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Call Detail Record Enhancements

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Call Detail Record Enhancements

Table Of Contents

Call Detail Record Enhancements

Feature Overview

Benefits

Related Features and Technologies

Related Documents

Supported Platforms

Supported Standards, MIBs, and RFCs

Prerequisites

Provisioning Tasks

Provisioning Procedures

Provisioning Basics

Enabling Support of Information Extraction from SDP

Disabling Support of Information Extraction from SDP

Provisioning Examples

Reference Information

Properties

Billing Interface

Ingress Media Device Address (Tag: 4205)

Egress Media Device Address (Tag: 4206)

Initial Codec (Tag: 4207)

Final Codec (Tag: 4208)

Ingress Media Device Port (Tag: 4209)

Egress Media Device Port (Tag: 4210)

Glossary


Call Detail Record Enhancements


Document Release History

Publication Date
Comments

September 1, 2003

Initial version of the document.


Feature History

Release
Modification

9.4(1)

Feature is introduced in this release of the Cisco Media Gateway Controller (MGC) software


This feature provides support for additional parameters in the Call Detail Records (CDRs) of the
Cisco MGC software.

This feature is described in the following sections:

Feature Overview

Supported Platforms

Supported Standards, MIBs, and RFCs

Prerequisites

Provisioning Tasks

Provisioning Examples

Reference Information

Glossary

Feature Overview

The CDR Enhancements feature provides support for additional CDR parameters, providing enhanced support for carriers that provide voice quality Service Level Agreements (SLAs) to their customers or have networks that originate or terminate calls to/from IP-based endpoints.

The addition of these parameters has the following impact:

Ingress and Egress Codecs (includes any codec changes mid-call)

New CDEs in the Cisco MGC software for ingress and egress IP addresses. These IP addresses are for the originating and terminating devices (for example, IP phones), not for a previous device in the call path (such as a proxy server).

Modifying the BAMS software to provide this data in the Extended ASCII and BT NICS Custom outputs.

Media IP Address (used for fraud prevention, it is the IP Address of the remote endpoint)

New CDEs in the Cisco MGC software for ingress and egress media IP addresses. These IP addresses are extracted from Media Gateway Control Protocol (MGCP), Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) or H.323 messages.


Note Since the extraction of IP addresses can affect system performance, this function is enabled or disabled using a trunk group property.


Modifying the BAMS software to provide this data in the Extended ASCII and BT NICS Custom outputs.

Benefits

This feature provides the following benefits:

Enables the collection of codec information in billing parameters

Carriers that utilize voice quality SLAs may require information on the codec(s) used during a call to monitor whether appropriate voice compression methods are being used.

Enables the collection of media IP addresses in billing parameters

Carriers that provide interconnects with IP-based carriers or endpoints may require information on the IP address of the gateway or end device (IP Phone) to facilitate proper billing.

Related Features and Technologies

This feature is related to the following features:

Support for Multiple Simultaneous Formats (for the Cisco BAMS)

Support for the British Telecom (BT) Billing Format (for the Cisco BAMS)

Related Documents

This document contains information that is related strictly to this feature. The documents that contain additional information related to the Cisco MGC are listed below:

Release notes for Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9.4(1)

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Hardware Installation Guide

Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for the Cisco Media Gateway Controller

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9Installation and Configuration Guide

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Dial Plan Guide

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 MML Command Reference Guide

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Messages Reference Guide

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Billing Interface Guide

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 MIB Guide

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Operations, Maintenance, and Troubleshooting Guide

Supported Platforms

The hardware platforms supported for the Cisco MGC software are described in the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Hardware Installation Guide.

Supported Standards, MIBs, and RFCs

Standards

No new or modified standards are supported by this feature.

MIBs

No new or modified MIBs are supported by this feature.

For more information on the MIBs used in the Cisco MGC software, refer to the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Release 9 MIB Guide.

RFCs

No new or modified RFCs are supported by this feature.

Prerequisites

You must have Cisco Media Gateway Controller (MGC) software Release 9.4(1). Prerequisites for this release can be found in the Release Notes for the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9.4(1).

Provisioning Tasks

This section contains the tasks required to provision this feature. For information on provisioning the rest of the Cisco MGC software, refer to the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide.

Provisioning Procedures

The provisioning procedures for this feature can be found in the following sections:

Provisioning Basics

Enabling Support of Information Extraction from SDP

Disabling Support of Information Extraction from SDP

Provisioning Basics

The procedures in this section describe how to start a provisioning session and how to save and activate the changes you have made.

Starting a Provisioning Session

Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes

Ending a Provisioning Session Without Activating your Changes

Retrieving Provisioning Data

For more detailed information about provisioning your Cisco MGC, refer to the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide.

Starting a Provisioning Session

You may need to start a provisioning session as part of your system operations. To do this, log into the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

mml>prov-sta::srcver="curr_ver",dstver="mod_ver"

Where:

curr_ver—The name of the current configuration version. In place of the name of the current configuration version, you can also enter:

new—A new default session configuration; no existing source configuration is available.

active—Selects the active configuration as the source for configuration changes.


Note If you do not know the name of your current configuration session, you can use the procedure in the "Retrieving Data on the Current Provisioning Session" section.


mod_ver—A new configuration version name that contains your provisioning changes.

For example, to use a configuration version called ver1 as the basis for a version to be called ver2, you would enter the following command:

mml>prov-sta::srcver="ver1",dstver="ver2"

Once a provisioning session is underway, you may use the prov-add, prov-ed, or prov-dlt MML commands to add, modify, and delete components on your system. For more information on provisioning other functions on your Cisco MGC software, refer to the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide.

There are two ways to close your provisioning session: saving and activating your provisioning changes, as described in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section or ending your provisioning session without saving and activating your changes, as described in the "Ending a Provisioning Session Without Activating your Changes" section.

Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes

When you have completed making provisioning changes in your session, you must enter a command to save and activate your changes. There are two different provisioning MML commands that do this: prov-copy and prov-dply.


Caution Using the prov-cpy and prov-dply MML commands can severely impact your system's call processing performance, depending on the extent of your provisioning changes. We recommend that these commands be issued during a maintenance window when traffic is minimal.

The prov-cpy MML command is used to save and activate your changes on the active Cisco MGC. This command is typically used to save and activate changes on a Cisco MGC in a simplex configuration. However, you can use the prov-cpy MML command on Cisco MGCs in high-availability or continuous-service configurations, to save and activate your changes on the active Cisco MGC. If you choose to do this, you should enter the prov-sync MML command immediately afterwards, to have your changes saved and activated on the standby Cisco MGC.


Note When you enter the prov-cpy command, your provisioning session is also automatically ended. If you want to make additional provisioning changes, you must start a new provisioning session as described in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section.



Caution Using the prov-sync MML command can severely impact your system's call processing performance. We recommend that this command be issued during a maintenance window when traffic is minimal.


Note When the prov-sync MML command is used to synchronize the provisioning settings on the standby MGC host with current settings on the active MGC host, the system does not indicate when the synchronization process has failed.


The prov-dply MML command is used to save and activate your changes on the active and standby
Cisco MGCs. This command is typically used to save and activate changes on Cisco MGCs in high-availability or continuous-service configurations. This command should not be used on a Cisco MGC in a simplex configuration.


Note When you enter the prov-dply command, your provisioning session is also automatically ended, unless an error occurs during execution. If you want to make additional provisioning changes, you must start a new provisioning session as described in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section.


Ending a Provisioning Session Without Activating your Changes

You may find that you want to end a provisioning session without saving and activating the changes you have entered during your session. If this is the case, you can enter the prov-stp MML command. This command ends your current provisioning session and your changes are not entered.

Retrieving Provisioning Data

You can use the prov-rtrv MML command to retrieve information about your current provisioning settings. The ways in which you can use this command to retrieve provisioning data are described in the following sections:

Retrieving Data for an Individual Component

Retrieving Data for All Components

Retrieving Data for All Components of a Particular Type

Retrieving Data on the Current Provisioning Session

Retrieving Data on Supported Signaling Protocols

Retrieving Data for an Individual Component

You can retrieve provisioning data on any individual component on your system. To do this, log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

mml>prov-rtrv:component:name=MML_name

Where:

component—The MML component type associated with the desired component. You can find a complete list of MML component types in the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide.

MML_name—The MML name for the desired component. You can determine the MML names for the various components using the prov-rtrv:all MML command.

For example, to view the value of properties for trunk group called 1001, you would enter the following command:

mml>prov-rtrv:trnkgrpprop:name="1001"

The response to the command is dependent upon the component type associated with the desired component. For example, to view the value of GTD properties for a GTD parameter set called t3, you would enter the following command:

mml>prov-rtrv:gtdparam:name="t3"

Retrieving Data for All Components

You can retrieve data on all of the components provisioned on your system. To do this, log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

mml>prov-rtrv:all

Retrieving Data for All Components of a Particular Type

You can retrieve provisioning data on all components of a particular type on your system. To do this, log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

mml>prov-rtrv:component:"all"

Where: component is the MML component type associated with the desired component group. You can find a complete list of MML component types in the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide.

For example, to view the provisioning data for all SS7 signaling services, you would enter the following command:

mml>prov-rtrv:ss7path:"all"

Retrieving Data on the Current Provisioning Session

You can retrieve provisioning data on the current provisioning session. To do this, log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

mml>prov-rtrv:session

The system returns a response similar to the following:

MGC-02 - Media Gateway Controller 2003-01-13 13:39:19
M  RTRV
   "session=jtest:session"
   /*
Session ID = mml1
SRCVER = active
DSTVER = jtest
   */

Retrieving Data on Supported Signaling Protocols

You can retrieve protocol data for the current provisioning session. To do this, log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

mml>prov-rtrv:variants

Enabling Support of Information Extraction from SDP


Note To begin the provisioning session, perform the steps in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section. Once you have finished provisioning your data, save and activate your provisioning data by performing the steps in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section.


To provision enable the extraction of information from Session Description Protocol (SDP), perform the following steps:


Step 1 Enter the following command to enable SDP information extraction:

mml>prov-ed:trnkgrpprop:name="trnk_num", populateSDPInfoInCDR="1"

Where: trnk_num—The number of the trunk to be modified.

For example, to enable SDP information extraction on a trunk group called 5000, you would enter the following command:

mml>prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="5000",populateSDPInfoInCDR="1"

Step 2 Repeat Step 1 for each trunk group you want to modify.


Disabling Support of Information Extraction from SDP


Note To begin the provisioning session, perform the steps in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section. Once you have finished provisioning your data, save and activate your provisioning data by performing the steps in the "Saving and Activating your Provisioning Changes" section.


To disable SDP information extraction, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Enter the following command to disable SDP information extraction:

mml>prov-ed:trnkgrpprop:name="trnk_num", populateSDPInfoInCDR="0"

Where: trnk_num—The number of the trunk to be modified.

For example, to disable SDP information extraction on a trunk group called 5000, you would enter the following command:

mml>prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="5000",populateSDPInfoInCDR="0"

Step 2 Repeat Step 1 for each trunk group you want to modify.


Provisioning Examples

This section provides the following examples of provisioning for this feature. Additional examples of provisioning for the Cisco MGC software can be found in the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide.

prov-add:trnkgrpprop:name="5000",populateSDPInfoInCDR="1"
prov-rtrv:trnkgrpprop:name="5000"
prov-add:files:name="TKGFile",file="two_trunkgroup.dat",action="import"

Reference Information

The following sections contain reference material related to this feature. Information is included on the following areas:

Properties

Billing Interface

Properties

The properties in this section are added for this feature. For information on other properties for the Cisco MGC software, refer to the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide.

The parent objects for the properties involved in this feature are found in Table 1.

Table 1 Software Properties Related to this Feature

Property Name
Parent Object
AVM
DPNSS
EISUP
IOCC
ISDNPRI
MGCP
RLM
SESSION
SGCP
SS7-ANSI
SS7-China
SS7-ITU
SS7-Japan
SS7-UK
TALI-IOCC
TCAPOverIP
TrunkGroup
VSI

populateSDPInfoInCDR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 


The properties added for this feature are described in Table 2.

Table 2 Properties 

Property
Definition

*.populateSDPInfoInCDR

This property enables or disables the extraction of SDP information from SDP. Extracted SDP information is populated in call detail records (CDRs). Value range: 0 (disabled) or 1 (enabled).

Default: 0


Billing Interface

This section lists the new CDEs that are being added to the Cisco MGC software to support this feature. For billing interface information for the rest of the Cisco MGC software, refer to the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Billing Interface Guide.

Ingress Media Device Address (Tag: 4205)

Table 3 Ingress Media Device Address Description Form 

Name: Ingress Media Device Address

Tag: 4205

Source: MDL

Description/Purpose: Identifies the IP address of the originating RTP end point. This is parsed from the SDP from SIP, MGCP, or EISUP (HSI).

Format: IA5 (string)

Length in Octets: 1 to 256

Data Value: IPV4 format or FQDN. Examples: 10.1.22.115, sp-46-39-gateway.customer.com.

Extended Data Value: No extended value.

General Information: If the call is originated in the H.323 domain as a Slow Start call, this information is not present in the 1010 CDB. If the call is originated in the H.323 domain as a Slow Start call and a switchover operation is performed on the Cisco PGW 2200, this information is not captured in any CDB.

MGC Release: Release 9.4(1) and later.

 

Answered (1010)

Deselected (1020)

Aborted (1030)

Release (1040)

Interrupted (1050)

Ongoing (1060)

Maintenance (1070)

External DB (1080)

End of Call (1110)

Y

N

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Y


Egress Media Device Address (Tag: 4206)

Table 4 Egress Media Device Address Description Form 

Name: Egress Media Device Address

Tag: 4206

Source: MDL

Description/Purpose: Identifies the IP address of the terminating RTP end point. This is parsed from the SDP from SIP, MGCP, or EISUP (HSI).

Format: IA5 (string)

Length in Octets: 1 to 256

Data Value: IPV4 format or FQDN. Examples: 10.1.22.115, sp-46-39-gateway.customer.com.

Extended Data Value: No extended value.

General Information: If the call is terminated in the H.323 domain as a Slow Start call, this information is not present in the 1010 CDB. If the call is terminated in the H.323 domain as a Slow Start call and a switchover operation is performed on the Cisco PGW 2200, this information is not captured in any CDB.

MGC Release: Release 9.4(1) and later.

 

Answered (1010)

Deselected (1020)

Aborted (1030)

Release (1040)

Interrupted (1050)

Ongoing (1060)

Maintenance (1070)

External DB (1080)

End of Call (1110)

Y

N

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Y


Initial Codec (Tag: 4207)

Table 5 Initial Codec Description Form 

Name: Initial Codec

Tag: 4207

Source: MDL

Description/Purpose: Identifies the initial codec used for the connection (the RTP stream). This is parsed from the SDP from SIP or MGCP.

Format: IA5 (string)

Length in Octets: 1 to 12

Data Value: String. Example: PCMU

If the Cisco PGW 2200 cannot determine the initial codec used for a call, it is set to UNKNOWN

Extended Data Value: No extended value.

General Information:

MGC Release: Release 9.4(1) and later.

 

Answered (1010)

Deselected (1020)

Aborted (1030)

Release (1040)

Interrupted (1050)

Ongoing (1060)

Maintenance (1070)

External DB (1080)

End of Call (1110)

Y

N

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Y


Final Codec (Tag: 4208)

Table 6 Final Codec Description Form 

Name: Final Codec

Tag: 4208

Source: MDL

Description/Purpose: Identifies the final codec used for the connection (the RTP stream). This is parsed from the SDP from SIP or MGCP.

Format: IA5 (string)

Length in Octets: 1 to 12

Data Value: String. Example: PCMU

If the Cisco PGW 2200 cannot determine the final codec used for a call, it is set to UNKNOWN

Extended Data Value: No extended value.

General Information:

MGC Release: Release 9.4(1) and later.

 

Answered (1010)

Deselected (1020)

Aborted (1030)

Release (1040)

Interrupted (1050)

Ongoing (1060)

Maintenance (1070)

External DB (1080)

End of Call (1110)

N

N

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Y


Ingress Media Device Port (Tag: 4209)

Table 7 Ingress Media Device Port Description Form 

Name: Ingress Media Device Port

Tag: 4209

Source: MDL

Description/Purpose: Identifies the ingress RTP port involved in the connection.

Format: IA5 (string)

Length in Octets: 1 to 6

Data Value: String. Example: 66218

Extended Data Value: No extended value.

General Information: If the call is originated in the H.323 domain as a Slow Start call, this information is not present in the 1010 CDB. If the call is originated in the H.323 domain as a Slow Start call and a switchover operation is performed on the Cisco PGW 2200, this information is not captured in any CDB.

MGC Release: Release 9.4(1) and later.

 

Answered (1010)

Deselected (1020)

Aborted (1030)

Release (1040)

Interrupted (1050)

Ongoing (1060)

Maintenance (1070)

External DB (1080)

End of Call (1110)

Y

N

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Y


Egress Media Device Port (Tag: 4210)

Table 8 Egress Media Device Port Description Form 

Name: Egress Media Device Port

Tag: 4210

Source: MDL

Description/Purpose: Identifies the egress RTP port involved in the connection.

Format: IA5 (string)

Length in Octets: 1 to 6

Data Value: String. Examples: 1024, 58890.

Extended Data Value: No extended value.

General Information: If the call is terminated in the H.323 domain as a Slow Start call, this information is not present in the 1010 CDB. If the call is terminated in the H.323 domain as a Slow Start call and a switchover operation is performed on the Cisco PGW 2200, this information is not captured in any CDB.

MGC Release: Release 9.4(1) and later.

 

Answered (1010)

Deselected (1020)

Aborted (1030)

Release (1040)

Interrupted (1050)

Ongoing (1060)

Maintenance (1070)

External DB (1080)

End of Call (1110)

Y

N

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Y


Glossary

Table 9 contains definitions of acronyms and technical terms used in this feature module.

Table 9 Glossary  

Term
Definition

ASCII

American Standard Code for Information Interchange

BAMS

Billing and Maintenance Server

BT

British Telecom

CDB

Call Detail Block

CDE

Call Detail Element

CDR

Call Detail Record

E-ISUP

Extended ISDN User Part—A proprietary protocol used to communicate between Cisco MGC nodes and between a Cisco MGC node and a Cisco H.323 Signaling Interface (HSI).

FQDN

Fully Qualified Domain Name

IP

Internet Protocol

ISDN

Integrated Services Digital Network

ISUP

ISDN User Part

ITU

International Telecommunication Union

H.323

ISDN Q.921 User Adaptation Layer

MGC

Media Gateway Controller

MGCP

Media Gateway Control Protocol

MIB

Managed Information Base

MML

Man-Machine Language

NICS

Network Interworking Call Server

OLO

Other Licensed Operator

PSTN

Public Switched Telephone Network

RFC

Return For Comment—A proposed standards document.

RTP

Real-time Transport Protocol

SDP

Session Description Protocol

SIP

Session Initiation Protocol

SLA

Service Level Agreement

TDM

Time-Division Multiplexing

VoIP

Voice Over Internet Protocol