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Support for M3UA Priority Routes

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Support for M3UA Priority Routes

Table Of Contents

Support for M3UA Priority Routes

Feature Overview

Benefits

Related Features and Technologies

Related Documents

Supported Platforms

Supported Standards, MIBs, and RFCs

Prerequisites for Using This Feature

Provisioning Procedures

Provisioning This Feature

Adding M3UA Connections

Modifying M3UA Components

Deleting M3UA Components

Provisioning Examples

Adding an M3UA Route

Modifying an M3UA Route

Deleting an M3UA Route

Command Reference

Modified MML Commands

PROV-ADD:m3uaroute—Provision an M3UA Route (Release 9.5(2))

PROV-ED:m3uaroute—Edit an M3UA Route (Release 9.5(2)

Reference Information

Planning for Provisioning

Collecting External Node Data

Collecting IP Route Data (optional)

Collecting M3UA Key Data

Collecting M3UA Route Data

Collecting SCTP Association Data

Collecting SS7 Signaling Gateway Process Data

Collecting SS7 Signaling Service Data

Collecting SS7 Subsystem Data

Provisioning Basics

Starting a Provisioning Session

Saving and Activating Your Provisioning Changes

Ending a Provisioning Session Without Activating Your Changes

Retrieving Provisioning Data

Components

Modified Components

External Node Types

Provisioning Worksheets

Obtaining Documentation

Cisco.com

Product Documentation DVD

Ordering Documentation

Documentation Feedback

Cisco Product Security Overview

Reporting Security Problems in Cisco Products

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Cisco Technical Support & Documentation Website

Submitting a Service Request

Definitions of Service Request Severity

Obtaining Additional Publications and Information

Glossary


Support for M3UA Priority Routes


Document Release History

Publication Date
Comments

June 26, 2007

Initial version of the document.


Feature History

Release
Modification

9.5(2)

The Support for M3UA Priority Routes feature was introduced on the Cisco MGC software.


This document describes the Support for M3UA Priority Routes feature. This feature is described in the following sections:

Feature Overview

Supported Standards, MIBs, and RFCs

Prerequisites for Using This Feature

Provisioning Procedures

Command Reference

Reference Information

Obtaining Documentation

Documentation Feedback

Cisco Product Security Overview

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Obtaining Additional Publications and Information

Glossary

Feature Overview

The Support for M3UA Priority Routes provides support on the Cisco Media Gateway Controller (MGC) to assign the priority of an M3UA route. This feature enables you to assign priorities for M3UA routes for each OPC/DPC (Origination Point Code/Destination Point Code) pair on the PSTN Gateway (PGW). Two levels of priority can be assigned on an M3UAROUTE link. The default is priority level 1. If multiple routes have the same priority assigned, the PGW loadshares traffic across the links. Otherwise, the PGW will select the higher priority route. The priority based routing can be beneficial when two Cisco IP Transfer Points (ITPs) are geographically separated. Users can configure a closer Cisco ITP with the higher priority, thus improving the efficiency of network resources. When the higher priority Cisco ITP fails, traffic is then routed to the lower priority Cisco ITP.

Benefits

This feature provides the benefit described below.

Improves Efficiency of Network Resources

This feature improves the efficiency of network resources by allowing the assignment of two levels of priority on M3UAROUTE links.

Related Features and Technologies

The following documentation describes additional features on the PGW 2200 (MGC) and IOS gateways that are related to this feature:

Support for M3UA and SUA with SCTP

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps1913/products_feature_guide09186a00801bcf9a.html

Related Documents

This document contains information that is related strictly to this feature. The documents that contain additional information related to the Cisco MGC are listed below and can be found at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps1913/tsd_products_support_series_home.html

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Hardware Installation Guide

Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for the Cisco Media Gateway Controller

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Installation and Configuration Guide

Release Notes for Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9.5(2)

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Dial Plan Guide

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Operations, Maintenance, and Troubleshooting Guide

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 MML Command Reference

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Messages Reference Guide

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Billing Interface Guide

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Management Information Base Guide

Supported Platforms

The hardware platforms supported for the Cisco MGC software Release 9.5(2) are described in the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Hardware Installation Guide which is located at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps1913/prod_installation_guides_list.html

Supported Standards, MIBs, and RFCs

This section identifies the new or modified standards, MIBs, and RFCs that are supported by this feature.

Standards

M3UA

MIBs

There are no new MIBs available for this feature.

RFCs

The following RFC is supported by this feature:

RFC-3332 (M3UA)

Prerequisites for Using This Feature

You must have Cisco MGC software Release 9.5(2). Prerequisites for this release can be found in the Release Notes for Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9.5(2) which is located at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps1913/prod_release_note09186a008022f692.html

Provisioning Procedures

You must modify the provisioning data of your system to enable this feature. Before you begin provisioning this feature, we recommend that you plan your provisioning changes as described in the "Planning for Provisioning" section.


Tip You can find information on starting and ending provisioning sessions and retrieving provisioning data in the "Provisioning Basics" section.


The following sections describe the provisioning tasks related to this feature:

Provisioning This Feature

Provisioning Examples

Command Reference

Provisioning This Feature

Adding M3UA Connections

This section contains the procedures that you must perform to add M3UA connections to your Cisco PGW 2200 provisioning data. When provisioning the components that enable the Cisco PGW 2200 to support M3UA, perform the procedures in the following order:

Adding Cisco ITP External Nodes

Adding Point Codes (OPC and DPC)

Adding M3UA Routing Keys

Adding SS7 Signaling Services

Adding M3UA Routes

Adding M3UA Signaling Gateway Processes

Adding IP Routes (Optional)

Adding SCTP Associations


Note To begin the provisioning session, perform the steps in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section. Once you have finished provisioning the M3UA data, save and activate your provisioning data by performing the steps in the "Saving and Activating Your Provisioning Changes" section.


Adding Cisco ITP External Nodes

To add Cisco ITP external nodes, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Enter the following command to add one Cisco ITP external node:

mml> prov-add:extnode:name="name", desc="description", type="itp", group=num

Where:

name—The name you want to give to the component. The name can be as many as 20 characters long and can contain numbers, letters, and the dash (-) symbol. The name should begin with a letter.

description—The long name assigned to the component. It can be as many as 128 alphanumeric characters in length.

num—The M3UA group number. The valid values are 1 through 100.

For example, to add a Cisco ITP external node named itp1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-add:extnode:name="itp1", desc="2651 ITP", type="itp", group=1

Step 2 Repeat Step 1 for each additional Cisco ITP external node you want to add to your provisioning data.


Adding Point Codes (OPC and DPC)

To add originating point codes (OPCs), perform the following steps:


Step 1 Enter the following command to add one OPC:

mml> prov-add:opc:name="name", desc="description", netaddr="addr", netind=num, 
type="trueopc"

Where:

name—The name you want to give to the component. The name can be as many as 20 characters long and can contain numbers, letters, and the dash (-) symbol. The name should begin with a letter.

description—The long name assigned to the component. It can be as many as 128 alphanumeric characters in length.

addr—The network address in dot notation.

num—The network indicator number. The default value is 0.


Note To support M3UA interfaces, set the value of the type parameter must be set to trueopc.


For example, to add an OPC named opc1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-add:opc:name="opc1", desc="Originating PC 1", 
netaddr="2.1.4",netind=2,type="trueopc"

Step 2 Repeat Step 1 for each additional OPC you want to add to your provisioning data.


To add destination point codes (DPCs), perform the following steps:


Step 1 Enter the following command to add one DPC:

mml> prov-add:dpc:name="name", desc="description", netaddr="addr", netind=num

Where:

name—The name you want to give to the component. The name can be as many as 20 characters long and can contain numbers, letters, and the dash (-) symbol. The name should begin with a letter.

description—The long name assigned to the component. It can be as many as 128 alphanumeric characters in length.

addr—The network address in dot notation.

num—The network indicator number. The default value is 0.

For example, to add a DPC named dpc1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-add:DPC:NAME="dpc1",DESC="DPC1",NETADDR="1.1.5",NETIND=2

Step 2 Repeat Step 1 for each additional DPC you want to add to your provisioning data.


Adding M3UA Routing Keys

To add M3UA routing keys, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Enter the following command to add one M3UA routing key:

mml> prov-add:m3uakey:name="name", desc="description", opc="opc", [dpc="dpc",] 
routingcontext=rc, [si="serv", networkappearance=na]

Where:

name—The name you want to give to the component. The name can be as many as 20 characters long and can contain numbers, letters, and the dash (-) symbol. The name should begin with a letter.

description—The long name assigned to the component. It can be as many as 128 alphanumeric characters in length.

opc—Man-Machine Language (MML) name of a previously assigned OPC. The selected OPC must have a type of trueopc.

dpc—MML name of a previously assigned DPC. This parameter is optional.

rc—Routing context value. For you to use the routing context, its value must be set to any integer other than 0. (0 indicates that there is no routing context.) The routing context value for each M3UA key you create must be unique.

serv—Service indicator value. This parameter is optional. The valid values are ISUP, TUP, and N/A. The default value is N/A.

na—Network appearance value. This parameter is optional. The valid values are integers from 1 through 32767. A value of 0 indicates an invalid network appearance.

For example, to add an M3UA key named m3uakey1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-add:M3UAKEY:NAME="m3uakey1",OPC="opc1",DPC="dpc1",si="ISUP", ROUTINGCONTEXT=10

Step 2 Repeat Step 1 for each additional M3UA key you want to add to your provisioning data.


Adding SS7 Signaling Services

To add SS7 signaling services, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Enter the following command to add one SS7 signaling service:

mml> prov-add:ss7path:name="name", desc="description", mdo="protFile", dpc="dpc", 
custgrpid="num", m3uakey="rtkey"

Where:

name—The name you want to give to the service. The name can be as many as 20 characters long and can contain numbers, letters, and the dash (-) symbol. The name should begin with a letter.

description—The long name assigned to the component. It can be as many as 128 alphanumeric characters in length.

protFile—MDO file name for the supported SS7 protocol. A list of file names for SS7 protocols supported in this release can be found in the Release Notes for the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9.5(2).

dpc—MML name of a previously provisioned DPC. There can be only one SS7 signaling service per DPC/M3UA pair.

num—Customer group ID number. The valid value is a four-digit number. The default value is 0000.

rtkey—MML name of a previously provisioned M3UA key.

For example, to add an SS7 signaling service named ss7svc1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-add:SS7PATH:NAME="ss7svc1", DESC="OPC1 to INET DPC1", M3UAKEY="m3uakey1", 
DPC="dpc1", MDO="Q761_BASE"

Step 2 Repeat Step 1 for each additional SS7 signaling service you want to add to your provisioning data.


Adding M3UA Routes

To add M3UA routes, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Enter the following command to add one M3UA route:

mml> prov-add:m3uaroute:name="name", desc="description", dpc="dpc", extnode="itp", 
opc="opc", pri=priority

Where:

name—The name you want to give to the component. The name can be as many as 20 characters long and can contain numbers, letters, and the dash (-) symbol. The name should begin with a letter.

description—The long name assigned to the component. It can be as many as 128 alphanumeric characters in length.

dpc—MML name of a previously provisioned DPC.

itp—MML name of a previously provisioned Cisco ITP external node.

opc—MML name of a previously provisioned OPC.

pri—M3UA route priority. This parameter is an integer value; it can be 1 or 2: 1 is the default value, 1 is higher priority, 2 is lower priority.


Note The M3UA route priority parameter is introduced in patch CSCOgs046 of Release 9.5(2).


For example, to add an M3UA route named m3uarte1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-add:M3UAROUTE:NAME="m3uarte1",DESC="M3UA Rte 1",OPC="opc1",DPC="dpc1", 
EXTNODE="itp1",PRI=1

Step 2 Repeat Step 1 for each additional M3UA route you want to add to your provisioning data.


Adding M3UA Signaling Gateway Processes

To add M3UA signaling gateway processes, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Enter the following command to add one M3UA signaling gateway process:

mml> prov-add:sgp:name="name", desc="description", extnode="itp"

Where:

name—The name you want to give to the component. The name can be as many as 20 characters long and can contain numbers, letters, and the dash (-) symbol. The name should begin with a letter.

description—The long name assigned to the component. It can be as many as 128 alphanumeric characters in length.

itp—MML name of a previously provisioned Cisco ITP external node.

For example, to add a signaling gateway process (SGP) for an M3UA path named m3ua-sgp1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-add:SGP:NAME="m3ua-sgp1",DESC="M3UA SGP 1 - ITP1", EXTNODE="itp1"

Step 2 Repeat Step 1 for each additional SGP you want to add to your provisioning data.


Note You must define an SGP for each M3UA path that you provision.



Adding IP Routes (Optional)

IP routes are required for your provisioning data if your Cisco PGW hosts are not on the same subnet as the Cisco access servers. To add IP routes, perform the following steps:


Step 1 If you do not already have an active provisioning session, start one as described in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section.

Step 2 Enter the following command to add one IP route:

mml> prov-add:iproute:name="name", desc="description", netmask="mask", nexthop="nhop", 
ipaddr="addr", dest="destination"

Where:

name—The name you want to give to the component. The name can be as many as 20 characters long and can contain numbers, letters, and the dash (-) symbol. The name should begin with a letter.

description—The long name assigned to the component. It can be as many as 128 alphanumeric characters in length.

mask—Subnet mask of the destination (optional). The value should be expressed as an IP address in decimal dot notation (default is 255.255.255.255).

nhop—Next hop router hostname, IP address, or one of the following property names defined in the XECfgParm.dat file:

IP_NextHop

IP_NextHop2

IP_NextHop3

IP_NextHop4

IP_NextHop5

IP_NextHop6

IP_NextHop7

IP_NextHop8

IP_Addr1

IP_Addr2

IP_Addr3

IP_Addr4

The IP address should be in decimal dot notation, and the hostname must be less than or equal to 32 characters.

addr—Local IP address. IP Address should be one of the following property names defined in the XECfgParm.dat file:

IP_Addr1

IP_Addr2

IP_Addr3

IP_Addr4

destination—Destination hostname or IP address. IP address should be in decimal dot notation and the hostname must be less than or equal to 32 characters.

For example, to add an IP route named iprte1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-add:IPROUTE:NAME="iprte1", DESC="IP Route 1", dest="10.82.80.0", 
ipaddr="IP_Addr1", netmask="255.255.255.0", nexthop="10.82.82.1"

Step 3 Repeat Step 2 for each additional IP route you want to add to your provisioning data.

Step 4 If there are no other components that you need to provision, end your provisioning session as described in the "Saving and Activating Your Provisioning Changes" section.

Otherwise, proceed to the "Adding M3UA Signaling Gateway Processes" section.


Adding SCTP Associations

To add Stream Controlled Transmission Protocol (SCTP) associations, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Enter the following command to add an SCTP association:

mml> prov-add:association:name="name", desc="description", type="sigtype", sgp="sgp", 
ipaddr1="addr1", ipaddr2="addr2", port=num, peeraddr1="paddr1", peeraddr2="paddr2", 
peerport=pnum, iproute1="iprte1", iproute2="iprte2", rcvwin=rcv, maxinittrans=rtxinitmsg, 
maxinitrto=rtxinittim, maxretransdest=prtx, maxretrans=rtx, cumsackto=sacktm, 
bundleto=bundtm, minrto=minrtx, maxrto=maxrtx, hbto=hb, ipprecedence="ipprec", dscp="dscp"

Where:

name—The name you want to give to the component. The name can be as many as 20 characters long and can contain numbers, letters, and the dash (-) symbol. The name should begin with a letter.

description—The long name assigned to the component. It can be as many as 128 alphanumeric characters in length.

sigtype—Name of the signaling protocol for this association. Valid values are IUA, M3UA, and SUA.

sgp—MML name of a previously defined signaling gateway process.

addr1—First local IP address, as defined by the XECfgParm.dat parameter IP_Addr1, IP_Addr2, IP_Addr3, or IP_Addr4. Valid values are:

IP_Addr1

IP_Addr2

IP_Addr3

IP_Addr4

addr2—Second local IP address, as defined by the XECfgParm.dat parameter IP_Addr1, IP_Addr2, IP_Addr3, or IP_Addr4. This parameter is optional. Valid values are:

IP_Addr1

IP_Addr2

IP_Addr3

IP_Addr4

N/A (default value)

num—Local SCTP port number (optional). Valid values are in the range from 1024 to 65535. The default value varies based on the protocol type selected.The default for IUA is 9900, the default for M3UA is 2905, and the default for SUA is 14001.

paddr1—Highest priority destination address, expressed in dot notation.

paddr2—Lowest priority destination address, expressed in dot notation. This parameter is optional. The default value for this parameter is 0.0.0.0.

pnum—Destination SCTP port number (optional). Valid values are in the range from 1024 to 65535. The default value varies based on the protocol type selected. The default for IUA is 9900, the default for M3UA is 2905, and the default for SUA is 14001.

iprte1—MML name of first IP route (optional). Valid value is the MML name of a previously provisioned IP route.

iprte2—MML name of second IP route (optional). Valid value is the MML name of a previously provisioned IP route.

rcv—Number of bytes to advertise for the local receive window (optional). Valid values are in the range from 1500 to 65535. The default value is 18000.

rtxinitmsg—Maximum number of times to retransmit SCTP INIT message (optional). Valid values are in the range from 0 to 100. The default value is 10. A value of 0 means that the SCTP internal default value is used.

rtxinittim—Maximum initial time retransmission value (optional). Valid values are in the range from 300 to 3000, and 0. The default value is 2000. A value of 0 means that the SCTP internal default value is used.

prtx—Maximum number of retransmissions to either PEERADDR1 or PEERADDR2 before the association is declared failed (optional). Valid values are in the range from 1 to 10. The default value is 3.

rtx—Maximum number of retransmissions over all destination addresses before the association is declared failed (optional). Valid values are in the range from 1 to 10. The default value is 5.


Note The value of this parameter cannot exceed the value of the MAXRETRANSDEST parameter multiplied by the number of destinations.


sacktm—Maximum time after a datagram is received before a SCTP SACK message is sent (optional). Valid values are in the range from 100 to 500 ms. The default value is 300 ms.

bundtm—Maximum time SCTP waits for other outgoing datagrams for bundling (optional). Valid values are in the range from 100 to 600 ms. The default value is 100 ms.

minrtx—Minimum value allowed for the retransmission timer (optional). Valid values are in the range from 300 to 3000 ms. The default value is 300 ms.

maxrtx—Maximum value allowed for the retransmission timer (optional). Valid values are in the range from 1000 to 3000 ms. The default value is 3000 ms.

hb—Time between heartbeats (optional). The heartbeat is this value plus the current retransmission timeout value. Valid values are in the range from 300 to 10000 ms, or 0. A value of 0 means that the heartbeat is disabled. The default value is 2000 ms.

ipprec—IP precedence (optional). The value for this parameter is inserted in place of the IP precedence portion of the Type of Service field in outgoing SCTP datagrams. Valid values are as follows:

ROUTINE (default) 000

PRIORITY 001

IMMEDIATE 010

FLASH 011

FLASH-OVERRIDE 100

CRITICAL 101

INTERNET 110

NETWORK 111

dscp—Differential Service Code Point. This value is placed in the DSCP portion of the Type Of Service field for outgoing SCTP datagrams (optional). EF is Expedited Forward, AF is Assured Forward, and DP is Drop Precedence). Valid values are:

EF 101110—Expedited Forwarding

AF11 001010—Assured Forwarding Class 1 Low Drop Precedence

AF12 001100—Assured Forwarding Class 1 Medium Drop Precedence

AF13 001110—Assured Forwarding Class 1 High Drop Precedence

AF21 010010—Assured Forwarding Class 2 Low Drop Precedence

AF22 010100—Assured Forwarding Class 2 Medium Drop Precedence

AF23 010110—Assured Forwarding Class 2 High Drop Precedence

AF31 011010—Assured Forwarding Class 3 Low Drop Precedence

AF32 011100—Assured Forwarding Class 3 Medium Drop Precedence

AF33 011110—Assured Forwarding Class 3 High Drop Precedence

AF41 100010—Assured Forwarding Class 4 Low Drop Precedence

AF42 100100—Assured Forwarding Class 4 Medium Drop Precedence

AF43 100110—Assured Forwarding Class 4 High Drop Precedence

N/A (default)

For example, to add an M3UA association named m3ua-assoc1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-add:ASSOCIATION:NAME="m3ua-assoc1",DESC="M3UA Association 1", 
TYPE="M3UA",SGP="m3ua-sgp1", IPADDR1="IP_Addr1", IPADDR2="IP_Addr2", 
PEERADDR1="10.82.80.187", PEERADDR2="10.82.81.164"

Step 2 Repeat Step 1 for each additional M3UA association you want to add to your provisioning data.


Modifying M3UA Components

This section contains the procedures that you must perform to modify M3UA connections in your Cisco MGC provisioning data. When modifying the components that enable the Cisco MGC to support M3UA, perform the procedures in the following order.

Modifying Cisco ITP External Nodes

Modifying Point Codes (OPCs and DPCs)

Modifying M3UA Routing Keys

Modifying SS7 Signaling Services

Modifying M3UA Routes

Modifying M3UA SGPs

Modifying IP Routes (Optional)

Modifying SCTP Associations


Note To begin the provisioning session, perform the steps in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section. Once you have finished provisioning the M3UA data, save and activate your provisioning data by performing the steps in the "Saving and Activating Your Provisioning Changes" section.


Modifying Cisco ITP External Nodes

Desc is the only parameter that can be modified for an existing Cisco ITP external node. To edit the description of a Cisco ITP external node, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Enter the following command to edit one Cisco ITP external node:

mml> prov-ed:extnode:name="name", desc="description"

Where:

name—MML name of the Cisco ITP node to be modified.

description—The long name assigned to the component. It can be as many as 128 alphanumeric characters in length.

For example, to modify a Cisco ITP external node named itp1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-ed:extnode:name="itp1", desc="7200 ITP"

Step 2 Repeat the above step for each additional Cisco ITP external node you want to modify in your provisioning data.


Modifying Point Codes (OPCs and DPCs)

An OPC cannot be modified if it is a parent component for an SS7 or M3UA route. Therefore, OPCs cannot be modified. To change the values for an OPC, you first have to delete it, and then reprovision it. For more information on deleting OPCs, see the "Deleting Point Codes (OPCs and DPCs)" section.

To modify DPCs, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Enter the following command to modify one DPC:

mml> prov-ed:dpc:name="name", desc="description", netaddr="addr", netind=num

Where:

name—MML name of the DPC to be modified.

description—The long name assigned to the component. It can be as many as 128 alphanumeric characters in length.

addr—The network address in dot notation.

num—The network indicator number. The default value is 0.

For example, to modify a DPC named dpc1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-ed:DPC:NAME="dpc1",DESC="Destinatio PC1",NETADDR="1.1.3",NETIND=4

Step 2 Repeat the above step for each additional DPC you want to modify in your provisioning data.


Modifying M3UA Routing Keys

M3UA routing keys cannot be modified. To enter different values for existing M3UA routing keys, you must first delete them, as described in the "Deleting M3UA Routing Keys" section, and then provision new M3UA routing keys, as described in the "Adding M3UA Routing Keys" section.

Modifying SS7 Signaling Services

To modify SS7 signaling services, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Set the SS7 signaling service to be modified to the OOS state by entering the following MML command:

mml> set-dest:sig_srv:OOS

Where sig_srv is the MML name of the SS7 signaling service to be modified.

Step 2 Repeat Step 2 for each SS7 signaling service to be modified.

Step 3 Start a provisioning session as described in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section.

Step 4 Enter the following command to modify one SS7 signaling service:

mml> prov-ed:ss7path:name="name", desc="description", side=cmside, mdo="protFile", 
custgrpid=num, m3uakey="rtkey"

Where:

name—MML name of the SS7 signaling service to be modified.

description—The long name assigned to the component. It can be as many as 128 alphanumeric characters in length.

cmside—Q.931 call model side. The valid values are user, for the user side, and network, for the network side. The default value is network.

protFile—Message Definition Object (MDO) file name for the supported SS7 protocol. A list of file names for SS7 protocols supported in this release can be found in the Release Notes for the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9.5(2).

num—Customer group ID number. The valid value is a four-digit number. The default value is 0000.

rtkey—MML name of a previously provisioned M3UA key.

For example, to modify an SS7 signaling service named ss7svc1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-ed:SS7PATH:NAME="ss7svc1",DESC="Orig PC1 to INET Dest PC1",M3UAKEY="m3uakey2"

Step 5 Repeat Step 4 for each additional SS7 signaling service you want to modify in your provisioning data.

Step 6 If there are no other components that you need to provision, end your provisioning session as described in the "Saving and Activating Your Provisioning Changes" section.

Step 7 Set the modified SS7 signaling services to the IS state by entering the following MML command for each signaling service:

mml> set-dest:sig_srv:IS

Where sig_srv is the MML name of the modified SS7 signaling service.


Modifying M3UA Routes

To modify M3UA routes, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Set the associated ss7path to OOS.

mml> set-dest:ss7svc:OOS 

Step 2 Enter the following command to modify one M3UA route:

mml> prov-ed:m3uaroute:name="name", desc="description", dpc="dpc", extnode="itp", 
opc="opc", pri=priority

Where:

name—MML name of the M3UA route to be modified.

description—The long name assigned to the component. It can be as many as 128 alphanumeric characters in length.

dpc—MML name of a previously provisioned DPC.

itp—MML name of a previously provisioned Cisco ITP external node.

opc—MML name of a previously provisioned OPC.

pri—M3UA Route Priority. This parameter is an integer value; it can be 1 or 2: 1 is the default value, 1 is higher priority, 2 is lower priority.

For example, to modify an M3UA route named m3uarte1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-ed:M3UAROUTE:NAME="m3uarte1",DESC="M3UA Route 1",OPC="opc2",DPC="dpc2", 
EXTNODE="itp2",PRI=2

Step 3 Set the associated ss7path to IS.

mml> set-dest:ss7svc:IS 

Step 4 Repeat the above step for each additional M3UA route you want to modify in your provisioning data.


Modifying M3UA SGPs

Desc is the only parameter that can be modified in M3UA signaling gateway processes. To modify the descriptions of M3UA signaling gateway processes, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Enter the following command to modify one M3UA signaling gateway process:

mml> prov-ed:sgp:name="name", desc="description"

Where:

name—MML name of the SGP to be modified.

description—The long name assigned to the component. It can be as many as 128 alphanumeric characters in length.

For example, to modify an SGP for an M3UA path named m3ua-sgp1, enter the following command:

mml> prov-ed:SGP:NAME="m3ua-sgp1",DESC="M3UA SG Process 1 - ITP1"

Step 2 Repeat the above step for each additional SGP you want to modify in your provisioning data.


Modifying IP Routes (Optional)

The only IP route parameter that cannot be modified is the name. To modify IP routes, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Set the IP route to be modified to the OOS state as described in Setting the Service State of an IP Route which is located at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps1913/products_maintenance_guide_chapter09186a008007e560.html#wp1974858

Step 2 Repeat Step 1 for each IP route to be modified.

Step 3 Start a provisioning session as described in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section.

Step 4 Enter the following command:

mml> prov-ed:iproute:name="name", desc="description", netmask="mask", nexthop="nhop", 
ipaddr="addr", dest="destination"

Where:

name—MML name of the IP route to be modified.

description—The long name assigned to the component. It can be as many as 128 alphanumeric characters in length.

mask—Subnet mask of the destination (optional). The value should be expressed as an IP address in decimal dot notation (default is 255.255.255.255).

nhop—Next hop router hostname, IP address, or one of the following property names defined in the XECfgParm.dat file:

IP_NextHop

IP_NextHop2

IP_NextHop3

IP_NextHop4

IP_NextHop5

IP_NextHop6

IP_NextHop7

IP_NextHop8

IP_Addr1

IP_Addr2

IP_Addr3

IP_Addr4

The IP address should be in decimal dot notation, and the hostname must be less than or equal to 32 characters.

addr—Local IP address. The IP address should be one of the following property names defined in the XECfgParm.dat file:

IP_Addr1

IP_Addr2

IP_Addr3

IP_Addr4

destination—Destination hostname or IP address. IP Address should be in decimal dot notation, and the hostname must be less than or equal to 32 characters.

For example, to modify the destination and local IP address in an IP route named iparte1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-ed:IPROUTE:NAME="iprte1", dest="10.82.80.1", ipaddr="IP_Addr2"

Step 5 Repeat the Step 4 for each additional IP route you want to modify in your provisioning data.

Step 6 If there are no other components that you need to provision, end your provisioning session as described in the "Saving and Activating Your Provisioning Changes" section.

Step 7 Set the IP route to be modified to the IS state.


Modifying SCTP Associations

To modify SCTP associations, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Set the SCTP association to be modified to the OOS state as described in the "Modifying SCTP Associations" section.

Step 2 Repeat Step 1 for each additional SCTP association to be modified.

Step 3 Start a provisioning session as described in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section.

Step 4 Enter the following command to modify an SCTP association:

mml> prov-ed:association:name="name", desc="description", ipaddr1="addr1", 
ipaddr2="addr2", port=num, peeraddr1="paddr1", peeraddr2="paddr2", peerport=pnum, 
iproute1="iprte1", iproute2="iprte2", rcvwin=rcv, maxinittrans=rtxinitmsg, 
maxinitrto=rtxinittim, maxretransdest=prtx, maxretrans=rtx, cumsackto=sacktm, 
bundleto=bundtm, minrto=minrtx, maxrto=maxrtx, hbto=hb, ipprecedence="ipprec", dscp="dscp"

Where:

name—The name you want to give to the component. The name can be as many as 20 characters long and can contain numbers, letters, and the dash (-) symbol. The name should begin with a letter.

description—The long name assigned to the component. It can be as many as 128 alphanumeric characters in length.

addr1—First local IP address, as defined by the XECfgParm.dat parameter IP_Addr1, IP_Addr2, IP_Addr3, or IP_Addr4. Valid values are:

IP_Addr1

IP_Addr2

IP_Addr3

IP_Addr4

addr2—Second local IP address, as defined by the XECfgParm.dat parameter IP_Addr1, IP_Addr2, IP_Addr3, or IP_Addr4. This parameter is optional. Valid values are:

IP_Addr1

IP_Addr2

IP_Addr3

IP_Addr4

N/A (default value)

num—Local SCTP port number (optional). The range for valid values is from 1024 to 65535. Default value varies based on the protocol type selected. The default for IUA is 9900, the default for M3UA is 2905, and the default for SUA is 14001.

paddr1—Highest priority destination address, expressed in dot notation.

paddr2—Lowest priority destination address, expressed in dot notation. This parameter is optional. The default value for this parameter is 0.0.0.0.

pnum—Destination SCTP port number (optional). The range for valid values is from 1024 to 65535. Default value varies based on the protocol type selected. The default for IUA is 9900, the default for M3UA is 2905, and the default for SUA is 14001.

iprte1—MML name of first IP route (optional). The MML name of any previously provisioned IP route is a valid value.

iprte2—MML name of second IP route (optional). The MML name of any previously provisioned IP route is a valid value.


Note Any route other than the route already used for iprte1 is acceptable.


rcv—Number of bytes to advertise for the local receive window (optional). The range for valid values is from 1500 to 65535. The default value is 18000.

rtxinitmsg—Maximum number of times to retransmit SCTP INIT message (optional). The range for valid values is from 0 to 100. The default value is 10. A value of 0 means that the SCTP internal default value is used.

rtxinittim—Maximum initial time retransmission value (optional). The range for valid values is from 300 to 3000, and 0. The default value is 2000. A value of 0 means that the SCTP internal default value is used.

prtx—Maximum number of retransmissions to either PEERADDR1 or PEERADDR2 before the association is declared failed (optional). The range for valid values is from 1 to 10. The default value is 3.

rtx—Maximum number of retransmissions over all destination address before the association is declared failed (optional). The range for valid values is from 1 to 10. The default value is 5.


Note The value of this parameter cannot exceed the value of the MAXRETRANSDEST parameter multiplied by the number of destinations.


sacktm—Maximum time after a datagram is received before a SCTP SACK message is sent (optional). The range for valid values is from 100 to 500 ms. The default value is 300 ms.

bundtm—Maximum time SCTP waits for other outgoing datagrams for bundling (optional). The range for valid values is from 100 to 600 ms. The default value is 100 ms.

minrtx—Minimum value allowed for the retransmission timer (optional). The range for valid values is from 300 to 3000 ms. The default value is 300 ms.

maxrtx—Maximum value allowed for the retransmission timer (optional). The range for valid values is from 1000 to 3000 ms. The default value is 3000 ms.

hb—Time between heartbeats (optional). The heartbeat is this value plus the current retransmission timeout value. The range for valid values is from 300 to 10000 ms, or 0. A value of 0 means that the heartbeat is disabled. The default value is 2000 ms.

ipprec—IP precedence (optional). The value for this parameter is inserted in place of the IP precedence portion of the Type of Service field in outgoing SCTP datagrams. Valid values are as follows:

ROUTINE (default) 000

PRIORITY 001

IMMEDIATE 010

FLASH 011

FLASH-OVERRIDE 100

CRITICAL 101

INTERNET 110

NETWORK 111

dscp—Differential Service Code Point. This value is placed in the DSCP portion of the Type Of Service field for outgoing SCTP datagrams (optional). EF is Expedited Forward, AF is Assured Forward, and DP is Drop Precedence). Valid values are:

EF 101110—Expedited Forwarding

AF11 001010—Assured Forwarding Class 1 Low Drop Precedence

AF12 001100—Assured Forwarding Class 1 Medium Drop Precedence

AF13 001110—Assured Forwarding Class 1 High Drop Precedence

AF21 010010—Assured Forwarding Class 2 Low Drop Precedence

AF22 010100—Assured Forwarding Class 2 Medium Drop Precedence

AF23 010110—Assured Forwarding Class 2 High Drop Precedence

AF31 011010—Assured Forwarding Class 3 Low Drop Precedence

AF32 011100—Assured Forwarding Class 3 Medium Drop Precedence

AF33 011110—Assured Forwarding Class 3 High Drop Precedence

AF41 100010—Assured Forwarding Class 4 Low Drop Precedence

AF42 100100—Assured Forwarding Class 4 Medium Drop Precedence

AF43 100110—Assured Forwarding Class 4 High Drop Precedence

N/A (default)

For example, to modify an M3UA association named m3ua-assoc1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-ed:ASSOCIATION:NAME="m3ua-assoc1",DESC="M3UA Association 1", IPADDR1="IP_Addr2", 
IPADDR2="IP_Addr1", PEERADDR1="10.82.80.188", PEERADDR2="10.82.81.165"

Step 5 Repeat Step 4 for each additional SCTP association you want to modify in your provisioning data.

Step 6 If there are no other components that you need to provision, end your provisioning session as described in the "Saving and Activating Your Provisioning Changes" section.

Step 7 Set the SCTP association to be modified to the IS state as described in the "Adding SCTP Associations" section.


Deleting M3UA Components

This section contains the procedures that you must use to delete M3UA components from your Cisco PGW 2200 provisioning data. When deleting the components that enable the Cisco PGW 2200 to support M3UA, perform the procedures in the following order:

Deleting Cisco ITP External Nodes

Deleting Point Codes (OPCs and DPCs)

Deleting M3UA Routing Keys

Deleting SS7 Signaling Services

Deleting M3UA Routes

Deleting SS7 Subsystems

Deleting M3UA SGPs

Deleting IP Routes

Deleting SCTP Associations


Note To begin the provisioning session, perform the steps in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section. Once you have finished provisioning the M3UA data (in this case, deleting M3UA components), save and activate your provisioning data by performing the steps in the "Saving and Activating Your Provisioning Changes" section.


Deleting Cisco ITP External Nodes

To delete Cisco ITP external nodes, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Set the interface on the external node that is associated with the Cisco MGC software to the out-of-service state. Refer to the documentation for your media gateway for more information on taking interfaces out of service.

Step 2 Delete the SS7 signaling service, as described in the "Deleting SS7 Signaling Services" section.

Step 3 If your system uses IP routes for this external node, delete the IP routes as described in the "Deleting IP Routes" section.

Step 4 Delete the SCTP associations for this external node.

Step 5 Enter the following command:

mml> prov-dlt:extnode:name="name"

Where name is the MML name of the Cisco ITP node to be deleted.

For example, to delete a Cisco ITP external node named itp1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-dlt:extnode:name="itp1"

Step 6 Repeat the above steps for each additional Cisco ITP external node you want to delete from your provisioning data.


Deleting Point Codes (OPCs and DPCs)

To delete OPCs, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Delete the SS7 signaling service, as described in the "Deleting SS7 Signaling Services" section.

Step 2 Delete the SS7 routes. To do this, enter the following MML command:

mml> prov-dlt:ss7route:name="name"

Where name is the MML name of the SS7 route to be deleted.

For example, to delete an SS7 route named ss7route1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-dlt:ss7route:name="ss7route1"

Step 3 Delete the M3UA routing keys, as described in the "Deleting M3UA Routing Keys" section.

Step 4 Delete the M3UA routes, as described in the "Deleting M3UA Routes" section.

Step 5 Delete the SS7 subsystems, as described in the "Deleting SS7 Subsystems" section.

Step 6 Enter the following command:

mml> prov-dlt:opc:name="name"

Where name is the MML name of the OPC to be deleted.

For example, to delete an OPC named opc1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-dlt:opc:name="opc1"

Step 7 Repeat the above steps for each OPC you want to delete from your provisioning data.


To delete DPCs, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Delete the SS7 signaling service, as described in the "Deleting SS7 Signaling Services" section.

Step 2 Delete the SS7 routes. To do this, enter the following MML command:

mml> prov-dlt:ss7route:name="name"

Where name is the MML name of the SS7 route to be deleted.

For example, to delete an SS7 route named ss7route1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-dlt:ss7route:name="ss7route1"

Step 3 Delete the M3UA routing keys, as described in the "Deleting M3UA Routing Keys" section.

Step 4 Delete the M3UA routes, as described in the "Deleting M3UA Routes" section.

Step 5 Enter the following command:

mml> prov-dlt:dpc:name="name"

Where name is the MML name of the DPC to be deleted.

For example, to delete a DPC named dpc1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-dlt:DPC:NAME="dpc1"

Step 6 Repeat the above steps for each additional DPC you want to delete from your provisioning data.


Deleting M3UA Routing Keys

To delete M3UA routing keys, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Delete the SS7 signaling service, as described in the "Deleting SS7 Signaling Services" section.

Step 2 Enter the following command:

mml> prov-dlt:m3uakey:name="name"

Where name is the MML name of the M3UA routing key to be deleted.

For example, to delete an M3UA routing key named m3rtekey1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-dlt:m3uakey:NAME="m3rtekey1"

Step 3 Repeat the above steps for each additional M3UA routing key you want to delete from your provisioning data.


Deleting SS7 Signaling Services

To delete SS7 signaling services, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

mml> set-dest:sig_srv:OOS

Where sig_srv is the MML name of the desired signaling service.


Note To delete the service, you have to first set it to OOS.


For example, to set the service state of a signaling service called sigsrv1 to OOS, enter the following command:

mml> set-dest:sigsrv1:OOS

Step 2 Block all of the CICs associated with this signaling service using the following MML command:

mml> blk-cic:sig_svc:all

Where sig_svc is the MML name of the signaling service associated with the CICs to be blocked.

Step 3 Delete the bearer channels associated with this signaling service, using the following MML command:

mml> prov-dlt:nailedtrnk:dstsrv="sig_svc", "all"

Where sig_svc is the MML name of this signaling service.

Step 4 Enter the following command:

mml> prov-dlt:ss7path:name="name"

Where name is the MML name of the SS7 signaling service to be deleted.

For example, to delete an SS7 signaling service named ss7svc1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-dlt:SS7PATH:NAME="ss7svc1"

Step 5 Repeat the above steps for each additional SS7 signaling service you want to delete from your provisioning data.


Deleting M3UA Routes

To delete M3UA routes, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Set the associated ss7path to OOS.

mml> set-dest:ss7svc:OOS 

Step 2 Enter the following command:

mml> prov-dlt:m3uaroute:name="name"

Where name is the MML name of the M3UA route to be deleted.

For example, to delete an M3UA route named m3uarte1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-dlt:M3UAROUTE:NAME="m3uarte1"

Step 3 Set the associated ss7path to IS.

mml> set-dest:ss7svc:IS 

Step 4 Repeat the above step for each additional M3UA route you want to delete from your provisioning data.


Deleting SS7 Subsystems

To delete SS7 subsystems, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Enter the following command:

mml> prov-dlt:ss7subsys:name="name"

Where name is the MML name of the SS7 subsystem to be deleted.

For example, to delete an SS7 subsystem named ss7subsys1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-dlt:SS7SUBSYS:NAME="ss7subsys1"

Step 2 Repeat the above step for each additional SS7 subsystem you want to delete from your provisioning data.


Deleting M3UA SGPs

To delete M3UA signaling gateway processes (SGPs), perform the following steps:


Step 1 Delete the SCTP associations. See "Deleting SCTP Associations" section.

Step 2 Enter the following command:

mml> prov-dlt:sgp:name="name"

Where name is the MML name of the SGP to be deleted.

For example, to delete an SGP for an M3UA path named m3ua-sgp1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-dlt:SGP:NAME="m3ua-sgp1"

Step 3 Repeat the above steps for each additional SGP you want to delete from your provisioning data.


Deleting IP Routes

To delete IP routes, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Set the service state of the IP route to OOS.

Step 2 Delete any components that used this route as a parameter..

Step 3 Enter the following command:

mml> prov-dlt:iproute:name="name"

Where name is the MML name of the IP route to be deleted.

For example, to delete an IP route named iprte1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-dlt:IPROUTE:NAME="iprte1"

Step 4 Repeat the above steps for each additional IP route you want to delete from your provisioning data.


Deleting SCTP Associations

To delete SCTP associations, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Set the SCTP association to the OOS state as described in the "Adding SCTP Associations" section.

Step 2 Enter the following command:

mml> prov-dlt:association:name="name"

Where name is the MML name of the association you want to delete.

For example, to delete an SCTP association named m3ua-assoc1, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-dlt:ASSOCIATION:NAME="m3ua-assoc1"

Step 3 Repeat the above steps for each SCTP association you want to delete from your provisioning data.


Provisioning Examples

This section provides the following examples of provisioning for this feature:

Adding an M3UA Route

Modifying an M3UA Route

Deleting an M3UA Route

Adding an M3UA Route

mml> prov-sta::srcver="new",dstver="m3uaPrioRoute"
mml> prov-add:OPC:NAME="opc",DESC="Own Point 
code",NETADDR="3.10.3",NETIND=2,TYPE="TRUEOPC"
mml> prov-add:DPC:NAME="dpc",DESC="Dest Point code",NETADDR="3.9.3",NETIND=2
mml> prov-add:EXTNODE:NAME="itp1",DESC="ITP1",TYPE="ITP",GROUP=1
mml> prov-add:EXTNODE:NAME="itp2",DESC="ITP2",TYPE="ITP",GROUP=1
mml> prov-add:SGP:NAME="sgp1",DESC="sgp1 to ITP1",EXTNODE="itp1"
mml> prov-add:SGP:NAME="sgp2",DESC="sgp2 to ITP2",EXTNODE="itp2"
mml> prov-add:M3UAROUTE:NAME="m3uaroute1",OPC="opc",DPC="dpc",EXTNODE="itp1",PRI=1
mml> prov-add:M3UAROUTE:NAME="m3uaroute2",OPC="opc",DPC="dpc",EXTNODE="itp2",PRI=2
mml> prov-add:M3UAKEY:NAME="m3uakey",OPC="opc",DPC="dpc",ROUTINGCONTEXT=31,SI="ISUP"
mml> prov-add:SS7PATH:NAME="ss7svc",DPC="dpc",MDO="Q761_BASE",M3UAKEY="m3uakey"
mml> prov-add:ASSOCIATION:NAME="asso1",SGP="sgp1",TYPE="M3UA",IPADDR1="IP_Addr1", 
IPADDR2="N/A",PORT=2905,PEERADDR1="10.0.8.7",PEERADDR2="0.0.0.0",PEERPORT=2905
mml> prov-add:ASSOCIATION:NAME="asso2",SGP="sgp2",TYPE="M3UA",IPADDR1="IP_Addr1", 
IPADDR2="N/A",PORT=2905,PEERADDR1="10.0.8.8",PEERADDR2="0.0.0.0",PEERPORT=2905
mml> prov-cpy

Modifying an M3UA Route

mml> set-dest:ss7svc:OOS
mml> prov-sta::srcver="active",dstver="modifying m3uaroute"
mml> prov-ed:m3uaroute:name="m3uaroute1",pri=2
mml> prov-cpy
mml> set-dest:ss7svc:IS

Deleting an M3UA Route

mml> set-dest:ss7svc:OOS
mml> prov-sta::srcver="active",dstver="deleting m3uaroute"
mml> prov-dlt:m3uaroute:name="m3uaroute2"
mml> prov-cpy
mml> set-dest:ss7svc:IS

Command Reference

This section documents new, modified, or deleted MML commands. All other MML commands are documented in the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 MML Command Reference Guide at the following location:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps1913/products_command_reference_book09186a008007e2f2.html

Modified MML Commands

This section contains the MML commands that were modified for the Support for M3UA Priority Routes feature.

PROV-ADD:m3uaroute—Provision an M3UA Route (Release 9.5(2))

 

Purpose:

This MML command enables you to send an SS7 message to a particular destination using M3UA. The M3UA route is similar to the SS7 route, but M3UA uses SGNode ID instead of a linkset. The associated sigPath cannot be in the IS state when editing or deleting a M3UA route.

Syntax:

prov-add:m3uaroute:name="route name",desc="route description", 
dpc="destination",extnode="external node",opc="origination",pri=priority

Input Description:

Name—Name of the M3UA route. Enter an alphanumeric string up to 20 characters in length.

Desc—Description of the M3UA route. This parameter can be up to 128 characters in length.

DPC—MML name of a previously defined DPC. The DPC must have an SS7PATH service with the M3UAKEY defined (with a matching DPC attribute). If an M3UAKEY does not exist when the M3UA route is added or edited, a warning is issued. If an M3UAKEY is still not defined when the provisioning session is copied or deployed, an error message is generated and the copy or deployment is stopped.

Multiple DPCs with the same NETADDR cannot be routed to the same OPC.

Extnode—MML name of a previously defined external node which supports M3UA signaling. M3UA routes against the same OPC/DPC pair must have EXTNODEs in the same GROUP.

OPC—MML name of a previously defined OPC. The OPC must be a true OPC. For a given OPC/DPC, only one route can be defined through a given external node.

A maximum of two M3UA.maxRoutesPerOpcDpc M3UA routes can be defined for a pair of OPC/DPCs.

PRI—M3UA Route Priority. This parameter is an integer value; it can be 1 or 2: 1 is the default value, 1 is higher priority, 2 is lower priority.

Note The M3UA route priority parameter is introduced in patch CSCOgs046 of Release 9.5(2).

Example:

mml> prov-add:m3uaroute:name="route1",desc="first",dpc="dpc1",
extnode="mgx-8260",opc="opc1",pri=1


PROV-ED:m3uaroute—Edit an M3UA Route (Release 9.5(2)

 

Purpose:

This MML command is used to edit an M3UA route. The associated sigPath cannot be in the IS state when you are editing or deleting an M3UA route.

Syntax:

prov-ed:m3uaroute:name="route name",<desc="route description",> 
<dpc="destination",><extnode="external 
node",><opc="origination",><pri=priority>

Input Description:

Name—Name of the M3UA route. Enter an alphanumeric string up to 20 characters in length.

Desc—Description of the M3UA route. This parameter can be up to 128 characters in length.

DPC—MML name of a previously defined DPC. The DPC must have an SS7PATH service with the M3UAKEY defined (with a matching DPC attribute). If an SS7PATH service does not exist when the M3UA route is added or edited, a warning is issued. If an SS7PATH service is still not defined when the provisioning session is copied or deployed, an error message is generated and the copy or deployment is stopped.

Multiple DPCs with the same NETADDR cannot be routed to the same OPC

Extnode—MML name of a previously defined external node which supports M3UA signaling. M3UA routes against the same OPC/DPC pair must have EXTNODEs in the same GROUP.

OPC—MML name of a previously defined OPC. The OPC must be a true OPC. For a given OPC/DPC, only one route can be defined through a given external node.

A maximum of two M3UA.maxRoutesPerOpcDpc M3UA routes can be defined for a pair of OPC/DPC.

PRI—M3UA route priority. This parameter has an integer value of 1 or 2. 1 is higher priority and is also the default value; 2 is lower priority. The PRI parameter is new for Release 9.5(2), patch CSCOgs046.

Example:

mml> prov-ed:m3uaroute:name="route1",desc="first",dpc="dpc1",
extnode="mgx-8260",opc="opc1",pri=1


Reference Information

The following sections contain reference material related to this feature. Information is included on the following areas:

Planning for Provisioning

Provisioning Basics

Components

External Node Types

Provisioning Worksheets

For information on the other XECfgParm.dat parameters, see the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Installation and Configuration Guide located at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps1913/products_installation_and_configuration_guide_book09186a008007df76.html


Note Specific provisioning procedures for this feature are located in the "Provisioning This Feature" section


Planning for Provisioning

This section lists the data that you must gather to successfully provision this feature. For more information on planning the provisioning for the rest of the Cisco MGC software, see the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide located at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps1913/products_configuration_guide_book09186a008007ddbd.html

Collecting External Node Data

The external node component type represents another node with which the MGC communicates. You must be ready to enter the following data:

MML name

Component description

Type of the external node

ISDN signaling type

M3UA Group Number

The parameters for EXTNODE are defined in Table 2.

Collecting IP Route Data (optional)

The IP route represents a static IP route. IP routes are required for this feature only when the Cisco PGW hosts are not on the same subnet as the Cisco access gateways. If your system requires IP routes, you must be ready to enter the following data:

IP route name

Component description

Destination hostname or IP address

Subnet mask of Destination (optional)

Next hop router IP address

Local IP address

Priority

The IP route component information are defined in Table 4.

Collecting M3UA Key Data

This component represents an M3UA routing key. You must be ready to enter the following data:

M3UA key name

Component description

Associated OPC

Associated DPC (optional)

Routing context value

Service indicator

Network appearance (optional)

The M3UA key component information are defined in Table 1.

Collecting M3UA Route Data

This component represents an M3UA route. You must be ready to enter the following data:

M3UA route name

Component description

Associated DPC

Associated external node

Associated OPC

M3UA route priority

The M3UA route component information is defined in Table 1.

Collecting SCTP Association Data

The SCTP association represents the connection between the Cisco MGC and a Cisco access gateway. You must be ready to enter the following data:

MML name of the SCTP association.

Description of this component.

Signaling type.

MML name of the signaling gateway process (SGP).

First local address.

Second local address (optional).

Local SCTP port number (optional).

The highest priority destination address.

The lowest priority destination address (optional).

Destination SCTP port number (optional).

MML name of the external node.

MML name of first IPROUTE (optional).

MML name of second IPROUTE (optional).

Number of bytes to advertise for the local receive window (optional).

Maximum number of times to retransmit SCTP INIT message (optional).

Maximum initial timer retransmission value (optional).

Maximum number of retransmissions over all destination addresses before the association is declared failed (optional).

Maximum time after a datagram is received before a SCPT SACK is sent (optional).

Maximum time SCTP waits for other outgoing datagrams for bundling (optional).

Minimum value allowed for the retransmission timer (optional).

Maximum value allowed for the retransmission timer (optional).

Time between heartbeats. The heartbeat is this value plus the current retransmission timeout value (optional).

Internet protocol precedence. This value is placed in the IP PRECEDENCE portion of the Type of Service field for outgoing SCTP datagrams (optional).

Differential Service Code Point (DSCP). This value is placed in the DSCP portion of the Type of Service field for outgoing SCTP datagrams (optional).

Maximum number of retransmissions to either PEERADDR1 or PEERADDR2 before it is declared failed (optional).

The SCTP association component structure is defined in Table 7.

Collecting SS7 Signaling Gateway Process Data

This component represents a SS7 signaling gateway process (SGP). You must be ready to enter the following data:

MML name of SGP

M3UA route name

Component description

External node that is running the SS7 signaling gateway process

The SS7 signaling gateway process component structure is defined in Table 8.

Collecting SS7 Signaling Service Data

This component represents an SS7 signaling service or signaling path to a particular SS7 switch (destination). You must be ready to enter the following data:

Unique ID of this component and component name used in MML commands

Component description

MDO file name

Destination point code MML name

Customer group ID

M3UA Routing key ID MML name

The SS7 signaling service component structure is defined in Table 9.

Collecting SS7 Subsystem Data

The SS7 subsystem component type represents an SS7 subsystem. You must be ready to enter the following data:

MML name of SS7 subsystem

Component description

MML name of Adjacent point code or TCAP/IP service

Protocol family

Adjacent point code of the mated STP

Priority

Local subsystem number

STP/SCP index used for IN triggers

Transport protocol (must be MUA for this feature)

MML name of an MUA key (optional)

Remote subsystem number

The SS7 subsystem component structure is defined in Table 8.

Provisioning Basics

Follow these procedures to start a provisioning session and to save, activate, and retrieve the provisioning data.

Starting a Provisioning Session

Saving and Activating Your Provisioning Changes

Ending a Provisioning Session Without Activating Your Changes

Retrieving Provisioning Data

For more detailed information about provisioning your Cisco PGW 2200, see the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide located at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps1913/products_configuration_guide_book09186a008007ddbd.html

Starting a Provisioning Session

You might need to start a provisioning session as part of your system operations. To do this, log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

prov-sta::srcver="curr_ver",dstver="mod_ver"

Where:

curr_ver—The name of the current configuration version. In place of the name of the current configuration version, you can also enter

new—A new default session configuration; no existing source configuration is available.

active—Selects the active configuration as the source for configuration changes.


Note If you do not know the name of your current configuration session, you can use the procedure in the "Retrieving Data on the Current Provisioning Session" section.


mod_ver—A new configuration version name for a version that contains your provisioning changes.

For example, to use a configuration version called ver1 as the basis for a version to be called ver2, you would enter the following command:

prov-sta::srcver="ver1",dstver="ver2"

Once a provisioning session is underway, you can use the prov-add, prov-ed, and prov-dlt MML commands to add, modify, and delete components on your system. This document describes how to add, modify, and delete M3UA components. For more information on provisioning other components on your Cisco PGW 2200, see the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide located at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps1913/products_configuration_guide_book09186a008007ddbd.html

Saving and Activating Your Provisioning Changes

There are two ways to close your provisioning session:

Saving and activating your provisioning changes, as described here.

Ending your provisioning session without saving and activating your changes, as described in the "Ending a Provisioning Session Without Activating Your Changes" section.

When you have completed making provisioning changes in your session, you must enter a command to save and activate your changes. There are two different provisioning MML commands that do this: prov-cpy and prov-dply.


Caution Using the prov-cpy or prov-dply MML command can severely impact your system's call processing performance, depending on the extent of your provisioning changes. We recommend that you issue these commands during a maintenance window when traffic is minimal.

Use the prov-cpy MML command to save and activate your changes on the active Cisco MGC. This command is typically used to save and activate changes on a Cisco MGC in a simplex configuration. However, you can use the prov-cpy MML command on Cisco MGCs in high-availability or continuous-service configurations; if you choose to do this, you should enter the prov-sync MML command immediately afterwards, to have your changes saved and activated on the standby Cisco MGC.


Note When you enter the prov-cpy command, your provisioning session is automatically ended. If you want to make additional provisioning changes, you must start a new provisioning session, as described in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section.



Caution Using the prov-sync MML command can severely impact your system's call processing performance. We recommend that you issue these commands during a maintenance window when traffic is minimal.


Note When the prov-sync MML command is used to synchronize the provisioning settings on the standby MGC host with current settings on the active MGC host, the system does not indicate when the synchronization process has failed.


Use the prov-dply MML command to save and activate your changes on the active and standby Cisco MGCs. This command is typically used to save and activate changes on Cisco MGCs in a high-availability or continuous-service configurations. Do not use this command on a Cisco MGC in a simplex configuration.


Note When you enter the prov-dply command, your provisioning session is automatically ended, unless an error occurs during execution. If you want to make additional provisioning changes, you must start a new provisioning session as described in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section.


Ending a Provisioning Session Without Activating Your Changes

You may want to end a provisioning session without saving and activating the changes you have entered during your session. If this is the case, you can enter the prov-stp MML command. This command ends your current provisioning session and your changes are not entered.

Retrieving Provisioning Data

You can use the prov-rtrv MML command to retrieve information about your current provisioning settings. The ways in which you can use this command to retrieve provisioning data are described in the following sections:

Retrieving Data for an Individual Component

Retrieving Data for All Components

Retrieving Data for All Components of a Particular Type

Retrieving Data on the Current Provisioning Session

Retrieving Data for an Individual Component

You can retrieve provisioning data for any individual component on your system. To do this, log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

prov-rtrv:component:name=MML_name

Where:

component—The MML component type associated with the desired component. You can find a complete list of MML component types in the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide located at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps1913/products_configuration_guide_book09186a008007ddbd.html

MML_name—The MML name for the desired component. You can determine the MML names for the various components using the prov-rtrv:all MML command.

For example, to view the provisioning data for an IUA signaling service called iua1, you would enter the following command:

prov-rtrv:sigsvcprop:name="iua1"

Retrieving Data for All Components

You can retrieve data on all of the components provisioned on your system. To do this, log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

prov-rtrv:all


Note This command returns data on all signaling components, except for signaling service and linkset properties.


Retrieving Data for All Components of a Particular Type

You can retrieve provisioning data on all components of a particular type on your system. To do this, log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

prov-rtrv:component:"all"

Where component is the MML component type associated with the desired component group. You can find a complete list of MML component types in the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide located at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps1913/products_configuration_guide_book09186a008007ddbd.html


Note You cannot use this command for components that are used to retrieve signaling or routing properties (that is sigsvcprop, lnksetprop, and trnkgrpprop). The properties for only one signaling or routing component can be listed per command instance. Use the following format:

prov-rtrv:propComp:name="compName" | name="ss7famName"

Where:

propComp—MML component name appropriate to the property type you want to retrieve, as listed below:

sigsvcprop—Provides maintenance access to the properties of signaling services
trnkgrpprop—Provides maintenance access to the properties of trunk groups
lnksetprop—Provides maintenance access to the properties of linksets

compName—MML name of a previously provisioned signaling service or trunk group
ss7famName—MML name of the SS7 family associated with the desired linkset


For example, to view the provisioning data for all signaling services, you would enter the following command:

prov-rtrv:naspath:"all"

Retrieving Data on the Current Provisioning Session

You can retrieve provisioning data on the current provisioning session. To do this, log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

prov-rtrv:session

The system returns a response similar to the following:

MGC-02 - Media Gateway Controller 2003-01-13 13:39:19
M  RTRV
   "session=jtest:session"
   /*
Session ID = mml1
SRCVER = active
DSTVER = jtest
   */

Components

The sections below describe the provisioning components that are modified for this feature. For information on the rest of the components on other Cisco MGC software components, see the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide located at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps1913/products_configuration_guide_book09186a008007ddbd.html

Modified Components

The provisioning component listed below was modified for this feature.

m3uaroute

This component represents an M3UA route. It is used to determine how to get an SS7 message to a particular destination using M3UA. The PRI parameter was added to this component for this feature.

MML Name—M3UAROUTE

Table 1 shows the M3UAROUTE component structure.

Table 1 M3UARoute Component Structure 

Parameter MML Name
Parameter Description
Parameter Values (Default)

NAME

M3UA route name

The name can be as many as 20 alphanumeric characters. No special characters other than "-" are allowed. The name should begin with a letter.

DESC

Component description

The description can be up to any 128 characters.

DPC

Associated DPC

MML name of a previously configured DPC.

EXTNODE

Associated external node

MML name of a previously configured external node.

OPC

Associated OPC

MML name of a previously configured OPC.

PRI

M3UA route priority

This parameter is an integer value; it can be 1 or 2: 1 is the default value, 1 is higher priority, 2 is lower priority.



Note NAME is the only parameter for this command that cannot be modified.


To create or edit M3UA routes, follow these rules:

The associated DPC must have an SS7PATH service with the M3UAKEY defined (with a matching DPC attribute). If an M3UAKEY does not exist when the M3UA route is added or edited, a warning is issued. If an M3UAKEY is still not defined when the provisioning session is copied or deployed, an error message is generated and the copy or deployment is stopped.

DPC must be a DPC object.

Multiple DPCs with the same NETADDR cannot be routed to the same OPC.

The associated OPC-DPC pair, only one route can be defined through a given external node.

Up to two M3UA routes can be defined per OPC-DPC pair.

The associated external node must support M3UA signaling.

M3UA routes for the same OPC-DPC pair must have external nodes in the same group.

When the provisioning session is saved and activated, there must be an ASSOCIATION of type M3UA that uses an SGP that is using the EXTNODE of each M3UAROUTE.

External Node Types

Table 2 lists the valid external node types for this release of Cisco MGC software.

Table 2 External Node Types  

External Node Type MML Name
Release
Supported Signaling Service Types

AS3600

Release 9.1(5) and up

MGCP IPFAS NAS IUA

AS3660

Release 9.1(5) and up

MGCP IPFAS NAS IUA

AS5200

Release 9.1(5) and up

IPFAS NAS

AS5300

Release 9.1(5) and up

MGCP IPFAS NAS IUA

AS5350

Release 9.2(2) and up

MGCP IPFAS NAS BSMV0 IUA

AS5400

Release 9.2(2) and up

MGCP IPFAS NAS BSMV0 IUA

AS5800

Release 9.1(5) and up

IPFAS NAS

AS5850

Release 9.1(5) and up

IPFAS NAS

AS7200

Release 9.1(5) and up

MGCP IPFAS NAS

CAT8510

Release 9.1(5) and up

MGCP

CAT8540

Release 9.1(5) and up

MGCP

C2600

Release 9.4(1) and up

MGCP IPFAS IUA

H323

Release 9.1(5) and up

EISUP

ITP

Release 9.4(1) and up

M3UA SUA

LS1010

Release 9.1(5) and up

MGCP

MC3810

Release 9.1(5) and up

MGCP IPFAS

MGC

Release 9.1(5) and up

EISUP

MGX8260

Release 9.1(5) and up

MGCP IPFAS NAS

MGX8850

Release 9.1(5) and up

MGCP SGCP IPFAS

SLT

Release 9.2(2) and up

BSMV0

TALISS7

Release 9.1(5) and up

SS7SG

UNKNOWN

Release 9.1(5) and up

UNKNOWN


Provisioning Worksheets

This section contains worksheets for the provisioning components required for this feature. For worksheets covering the rest of the provisioning components in the Cisco MGC software, see the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide located at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps1913/products_configuration_guide_book09186a008007ddbd.html

Table 3 External Node Worksheet Example  

Name
Type
ISDN Signaling Type
Group
Description

va-3600-37

AS3600

iua

 

DPNSS conn to va-3600-37

         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         

Table 4 IP Route Worksheet Example  

Name
Destination
Subnet Mask
Next Hop
IP Address
Priority
Description

iproute1

itp1

255.255.255.0

itp2

175.25.211.17

1

IP route to itp1

             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             

Table 5 M3UA Key Worksheet Example  

Name
OPC
DPC
Routing Context
Service Indicator
Network Appearance
Description

m3key1

opc1

dpc1

14

ISUP

700

M3UA key 1

             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             

Table 6 M3UA Route Worksheet Example  

Name
DPC
External Node
OPC
PRI
Description

m3rte1

dpc1

itp1

opc1

1 or 2

M3UA route 1

           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           

Table 7 SCTP Association Worksheet Example 

Parameter
Parameter Value

Name

assoc1

Description

association 1

Signaling Type

M3UA

SGP name

sgp1

First local address

175.23.211.15

Second local address (optional)

n/a

Local SCTP port number (optional)

2905

Highest priority destination address

117.52.16.20

Lowest priority destination address (optional)

 

Destination SCTP port number (optional)

 

External node name

itp1

First IP route name (optional)

iproute1

Second IP route name (optional)

iproute2

Number of bytes to advertise for the local receive window (optional)

 

Maximum number of times to retransmit SCTP INIT message (optional)

 

Maximum initial timer retransmission value (optional)

 

Maximum number of retransmissions over all destination addresses before the association is declared failed (optional)

 

Maximum time after a datagram is received before a SCPT SACK is sent (optional)

 

Maximum time SCTP waits for other outgoing datagrams for bundling (optional)

 

Minimum value allowed for the retransmission timer (optional)

 

Maximum value allowed for the retransmission timer (optional)

 

Time between heartbeats (optional)

 

IP precedence (optional)

 

Differential Service Code Point (optional)

 

Maximum number of retransmissions to peer address 1 or 2 before it is declared failed (optional)

 

Table 8 SS7 Route Worksheet Example  

DPC
Linkset
OPC
Priority

dpc1

lnkset1

opc1

1

       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       

Table 9 SS7 Signaling Service Worksheet Example  

Name
Q.931 Call Model Side
MDO File Name
DPC
Customer Group ID
OPC or Route Key ID
Description

ss7svc1

network

ansi_ss7

dpc1

0000

m3rtkey1

SS7 signaling service 1

             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             

Obtaining Documentation

Cisco documentation and additional literature are available on Cisco.com. Cisco also provides several ways to obtain technical assistance and other technical resources. These sections explain how to obtain technical information from Cisco Systems.

Cisco.com

You can access the most current Cisco documentation at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport

You can access the Cisco website at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com

You can access international Cisco websites at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/public/countries_languages.shtml

Product Documentation DVD

Cisco documentation and additional literature are available in the Product Documentation DVD package, which may have shipped with your product. The Product Documentation DVD is updated regularly and may be more current than printed documentation.

The Product Documentation DVD is a comprehensive library of technical product documentation on portable media. The DVD enables you to access multiple versions of hardware and software installation, configuration, and command guides for Cisco products and to view technical documentation in HTML. With the DVD, you have access to the same documentation that is found on the Cisco website without being connected to the Internet. Certain products also have.pdf versions of the documentation available.

The Product Documentation DVD is available as a single unit or as a subscription. Registered Cisco.com users (Cisco direct customers) can order a Product Documentation DVD (product number DOC-DOCDVD=) from Cisco Marketplace at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/marketplace/

Ordering Documentation

Beginning June 30, 2005, registered Cisco.com users may order Cisco documentation at the Product Documentation Store in the Cisco Marketplace at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/marketplace/

Nonregistered Cisco.com users can order technical documentation from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (0800 to 1700) PDT by calling 1 866 463-3487 in the United States and Canada, or elsewhere by calling 011 408 519-5055. You can also order documentation by e-mail at tech-doc-store-mkpl@external.cisco.com or by fax at 1 408 519-5001 in the United States and Canada, or elsewhere at 011 408 519-5001.

Documentation Feedback

You can rate and provide feedback about Cisco technical documents by completing the online feedback form that appears with the technical documents on Cisco.com.

You can send comments about Cisco documentation to bug-doc@cisco.com.

You can submit comments by using the response card (if present) behind the front cover of your document or by writing to the following address:

Cisco Systems
Attn: Customer Document Ordering
170 West Tasman Drive
San Jose, CA 95134-9883

We appreciate your comments.

Cisco Product Security Overview

Cisco provides a free online Security Vulnerability Policy portal at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/products_security_vulnerability_policy.html

From this site, you can perform these tasks:

Report security vulnerabilities in Cisco products.

Obtain assistance with security incidents that involve Cisco products.

Register to receive security information from Cisco.

A current list of security advisories and notices for Cisco products is available at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/psirt

If you prefer to see advisories and notices as they are updated in real time, you can access a Product Security Incident Response Team Really Simple Syndication (PSIRT RSS) feed from this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/products_psirt_rss_feed.html

Reporting Security Problems in Cisco Products

Cisco is committed to delivering secure products. We test our products internally before we release them, and we strive to correct all vulnerabilities quickly. If you think that you might have identified a vulnerability in a Cisco product, contact PSIRT:

Emergencies — security-alert@cisco.com

An emergency is either a condition in which a system is under active attack or a condition for which a severe and urgent security vulnerability should be reported. All other conditions are considered nonemergencies.

Nonemergencies — psirt@cisco.com

In an emergency, you can also reach PSIRT by telephone:

1 877 228-7302

1 408 525-6532


Tip We encourage you to use Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) or a compatible product to encrypt any sensitive information that you send to Cisco. PSIRT can work from encrypted information that is compatible with PGP versions 2.x through 8.x.

Never use a revoked or an expired encryption key. The correct public key to use in your correspondence with PSIRT is the one linked in the Contact Summary section of the Security Vulnerability Policy page at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/products_security_vulnerability_policy.html

The link on this page has the current PGP key ID in use.


Obtaining Technical Assistance

Cisco Technical Support provides 24-hour-a-day award-winning technical assistance. The Cisco Technical Support & Documentation website on Cisco.com features extensive online support resources. In addition, if you have a valid Cisco service contract, Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) engineers provide telephone support. If you do not have a valid Cisco service contract, contact your reseller.

Cisco Technical Support & Documentation Website

The Cisco Technical Support & Documentation website provides online documents and tools for troubleshooting and resolving technical issues with Cisco products and technologies. The website is available 24 hours a day, at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport

Access to all tools on the Cisco Technical Support & Documentation website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password. If you have a valid service contract but do not have a user ID or password, you can register at this URL:

http://tools.cisco.com/RPF/register/register.do


Note Use the Cisco Product Identification (CPI) tool to locate your product serial number before submitting a web or phone request for service. You can access the CPI tool from the Cisco Technical Support & Documentation website by clicking the Tools & Resources link under Documentation & Tools. Choose Cisco Product Identification Tool from the Alphabetical Index drop-down list, or click the Cisco Product Identification Tool link under Alerts & RMAs. The CPI tool offers three search options: by product ID or model name; by tree view; or for certain products, by copying and pasting show command output. Search results show an illustration of your product with the serial number label location highlighted. Locate the serial number label on your product and record the information before placing a service call.


Submitting a Service Request

Using the online TAC Service Request Tool is the fastest way to open S3 and S4 service requests. (S3 and S4 service requests are those in which your network is minimally impaired or for which you require product information.) After you describe your situation, the TAC Service Request Tool provides recommended solutions. If your issue is not resolved using the recommended resources, your service request is assigned to a Cisco engineer. The TAC Service Request Tool is located at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport/servicerequest

For S1 or S2 service requests or if you do not have Internet access, contact the Cisco TAC by telephone. (S1 or S2 service requests are those in which your production network is down or severely degraded.) Cisco engineers are assigned immediately to S1 and S2 service requests to help keep your business operations running smoothly.

To open a service request by telephone, use one of the following numbers:

Asia-Pacific: +61 2 8446 7411 (Australia: 1 800 805 227)
EMEA: +32 2 704 55 55
USA: 1 800 553-2447

For a complete list of Cisco TAC contacts, go to this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport/contacts

Definitions of Service Request Severity

To ensure that all service requests are reported in a standard format, Cisco has established severity definitions.

Severity 1 (S1)—Your network is "down," or there is a critical impact to your business operations. You and Cisco will commit all necessary resources around the clock to resolve the situation.

Severity 2 (S2)—Operation of an existing network is severely degraded, or significant aspects of your business operation are negatively affected by inadequate performance of Cisco products. You and Cisco will commit full-time resources during normal business hours to resolve the situation.

Severity 3 (S3)—Operational performance of your network is impaired, but most business operations remain functional. You and Cisco will commit resources during normal business hours to restore service to satisfactory levels.

Severity 4 (S4)—You require information or assistance with Cisco product capabilities, installation, or configuration. There is little or no effect on your business operations.

Obtaining Additional Publications and Information

Information about Cisco products, technologies, and network solutions is available from various online and printed sources.

Cisco Marketplace provides a variety of Cisco books, reference guides, documentation, and logo merchandise. Visit Cisco Marketplace, the company store, at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/marketplace/

Cisco Press publishes a wide range of general networking, training and certification titles. Both new and experienced users will benefit from these publications. For current Cisco Press titles and other information, go to Cisco Press at this URL:

http://www.ciscopress.com

Packet magazine is the Cisco Systems technical user magazine for maximizing Internet and networking investments. Each quarter, Packet delivers coverage of the latest industry trends, technology breakthroughs, and Cisco products and solutions, as well as network deployment and troubleshooting tips, configuration examples, customer case studies, certification and training information, and links to scores of in-depth online resources. You can access Packet magazine at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/packet

iQ Magazine is the quarterly publication from Cisco Systems designed to help growing companies learn how they can use technology to increase revenue, streamline their business, and expand services. The publication identifies the challenges facing these companies and the technologies to help solve them, using real-world case studies and business strategies to help readers make sound technology investment decisions. You can access iQ Magazine at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/iqmagazine

or view the digital edition at this URL:

http://ciscoiq.texterity.com/ciscoiq/sample/

Internet Protocol Journal is a quarterly journal published by Cisco Systems for engineering professionals involved in designing, developing, and operating public and private internets and intranets. You can access the Internet Protocol Journal at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/ipj

Networking products offered by Cisco Systems, as well as customer support services, can be obtained at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/index.html

Networking Professionals Connection is an interactive website for networking professionals to share questions, suggestions, and information about networking products and technologies with Cisco experts and other networking professionals. Join a discussion at this URL:

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Glossary

Table 10 contains definitions of acronyms and technical terms used in this feature module.

Table 10 Glossary 

Term
Definition

ANSI

American National Standards Institute

CIC

Carrier Identification Code

DPC

destination point code

DSCP

Differential Service Code Point

I/O

input/output

IOCC

I/O channel controller

IOCM

I/O Channel Controller Manager

ISDN

Integrated Services Digital Network

ISUP

ISDN User Part

ITP

IP Transfer Point

ITU

International Telecommunication Union

IUA

ISDN Q.921 User Adaptation Layer

LNP

Local Number Portability

M3UA

Message Transfer Point Level 3 User Adaptation

MDO

message definition object

MGC

Media Gateway Controller

MGCP

Media Gateway Control Protocol

MIB

Management Information Base

MML

Man-Machine Language

MTP3

Message Transfer Part Level 3

NAS

Network access server

NFAS

Non-Facility Associated Signaling

PGW

PSTN Gateway

PR

Path Replacement

PSTN

Public switched telephone network

Q.931

ITU document that defines the ISDN connection control protocol.

Q.921

ITU document that defines the data link protocol used on an ISDN D-channel. Also known as Link Access Protocol - D Channel (LAPD).

RFC

Request For Comments. A proposed standards document. There are RFCs for both IUA and SCTP.

RLM

Redundant Link Manager. A proprietary protocol used for the transport of Q.931 data between a Cisco MGC host and an associated media gateway.

RO

Route Optimization

SCCP

Service Connection Control Part

SCTP

Stream Controlled Transmission Protocol

SIGTRAN

Signaling Transport—An IETF working group that addresses the transport of packet-based PSTN signaling over IP networks.

SIP

Session Initiation Protocol

SS7

Signaling System 7

SUA

SCCP User Adaptation

TALI

Transport Adapter Layer Interface

TCAP

Transaction Capability Application Part

UDP

User Datagram Protocol