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Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch

CIC Availability CDB Feature Module

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CIC Availability Measurement CDB

Table Of Contents

CIC Availability Measurement CDB

Feature Overview

Related Documents

Supported Platforms

Provisioning Procedures

Provisioning Basics

Provisioning Examples

Starting a CIC Audit

Command Reference

New MML Commands

MML Syntax for an Unconfigured 1071 CDB

MML Syntax for a Successful CIC Audit

MML Syntax for an Un-successful CIC Audit

MML Syntax for a CIC Audit on the Standby Platform

MML Syntax for a CIC Audit with Conflicting 1071 Configuration

MML Syntax with an Active Provisioning Session

MML Syntax for a User with Minimum Privileges

MML Online Help

HELP command

sta-aud-cic—Start CIC State Auditing Process

Reference Information

Billing Interface

Total Circuit Count (Tag: 4234)

Total Circuits Unavailable Count (Tag: 4235)

SS7 CIC Audit CDB Record (Tag: 1071/Release 9 or Later)

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Cisco.com

Technical Assistance Center

Cisco TAC Web Site

Cisco TAC Escalation Center

Glossary


CIC Availability Measurement CDB


Document Release History

Publication Date
Comments

June 28, 2007

Initial version of the document.


Feature History

Release
Modification

9.4(1)

This feature was introduced on a patch for the Cisco MGC Software Release 9.4(1).


The CIC Availability Measurement CDB on the PGW 2200 feature is described in the following sections.

Feature Overview

Supported Platforms

Provisioning Procedures

Provisioning Examples

Provisioning Examples

Command Reference

Reference Information

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Glossary

Feature Overview

The CIC Availability Measurement CDB on the PGW 2200 featurette introduces CDB 1071 to capture the accurate availability of a circuit (CIC) as it pertains to a trunk group or SigPath. Benefits include:

Provides CIC count accuracy

The addition of CDB Tag 1071 provides CIC availability count accuracy.

Provide the current count of CICs

CDB Tag 1071 provides a "snapshot" of the number of available CICs.

Supports accurate CIC availability measurements

CDB Tag 1071 is processed by BAMS to support accurate CIC availability measurements.

The CIC Availability Measurement CDB on the PGW 2200 feature provides the following audit types:

Real-time audit—Performed each time CIC availability changes

Audit on demand—Performed at any time by using the sta-aud-cic MML command

Related Documents

This document contains information that is related strictly to the CIC Availability Measurement CDB on the PGW 2200 feature. The documents that contain additional information related to the Cisco Media Gateway Controller (MGC) are listed below:

Release Notes for Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9.4(1)

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Hardware Installation Guide

Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for the Cisco Media Gateway Controller

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Installation and Configuration Guide

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Dial Plan Guide

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 MML Command Reference Guide

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Messages Reference Guide

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Billing Interface Guide

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 MIB Guide

Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Operations, Maintenance, and Troubleshooting Guide

Supported Platforms

The hardware platforms supported for the Cisco MGC software are described in the Release Notes for Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9.4(1).

Provisioning Procedures

Provisioning procedures can be found in the following sections:

Provisioning Basics

The procedures in this section describe how to start a provisioning session and how to save and activate the changes you have made.

Starting a Provisioning Session

Saving and Activating Your Provisioning Changes

Ending a Provisioning Session Without Activating Your Changes

Retrieving Provisioning Data

For more detailed information about provisioning your Cisco PGW 2200, refer to the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide.

Starting a Provisioning Session

You may need to start a provisioning session as part of your system operations. To do this, log into the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

mml> prov-sta::srcver="curr_ver",dstver="mod_ver" 

Where:

curr_ver—The name of the current configuration version. In place of the name of the current configuration version, you can also enter:

new—A new default session configuration; no existing source configuration is available.

active—Selects the active configuration as the source for configuration changes.


Note You can use "new" as the source configuration only when there is no existing, active set of provisioning data in the configuration library. Therefore, "new" cannot be used as the source configuration once a provisioning session has been saved and activated by using prov-cpy or prov-dply. Once you have saved and activated a set of data, you must use either "active" or the name of the set of provisioning data as the source configuration.



Note If you do not know the name of your current configuration session, you can use the procedure in the "Retrieving Data for the Current Provisioning Session" section.


mod_ver—A new configuration version name that contains your provisioning changes.

For example, to use a configuration version called ver1 as the basis for a version to be called ver2, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-sta::srcver="ver1",dstver="ver2" 

Once a provisioning session is underway, you may use the prov-add, prov-ed, or prov-dlt MML commands to add, modify, and delete components on your system. This document describes how to add, modify, and delete M3UA and SUA components. For more information on provisioning other components on your Cisco PGW 2200, refer to the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide.

There are two ways to close your provisioning session: saving and activating your provisioning changes, as described in the "Saving and Activating Your Provisioning Changes" section or ending your provisioning session without saving and activating your changes, as described in the "Ending a Provisioning Session Without Activating Your Changes" section.

Saving and Activating Your Provisioning Changes

When you have completed making provisioning changes in your session, you must enter a command to save and activate your changes. There are two different provisioning MML commands that do this: prov-cpy and prov-dply.


Caution Using the prov-cpy and prov-dply MML commands can severely impact your system's call processing performance, depending on the extent of your provisioning changes. We recommend that these commands be issued during a maintenance window when traffic is minimal.

The prov-cpy MML command is used to save and activate your changes on the active Cisco MGC. This command is typically used to save and activate changes on a Cisco MGC in a simplex configuration. However, you can use the prov-cpy MML command on Cisco MGCs in high-availability or continuous-service configurations, to save and activate your changes on the active Cisco MGC. If you choose to do this, you should enter the prov-sync MML command immediately afterwards, to have your changes saved and activated on the standby Cisco MGC.


Note When you enter the prov-cpy command, your provisioning session is also automatically ended. If you want to make additional provisioning changes, you must start a new provisioning session as described in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section.



Caution Using the prov-sync MML command can severely impact your system's call processing performance. We recommend that this command be issued during a maintenance window when traffic is minimal.


Note When the prov-sync MML command is used to synchronize the provisioning settings on the standby MGC host with current settings on the active MGC host, the system does not indicate when the synchronization process has failed.


The prov-dply MML command is used to save and activate your changes on the active and standby
Cisco MGCs. This command is typically used to save and activate changes on Cisco MGCs in high-availability or continuous-service configurations. This command should not be used on a Cisco MGC in a simplex configuration.


Note When you enter the prov-dply command, your provisioning session is also automatically ended, unless an error occurs during execution. If you want to make additional provisioning changes, you must start a new provisioning session as described in the "Starting a Provisioning Session" section.


Ending a Provisioning Session Without Activating Your Changes

You may find that you want to end a provisioning session without saving and activating the changes you have entered during your session. If this is the case, you can enter the prov-stp MML command. This command ends your current provisioning session and your changes are not entered.

Retrieving Provisioning Data

You can use the prov-rtrv MML command to retrieve information about your current provisioning settings. The ways in which you can use this command to retrieve provisioning data are described in the following sections:

Retrieving Data for an Individual Component

Retrieving Data for All Components

Retrieving Data for All Components of a Particular Type

Retrieving Data for the Current Provisioning Session

Retrieving Data for Supported Signaling Protocols

Retrieving Data for an Individual Component

You can retrieve provisioning data for an individual component on your system. To do this, log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

mml> prov-rtrv:component:name=MML_name 

Where:

component—The MML component type associated with the desired component. You can find a complete list of MML component types in the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide.

MML_name—The MML name for the desired component. You can determine the MML names for the various components using the prov-rtrv:all MML command.

For example, to view the provisioning data for a M3UA signaling service called m3ua1, enter the following command:

mml> prov-rtrv:ss7path:name="m3ua1" 

The response to the command is dependent upon the component type associated with the desired component. For example, to view the properties for an SUA routing key called suakey1, enter the following command:

mml> prov-rtrv:suakey:name="suakey1" 

Retrieving Data for All Components

You can retrieve data for all of the components provisioned on your system. To do this, log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

mml> prov-rtrv:all 

Retrieving Data for All Components of a Particular Type

You can retrieve provisioning data for all components of a particular type on your system. To do this, log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

mml> prov-rtrv:component:"all" 

Where: component is the MML component type associated with the desired component group. You can find a complete list of MML component types in the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide.

For example, to view the provisioning data for all SS7 signaling services, you would enter the following command:

mml> prov-rtrv:ss7path:"all" 

Retrieving Data for the Current Provisioning Session

You can retrieve provisioning data for the current provisioning session. To do this, log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

mml> prov-rtrv:session 

The system returns a response similar to the following:

MGC-02 - Media Gateway Controller 2004-08-13 13:39:19
M  RTRV
   "session=jtest:session"
   /*
Session ID = mml1
SRCVER = active
DSTVER = jtest
   */

Retrieving Data for Supported Signaling Protocols

You can retrieve protocol data for the current provisioning session. To do this, log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

mml> prov-rtrv:variants 

Provisioning Examples

This section provides the following examples of provisioning for this feature:

Starting a CIC Audit

Starting a CIC Audit

To start a CIC audit, log in to the active Cisco MGC, start an MML session, and enter the following command:

mml> sta-aud-cic 


Note The sta-aud-cic MML command can be executed only by a user with supervisor privilege. A user with minimum access privilege can not execute this command.



Note The sta-aud-cic MML command is denied if the CDB Tag 1071 is not configured in the XECfgParm.dat.


The MML command starts the CIC state audit process. This command generates a CDB Tag 1071 for every configured ISUP trunk group in Call Control mode; or generates a CDB Tag 1071 for every configured ISUP SigPath in Signaling mode.

A CDB Tag 1071 is generated for each trunk group or SigPath. The CDB tag information is used to provide the downstream BAMS system with the counts of the CICs for all the trunk groups and SigPaths.

Additional examples of provisioning for the Cisco MGC software can be found in the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Provisioning Guide.

Command Reference

This section documents new, modified, or deleted Man-Machine Language (MML) commands. All other commands are documented in the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 MML Command Reference Guide.

New MML Commands

This section contains the start audit CIC MML commands that are new for the CIC Availability Measurement CDB on the PGW 2200 feature.

Executing the start audit CIC MML command instructs the engine to generate the CDB Tag 1071 with a snapshot of the current CIC availability on each configured ISUP trunk group (ISUP SigPath in signaling mode).

MML Syntax for an Unconfigured 1071 CDB

mml> sta-aud-cic 

   MGC-01 - Media Gateway Controller 2004-05-06 10:05:27.997 EST
M DENY

 SOSE /* SS7 Cic Audit CDB 1071 is not configured. */
   "MGC-01"
   ;

MML Syntax for a Successful CIC Audit

mml> sta-aud-cic 

   MGC-01 - Media Gateway Controller 2004-05-06 10:05:27.997 EST
M  COMPLD
   "MGC-01"
   ;

MML Syntax for an Un-successful CIC Audit

mml> sta-aud-cic 

   MGC-01 - Media Gateway Controller 2004-08-13 10:05:27.997 EST
M  DENY

 SROF  /* Unsuccessful completion */
   ;

MML Syntax for a CIC Audit on the Standby Platform

mml> sta-aud-cic 

   MGC-02 - Media Gateway Controller 2004-08-13 10:18:06.099 EDT
M  DENY

   SOSE   /* Command Prohibited On Standby Platform */
   ;

MML Syntax for a CIC Audit with Conflicting 1071 Configuration

mml> sta-aud-cic 

   MGC-02 - Media Gateway Controller 2004-08-13 10:18:06.099 EDT
M  DENY

   SOSE   /* SS7 Cic audit CDB 1071 is not supported with End of Call CDB 1110. */
   ;

MML Syntax with an Active Provisioning Session

The MML command sta-aud-cic is blocked during provisioning session. Operator will see following error:


   MGC-02 - Media Gateway Controller 2004-08-13 10:18:06.099 EDT
M  DENY

   SOSE   /* While provisioning session in progress all commands affecting component's 
operational state are blocked. Please wait for the provisioning session to finish, or stop 
the session using the prov-stp command */
  ;

MML Syntax for a User with Minimum Privileges

The MML command sta-aud-cic is blocked during provisioning session. Operator will see following error:


   MGC-02 - Media Gateway Controller 2004-08-13 10:18:06.099 EDT
M  DENY

   PICC /* Not in privileged mode */
  ;

MML Online Help

Help:sta-aud-cic 

mml> help:sta-aud-cic 

   MGC-02 - Media Gateway Controller 2004-08-13 10:24:12.453 EDT
M  RTRV

      
      
                      STA-AUD-CIC: Start CIC State Auditing Process
                      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      
   Purpose:      Starts CIC state audit process. This command generates 1071 CDB for every 
configured ISUP trunk group in Call Control Mode or every configured ISUP SigPath in 
Singling Mode. 
                 
   Syntax:       STA-AUD-CIC
      
   Example:      The MML command shown in the following example starts the CIC state 
auditing process.

mml> sta-aud-cic
  MGC-01 - Media Gateway Controller 2004-08-13 10:05:27.997 EST
M  COMPLD
  "MGC-01"
  ;

HELP command

MML help would display sta-aud-cic as valid option.

mml> help 

sta-aud-cic—Start CIC State Auditing Process

Purpose:

Start a CIC audit.

Syntax:

Ex:

sta-aud-cic 

Input Description:

sta—Start.

aud—Audit.

cic—Circuit.

Example:

mml> sta-aud-cic 
MGC-01 - Media Gateway Controller 2004-08-13 10:05:27.997 EST
M  COMPLD
  "MGC-01"
  ;

Comments:

CDB 1071 is configurable in XECfgParm.dat by adding it in engine.CDRmessageType; but if CDB 1110 is configured, CDB 1071 is suppressed.


Reference Information

The following sections contain reference material related to this feature. Information is included on the following areas:

Billing Interface

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Billing Interface

The total circuit count tag (4234), shown in Table 1, and total circuits unavailable count tag (4235), shown in Table 2, have been added to support the CIC Availability Measurement CDB on the PGW 2200 feature.

Total Circuit Count (Tag: 4234)

Table 1 Total Circuit Count Description Form 

Name: Total Circuit Count

Tag: 4234

Source: Engine

Description/Purpose: Identifies the total circuits (CICs) defined for a trunk group or SigPath.

Format: BE

Length in Octets: 4

Data Value:

0 or greater (unsigned)

ANSI/ITU Variations: None.

Extended Data Value: No extended value.

General Information:

MGC Release: Release 9.4(1) patch and later.

 

Answered (1010)

Deselected (1020)

Aborted (1030)

Release (1040)

Interrupted (1050)

Ongoing (1060)

Mnt  CIC Aud (1070) (1071)

External DB (1080)

End of Call (1110)

N

N

N

Y

N

N

N              Y

N

N


Total Circuits Unavailable Count (Tag: 4235)

Table 2 Total Circuits Unavailable Count Description Form 

Name: Total Circuits Unavailable Count

Tag: 4235

Source: Engine

Description/Purpose: Identifies the total circuits (CICs) currently unavailable within a trunk group or SigPath. The definition of unavailable is a circuit that is either "blocked" or "OOS". A circuit that is already blocked, but which then goes OOS, is not reported additionally as unavailable, since it was already unavailable.

Format: BE

Length in Octets: 4

Data Value:

0 or greater

ANSI/ITU Variations: None.

Extended Data Value: No extended value.

General Information:

MGC Release: Release 9.4(1) patch and later.

 

Answered (1010)

Deselected (1020)

Aborted (1030)

Release (1040)

Interrupted (1050)

Ongoing (1060)

Mnt  CIC Aud (1070) (1071)

External DB (1080)

End of Call (1110)

N

N

N

Y

N

N

N              Y

N

N


SS7 CIC Audit CDB Record (Tag: 1071/Release 9 or Later)

Table 3 lists data about the SS7 CIC audit record CDB type. CDB Tag 1071 is created to record changes of the number of circuits configured and unavailable for a trunk group (switched configuration) or SigPath (nailed up). This CDB only applies to the SS7 protocol.

Table 3 SS7 CIC Audit CDB Record  

Field Name
Tag Value

MGC Generic Tags 

CDB Version

4000

CDB Timepoint

4001

Maint Trunk Group

4017

Maintenance SigPath ID

4074

Total Circuit Count (added in 9.4(1) patch)

4234

Total Circuit Unavailable Count (added in 9.4(1) patch)

4235


Cisco Reserved Tags 

Unique Call ID (Release 9 and later)

5000



Note CDB 1071 is configurable in XECfgParm.dat by adding it in engine.CDRmessageType; but if CDB 1110 is configured, CDB 1071 is suppressed.


Once configured in XECfgParm.dat, CDB 1071 is generated for the following conditions.

When the MML command sta-aud-cic is used to generate the current CIC availability information on each configured ISUP trunk group or SigPath.

A provisioning change (add or delete) is made in the number of circuits.

A CIC service state or block state change occurs. A circuit that is unavailable is either blocked, OOS, or both. A circuit that is blocked and also OOS is not double counted as unavailable circuits. The following tables show the action taken when there is a service state or block state change.

Table 4 Service State Change

Service State Change
Blocked
Unblocked

OOS

Do nothing

Increment total unavailable counters

IS

Do nothing

Decrement total unavailable counters


Table 5 Service Block Change

Service Block Change
OOS
IS

Block

Do nothing

Increment total unavailable counters

Unblock

Do nothing

Decrement total unavailable counters


A blocked state is one or a combination of the following states:

Manual local block

Manual remote block

Auto remote block (hardware failure)

Auto local block

Propagation block (gateway initiated blocking)

CDB Tag 1071 generation rules:

If CDB Tag 1071 is generated as the result of the sta-aud-cic MML command, it includes the CIC unavailability information per trunk group for switched configuration, or per SigPath for nailed up. For other two scenarios, it only generates the information for the trunk groups that are impacted.

CDB Tag 1071 is generated only on the active side.

To generate the CDB Tag 1071 on a trunk group or SigPath level rather than individual CIC level to minimize CPS impact, an internal 10-second timer is used. 1071 CDB is generated 10 seconds after the initial CIC state change and/or the initial CIC provision change. This delay prevents the flooding of 1071 CDBs if a large number of CICs have blocks or service state changes almost simultaneously.

The sta-aud-cic MML command is rejected for the following conditions:

The MML command is attempted to be run on the standby side

CDB Tag 1071 is not configured in the XECfgParm.dat file

A circuit that has COT failure and has COT retest in progress is not counted as unavailable.

If the CDB Tag 1071 is configured to be generated for Cisco MGS software Release 9.5(2), that pre BAMS 3.20 would require a skip-CDE for the CDB Tag 1071 record to be added to BAMS.

For billing interface information for the rest of the Cisco MGC software, refer to the Cisco Media Gateway Controller Software Release 9 Billing Interface Guide.

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Cisco provides Cisco.com as a starting point for all technical assistance. Customers and partners can obtain online documentation, troubleshooting tips, and sample configurations from online tools by using the Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) Web Site. Cisco.com registered users have complete access to the technical support resources on the Cisco TAC Web Site.

Cisco.com

Cisco.com is the foundation of a suite of interactive, networked services that provides immediate, open access to Cisco information, networking solutions, services, programs, and resources at any time, from anywhere in the world.

Cisco.com is a highly integrated Internet application and a powerful, easy-to-use tool that provides a broad range of features and services to help you with these tasks:

Streamline business processes and improve productivity

Resolve technical issues with online support

Download and test software packages

Order Cisco learning materials and merchandise

Register for online skill assessment, training, and certification programs

If you want to obtain customized information and service, you can self-register on Cisco.com. To access Cisco.com, go to this URL:

http://www.cisco.com

Technical Assistance Center

The Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) is available to all customers who need technical assistance with a Cisco product, technology, or solution. Two levels of support are available: the Cisco TAC Web Site and the Cisco TAC Escalation Center.

Cisco TAC inquiries are categorized according to the urgency of the issue:

Priority level 4 (P4)—You need information or assistance concerning Cisco product capabilities, product installation, or basic product configuration.

Priority level 3 (P3)—Your network performance is degraded. Network functionality is noticeably impaired, but most business operations continue.

Priority level 2 (P2)—Your production network is severely degraded, affecting significant aspects of business operations. No workaround is available.

Priority level 1 (P1)—Your production network is down, and a critical impact to business operations will occur if service is not restored quickly. No workaround is available.

The Cisco TAC resource that you choose is based on the priority of the problem and the conditions of service contracts, when applicable.

Cisco TAC Web Site

You can use the Cisco TAC Web Site to resolve P3 and P4 issues yourself, saving both cost and time. The site provides around-the-clock access to online tools, knowledge bases, and software. To access the Cisco TAC Web Site, go to this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/tac

All customers, partners, and resellers who have a valid Cisco service contract have complete access to the technical support resources on the Cisco TAC Web Site. The Cisco TAC Web Site requires a Cisco.com login ID and password. If you have a valid service contract but do not have a login ID or password, go to this URL to register:

http://www.cisco.com/register/

If you are a Cisco.com registered user, and you cannot resolve your technical issues by using the Cisco TAC Web Site, you can open a case online by using the TAC Case Open tool at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/tac/caseopen

If you have Internet access, we recommend that you open P3 and P4 cases through the Cisco TAC Web Site.

Cisco TAC Escalation Center

The Cisco TAC Escalation Center addresses priority level 1 or priority level 2 issues. These classifications are assigned when severe network degradation significantly impacts business operations. When you contact the TAC Escalation Center with a P1 or P2 problem, a Cisco TAC engineer automatically opens a case.

To obtain a directory of toll-free Cisco TAC telephone numbers for your country, go to this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/687/Directory/DirTAC.shtml

Before calling, please check with your network operations center to determine the level of Cisco support services to which your company is entitled: for example, SMARTnet, SMARTnet Onsite, or Network Supported Accounts (NSA). When you call the center, please have available your service agreement number and your product serial number.

Glossary

Table 6 contains definitions of acronyms and technical terms used in this feature module.

Table 6 Acronyms and Definitions

Acronym
Definition

BAMS

Billing and Measurements Server

CDB

Call Detail Block

CIC

Circuit

MGC

Cisco Media Gateway Controller

PGW

PSTN Gateway

PSTN

Public Switched Telephone Network

SC

Signaling Controller

VSC

Virtual Switch Controller