator, with no QSIG tunneling enabled, provisioning.

prov-sta:srcver="qsig1",dstver="QSIGdis"
;dpnss-stim
;ADD gateway 1 port 0/0 to stim
prov-add:extnode:name="sh-stim-001",desc="sh-stim-3001 for dpnss",type="AS5400", 
isdnsigtype="IUA",group=0
prov-add:mgcppath:name="mgcp-stim-dpnss001",desc="MGCP",extnode="sh-stim-001"
prov-add:iplnk:name="sh-stim-dpnss1",desc="link 1 to 
sh-stim-001",svc="mgcp-stim-dpnss001",ipaddr="IP_Addr1",port=2427,peeraddr="10.0.5.52", 
peerport=2427,pri=1,iproute=""
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="mgcp-stim-dpnss001",mgcpDomainNameRemote="s0/ds1-0/1@10.0.5.52"
prov-add:association:name="stim-dpnss1",desc="",extnode="sh-stim-001",sgp="",type="IUA", 
ipaddr1="IP_Addr1",port=9903,peeraddr1="10.0.5.52",peerport=9903,iproute1="",rcvwin=18000,
maxinitretrans=10,maxinitrto=2000,maxretrans=5,cumsackto=300,bundleto=100,minrto=300, 
maxrto=3000,hbto=2000,maxretransdest=3
prov-add:dpnsspath:name="dpnss-pathin1",desc="dpnss 
sh-001",extnode="sh-stim-001",mdo="DPNSS_BTNR188",custgrpid="1111",sigslot=0,sigport=0
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="dpnss-pathin1",CustomerVPNOnNetTblNum="5"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="dpnss-pathin1",CustomerVPNOffNetTblNum="5"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="dpnss-pathin1",customervpnid="1"
prov-ed:sigsvcprop:name="dpnss-pathin1",ownroutingnumber="488"
prov-ed:sigsvcprop:MgcpBehavior="2",name="mgcp-stim-dpnss001"

prov-ed:sigsvcprop:name="dpnss-pathin1",MwiStringOFF ="*58*AN*1"
prov-ed:sigsvcprop:name="dpnss-pathin1",MwiStringON ="*58*AN*0"

prov-add:trnkgrp:name="3600",svc="dpnss-pathin1",type="TDM_DPNSS",selseq="ASC",qable="N"
prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="3600",CustGrpId="1111",gatewayrbtonesupport="1"
prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="3600",customervpnid="1"
prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="3600",FeatureTransparencyDisabled ="0"
prov-add:switchtrnk:name="3600",trnkgrpnum="3600",spansize=31,span="ffff",cic=1, 
endpoint="S0/ds1-0/1@10.0.5.52",cu="sh-stim-001"
prov-add:rttrnkgrp:name="3600",type=6,reattempts=2,queuing=30,cutthrough=3

prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="3600",MwiStringOFF ="*58*AN*1"
prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="3600",MwiStringON ="*58*AN*0"

;hsi-bighead
prov-add:extnode:name="sh-bighead",desc="HSI 
sh-bighead",type="H323",isdnsigtype="N/A",group=0
prov-add:eisuppath:name="eisup-bighead",desc="EISUP to HSI sh-bighead", 
extnode="sh-bighead",custgrpid="1111",origlabel="",termlabel=""
prov-add:iplnk:name="ip-bighead",desc="IP lnk to HSI sh-bighead", 
svc="eisup-bighead",ipaddr="IP_Addr1",port=8003,peeraddr="10.0.5.48", 
peerport=8003,pri=1,iproute=""

prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="eisup-bighead",AllowH323Hairpin="1"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="eisup-bighead",FeatureTransparencyDisabled="0"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="eisup-bighead",H323AdjunctLink="1"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="eisup-bighead",OOverlap="1"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="eisup-bighead",QSIGTunnelVariant="0"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="eisup-bighead",TOverlap="0"

prov-add:trnkgrp:name="9300",clli="EISUP2B",svc="eisup-bighead",type="IP"
prov-add:rttrnkgrp:name="9300",type=4
prov-add:rttrnk:weightedtg="OFF",name="eisup-bighead",trnkgrpnum=9300
prov-add:rtlist:name="rtlist-bighead",rtname="eisup-bighead"

;dialplan
numan-add:dialplan:custgrpid="1111",overdec="NO"

;4* - eisup-bighead
numan-add:resultset:custgrpid="1111",name="eisup-set4"
numan-add:resulttable:custgrpid="1111",name="eisup-result4",resulttype="ROUTE", 
dw1="rtlist-bighead",setname="eisup-set4"
numan-add:resulttable:custgrpid="1111",name="tab33",resulttype="BNBRMODMWI",dw1= 
"mwion",dw2="wioff",setname="rset33"
numan-add:bdigtree:custgrpid="1111",callside="originating",digitstring="4", 
setname="eisup-set4"
numan-add:digmodstring:custgrpid="1111",name="mwioff",digstring="5719"
numan-add:digmodstring:custgrpid="1111",name="mwion",digstring="5718"

Provisioning Message Waiting Indicator (with QSIG Tunneling)

The following MML commands are an example of message waiting indicator, with QSIG tunneling enabled, provisioning.

prov-sta:srcver="qsig2",dstver="QSIGen"
;dpnss-stim
;ADD gateway 1 port 0/0 to stim
prov-add:extnode:name="sh-stim-001",desc="sh-stim-3001 for 
dpnss",type="AS5400",isdnsigtype="IUA",group=0
prov-add:mgcppath:name="mgcp-stim-dpnss001",desc="MGCP",EXTNODE="sh-stim-001"
prov-add:iplnk:name="sh-stim-dpnss1",desc="link 1 to 
sh-stim-001",svc="mgcp-stim-dpnss001",ipaddr="IP_Addr1",port=2427,peeraddr="10.0.5.52", 
peerport=2427,pri=1,iproute=""
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="mgcp-stim-dpnss001",mgcpDomainNameRemote="s0/ds1-0/1@10.0.5.52"
prov-add:association:name="stim-dpnss1",desc="",extnode="sh-stim-001",sgp="",type="IUA", 
ipaddr1="IP_Addr1",port=9903,peeraddr1="10.0.5.52",peerport=9903,iproute1="",rcvwin=18000,
maxinitretrans=10,maxinitrto=2000,maxretrans=5,cumsackto=300,bundleto=100,minrto=300, 
maxrto=3000,hbto=2000,maxretransdest=3
prov-add:dpnsspath:name="dpnss-pathin1",desc="dpnss sh-001", 
extnode="sh-stim-001",mdo="DPNSS_BTNR188",custgrpid="1111",sigslot=0,sigport=0
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="dpnss-pathin1",CustomerVPNOnNetTblNum="5"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="dpnss-pathin1",CustomerVPNOffNetTblNum="5"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="dpnss-pathin1",customervpnid="1"
prov-ed:sigsvcprop:name="dpnss-pathin1",ownroutingnumber="488"
prov-ed:sigsvcprop:MgcpBehavior="2",name="mgcp-stim-dpnss001"

prov-ed:sigsvcprop:name="dpnss-pathin1",MwiStringOFF="*58*AN*1"
prov-ed:sigsvcprop:name="dpnss-pathin1",MwiStringON="*58*AN*0"

prov-add:trnkgrp:name="3600",svc="dpnss-pathin1",type="TDM_DPNSS",selseq="ASC",qable="N"
prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="3600",CustGrpId="1111",gatewayrbtonesupport="1"
prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="3600",customervpnid="1"
prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="3600",FeatureTransparencyDisabled="0"
prov-add:switchtrnk:name="3600",trnkgrpnum="3600",spansize=31,span="ffff",cic=1, 
endpoint="S0/ds1-0/1@10.0.5.52",cu="sh-stim-001"
prov-add:rttrnkgrp:name="3600",type=6,reattempts=2,queuing=30,cutthrough=3

prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="3600",MwiStringOFF="*58*AN*1"
prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="3600",MwiStringON="*58*AN*0"

;hsi-bighead
prov-add:extnode:name="sh-bighead",desc="HSI 
sh-bighead",type="H323",isdnsigtype="N/A",group=0
prov-add:eisuppath:name="eisup-bighead",desc="EISUP to HSI sh-bighead", 
extnode="sh-bighead",custgrpid="1111",origlabel="",termlabel=""
prov-add:iplnk:name="ip-bighead",desc="IP lnk to HSI 
sh-bighead",svc="eisup-bighead",ipaddr="IP_Addr1",port=8003,peeraddr="10.0.5.48", 
peerport=8003,pri=1,iproute=""

prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="eisup-bighead",AllowH323Hairpin="1"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="eisup-bighead",FeatureTransparencyDisabled="0"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="eisup-bighead",H323AdjunctLink="1"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="eisup-bighead",OOverlap="1"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="eisup-bighead",OwnRoutingNumber="545"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="eisup-bighead",QSIGTunnelVariant="1"
prov-add:sigsvcprop:name="eisup-bighead",TOverlap="0"

prov-add:trnkgrp:name="9300",clli="EISUP2B",svc="eisup-bighead",type="IP"
prov-add:rttrnkgrp:name="9300",type=4
prov-add:rttrnk:weightedtg="OFF",name="eisup-bighead",trnkgrpnum=9300
prov-add:rtlist:name="rtlist-bighead",rtname="eisup-bighead"

prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="9300",FeatureTransparencyDisabled="0"
prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="9300",CustomerVPNid="longan"
prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="9300",customervpnoffnettblnum="5"
prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="9300",customervpnonnettblnum="5"

;dialplan
numan-add:dialplan:custgrpid="1111",overdec="NO"

;4* - eisup-bighead
numan-add:resultset:custgrpid="1111",name="eisup-set4"
numan-add:resulttable:custgrpid="1111",name="eisup-result4",resulttype="ROUTE", 
dw1="rtlist-bighead",setname="eisup-set4"
numan-add:bdigtree:custgrpid="1111",callside="originating",digitstring="4", 
setname="eisup-set4"

Provisioning a Customer VPN ID in a Trunk Group

To provision a VPN ID in a trunk group, enter the following MML commands in an open provisioning session.

mml> prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="9300",FeatureTransparencyDisabled="0"
mml> prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="9300",CustomerVPNid="longan"
mml> prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="9300",customervpnoffnettblnum="5"
mml> prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="9300",customervpnonnettblnum="5"

Provisioning a Customer VPN ID in the Dial Plan

To provision a VPN ID in a dial plan, enter the following MML commands in an open provisioning session.

Creating the dial plan

mml> numan-add:dialplan:custgrpid="T002" 

Provisioning the customer VPN ID table and the result table

mml> numan-add:customervpnid:custgrpid="T002",name="Abbey" 

mml> 
numan-add:resulttable:custgrpid="T002",name="result1",resulttype="ORIG_VPN_ID",dw1="Abbey"
,dw2="5",dw3="5",setname="VpnCust1" 

Provisioning the digit tree to use the results

mml> 
numan-add:adigtree:custgrpid="T002",digitstring="0",callside="originating",setname="VpnCul
" 

Provisioning pre-analysis to use the results

mml> numan-add:bnpi:custgrpid="T002",npiblock=1,setname="VpnCust1" 
mml> numan-add:bnoa:custgrpid="T002",noavalue=1,npiblock=1 

Provisioning a QSIG Trunk Group or sigPath

Ensure feature transparency is enabled:

mml> prov-ed:sigsvcprop:name="Q-PBX-1",FeatureTransparencyDisabled="0" 

Assign a customer VPN ID and profile indexes:

mml> prov-ed:sigsvcprop:name="Q-PBX-1",CustomerVPNid="CUST-1" 
mml> prov-ed:sigsvcprop:name="Q-PBX-1",CustomerVPNOnNetTblNum="5" 
mml> prov-ed:sigsvcprop:name="Q-PBX-1",CustomerVPNOffNetTblNum="6" 

Enable Path Replacement / Route Optimization:

mml> prov-ed:sigsvcprop:name="Q-PBX-1",OwnRoutingNumber="1234" 

Provisioning an H.323 EISUP Trunk Group or sigPaths for Transparent Annex M1 (Tunneled QSIG)

Ensuring QSIG tunneling is enabled:

mml> prov-ed:sigsvcprop:name="EISUP-HSI-1",QSIGTunnelVariant="1" 

Assign a customer VPN ID and profile indexes:

mml> prov-ed:sigsvcprop:name="EISUP-HSI-1",CustomerVPNid="CUST-1" 
mml> prov-ed:sigsvcprop:name="EISUP-HSI-1",CustomerVPNOnNetTblNum="5" 
mml> prov-ed:sigsvcprop:name="EISUP-HSI-1",CustomerVPNOffNetTblNum="6" 

Enable path replacement / route optimization:

mml> prov-ed:sigsvcprop:name="EISUP-HSI-1",OwnRoutingNumber="1234" 

Disable feature transparency for CCM interworking:

mml> prov-ed:sigsvcprop:name="EISUP-HSI-1",FeatureTransparencyDisabled="1" 

If QBE is to be used for CCBS instead of tunnel, change the DisableCCBSoverTunneledQSIG XECfgParm.dat parameter to a value of 1.

Billing Interface

This section identifies the call detail record (CDR) data added for this feature. For billing interface information for the rest of the Cisco MGC software, refer to the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Billing Interface Guide.

Service Data (Tag: 4239)

Table 2 Service Data Description Form 

Name: Service Data

Tag: 4239

Source: MDL

Description/Purpose: This tag indicates the services invoked or transited using the feature interworking containers.

Format: Structured variable

Length in Octets: 2

OCTET FIELD VALUE MEANING

   1 Service Name See below The name of the feature
or service being interworked

   2 Service Action See below The type of action

Data Value:

SERVICE NAME: 1= MWI (Message Waiting Indicator), 2=SSCT (Single Step Call Transfer), 3= RO (Route Optimization), 4=Call Transferred, 5=CB (Busy) Request, 6=CB (No replay) Request, 7=CB Free Notification, 8=CB Call Setup, 9=CB Cancel, 10=Extension Status, 11=Call Diversion (unconditional), 12=Call Diversion (busy), or 13=Call Diversion (no reply)

SERVICE ACTION: 1=Request, 2=Executed, 3=Rejected, 4=Activate, or 5=Deactivate

ANSI/ITU Variations: None.

Extended Data Value: No extended value.

General Information:

MGC Release: Release 9.7(3) and later.

 

Answered (1010)

Deselected (1020)

Aborted (1030)

Release (1040)

Interrupted (1050)

Ongoing (1060)

Maintenance (1070)

External DB (1080)

End of Call (1110)

N

N

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Y


Command Reference

This section documents new, modified, or deleted Man-Machine Language (MML) commands. All other MML commands are documented in the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 MML Command Reference Guide.

New MML Commands

This section contains the MML commands that are new for this feature.

Properties

New properties have been added to the following MML commands to configure loop avoidance, calling name display, call transfer, message waiting indication, and routing numbers for Route Optimization or Path Replacement:

CustomerVPNid

Purpose:

This property extends the usage of customer VPN ID to EISUP (HSI only) trunk groups and sigPaths to enable QSIG transparency and feature interworking between different protocol families.

Valid Values:

As many as an 8-character string

Default Value:

00000000 (indicates that there is no customer associated with the interface and feature transparency does not occur)

Domain:

X_sigPath, X_Trunk Group

Protocol Family

EISUP, DPNSS, and QSIG

Example:

mml> prov-ed:trnkgrpprop:name="1000",CustomerVpnId="Abbey-1" 

CustomerVPNOnNetTblNum

Purpose:

This property extends the usage of customer on net profile index to EISUP (HSI only) trunk groups and sigpaths to enable QSIG transparency and feature interworking between different protocol families.

Valid Values:

An integer, range 1-8

Default Value:

5

Domain:

_X_sigPath, X_Trunk Group

Protocol Family

EISUP, DPNSS, and QSIG

Example:

mml> prov-ed:trnkgrpprop:name="1000",CustomerVPNOnNetTblNum="2" 

CustomerVPNOffNetTblNum

Purpose:

This property extends the usage of customer VPN ID to EISUP (HSI only) trunk groups and sigpaths to enable QSIG transparency and feature interworking between different protocol families.

Valid Values:

An integer, range 1-8

Default Value:

5

Domain:

_X_sigPath, X_Trunk Group

Protocol Family

DPNSS, EISUP, and QSIG

Example:

mml> prov-ed:trnkgrpprop:name="1000",CustomerVpnPffNetTblNum="5" 

OwnRoutingNumber

Purpose:

This property extends the use of own routing number to QSIG and EISUP trunk groups and sigPaths to enable Path Replacement (if not already enabled). The absence of this property acts as an indication that the Path Replacement service is disabled across that interface.

Default Value: null

Valid Values:

As many as 32-character alphanumeric string

Default Value:

null

Domain:

_X_sigPath, X_Trunk Group

Protocol Family

DPNSS, EISUP, and QSIG

Example:

mml> prov-ed:sigsvcprop:name="Q-PBX-1",OwnRoutingNumber="1234" 

QSIGTunnelVariant

Purpose:

This property allows the QSIG tunnel capability to be enabled across outbound EISUP (HSI) interfaces and specify which protocol variant is used.

Valid Values: 0 (QSIG tunneling is disabled) or 1 (QSIG tunneling is enabled).

Default Value: 0

Valid Values:

a single digit 0 or 1

Default Value:

0

Domain:

_X_sigPath, X_Trunk Group

Protocol Family

EISUP

Example:

mml> prov-ed:trunkgrpprop:name="1000",qsigtunnelvariant="1" 

DisableQSIGReleaseMethod

Purpose:

This property indicates the QSIG release method. An H.225 signaling connection can be released with a single Release Complete message instead of a three-stage QSIG release sequence. This is only applicable to release procedures initiated by the PGW 2200. The PGW accepts receipt of either type of release method.

Valid Values:

a single digit integer: 0 or 1

Default Value:

0 (Normal QSIG release is enabled for QSIG tunneling)

Domain:

_X_sigPath, X_Trunk Group

Protocol Family

EISUP

Example:

mml> prov-ed:trunkgrpprop:name="1000",disableqsigreleasemethod="1" 

DpnssRORoutingNumberLength

Purpose:

This property allows for DPNSS - QSIG PR ROO interworking, the DPNSS RO routing number and call reference are concatenated and in QSIG they are separate fields. An indication of where the divide point is between the fields is an optional parameter in the DPNSS specification. It is therefore necessary to provide a configurable definition of how to split these two fields.

Valid Values:

an integer: 2-10

Default Value:

4

Domain:

_X_sigPath, X_Trunk Group

Protocol Family

DPNSS

Example:

mml> prov-ed:trnkgrpprop:name="1000",dpnssroroutingnumberlength="4" 

EnableCCBSpathReservation

Purpose:

This property allows configuring the Path Reservation option against each QSIG destination. In the case of EISUP, this is valid for HSI destinations only

Valid Values: 0-CCBS with Path Reservation is disabled or 1-CCBS with Path Reservation is enabled

Valid Values:

a single digit integer: 0 or 1

Default Value:

0

Domain:

_X_sigPath, X_Trunk Group

Protocol Family

EISUP and QSIG

Example:

mml> prov-ed:trnkgrpprop:name="1000",enableccbspathreservation="1" 

Software Changes for this Feature

Alarms

This section lists the alarm that is added to support this feature. For information on the other alarms for the Cisco MGC software, refer to the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Messages Reference Guide.

New Alarms

The alarm that is added for this feature is:

EISUP: Tunneled QSIG data received over a tunneling disabled interface

Description The HSI is configured for tunneled QSIG but the PGW interface is not.

Severity Info

Cause This alarm is reported by EISUP when a tunneled QSIG message is received on an EISUP interface that is configured as tunneling disabled.

Type 1 (Communication error).

Action The craftsperson should verify that the data configuration consistency on the PGW and HSIs.

419 "EISUP: Tunneled QSIG data received over a tunneling disabled interface" 1 Y "The HSI is configured for tunneled QSIG but the PGW interface is not" "The HSI is configured for tunneled QSIG but the PGW interface is not" 2

Measurements

Table 3 contains the system measurements that are added to support this feature. For information on the other system measurements, refer to the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Operations, Maintenance, and Troubleshooting Guide.

Table 3 New Operational Measurements 

MML Counter Group:Name
Description
Related Components
Logging Interval

Call GROUP

CALL: CTICBReq

CALL: CTICBCancel

CALL:CallBackFreeNotification

CALL:CallBackCallSetup

CALL:MessageWaitingIndication

Call message statistics

This counter increments each time a Call Back request is received by the PGW from DPNSS, QSIG, or Tunneled QSIG interfaces.

This counter increments each time a Call Back Cancellation is received by the PGW from DPNSS, QSIG, or Tunneled QSIG interfaces.

This counter increments each time a Call Back Line Free Notification is received by the PGW from DPNSS, QSIG, or Tunneled QSIG interfaces.

This counter increments each time a Call Back Call set up request is received by the PGW from DPNSS, QSIG, or EISUP (with tunneled QSIG) interfaces.

This counter increments each time a Message Waiting Indication is received by the PGW over DPNSS, QSIG, Tunneled QSIG, or SIP.

Association

15, 60, 24

15, 60, 24

15, 60, 24

15, 60, 24

15, 60, 24


Properties

The properties in this section are used for this feature. For information on other properties for the Cisco MGC software, refer to the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide.

The parent objects for the properties involved in this feature are found in Table 4.

Table 4 Software Properties Related to this Feature 

Property Name
Parent Object
AVM
DPNSS
EISUP
IOCC
ISDNPRI
MGCP
QSIG
RLM
SESSION
SGCP
SIP
SS7-ANSI
SS7-China
SS7-ITU
SS7-Japan
SS7-UK
TALI-IOCC
TCAPOverIP
TrunkGroup
VSI

CustomerVPNid

 

X

X

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

CustomerVPNOffNetTblNum

 

X

X

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

CustomerVPNOnNetTblNum

 

X

X

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

DisableQSIGReleaseMethod

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

DpnssRORoutingNumberLength

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

EnableCCBSpathReservation

 

 

X

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

OwnRoutingNumber

 

X

X

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

RORequestDelayTimer

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

QSIGTunnelVariant

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 


Table 5 Provisionable Properties 

Property
Modified value takes effect without restart

CustomerVPNid

Yes

CustomerVPNOffNetTblNum

Yes

CustomerVPNOnNetTblNum

Yes

DisableQSIGReleaseMethod

Yes

DpnssRORoutingNumberLength

Yes

EnableCCBSpathReservation

Yes

OwnRoutingNumber

Yes

RORequestDelayTimer

Yes

QSIGTunnelVariant

Yes


The properties used for this feature are described in Table 6.


Note Three of the properties listed below are existing properties whose value was modified for this feature. The remaining properties are new for this feature module.


Table 6 Properties 

Property
Definition

CustomerVPNid

Extends the use of the customer VPN ID to EISUP (HSI only) trunk groups and sigPaths to enable QSIG transparency and feature interworking between different protocol families. Valid range: any 8-character alphanumeric string.

Valid Values: any 8-character alphanumeric string.

Default Value: 00000000

CustomerVPNOnNetTblNum

Extends the use of customer on-net profile index to EISUP (HSI only) trunk groups and sigPaths to enable QSIG transparency and feature interworking between different protocol families.

Valid Values: 1-8

Default Value: 5

CustomerVPNOffNetTblNum

Extends the use of customer off-net profile index to EISUP (HSI only) trunk groups and sigPaths to enable QSIG transparency and feature interworking between different protocol families.

Valid Values: 1-8.

Default Value: 6

OwnRoutingNumber

Extends the use of own routing number to QSIG and EISUP trunk groups and sigPaths to enable Path Replacement (if not already enabled). The absence of this property acts as an indication that the Path Replacement service is disabled across that interface.

Valid Values: As many as 32-character alphanumeric string.

Default Value: null

QSIGTunnelVariant

Allows the QSIG tunnel capability to be enabled across outbound EISUP (HSI) interfaces and specify which protocol variant is used.

Valid Values: 0 (QSIG tunneling is disabled) or 1 (QSIG tunneling is enabled).

Default Value: 0

DisableQSIGReleaseMethod

Indicates the QSIG release method. An H.225 signaling connection can be released with a single Release Complete message instead of a three-stage QSIG release sequence. This is only applicable to release procedures initiated by the PGW 2200. The PGW accepts receipt of either type of release method.

Valid Values: 0 (Normal QSIG release is enabled for QSIG tunneling) or 1 (Normal QSIG release is disabled for QSIG tunneling)

Default Value: 0

DpnssRORoutingNumberLength

For DPNSS - QSIG PR ROO interworking, the DPNSS RO routing number and call reference are concatenated and in QSIG they are separate fields. An indication of where the divide point is between the fields is an optional parameter in the DPNSS specification. It is therefore necessary to provide a configurable definition of how to split these two fields.

Valid Values: 2-10

Default Value: 4

EnableCCBSpathReservation

Allows configuring the Path Reservation option against each QSIG destination. In the case of EISUP, this is valid for HSI destinations only.

Valid Values: 0 (CCBS with Path Reservation is disabled) or 1 (CCBS with Path Reservation is enabled)

Default Value: 0

RORequestDelayTimer

Specifies the time delay before sending out Route Optimization requests.

Valid Values: integer, range 0-1000

Default value: 0


Result Type Definitions

Result analysis provides the capability to group actions into result sets that can be attached at different points of analysis. The main attachment points are: Pre-analysis, A-number analysis, B-number analysis, and Cause analysis.

The following result type definitions are added, modified, or deleted for this feature. For information on other result type definitions for the Cisco MGC software, refer to the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Dial Plan Guide.

Table 7 shows the result type added for this feature.

Table 7 New Result Type Definitions 

Result Number.
Result Type
Dataword1
Dataword2
Dataword3
Dataword4
Analysis Points
Result Type Valid For
Intermediate
End Point
A-digit analysis
B-digit analysis
Cause
Pre-analysis

71

ORIG_VPN_ID

VPN ID

On-net index

Off-net index

0 (not used)

X

 

X

X

 

X


Result Type Definitions

The following paragraphs contain definitions of the result type listed in Table 7.

ORIG_VPN_ID

The ORIG_VPN_ID result type is returned from A-number analysis (the called number) indicating the originating VPN ID and if the originating index is on net or off net. This is an integer representation of the provisioned VPN ID. When provisioned, the VPN ID is a string. The ID string is stored in the dial plan as an integer key in dataword1. The combining of the VPN ID and the integer key is made as the VPN ID entry in the dial plan.

Valid dataword1 (VPN ID) values are: any 8-digit alphanumeric character string.

Valid dataword2 (on-net index) values are a single integer from 1-8, with a default value of 5.

Valid dataword3 (off-net index) values are a single integer from 1-8, with a default value of 6.

XECfgParm.dat Parameters

The XECfgParm.dat file configuration parameters added for this feature are in the table below. For information on the other XECfgParm.dat parameters, refer to the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Installation and Configuration Guide.

Configuration Parameter
Definition

*.DisableCCBSoverTunneledQSIG

This parameter allows choosing either the QBE or Tunnel QSIG interface for Callback service, since both interfaces cannot be selected at the same time. The default value (0) uses the Tunnel QSIG interface for Callback service. Setting a value of 1 selects the QBE interface for Callback service.

Valid Values: 0-CCBS with QSIG tunneling is enabled or 1-Callback using the QBE interface is enabled

Default Value: 0


Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines

For information on obtaining documentation, obtaining support, providing documentation feedback, security guidelines, and also recommended aliases and general Cisco documents, see the monthly What's New in Cisco Product Documentation, which also lists all new and revised Cisco technical documentation at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/general/whatsnew/whatsnew.html

Glossary

Table 8 contains definitions of acronyms and technical terms used in this feature module.

Table 8 Acronyms and Definitions

Acronym
Definition

ARQ

Automatic Retransmission Request

CBWF

Call Back When Free

CBWNU

Call Back When Next Used

CCBS

Call Completion to Busy Subscriber

CCM

Cisco CallManager

CCNR

Call Completion on No Reply

DPNSS

Digital Private Network Signaling System No. 1

EEM

DPNSS End-to-End Message

FT

feature transparency

HSI

H.323 Signaling Interface

MGC

Cisco Media Gateway Controller

MWI

Message Waiting Indicator

PBX

Private Branch Exchange

PGW

PSTN Gateway

PR

path replacement

QBE

Quick Buffer Encoding

QSIG

signalling between the Q reference points

TDM

time-division multiplexing

VPN

Virtual Private Network